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Full text of "Sponsor"

NATIONAL 6ROA0CASTING COMPANY, Inc. 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
» ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N. Y 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor53sponno2 



■ 



* t. 



;azine for Radio and TV advertisers 



13 JULY 1953 



50c per copy* $8 per yea 








L0$ ANGELE$ 






El SEGUNOO LA. 
VeNtCE LA. 



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£.«^S®S^ 




gjj} PEDRO LA- 



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...Tale of 200 cities! 

Metropolitan Los Angeles is made up of 
200 cities and towns, spans 60 miles, covers 
1,910 square miles. It's so decentralized 

that less than 10% of all retail trade 

is done in the "downtown" shopping area. 

The surest way to cover nil of this vast 
market is with radio. Because 98.3* of all 
Los Angeles homes are radio homes 
Fact is, there are more auto radios alone 
than there are total television homes in 
Los Angeles. I And 50.000-watt KNX is 
J. os Angeles' most listened-to radio 
station ... urinning man than twic< 
many quarter-hour "firsts" as ail oi 
Los Angi U s stations combint d! 

Any way you turn. KNX is the 3hort( 
route to sales results in Los Angeles. 

Lea A ng< lee • < IBS Owned KNX 

Re] • /.'>" Rod 



f lh fiiiMtffif 

FALL 
FACTS 



I.V.VIK* 



II hat are hoi 

issues in radio 

A T\ this fall? 31 

I dehatr an 
l.lU's <-onf rot-criiaf 
inl<-r-iM«>rfin stntiti 36 



RADIO FEATURES 

NETWORK 67 

SPOT 101 

RADIO BASICS 157 



TV FEATURES 

NETWORK 173 

SPOT 

TV MARKETS DATA 

TV BASICS 

CONVENIENT IN 

subjects covered 

front of book 6 



A 



Source* on request 




ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH COMPANY does* complete job. 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 




\ICHMWS0f 

\haVENS & MA8TININC. 








rhesourKs first television station? 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



This is Elgin — only watchmaker in the 
world who's made over 50 million watches 
. . . who maintains its own observatory 
. . . who pioneered in the field of research, 
out of which developed the guaranteed 
unbreakable durapower mainspring — "the 
heart that never breaks." Elgin, 89 years in 
business — a leader in its field! 

This is Havens & Martin, Inc. Stations — 
only complete broadcasting institution in 
Richmond! WTVR(TV), WMBC(AM), 
WCOD(FM) are pioneer NBC outlets. They 
serve millions of loyal listeners in the rich 
markets around Richmond. Most likely these 
First Stations of Virginia are serving you! 
Good results have brought us many a 
long-time business friend! 



WMBG ^ WCOD m WTVR 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 






r 




Here's your 236- 
page fall guide 



How many see 
TV commercials? 



Lifebuoy goes 
after the gals 



1 10 million radio 
sets now in U.S. 



Radio nets have 
reversed decline 



Don't let size of this 236-page Fall Facts issue (our 7th) scare you. 
It's broken down into six easy-to-read sections starting page 67. For 
quick briefing on hot trends for fall and what this issue oontaii 
see article page 31. Complete index of subjects covered in this 
issue a ppears page 6. In brief, this issue is your guide to fall 
and winter buying. Read it; use it; keep it. 

-SR- 

Hottest thing in TV research: A leading research house will soon come 
out with some surprising figures on how many people see your TV com- 
mercial. SPONSOR'S seen some preliminary figures (not releasable). 
These disprove theory held by some air researchers program audience 
and commercial audience are one and same. They also show latter' s 
still good sight bigger than that o f ads in printed media. LIFE, 
under fire from air for its media study (see page 36), reported most 
anxious to get these TV figures for competitive purposes. 

-SR- 

Lifebuoy's $550,000 ad budget for 1953 is being split 40-60 between 
air and print media. Participation on CBS Radio's "Aunt Jenny" rep- 
resents Lifebu o y's dramatic switch to women-appeal advertising. Life- 
buoy's 1953 budget is reputedly largest in soap's history: 1952 — 
$464,728; 1951 — $237,699. (See story, page 34.) 

-SR- 

Air media continue to boom. RTMA reports 6,102,711 radios, 3,309,757 
TV sets made first 5 months this year (same period. 1952: 4,469,432 
radios, 1,957,083 TV sets). ABC, CBS, MBS, and NBC Research Depts. 
estimate 110 m i llion radio sets were in working order in U.S. as of 
1 January 1953, up 5 million over previous year, as follows: total 
radio homes, 44.8 million; extra sets in homes, 30 million; car sets, 
26.2 million; miscellaneous outdoor, public, etc., 9 million. 

-SR- 

Three of 4 radio nets confident they'll surpass last year's billings, 
reverse 4-year downtrend. C BS Radio, NBC, MBS up over last year a t 
half-way mark , though PIB puts time sales of all 4 radio nets through 
May at $69.3 million, against $70.5 million for same 1952 period. In 
TV, network time sales total $87.5 million against $75.4 million. 



SPO\SOR in lieu- offices 

Effective today (13 July), SPONSOR editorial, advertising, and circulation 
headquarters are located at Madison & 49th St. (40 E. 49th St.), New York 1". 
in the heart of the advertising district. Rapid expansion of SPONSOR person- 
nel and services made this move into larger quarters necessary. Entire 15th 
floor is occupied. Phone number remains MUrray Hill 8-2772. Other offices 
are in Chicago and Los Angeles. 



L 



_l 



SPONSOB, Volume 7. No 11. 13 July 1953. Published biweekly by SPONSOR PnfcHcatl •■-. Inc., it 3110 Elm Are.. Baltimore. M 

lation Offices 40 E. 49th St.. New York IT. JS a year In I S - re. Entered as second class matter » January 19.9 at Baltimore. Md. poatofflre un-: 



r 



III I'OKT TO SPONSORS for 13 July 1953 



Thomas will cost 
Pall Mall $49,000 



Autry, Skelton 
vs. Milton Berle 



Sponsors readier 
to share films 



D-F-S, Esty lead 
in air billings 



Top 10 national 
advertisers 



"TV Production 
Handbook" out 



Per half-hour filming of Danny Thomas show costing ABC TV around 
$40,000, but Pall Mall (American Cigar & Cigarette) will pay $21,850 
a show for 30 new showings, 9 repeats. Series starts in fall, will 
carry additional time bill of about $27,000 a week. 

-SR- 

CBS TV will make strong b i d to we a n away some of Milton Berle 's mop- 
p et audience this fall. Tuesday night lineup on CBS TV now looks like 
Gene Autry from 8 to 8:30 and Red Skelton from 8:30 to 9. 

-SR- 

Agencies report clients reconsidering their stand on exclusive rights 
to network film shows. Sponsors once loath to buy anything other 
than on national basis now inclined to contract only for markets they 
need and thus benefit from proportional cost of show. On this basis 
they can get film for from 50 to 60% of negative's cost, instead of 
85 to 100% (producer's customary demand). 

-SR- 

Leading National Advertisers reports Young & Rubicam led magazine 
billings in 1952 with $39.5 million, Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample topped 
network radio billings with $15.2 m illion, William Esty surprised 
with $12.6 million to lead network TV. 

-SR- 

With ANPA's release of national newspaper expenditures, SPONSOR tabu- 
lation of ANPA and PIB figures shows top 10 national advertisers in 
newspapers, magazines, network radio, and network TV to be as follows 
(air expenditures are for gross time only) : 

Firm Total (mil.) Air (mil.) 

7. Chrysler $19.4 $2.5 

8. R. J. 
Reynolds $17.2 $10.8 

9. Gen. Mills $16.8 $10.1 
10. Distillers 

Corp. $15.4 ($14,317) 

-SR- 

"Television is one of most effective tools in advertiser's kit," 
says BBDO's Ben Duffy in introduction to "Television Advertising and 
Production Handbook." Co-edited by Irving Settel, SPONSOR'S Norman 
Glenn and published by Crowell, book is first of its kind. 



Firm Total (mil. ) 


Air (mil. 


1. P&G $45.4 


$30.4 


2. Gen. Motors $39.2 


$6.2 


3. Colgate $29.5 


$12.3 


4. Gen. Foods $28.3 


$13.5 


5. Lever Bros. $26.9 


$13.3 


6. Ford $20.0 


$3.2 



\ <»ir national spot radio and TV business 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET 


CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


Block Drug, N) 


Polident denture 
cleanser 


Cecil & Presbrey, NY 


15 to 20 TV mkts; 
nationwide 


TV: 60-sec anncts; mid-]une; (13 wks) 


Broil-Quik Corp., NY 


Broil-Quik Chef 


Zlowe Co, NY 


4 Eastern mkts; NY, Pa 


TV: 60-sec partic; 1 a da, 7 da a wk; Jun; 
126 wks) 


Excelsior Quick 


Frozen meats, 


Paris & Peart, NY 


NY radio, TV; TV in 


TV: 10- and 20-sec anncts: end of July; 


Frosted Meat 


meat prods 




Schenectady, Rochester, 


(13 wks) 


Prods, NY 






Utica, Buffalo; Sagi- 
naw, Mich: Phila, 
Boston, Cinci, Day- 
ton, Columbus 




Red Top Brewing Co, 


Red Top Beer, 


Cecil & Presbrey, NY 


Cinci, Columbus 


Radio: 20- and 60-sec anncts; saturation cam- 


Cinci 


Barbarossa Beer 






paign; 22 Jun: 13 wks) 


Skinner & Eddy Corp, 


Icy Point Salmon 


Paris & Peart, NY 


NY mkt, radio stations 


Radio; 10-sec I.D.'s; 6 or 7 a wk: Aug; 


Seattle 








H3 wks) 


Turner Smith Co, NY 


Poundex (weight- 


Dowd, Redfield & 


Over 300 stations. 


Radio: S-, 10-, 15-min partic; 3 a da, 7 da 




gaining aid) 


Johnstone, NY 


nationwide 


a wk; Jun; (26 wks) 



J 



SPONSOR 




WDSU v) 
NEWSPAPER / 
ADS / 




Hm'S/t/WOW£P NEW ARRIVAL 
IN WDSU'S EXPANDING 
PROMOTION PROGRAM! 



• Consider the "stark" facts this Fall . . . and don't 
overlook the fact that there's a new arrival in 
WDSU's promotion household. This latest addition 
to our year 'round family of promotion "plus" fea- 
tures, is WDSU's Special Merchandising Represen- 
tative. We've added to our staff the talents of a 
retail merchandising specialist whose sole func- 
tion is to plan and execute effective merchandising 
of clients' products among New Orleans retailers. 

• This latest addition . . . plus the many other 
"bundles of happiness" that we offer sponsors, is 
but another reason why WDSU can deliver greater 
sales for you in the rich New Orleans trading area. 

• Write, Wire or Fly to Your Nearest 
JOHN BLAIR Man! 



WDSU 

NEW ORLEANS 

© © 



13 JULY 1953 



the magazine Radio and TV 



advertisers use 



_j 



Volume 7 Numsr 
13 July 1953 




ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



What are the hot radio and TV trends this Sail? 

Here summarized are trends from the six sections which comprise SPONSOR'S 
annual Fall Facts issue. Article is designed to do double duty: give you quick 
fill-in on trends themselves and also show you what issue contains 

ll*nc I tfehuoy cured its oien B.O. 

Lifebuoy's "medicinal" approach failed to sell the soap when the cosmetic 
appeal of other brands won the women's vote. A deodorizing job, new copy, 
feminine appeal, and heavy use of air media point to a bright future 

Is LEFE's media study fair to radio and TV? 

Two top-notch media experts debate the strengths and weaknesses of Politz's 
media study for LIFE. Both sides get chance to present their views for and 
against validity of the $250,000 study 

FALL FACTS: 1953 see complete index paye 6 

Network radio report: Analyzes, among other things, the fall out- 

look, cumulative network audiences, measurement of multi-set listening, 
"tandem" plans, merchandising, and network flexibility 

Spot raifio report: Discusses availabilities, rate outlook, Negro ra- 

dio, FM, transcriptions, library services, foreign-language radio 

Radio Basics: Up-to-date facts and figures in chart form showing the 

dimensions of radio; a comprehensive guide to commercial radio today 

iVelM*Orl» Tl report! Covers the one-station market situation, network 

lineups, UHF, costs, programs and audiences, merchandising, unions 

Spot TV report: Goes into availabilities, new stations, rates, com- 

mercials costs, 10-second I.D.'s, use and cost of color commercials 

T\ Basics: Latest data on the country's fastest growing ad medium; 

statistics are spelled out in chart form for easy readability 



COMING 



Beware of these media research traps 

Part 7 of SPONSOR'S All-Media Study outlines some common misinterpreta- 
tions of research data, fallacious reasoning that often results, and how to (> -. . , 
dodge these pitfalls, get the most out of research *' *""?/ 

Why American Machine & Foundry Co. went TV 

Producer of high-priced machinery used "Omnibus" to reach upper bracket 

audience to whom it demonstrates the ingenuity of its products. It aims tc », «. - . 

sell them for home-workshop use as well as for heavy industrial plants '""'?/ 



31 

34 

36 

67 
101 
157 
173 
191 
219 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

49TH & MADISON 

MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

P.S. 

MR. SPONSOR, Elliott Plowe 

FILM TOP 20 

NEW TV STATIONS 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

AGENCY PROFILE, Showalter Lynch 

NEWSMAKERS 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEW & RENEW 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor S President: Norman R feieni. 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper G'enn 

Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 

Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. J,- 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, Ev«i 

Konrad, Joan Baker 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President - Advertising: Norman Kni-> 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coo r 

(Western Manaqer), Maxine Cooper (Easti 

Manager), Wallace Engelhardt (Regio 

Representative), John A. Kovchok (Prod 

tion Manager), Cynthia Soley, Ed Higg 

Vice President- Business Men-.: Bernard PI 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Si 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Aujgusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly by 8P0NS0R PUBLICATIONS IN 

I with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulation. • 

Advertising Offices: 19th lc Madison (40 E. 19th St 

N <« \ > i k 17. N V Ti1.pIi.mh-: MUrray Hill 8-27 

Chicago Office: 161 E Gran.l Ave. Phone Slpcr 

I Office 6087 Sunset Boulevard, 1 

Telephone: Hollywood 1-8089 Printing Oflli 

3110 Elm An . Baltimore 11, M.l Subscriptions: Unli 

States I inidi an.] foreign $9. Single cop 

50c. Printed In D S A Address all corresponder 

to 10 E 19th St.. New Sort IT, N Y Ml'rray Hill 

2772 Copyright 1958 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS IN 



Things have changed 
in ARKANSAS, too! 



Arkansas has come a long way since the old 
"mule-and-plow" days — the majority of farms 
are now far more mechanized . . . electrified . . . 
-perous. Result: Arkansas Farm Income is 
" , greater than it was ten years ago — 
a 16.0% greater increase than for the Nation 
i.< it whole.* 

There have been other changes in Arkansas, too. 
Almost all the State can now be covered with one 
radio station, KTHS in Little Rock — now CBS 
and the only Class 1-B Clear Channel station in 
the State. KTHS offers primary daytime coverage** 
of more than a million people. Secondary, inter- 
ference-free daytime coverage*** adds 2,369,675 
.people and includes practically all of Arkansas! 

Write direct or ask The Branham Company for 
all the facts on the big, new KTHS! 



*V. S. Dept. of Agriculture figures. 
••Half millivolt. 

***Otir-tc»tli millivolt. 



50,000 Watts 




CBS Radio 



Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management As KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive \'ire President 

B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



KTHS 

BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 



COMPLETE INDEX OF FALL FACTS ISSUE SUBJECTS 



NETWORK RADIO REPORT starts page 67 

Fall outlook: Daytime will be a sellout, there's 
more optimistic atmosphere at networks this year 68 
Network audiences: Includes cumulative audi- 
ence figures for soap operas, night newscasts 68 
Out-of-home listening: Latest available in forma- 
tion on radio's important "bonus" audience 69 

Average cost of programs, top 10 agencies 70 
''Tandem'' plans: A status report on the dispersed- 
audience type of programing on all nets 72 
Merchandising: What the nets offer, and specific 
results obtained for clients in efforts to date 74 
Network flexibility: Advertisers have more lee- 
way in tailor-making their radio coverage 76 

Research round-up: Better measurement of mul- 
tiple-set homes will mean higher radio ratings soon 80 
Radio availabilities: The top 10 available pro- 
grams on each of the nets with costs, other data 85 

SPOT RADIO REPORT starts page 101 

Availabilities: More clients may turn to nighttime 102 
Nighttime spot radio: Sellers contend research 
proves night is good dollar buy despite television 104 
Rate outlook: Definite trend setting in toward 
single-rate structure, especially in TV areas 105 
Transcriptions: Trend is toward multiple-spon- 
sorship. All firms say business good __ 106 

Library services: Move here is to supply almost 

complete programing services 110 

Negro radio: With Negro's economic status im- 
proving, more advertisers are showing interest 128 
Foreign-language : Stations in this field have had 

to increase amount of time on air 130 

FM: Set production is up to 30.000 a month 134 

Storecasting: 70% renewal rate is indication 

users of medium are satisfied 136 

Transit Radio: TR exec says medium will even- 
tually gain back strength 138 

Station research: More stations will probably add 

to their research ammunition with area studies 138 

Coverage services: A brief review of the two cov- 
erage services available to measure radio and TV— 139 



NETWORK TV REPORT starts page 173 

One-station markets: An analysis of the clear- 
ance problem and its soon-to-come solution 174 
Network lineups: A \2o-station hookup on one 
net should be possible by September 176 

Average cost of programs, top 10 agencies 176 

Ultra High Frequency: Growth, conversion rates, 

signal coverage, other aspects analyzed 180 

Costs: Gross costs haven't hit peak but added cov- 
erage has lowered cost-per- 1,000 182 
Programs & audiences : Intense competition may 

tend to stifle experimentation 185 

Net TV availabilities: The top 10 available pro- 
grams on the television nets with costs, other data 186 
Merchandising: An outline of differences be- 
tween the NBC and CBS concepts 187 

Color: No significant developments for advertisers 

indicated for at least one year _ 1 88 

Unions: A checkup on labor developments and 
their meaning to cost-conscious admen 188 



SPOT TV 



starts page 191 



Availabilities: Plenty of openings in morning, 

afternoon tougher, nighttime rough 192 

Netv TV stations: Time buying is easing, cover- 
age now reaches almost 80 r i of U.S. homes 192 
SAG talent scale: Highlights of payments to film 

commercial talent; a table suitable for filing 193 

Spot TV rates: Set growth is determining factor; 

rates may go up, cost-per-l.QQO down _ 196 

Color TV: Although this is a long-range worry, 

advertisers should watch developments _. 196 

Commercials cost: New SAG scales call for use 

of ingenuity in holding costs down 198 

10-second I.D.'s: Standardization has won popu- 
larity for "quickie" commercials _____ 200 

Syndicated films: Advertisers are assured of va- 
riety in available product, business for film men good 201 
Spot-placed films: Clients who place own film 
shows via spot seek flexibility, better clearances — 203 
TV markets: A status rejwrt on TV in the 225 
metropolitan county markets 20& 



RADIO RASICS ... starts page 157 TV DASICS starts page 219 

/. Dimensions of TV's audience: Sets in each Tl 
market, radio and Tl families compared. 

II. Television vieiving habits: How viewing varies 
by time of day. audience composition, seasonal variation. 

III. Cost of television advertising: TV costs vs. cir- 
culation compared with print media, spot Tl costs. 

IV. Television's billings: Billings by networks '49-'53, 
spot TV billings '49-'53 ('53 estimate S125.000.00O). 



I. Dimensions of radio's audience : Includes number 
of homes, out-of-home data, audience composition. 

II. Radio listening habits: Seasonal variations, amount 
of radio listening TV homes and areas contribute. 

III. Cost of radio advertising: Cost-per-1,000 homes 
by program types, typical production costs, spot costs. 

IV. Radio's billings: Billings by networks '48-'53. 
spot radio billings '47-'53 ('5'S estimate: $130.000,0001. 



SPONSOR 




<J T&» 



NOW IT CAN 
BE TOLD! 



Population estimates find 
ALAMEDA COUNTY 
with more people than neigh- 
boring SAN FRANCISCO 
COUNTY. Reach the 2,968,- 
500 people in the 9 adjacent 
Bay Area Counties 

5000 WATTS 



DAY and 



NIGHT 





. 1 in News • Sports • Music 
THE TRIBUNE STATION 

TRIBUNE TOWER 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by 

Burns-Smith Company 

on Pacific Coast 

Duncan A. Scott & Company 




Wendell Moore, Grant Advertising, Detroit, 
placed 84 minute announcements and chainbreaks 
per radio station in 60 top markets for the 
Chrysler Corp.'s Dodge Division campaign, which 
ran for two weeks starting 13 Mar and 10 June. 
"Radio, along with newspapers, formed the one-two 
punch that allowed Dodge to capitalize on its 
Mobilgas Economy Run victory," Wendell explains. 
Dodge won the miles-per-gallon category in this test 
run. Wendell placed annoum ements in early-a.m., 
late afternoon slots to catch in-car audiences. 



Ed Rattier. Friend, Reiss, McGlone, New York, 
placed radio and TV announcements and programing 
in 30 markets in fall 1952 to introduce Liqui- 
Moly, a new additive to car oil. "Within nine 
months, Liqui-Moly sold more than one million cans 
all over the country" Ed reports. "The air pattern 
was consistent in each market: 7 to 8 a.m. d.j. and 
5 to 8 p.m. sports adjacencies on radio, five-minute 
live sports programing on TV." Ed bought time for 
three to five Liqui-Moly commercials a week on radio 
and TV in each market, plans bigger drive in fall. 



Betty Vns.se. Duane Jones Co., New York, is 
now looking over availabilities for American 
Protam Co.'s revamped and more intensive fall radio 
campaign. Betty, who's worked on this account 
for three years at three different agencies, explains 
her new approach to Protam time buying this way: 
"In the past, we evaluated the efficiency of the 
programs we bought on basis of mail pull, since 
Protam, a dietary product, was sold mainly by mail 
order. With increased demand, Protam is now 
aiming for more drug store distribution." 



Stephen Suren. Sullivan. Stauffer, Col well & 
Bayles, New York, bought a heavy radio schedule 
last month to supplement network TV advertising 
for Simoniz Co.'s new HiLite furniture polish. 
"We introduced the product with announcements on 
\ BC Tl 's The Big Story," Steve relates. "Now we'll 
supplement the NBC TV summer replacement, Door- 
way to Danger, with three to 10 radio announce- 
ments weekly for an eight-week period starting 15 
June." HiLite's radio push covers over 50 markets. 
Another active radio account is Smith Bros. 



SPONSOR 




l$o Seiv 



Has Been Selling Products |# VC A DC 
and Services on WHAM for 10 t AK J 



Since Esso began reporting news 16 years 
ago on WHAM, 3 times daily "Your Esso 
Reporter" has reached upstate New York 
markets. 

On July 1, 1953— WHAM's 30th Anni- 
versary Year — "Your Esso Reporter" will 
begin the 17th year of newscasting in 
WHAM's buying area. 

"Your Esso Reporter" has firmly estab- 



lished Esso products and services in the 
minds of WHAM listeners in this market 
with its more than S2 billion dollar buying 
power. When WHAM listeners arc sold. 
they buy. Esso sales records prove that. 

Year after year Esso's confidence in 
WHAM has been justified. Ksso is only one 
of many advertisers who have found that 
advertising dollars spent on WHAM bring 
them abwn e average returns. 



LET 



WHAM 



SELL FOR YOU 



The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y. Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



13 JULY 1953 





ADOLPHE \ll VMM 

your Star and Host in 

*» "FAVORITE STORY 



: m 



THE MAN WHO SELLS 
WITH THE SHOW 
THAT COMPELS! 



/ 



^^k^ ^ 



Each magnificent story a co 
and captivating half-hour dil 

The romantic! The bizarre! The sui* 



m oforcyc/« ~ p c nase<: r. "Our en,V r y 

v - three f,,ii i '• Q cfon"; 9 fa *i mk 







RAT ' NG >NFO RM 



4TIQN 




Ran* 



o*tn 



%($$*" [ ^^Ai^ I 





Starring 

MNMN RENAIDO 

AS "CISCO" 

and 

UO CttffUo 

AS "PANCHO' 

E «h program a comply . * ' 7*?* »»»«»!>. 




^^SS^! 



cV^^% 



£/?<?/£ 




zooMzmd^ 



4 8 8 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 



15 2 9 MADISON ROAD 
CINCINNATI 6, OHIO 

5 2 5 5 CLINTON AVE 



HOLLYWOOD 



AGAI 

Omaha's 

Favorite 



100,000 WATT 
TV STATION 



Kimv 

Carries the 

TOPS 
SHOWS 

in OMAHA 




ra 



The latest PULSE (May 17 through 
23rd) shows KMTV is again Omaha's 
MOST LOOKED-AT, MOST LIS- 
TENED-TO STATION. Not only 
does KMTV lead with the TOP 5 . . . 
it also carries 7 of the top 10 weekly 
shows in Omaha. 

Place your message on KMTV . . . 
the station with the BIG audience. 
Contact KMTV or \our Petry repre- 
sentative today. 




KANSAS 



With 100.000 WATTS of Power. KMTV now 
servos a market with nearly 200.000 TV sets. 
1 ' ^ million people, with an effective buying 
income of nearly 2 billion dollars, live within 
the KMTV area. 



KII1TV 



CBS 

DUMONT 

ABC 



OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 
CHANNEL 3 



Now Represented By 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



49th & MADISON 



POCKET BOOKS 

I would like to congratulate you <>n 
your \tr\ interesting and, I feel, most 
accurate reporl on the pocket-sized 
book industry and its advertising prob- 
lems. 

I look forward eagerly to the da) 
when sponsor may publish another 
such survey article, perhaps reporting 
on the "extensive radio and TV ad- 
vertising" of America's leading pub- 
lishers in the field. Perhaps that day 
is nearer than we know. 
Thanks again for your lucid analysis. 
Norm Hill 
Promotion Manager 
Pines Publications Inc. 
Xeiv York 



15% COMMISSION 

I have read your article on the 15' < 
business ("Do agencies earn their 15' < 
on air accounts?" 29 June 1953, page 
32), and I should like to add the 
following: 

\nv advertiser who questions wheth- 
er he is getting his moneys worth for 
his 15' i might very sensibly stop a 
moment to consider if the fault might 
to any degree be partly his own. The 
question is not purely one as to what 
the agency does to earn its money. It 
is also what the manufacturer does to 
make a fine contribution possible on 
the company's part. To get the full 
measure of what a good agency can de- 
liver, the advertiser can do a great 
deal by his own attitude on such points 
as these: 

His attitude should be one that 
reaches out for ideas, encouraging 
rather than repelling them. 

His mind should be open to discus- 
sions oi an] part of the company's 
business, leaving no fear in the agency 
about sacred cows, touchiness in re- 
gard to questioning of past procedure, 
oi unwillingness to face things realis- 
tically. 

The agency should be enabled and 
encouraged to deal with the advertiser 
at all levels from the president down. 
Contact with the advertising manager 
alone i> not enough. 

The agency should never be dealt 
with at arm's length, but always as a 



member of the Family, and the agency's 
motives should be credited as being 
identical with those of the client. 

The agency should be given the 
maximum freedom of operation and 
initiative. 

Above ever\ thing else, the advertiser 
needs to have the capacity to stimulate 
good ideas, to recognize them when 
the) are presented, and to put them to 
work. The brilliant campaigns we all 
admire have existed only because some- 
bod) bad a good plan. 

Vincent R. Bliss 

Executive I ice President 
Earle Ludgin & Co. 

Chicago 



RATINGS PROJECTION 

I want to congratulate y ou on run- 
ning the article on rating projections 
by Miles I)a\iil ("Needed: a way to 
project ratings."' 18 May 1953, page 
36 1 . It served to clarif) a very con- 
fused situation. 

It looks as if regardless of its dis- 
advantages, advertisers are going to 
continue to project local rating figures 
on the basis of NCS and SAM weekly 
audience. As long as this is true, I 
would like to suggest a phrase. "Pro- 
jectable Rating Families" to describe 
the purely fictional base derived from 
the total weekly audience figures for 
projection. In the case of the illustra- 
tion in the article, the "Projectable 
Rating Families"' would be 1.200.000. 
Naturally since most stations' coverage 
are different day and night, two sep- 
arate "Projectable Rating Families" 
must be used, one for day a::d one for 
night and can easily be derived as out- 
lined by Mr. David. 

C. H. TOPMILLER 
Station Manager 
WCKY, Cincinnati 

• Many readers ha% e commented on the im- 
port an ro of resolving the projection problem, 

V future Isaac will contain further rorcroge of 
the subject. 

UTILITIES ON TV 

I have been looking through our file 
of back issues of sponsor in hopes of 
finding some kind of report on the use 
of television bv public utilities adver- 
tisers. So far. nothing has come to 
light, perhaps because our file is in- 
complete or because you have not yet 
run a published surve) on the subject. 

Specifically, we would like to get as 
much information as possible on the 
following: 

1. How many public utilities are 



12 



SPONSOR 




13 JULY 1953 



13 




It pays to look at a problem from many angles. 

We suggest you view this one from the previous page. 

McCANN-ERICKSON, Inc. 



14 



SPONSOR 



i urrentl) active in T\ . especiall) in 
programs? Is there an increase in the 
number oi sponsors in budgets in- 
vested? 

2. \ list of publk utilit) I \ Bpon- 
iors, showing Bponsor, name and t v | •< ■ 
,,f program, numbei ol Btations, and 
approximate cost. 

\\ ,• u ill appro iate youi help w iili 

these questions. II the answers arc not 

readil) available in your files, we 

would welcome suggestions as i" where 

the] mighl be obtained. 

Man) thank- foi 5 "in i ooperation. 

Sherwood Armstrong 

Brooke. Smith, French 

X Dorrance 
San Francisco 

• »|,,|, i... rurve) i- ■▼■liable i- i" lh« n.ii... 
I.T ,.f public nlUlllei •>.... ulna IN. SPONSOR 
I,..- pobllmbed ■ number »i • .-■■ hliloriee Uhu- 

Irjlini: hov. pul.lir ulUltJ linn- benefit from ilir 

wKertUlnc. (Te«r eoplei were -■»< lo Mr. Vrm- 

.lro„ c .) 



RADIO IN TV MARKETS 

Recentl) from time to time there 
have appeared in sponsor some verj 
fine article- whereb) comparisons are 
made between the I \ and radio opera- 
dons in TV markets. The most recent 
article appeared in the June I issue and 
i- entitled "I- dropping your radio 
-how in a TV market False econonrj ? 
I page 28) . 

The thought has occurred to us thai 
a great deal of value could be had in 
our instance (a radio-onl) station) b) 
the use of these articles as mailing 
pieces. We doubt seriousl) il you have 
reprints available for such use. We 
would like to reprint these article- at 

our expense and use them as mailing 
promotion pieces, and we would like 
your permission to do so. Of course, 
\our splendid publication will always 

n ■ ii\e full credit. 

\l. M. Ro< HESTER 

General Manager 
KSEL 
Lubbock, Tex. 

• Reprints of SPONSOR artlelei >r. permitted 
on written request and wbere the publication i- 
lullv Identified. 



PERSONNEL CHANCES 

What are you t r> in *i to do to m) 
SO-far normal blood pre— are? 

In your June 1 issue, page 18, m\ 
new affiliation is listed as ""director of 
uulio. 1\ and films." Considering the 
pace o! developments, isn't T\ alone 
enough for am bod) ? 

Listing should have read: "Former 
affiliation: G. M. Basford Co., account 
executive and director of radio. TV, 

13 JULY 1953 



and films. New affiliation : I he Pi in< e 
ton Film ( entei , direct t tele> ision. 

I < on. ede that one < oidd li mil . 

1. 1. one youi "New and R< ti( h i ditoi 
foi leu ting » tilt in. redulit) towards 
the listing ol m) formei i ombination 
of responsibilities hut that - tin- wa) 
1 1 was. 

But, <>l • "in se, I -till think \ ou pill 

out tin- hottest -licit .ind will • ontinue 

to read it m ith absoi ption. 
( .i \i Hi [< in i; i 
Directot oj I e/ei ision 
Princeton I ihn Centet . In* . 
Prim eton 



FEATURE FILMS 

} ..in June 1 5 issue "I SPONSOR • or 
tains one of the best arti< les on feature 
films for television thai I have evei 
nail i " l\ Feature films: 1953," page 
111. ^ on cei tainl) have presented the 
picture situation clearl) and squarel) 
to both stations and distributors. 

This ai tide w ill be ol assistant e to 
all con. "i M.-.l and this type ol editoi ial 
make- sponsor a reading must for 
those of u- in the industi ) . 

M\i t;n ( rRl -It LM 

General Sales Mana\ 
Peerless T) Produt tions 

llolh ii ood 



MEDIA STUDY 

Please reserve this agern y a i op) ol 
your forthcoming book, ""Media Bas- 
ics. 

This i- a noble sen i< e to the adver- 
tising industr) and should -inn-then 
the scientific use and resultfulness ol 
the several media. 

Congratulation- on your continuing 
good work in this field. 

C. Ri ii» W i bber 

ll ebber Idvertising l~ 

I ■ urn! Rapids 



I ongratulations foi sponsor's ex< el 
lent job "f re-ear. h in getting together 
the ver) fine media evaluation study. 

I certainl) hope you are planning 
put this stud) out in hook form, pn 
abl) in looseleal form on slight!) heav- 
ier stock than the magazine pages. 1 
mentioned this to Ed Cooper, your 
Wesl Coasl representative, when he 
called in to see me recently. He says 
mosl of the station- he '.died on since 
the series started have expressed the 
same thought — thai the Media Study 



••••••«»•••*•• 



K D ON 

5000 WATT 

POWERFUL 

INDEPENDENT VOICE 
OF THE GREATER 

MONTEREY BAY AREA 

AND THE RICH 

SALINAS VALLEY 




PALM BIACH 

I.C^ 

►aC*K • ■ /• \* 

L • ^ 

" UOHTTtty 



SAUNAS 





YOUR BEST BUY IS 

KDON 

He sure to ash about the outstanding 

KDON MERCHANDISE PLAN 
1952 Retail Sales S22 1 ,000,000 00 



Contact 



FORJOE & CO. 



•••••••••••••••••••••••••••< 



15 





AMERICAN 
SECURITY&TRUST 



J. 








GOOD LUCK 
MARGARINE 


■ 




A. GOODMAN 
&SONS 






GORTON PEW 
FISHERIES 




GRIFFIN 
SHOE POLISH 


j 










GROLIER SOCIETY 


1 




mm 


'■ 




HABITANT SOUP 




HELLMANNS 
MAYONNAISE 




ORANGE DRINK 






•..-" •■'. ,_ , ; ..;. 




HILLMAN MINX 






HILLS BROS. 
COFFEE 






HOFFMAN SAUCE . 












HOLIDAY BRAND 
PRODUCTS 





m 



■Hi 



m 

v 

I a 

■ 



PANEL OF EXPERTS 



3! 
131 
151 
231 




4> 



METROPOLITAN 
SAVINGS 



NEW ENGLAND 
SYRUP 




,2L ■EZuIIIS^B 







■.U'l.HW'l '.TTW 



SATURDAY 
EVENING POST 



SCHULZE BURCM 
BISCUITS . 



F. SCHUMACHER 
A COMPANY 



SNOW CANNING- 







£ 



TRANS MO«U> 
AMUSES 




wt ST CHESTER 
CMtCKtN 




Here's when- man) of the mosl successful people stay. They're expert al picking the righl spol for a 
That's wh) the) re all among the more than 500 currenl ami recent users of The II" - Protective 

League. Ihe\ know that UPI. (broadcast locall) in 13 major markets) t- "the most sales-effective participate % 
program m all broadcasting." It you'd like to dwell and sell in the manner to which th< - - isful spons 
have become accustomed (thanks to HPL), call us or CBS Radio Spot Sales for lull information on... 

THE HOI SE>\1> EJS" PROTECTIVE l.i:V<;i E 

t85 Madison Ivt., New York Plasa 1-2345 • Columbia Square, Lot t Hollywood 9-1212 • Represented by CBS Ra - Sales 







IN SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 

You don't have to dig for it. 
You don't have to pan it. It's 
rolling into the cash registers . . 
as California again this month 
hits a new high for "settlers"! 

MARKET FACT NO. 1 : 
More families are moving 
to California every month 
than ever moved to any part 
of the world in any time 
in history. It's a "gold rush" 
for advertisers. 

MARKET FACT NO. 2: 

km PC gives you primary 
coverage of Southern 
California in 205 communities. 
Like to hear about the 
golden opportunities for you? 
Call, write or wire: 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 




50,000 watts days • 10,000 watts nights 
Gene Autry, president 
Robert O. Reynolds, vice president 
& general manager 



RADIO 



ill book form could be ail extremely 
valuable sales tool for anyone dealing 
in advertising. 

Herb Michael 

Commercial Manager 

KERG 
Eugene, Ore. 

• SPONSOR'S ill-Media Stud) -ill be pub- 
lished in book form :ii a later date. Publication 

(l;it<- will In- announced i" ;i iutur< Issue. 



AMERICAS GREATEST 
ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



Like every other bus) gu) in adver- 
tising, ii lakes dynamite to get me to 
add additional publications to inv 
"must read"' list. 

I am now a convert and a real 
SPONSOR Ian. Here's how it happened: 
It was onl\ yesterday that I finallv got 
down to your stor) on Media ["valua- 
tion in I be April 20 issue. I found it 
so informative that I immediately read 
your Ma) 1 issue. After reading both 
articles. I proceeded to read the bal- 
ance of your magazine and found the 
material most informative. Now I am 
going to make darn sure that I don't 
miss an issue. I thought you might like 
to know all of this because we fellows 
are prettv well pressed and it just 
takes one informative article to get us 
to be loyal readers. 

Now to the Media Evaluation story. 
It is. in nn estimation, a job well done 
and it confirmed a lot of mv thinking. 
More important, it has prompted me 
to think more about media and their 
uses. I believe Mr. Abrams' article in 
Printers' Ink recently on imagination 
in space buying very neatly comple- 
ments the philosophy behind your first 
two articles. Mr. Abrams is on your 
panel. 

As you know, here at this agencv we 
start with a product and its benefits. 
We make sure that we have a good 
exclusive benefit story to tell. We feel 
that generally if you have a story of 
this type, most media will do a good 
selling job. However, media buying is 
an art; we know that certain media are 
more adaptable to both product and 
story. Thus we tr) to emplo) the same 
efforts in selection of media as we do 
in developing the product story. 

Many times all of us in advertising 
take certain media lor granted. Y our 
articles should make man) advertising 
men reappraise their media selections. 
Please keep on giving information like 
this. 

Harold M. Mitchell 
Harold M. Mitchell Inc. 
New York 




worried about sales 
in Oklahoma? 



^ 




wondering which radio 
station to use? 



-^ 




the happy solution is. 



RADIO 



930 KC • OKLAHOMA CITY 
Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



Owned and Operated by The OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING CO. 

The Daily Oklahoman • Oklahoma Cily Times 

The Former-Stockman • WKY-TV 




18 



SPONSOR 






All & re * 



These clients, <>n tele\ i-i<»n and radio <>i Imth l.i-i - 1 « r 1 1 1 l: - are 
expected t<> return i<> the ;iir ilii~ fall. Man) never l<li ii ' 



American Safet) Razor Corporation 
I'Ik' American Tobacco Company, Inc. 

(Luck} Strike cigarettes) 
Armstrong ( iork Company 
Barcalo Manufacturing (lompanx 
The California Oil Company (Calso) 
( lircus Poods, Inc. 

Consolidated Edison Company of N. ^ .. inc. 
The Cream <>f Wheal Corp. 
De Soto-Plymouth Dealers of America, Inc. 
Doughboy Industries, Inc. 
E. I. « 1 1 1 I'oni de Nemours & Co. (Inc.) 
Ethy I Corporation 
The hirst National Hank of Boston 
Fori I'iit Brewing Company 
E. cK J. Gallo Winery 
General Raking Company 
General Electric Company 
The B. F. Goodrich Co. 
Hamilton Wairli Company 



Geo. V. rlormel ^\ < o. 

I ,i\ er Brol hers ( loin nan \ 

Liberty Mutual Fire Insurance Company 

M. I. B. Com, mi ix 

Marine Trust Co. of Western V V 

National City Hank of New ^ ork 

Nehi ( lorporal ion 
Norilirup King i\ ( lo. 
The Pacific Telephone A Telegraph ( o. 
Polaroid < lorporal ion 
Rexall I )rug ( lompany 
Savings Bank \-~'n of Massachusetts 
F. «\ \1. Schaefer Brewing Company, Inc. 
Jacob Schmidl Brewing Co. 
Spreckels Sugar I o. 
Standard < )il Co. of < California 
R. II. Stearns < lompany 
Timken Holler Bearing < !o. 
I nit.-.l States Steel < Corporation 
\\ ildrool ( lompany . Inc. 
( lompany 



Wynn Oil 
Premiere July 11 — a new dramatic show for om new client, Chrysler ( orporation 



BBDO 

BATTEN, BARTON, 1)1 RSTINE a OSBOKN, INC 

Advert ising 



NEW YORK • BOSTON • Bl'FFALO ■ CHICAGO • CLEVELAND ■ riTTMU RC-H ■ MISM\r«>ll» SAM fRW ISCO HOLLYWOOD I"- INCELES • DETROIT 



13 JULY 19^3 



19 



"LIKE 
DUCKS 
TAKE TO 
WATER" 




Agencies and clients just 
naturally take to KSDO. It 
delivers the most listeners 
per dollar in San Diego's 
billion dollar market. 

Hooper and Nielsen both 
say... KSDO is first in 
San Diego. Naturally, 
we agree! 

May we show you how to 
navigate profitably in 
these waters? 



KSDO 

1130KC 5000 WATTS 



Representatives 

Fred Stubbins — los Angeles 
Daren McGovren — San Francisco 
John E. Pearson, Co. — Hew York 




111 II 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Scouting the saloons 

Here it is mid-July and sponsor is preoccupied, on regular mid- 
July schedule, with its Fall Facts and forecasting. To which worthy 
rodeo, all proper attention. But rather than add two cents of pass- 
ing comment to a large draft of data, this column elects to stand out 
of the shadows of autumn cast in the present i->ue and talk of the 
summer now with us. in special reference to the classic network 
utilization of hot weather as an opportunity to "showcase" and 
"develop" new entertainments. 



Radio started the custom of using open evening time during 
hiatus to break in new program*. Television continues the custom. 
Outwardly, its nature taking its course, since only in summer is it 
possible to exploit the premium hours. 



\\ hat is the score on summer tryouts? It seems never to have been 
accurately computed through the years. As with much valuable pro- 
gram information, the facts are buried in the files of the program 
research departments of the networks and reserved prett) much for 
the private use of salesmen and sales promotion gentry out to prove 
a point, as and when it needs proving. 



Admittedly a fair number of summer shows have made the grade 
through the vears and been carried over into the fall, sustaining or 
sponsored. The original Columbia Workshop started as a summer 
noveltv in 1936, ran right through five-and-a-half-years to Pearl 
Harbor week. There are probably a dozen standout samples of sum- 
mer tryouts becoming established franchises. And maybe a dozen 
standouts is enough justification for the elaborate network striving 
vear after year during the summer season. 



But one misfortune remains. For it is a misfortune that the eco- 
nomics of broadcasting conspire to limit showcase opportunities to 
limited-budjjet. limited-audience, limited-test conditions. This means 
in practical fact that the untried show is obliged to buck conditions 
which established shows tend to duck and to do with less of every- 
thing, including prestige, promotion, and press. Nor is there any 
assurance, save a nominal hope, that a summer show which does 
click, as a summer show, has better than an outside chance in the 
fall. Again, the economics of broadcasting — the preemptions and 
options of premium time segments -conspire to prevent ready sched- 
uling of anything 'new.*" This is not arguing that it doesn't some- 
times happen happily. This is just saying how tough it is. how 
long the odds, how infrequent the successiul conclusion. 

(Please turn to page 148) 



20 



SPONSOR 




Head in the clouds 




Feet on the ground 



The head in the clouds may dream up a lot of 
startlingly new and different advertising ideas. 

But it takes a man with his feet on the ground 
to decide whether those ideas will sell goods. 

Combine both qualities in one person, and you 
have the kind of creative ability that consistently 
comes up with outstanding — and outstandingly 
effective — advertising. 



YOUNG & RUBICAM, INC. 

Advertising • N«w York Chicago D#'roif Son Froncitco 
Ho/Vwood Montreal Toronto M*mkq dry london 



13 JULY 1953 



21 



look whds keeping i 

pMO 






ll 



S. T 






- -'<"■*;.• 



» 



l^« 



».• 



>»»- 






■I ■ I 



«» 



• : MZ 



ENERAL 



M IUSJB 



now* 



kJ 




P nights! 




There's no business lik<- more busii 
espe< iall\ i<» prove the box-office vitality <>i m i 
work radio. \ 1 1 « 1 more business is whats 
lighting up the -k\ ovei Mutual these nights. 

Cot a Cola, Bromo-Seltzei ...( hesterfield, 
Camel. ..Level Bros., General Wills ... Kreisler, 
( niter. Murine, \iennen names lik»- th< 
are now up in lights along this bus\ Rialto, 
moving here on advice "I such audience-wise 
agents as l> in y, Lennen & Wewell, Esty, 
Cunningham & 11 alsh, Tatham-Laird, Bai 
SSC&B, Grey,BBD&0, Foote,Com & Beldii 

It takes a multiple Mister I'll S to provide the 
special advantages thai keep .ill this business 
thriving under the Mutual marquee: 500-plus 
affiliates in 1<"> states... program realignment, 
winning the only gain in network listening, 
8-9 p.m! ... long-run program strength, deliver- 
ing a five-year high in listening, 7:30 |».m:*. . . 
mass economy, unmatched elsewhere. 

No wonder Mutual- business is thriving, with 
a whopping, contra-industry gain in bookings 
for all '52, and .-till greater sales for '53 to date. 

Mranwliilf.il more business is important 
to you, we have a special plus-combination 
that can pul your name in lights like thes 

Ma\ \\«' -h"\\ you li<>\\ it \\<>rk~ 

♦SKI Jin x ... M F) 

Mutual 

THE P L I S NETWORK I ' > R RAD! 1 



In Greater Los Angeles 
an area of... __ ^.wubrr ' 

KOWL 



«t&> 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 

i' 



n 



mm 




KOWL'S programming, plus its 
5000 watts, appeal MORE to 
the 1,000,000 persons of the 
Mexican-American, Negro and 
Jewish communities in the Los 
Angeles area . . . combined 
with the programming and 
power are distinctive radio 
personalities who sell these 
big markets. 



5,000 BIG WATTS 
1580 Kc 



Santa Monica, California 

Represented nationally by 
George W. Clark, Inc. 
Chicago, Illinois 
New York. New York 
Daren McCavren Agency 
San Francisco. California 
Dora-Clayton Agency, Inc., 
Atlanta. Georgia 






150 radio, 80 TV stations tied in merchandising (above) with "Beast" spots 

See: "Movies on tin- air** 

Issne: 8 September 1952, p. 38 

Subject: Warner Bros.' 8200.000 air drive 
for "Beast from 20.000 Fathoms" 

Warner Bros.' $200,000 mid-June air push to promote the com- 
pany's newest release. "Beast from 20.000 Fathoms." proves once 
again that Hollywood takes no half-way measures. In less than a 
\ ear, Hollywood graduated from the "King Kong"' approach to 
"The Beast"' — from a localized saturation TV campaign to a "super- 
colossal" national splurge. 

To avoid the stock exhibitor complaint that promotion comes too 
far in advance. Mort Blumenstock. Warner v.p. in charge of adver- 
tising, exploitation, and publicity, keyed the air campaign to book- 
ings in one of the costliest, most-concentrated 10-dav air splurge- 
yet undertaken. Y\ arner Bros, rushed the film into as many movie 
theatres as possible for simultaneous opening. B\ mid-June, with 
1.500 bookings confirmed. "The Beast took to the air on over 80 
TV and more than 150 radio stations. 

Sixteen different T\ teasers ranging from 20-second to minute 
trailers were shown. These announcements plugged key-city open- 
ings, ended with telops giving the names of three major movie 
theatres in each city which featured the film. 

Among other major movie companies using the air media is 20th 
Century-Fox, which studied the effects of showing preview-trailer? 
on TV througli its tie-in with CBS TVs Toast of the Town. In July . 
says Charles Einfeld. v.p. in charge of advertising, publicity, and 
exploitation. 20th Century-Fox will kev the TV campaigns for 
"White Witch Doctor" to local area premieres. The campaign will 
be tied in, as often as possible, with special, station-sponsored pro- 
motions. 20th Century will vary its trailers in keeping with the 
audience and section of the country. 

BKO. pioneer in use of air media for movie promotion with its 
"King Kong."" will re-release '"Mighty Joe Young" this summer, with 
$55,000 in advertising support. The opening of the film in four e\- 
< liange areas will be promoted bj nine trailers in a $35,000 T\ 
campaign. Remainder of the budget will go into newspapers and 
an unusuallv heavv merchandising effort. * * * 



24 



SPONSOR 



All it Took was a Bombshell 




. . . Tossed by a marine in the rigging of the Bon Homme 
Kichard. to end the ship's most famed battle. The bomb landed 
in a powder tub on the British warship ami exploded. Betting 
it afire. The British Captain wisely strnek his colors and 
enlisted the aid of the sinking Bon Homme Richard's crew to 
put out the blaze. 

Equally abrupt was the effects of a programming "Bombshell'' 
flipped into the Omaha. Council Bluffs area by radio kOWII. 
The audience reaction shows little indication of cooling a lull 
18 months later ... as the below Hooper averaged for the 
months from October, 1951. to April. 1953. proves. If you're 
looking for a red-hot audience for your sales message — con- 
fidentially, we got 'em! 




35.7% 



• Largest /<>/«/ audi- 
ence <>f an) Omaha 
station, 8 A.M. to <> 
P.M. Mondaj thru 
Saturdaj ! I Hooper, 
Oct., 1951, thru 

Vprii. l <>.->:>.) 

• Largest share «»/ 
audience, in anj in- 
dividnal time peri- 
od, of an\ indepen- 
dent station in all 

V in erica ! I ipril, 

I<>.i.*.) 



OTHER 
Sto. "A'sto. "B" STATION RATINGS 



Sto. "C 



Sto. "D" 

Sto. "E" 



LQ 



S&Sfl 



O M A 



"America's Most Listened-to Independent Station 



General Manager, Todd Ston; Repre.ented Nationally By The BOLLING CO. 




YOU 
CHOOSE ,• 
CANADA'S 
FIRST 
STATION... 



iion u 



Mail Sales up 36.9% 
CFCf local sales 

un 



m urn RifN \ ,>,, 

&<fse<S on Met &Af fr'fures. 

In +h* U .$. , see Weed * C. 
|m Canada, All- CswaJ/*. 




IrJpiiir 



Elliott Plogge 

Advertising Manager 
Peter Paul, Inc., Naugatuclc, Conn. 

The top of the heap can be a pretty dangerous spot: too darned 
many people keep trying to shove you off. Peter Paul. Inc.. with 
Mounds and Almond Joys holding top selling honors in the 10c 
candy bar field, has assigned Elliott Plowe a hefty share of the 
responsibility for maintaining that position. 

Plowe believes that the best way to hang onto the front-running 
post is to sink every nickel of his $1,500,000 budget into spot radio 
and TV (TV; and 25^/c, respectively!: newscasts and announce- 
ments on radio in 160 cities and TV announcements in 12 markets. 

Replying to critics of his two-media plan. Plowe says. "Only a 
fool tinkers with a winning team. We've been in and out of other 
media and we think the combination we have now works best for 
us with the budget we've got. We tried network TV aimed at 
younger age groups a few years ago (Buck Rogers, Magic Cottage. 
See-Saiv Zoo) but we found that we just can't afford it." 

The advertising campaign is concentrated in a nine-month period 
with a hiatus during the hot weather months when the demand for 
chocolate-covered candy bars is off. Fortunately for Peter Paul, 
the company's agency, Maxon, Inc., has a client (Armstrong Rub- 
ber Co.) whose heavy selling season is summer and who picks up 
about S5 r '< of the candy maker's time slots. 

Peter Paul's love for newscasts has ripened over the years. Said 
Plowe to sponsor: "We think they're ideal for us because studies 
show that the audience composition is closely parallel to the actual 
population breakdown in this country. And we prefer to hit whole 
families because we don't believe that youngsters are the big buyers 
of 10^ bars. W e find that newscasts build loyal audiences so we get 
a solid repetition factor which is so useful in selling a low-priced. 
quickly consumed product.' 

All TV announcements arc scheduled in prime time and the con- 
sistency of Peter Paul's advertising has won the firm some fine 
adjacencies. The company uses four announcements a week in its 
top six markets, three a week in the next four, and two a week in the 
bottom two markets. 

Born in Bad Axe. Mich. I pop. 2.600 i. Plowe graduated from the 
Universit) of Michigan. From 1936 to 1950 he worked his way up 
to ad manager of H. J. Heinz, joined Peter Paul immediateb 
thereafter. His wife is a golf- and fishing-widow. • * * 



26 



SPONSOR 



Around Detroit^Around the Clock- 

Your Dollar Buys 

More On W J B K-T V 




Take a good look at all these 
figures, specially WJBK-TVs 
daytime dominance. That day- 
time audience is mighty potent 
in this big, booming industrial 
area where swing-shift work- 
ing hours mean more daytime 
TV watching . . . more sales 
per daytime TV dollar. Cost 
of sales goes down as number 
of viewers goes up. It's as 
simple as that! And number of 
viewers is greatest on WJBK- 
TV, Detroit's CBS affiliate. 



,of * hat 



All Day Long on CHANNEL 2 You Get The 
GREATEST SHARE OF THE TELEVISION AUDIENCE 

7:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon . WJBK-TV. .47% 

STATION X . . 36% 
STATION XX . 17% 

12:00 Noon to 6:00 P.M . WJBK-TV.. 37% 

STATION XX . 32% 
STATION X . . 31% 

6:00 P.M. to Midnight . . WJBK-TV.. 39% 

STATION X . . 35% 
STATION XX . 26% 

May, 1953 Pulse Figurei on Shore of Audience. Mondoy Thru Friday 



^^1 ^L^^dJJtf^l ^^^^ May, 1953 Pulse Figures on Share of Audience. M. 



<2> 



etrolt 




Represented 
Nationally by 

THE KATZ AGENCY 



TOP CBS and DUMONT TELEVISION PROGRAMS 

STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY • National Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 11 8 E. 57th, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-7690 

13 JULY 1953 27 



Hour of 
Charm" - 



\ \v\\\w; 



trv 






Of •!*? 






Biggest feature 

of its kind in 

the transcription 

library field.' 



Cer 1800 
iging 
c nmerc'ial 
jgles 
cvering 
ore than 70 
onsor categories 



1 <:f> 



p u/set* 




TUESAtRUS Library gives you all this... 
BASIC LIBRARY of approximately 5,000 
selections . . . monthly release of ~)2 or 
more new selections . . . weekly scripts 
tor 31 program series — 80 individual 

shows . . . PRODUCTION AIDS ... SOI M) 

effects . . . sales aids including sponsor- 
selling brochures, sales-clinching audition 
discs, audience-building promotion kil~ 
. . . filing system complete with cabinets, 
catalog, index cards. 

ALL THESE SHOWS IN THESAURUSI 




HALF-HOUR SHOWS 

Concert Hall of the Air 
Men Behind the Melody 
Norman Cloutier and 
His Memorable Music 

QUARTER-HOUR SHOWS 

Music of Manhattan 
Church in the Wildwood 
Fran Warren Sings 
A Festival of Waltzes 
The Singing Americans 
Vincent Lopez 



Music in March Time 
I Hear the Southland 

Singing 
Music To Dream By 
Slim Bryant 

and His Wildcats 
Here's June Christy 
Organairs 
Old New Orleans 
Claude Thornhi II 
Artie Shaw 
Ray McKinley 
Jumpin Jacks 



For Thesaurus Brochure 
phone, urite, wire Dept. C-70 

recorded 



itim CirpntNi if Uinci 



program 
services 



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630 Fifth in-.. \r„ York 20, V ) ...II iam 2S011 
Chicago Hollyu-ood Atlanta Dallas .«. 



■ 1 



This Year... 200 Million for the Pig Banks of 




P^ 



he more than 5 million hogs which go annually 
to market from Paul Bunyan Land will sell — on 
today's market — for $40.00 each or more. 
Staggering as that may seem — here's another 
amazing condition — the unique position of WCCO. 
Able to reach a million radios and a half million 
TV sets — WCCO can deliver more of them than 
any other sta!ion! One station can cover PckjI 
Bunyan Land! 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

WCCO 

CBS 

RADIO — 50,000 Watts— 830 K.C. 
TELEVISION— 100,000 Watts— Ch. 4 



30 



SPONSOR 




Fuller measurement of radio's audience will be assured by set cs shown above. New Audimeters will measure increased 
new Nielsen Multiple-Receiver Metering Audimeters which number of multi-set homes in new Nielsen sample. Ratings 
can record audience for as many as three radios and one TV reflecting these changes will be out soon. Details p«f|«' HU 






What are the hot radio and 11 



trends this fall? 



From com i 111: end of ili<> one- 
station market era in television to 



signs of revival in nighttime spot radio, the changes will be fast and furious 



M bis is the seventh in sponsor's se- 
ries of yearl) Fall Facts issues. Like* 
its predecessors il is designed to help 
you make immediate fall buying deri- 
sions and to serve as well as a vear- 
'round manual. 

The i sue i- divided unto >i\ main 
sections: reports on network radio, spot 
radio, network TV, spot TV: and two 

13 JULY 1953 



Basi a sections, one l"t ea< h "i the aii 
media. The Radio and TV Bas - - 
tions a- in the past two years pi 
the major research fa ts al oul radio 
ami lelr\ ision in charts. 

The reports on network and spot 
cover the most important trend- for 
you to watch. What these trends are 

\ ou'll find on the next t M 



This is your summary of 
7th annual Fall Facts issue 

- ■ • •• 
■ 



31 







More than 1,000 persons turned out for screening of CBS Radio's film 
"It's Time For Everybody" shown recently in Hollywood. Above are 
Paul Mundie, Lever Bros.; Les Irvin, Hill Bros.; E. W. Buckalew, KNX- 
CPRN; Adrian Murphy, CBS Radio. Chart from movie on page HO 



Dr. Sydney Roslow, president of Pulse, points to chart which throws 
light on differences between rating services. Pulse figures on radio 
sets-in-use in N.Y.C. indicate close agreement with Nielsen; Hooper 
figures far below both. See Research round-up starting on p<lQ*' 80 



NETWORK RADIO TRENDS 

(Complete report .starts page 67) 



1. Rates: \\ ith none of the confusion and uncer- 
tainty about rates that existed last year at this time, adver- 
tisers are making their fall network plans earlier. 

2. Research: Network radio will benefit from an 
increasingly adequate measurement of radio's audience. 
Nielsen is going ahead with installation of its Multiple- 
Receiver Metering ( MRM I Audimeters so as to reflect the 
larger number of multi-set homes that turned up in the 
Nielsen Coverage Service survey of last year. While in- 
stallation is going on Nielsen will supply weighted ratings 
to reflect the new multi-set home figures. The networks 
are also using studies by Nielsen, Pulse and others on out- 
of-home radio listening to sell clients. 

3. Rillings: There is evidence of an upward trend 
in network radio billings. Both CBS and NBC report bill- 
ings for the first half of 1953 are ahead of the correspond- 
ing period last year, while Mutual's 1952 billings came to 
nearlv 30 r c above 1950. 

4. Audience: \\ hile network program ratings are 
down a little this year the reduction in audiences is minor 
since there are more radio sets and more people than there 
were last year. 

5. i (indents: The various network "tandem" plans 
have been doing well, for the most part. Mutual's Multi- 
Message Plan has been sold out, and during this summer. 
the overflow of clients seeking to buy into the plan have 
been poured into non-Multi-Message Plan programs at the 
regular plan rates. Mutual expects this overflow situation 
to continue in the fall. CBS" Power Plan started out slow 
last fall but ended up the 1952-53 season practically sold 
out. NBC's Operation Tandem was sold out for part of 
tin- -I'ibim, NBC has alreadv sold one client for the fall. 



SPOT RADIO TRENDS 

(Complete rt port starts pagt L01 






1. XrtiilabUities: The trend toward use of morn- 
ing radio by TV-shy clients is still on — to such a degree 
that many big radio stations have to put spot advertisers 
on rotating schedules to fit them in. See page 102. 

2. Xighttitne radio: With nighttime rates drop- 
ping, there s a definite movement on the part of both buy- 
ers and sellers to re-explore the possibilities of nighttime 
spot radio. 

3. Curfews: Several major advertisers, like Old 
Gold and Lever Bros., still have arbitrary morning "cur- 
fews"' after which they wont buy spot radio. But buying 
trend is now away from this practice. 

4. Single rates: Reps estimate that between 30 c /c 
and 50' '< of major radio outlets in video areas are now 
on single-rate basis I same prices for both day and night i. 
Another 10 r t , or more, will make the changeover in rates 
before fall. See page 105. 

5. Spot yardsticks: More agencies than ever be- 
fore are using broadcast research tools — like NCS and 
SAM — in their spot radio time buying. 

6. \egro programing: To reach the $15 billion 
Negro market in the I .S.. a growing list of advertisers 
are using the 200-plus radio stations airing programs with 
spei ial appeal to this important American group. See 
page 128. 

7. F.II Radio: Sales of FM-AM sets and FM tuners 
are on the upbeat. More FM "sisters"' of \M outlets are 
airing their own programs. 

8. Storecasting: This specialized form of FM 
service, which consists of in-store broadcasts, now counts 
300 advertisers, has high rate of renewals. 



32 



SPONSOR 




NETWORK TV TRENDS 

■ nijii, i, i. port ttax it i"i<i- i . 



/. Sinyle-st ofioii markets: I l>. single-sta 

t ion markets will practical!) be a thing "I the past l>\ 
Christmas. <M the '2l\ largest one-station markets I in terms 
• ! I\ Bel circulation) 23 will have ;it least two video 
outlets bj that time. Mosl of the "second stations' 1 will 
be I IIF which means ili.it the advertise) - audience will nol 
immediately be equal to sel penetration. 

2. Network size: \\ networks will be tboul 
twice as large i li 1 - fall as lasl fall. Indications ire thai 
the top programs will be beard <>n LOO-plus stations. B) 
•arl\ 1954 a 125-station network ma) nol be uncommon. 

."{. I'royram competition: Program competi- 
tion vn ■ 1 1 be keener than ever. Ibis will not onl) be due 
to tin' easing <>t the one-station markel problem l>ui will 
result from i a i NBC's entr) into late morning television 
to battle the current CBS monopol) and (b) \IH 's new 
star-studded stable of show business personalities. 

f. TiiiM* costs: While costs-per-1,000 loi station 
timi' will natural!) be high in new markets at the begin- 
ning, the dropping costs-per-1,000 in established markets 
will olT-et this to a greal degree. 

.>. Program easts: Uthougb an advertiser will 
be able to find low-cosl network shows, the cos! trend 
among the top programs has been upward. 

H. TV set growth: Set growth in new TV mar- 
kets where there i- no OUtside competition will be rapid. 

7. t IIF conversion: Where a new I HF station 
goes on the air. the rate of conversion depends on a num- 
ber of factors. These factors include (a) the distance from 
the nearest \ HF station. ibi the number of good qualit) 
YHF signals available, (c) length of time the I HF -la- 
tions are on air and idl qualit) of local I HI-* -how-. 



SPOT 


TV 


TRENDS 






oil 



1. Iruilabilities: With l\ saturi n in the I S 

"\ ei )i»',. there - i trend among lai ind ad 

vertisers i" use daytime spol l\ Reason Daytime 
audiences are in reasing in size, and nighttime -p'>t -l«>t- 
are -till ven scarc< 

2. Franchises: \- die) did in radio, man) adver- 
tisers like Bulova, Benrus, < amel, I ' -S < - . are pin k lo n 

in mi new I \ stations to tie up ti an In- - 

:i. Careful buying: Few igencies, however, ire 

buying blindly. lli_l t- have dictated careful 

chasing ol new and old outlets, particular!) post-fret 
vide. i stations. Sel penetration, I HI convention i 
overlaps all are ■ he< ked. 

I. Mayer hatlyets: Mosl idvertisers would 
rathei .n\i\ to l\ budgets than drop "if stations. One 
agenc) figures additional V, i- necessar) to finish oul 
1953, keeping pace with the expected rise in rates. 

.». Kates to rise: Most i ites on pn freeze stations 
will hold steady, but about 10$ of outlets will be hiking 
their prices alter fall, reps r i ■ » \s predict. Rates on new 
outlet- will jump soon as new video areas till up with sets 

(i. Color films: With coloi again on the TV hori- 
zon, a few advertisers like R. I. Reynolds, < olgate and 
other- are shooting color film commercials is i hedge. 

7. Iliyher film costs: Advertisers ire moving 
carefull) when the) make film commercials, due t,, re-use 
scales in new SAG contracts. Film experts give theii ad- 
vice mi how tii work within SAG limitations on page 198. 

H. TV I.D.'s: 10-second "quickies ire jr. .win- in 
popularit) with video 'bent-. Man) stations r.-p-.rt • 

onl\ 20'. of available 1. 1). -|..|- are unsold. 



Filming of commercial at Transfilm shows way to keep costs down 
despite increases inherent in new SAG contract. Men in background 
are "extras," because they have no lines; man in foreground gets 
repayments as "actor," is narrator. See SAG talent scale \mqv lfUl 



Ziv Television Proqrams. Inc. is kept 'busy putting new episodes of 
"Boston Blackle " in the can. Produced in Hollywood, this and 
other film series have enjoyed strong upsurge in business as a result of 
the many new television stations. Film coverage starts pnf|«* 'JO I 




13 JULY 1953 



33 




&NGER r 



It may be hurting you, too, bathing with Lifebuoy Health Soap 
because one never knovc» You'll thoroughly enjoy this delightful 

toilet soap. You'!! quickly learn to love 
its pleasant, e*fra~efcan scent that van- 
ishes us you rinse. Use ijfebuoy a. week 
ii'll be a Lifebuiiyjan ^tJik. It 



when one u guilty 

)ERUAFS you think these warai 




1926 



. B.O. copy theme helped make Lifebuoy No. I, but ap- 
■ peal was to men. Soap lost ground to perfumed brands 




1953: 



Sweet smell (note "Big Town" character Lorelei sniffing) 
is Lifebuoy's copy theme. TV commercials are integrated 



How Lifebuoy cured its own 6. 0. 

Lifebuoy changed its smell, its color, its package, admitted to consumers 
it had had "B.O.** Then it aimed '53 advertising at women 



M^j ifebuoy's comeback is the story of 
a soap that cured its own case of B.O. 

Lifebuoy's B.O., as a product, 
stemmed from two factors: (1) The 
B.O. copy theme identified Lifebuoy 
as a man's soap. (2) Its strong "me- 
dicinal" odor further alienated the 
feminine public which in the past 20 
years has leaned to sweeter smelling 
toilet soaps. 

In 1952, Lifebuoy fought back. 

Lever Bros. (1) revamped the prod- 
uct, killing the "medicinal" odor and 
replacing it with Puralin, a new odor- 
less B.O. -preventive formula, and 
switched the soap color from male-ap- 
peal red to a more feminine coral. 
Then (2) it keyed its advertising to 



34 



reach a predominantly female public. 

Has the two-pronged change in strat- 
egy worked? 

So much so that Lever Bros, man- 
agement, encouraged by the 1952 up- 
surge in sales, has regained confidence 
in the new Lifebuoy to the tune of an 
approximate 10 f \ ad budget increase 
in 1953 over 1952. In 1953, the com- 
pany is spending a SPONSOR-estimated 
$550,000 in advertising, against $464.- 
728 in 1952, and $237,699 in 1951. 
Over 40% of this year's ad budget is 
earmarked for radio and TV. 

Lever Bros.' send-off copy for the 
new 1953 campaign was frank about 
the product's former deficiencies to the 
degree of heading the newspaper ads: 



"How we cured our own famous case 
of B.O." Advertisers whose products 
have run into serious sales slumps re- 
sulting from product difficulties might 
learn a lesson from Lifebuoy's frank 
admissions. A sure way to show the 
public that your product has been re- 
vamped is to admit that it was lacking 
in certain qualities prior to its face- 
lifting. 

Lifebuoy's choice of radio and TV 
I'K igrams is indicative of the firm's 
new ad approach: Aunt Jenny, CBS 
Radio, 12:15-12:30 p.m. across the 
board — Lifebuoy is sharing the pro- 
gram with Spry, is getting four to five 
announcements a week: Big Town, 
CBS TV, 9:30-10 p.m. Thursdays— 

SPONSOR 



Lifebuoy i-> getting one of the Level 
announcements each week, as 01 1 
June. 

Lifebuoy's advertising polic) 101 
1953 can be summed up as follows : 
radio for a direct pitch t<> women and 
foi sustained effort through the yeai ; 
I \ for it- impact as well as to main- 
tain the sustained advertising effort; 
pi ini media I" tell the Lifebuo) -t"i \ 
it) detail with strong emphasis "ii its 
new eye appeal, both in package and 
of ilic product. I'lint media are used 
main I \ during the summer, which is 
Lifebuoy's best season. 

In preparation lor the draw sum- 
mer push, Lifebuo) bought a package 
deal for an intensive radio campaign 
in it- largest market, New York. This 
past Ma) and June. Lifebuo) ran 12 
announcements a week over WNI.W — 
quickie 1"- and 30-second announce- 
ments keyed to weathercasts, alternat- 
ing with IVpsodent's -pot campaign. 

Tlic most dramatic aspe t ol the new 
ad campaign is Lifebuoy's debut on 
Aunt Jenny, a straight pitch to house- 
wives. Here, as in its other current 
Lifebuoy ad copy, Lever Bros., through 
it- agency Sullivan. Stauffer, Colwell 
& navies, is being outspoken and frank 
about earlier deficiencies of the prod- 
uct. Says Aunt Jenny to her listeners: 

■'Friend-. I've worked with Lever 
Brothers Company for a number of 
fears, but I never dreamed I'd get ex- 
cited about Lifebuoy soap. Mainly be- 
i ause I didn't like that strong 'medic- 
inal' odor. Now I am excited! They've 
just brought out a brand-new Lifebuoy 
— new inside and out. and believe me 



it- simpl) wonderful. It imelh won- 
dei tul. I bat old "mi.-i I it inal 1 odoi is 
Now I ifebuo) -M ell- nil •■ ind 
1 1 .i" iini .i real beauty -soap fi agram e. 
\nd friends it does so mm b l"i \ ou !" 

Dan Seymour, announce! on the 
liini lenn\ show, joins in foi the 
Btraighl sell: 

"' I hat's 1 1 In. \iint Jenny . This new 
I ifebuoj gives you a new kind oi bath- 
to-bath l'>.< ». prote ii"M. I hat's bi ause 
I i ebuo) now has a new ingredii 
a new deodoi izei called Puralin. i- ou 
can't see it, oi feel it. oi -m.il it ; ut 
I'm din Btays with youi -km and h 
on protei ting j ou as long as three daj s 
after a bath. So don't wait. I 
j our family to this won lei ful new I 
buoy at it- dow n-to-earth pi i 



IIIIIHifiriflllllfiniilllMMilllliflllllillllllMMMIliMMIIIIIMIMflEIIMMIMMEMiEllllllltl 

case history 



Aunt Jenny : "I rj it ! x oull love it. 
I'm sure!" 

In tcle\ i-ion. Lifebuoy uses an inte- 
grated film commercial on Big Town, 
with program characters Steve and 
Lorelei discussing the merits "I the 
new Lifebuoy . Here, the copy i- aimed 
at a mixed audience, rather than strii t- 
I\ at women. 

In print media. Lever Bros, has been 
using four-color spreads to put a r< ss 
the new coral color of Lifebuoy with 
Puralin. The bulk of the print-media 
budget goes into Sunday sup] 
comic-, and daily newspapers. 

Lifebuoy's difficulties dale from the 
advent of the cosmetic appeal in toilet 



d toothp -t'-- in the middle 
I hirties. I hi : ion of fi 

w itb mildness wbi< b > ompetiti 

i . stress in then advei i ling Ini 
1 
where it hurt in it- Bales i urve. I he 

theme w In b had i I 
buoy mi 

the earlj I hii ties I see box on this 
for histoi . "I thi Ii • • now 

turned aroun 

-mall chance Lifebuoy might have bad 
with the women- market in the late 
I hirties. I ,\ en in the fai e oi a stead- 
iK i ising - ties i urve lor the t 

■ industry due i" 
ing as defense plant mom ted, 

! ifebuoy - ink to numbei eight spot. 

In I'M I the iil'K dii' Iding oi the 
Lever family attempti i opy ap» 

b to supplement slipping - des in 
the male market w ith incre ised - 

market - tli -. I he py theme in 

; lb- ii 1941 advertising, 

m • tl\ .it women : ". . . 

fresh ind exhil irating. . ." I nfor- 
tunatel) . the subsequent boost t" - 
after a brief, momentary upsurge, w is, 
if fresh, not very exhilaratii I 
buoy was cow making a bid for the 
i ighl market, but the prodt* t ha I 
yet achieved women- appeal. Lifebuoy 
had ■ i •! to graduate from odor to fra- 
l.ifebii" - -tin k M ith 

the !'>.( ■. theme. 

On radio, the I!.", foghorn in ef- 
fe i achieved bj filter technique I 

beard on -u b ■• - 

At ind ( nil 

the Police 1 etween 1946 an I 1949 

'urn In | 



IIIIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIII 



ffotr Lifebuoy atUled B.O. to the hnylish friiir/iffrr/c 



Introduced in the V. S. in 1895 from England, Lifebuoy 
climbed lo one of the top selling spots among toilet soap*. h\ 
the early part of the 20th century. 

it 

It was sold as an antiseptic health soap. The 1918 in- 
fluenza epidemic catapulted Lifebuoy sales due to the firm's 
advertising approach which capitalized upon Lifebuoy's germ- 
killing qualities, its ability to combat disease. 

The year 1926 marks the beginning o) the B.O. 
Ads that year claimed the soap combatted "perspiration 
odor." The evolution from "perspiration odor" to "body 
odor" to "B.O." followed within weeks, and by the end of 
1926, B.O. had become the newest addition to the Ameri- 
can vocabulary. This copy approach, overwhelming 
ful initially, uas to have a reverse effect utter a decade. 



■ and 1930, th> B.O dped quadruple 

I febuoy, which had led as a 

family soap, was ' | identified with male 
I becaust 



The trend away trom "medi< inaf < hich 

started in the drug industry in the early Thirties worked 

febuoy. The B.O. theme began lo hit a point of 

diminishing returns. Advertising ar^propriations were cut 

sharply after a five-year decline in sites, but th- 
copy theme was never abandoned. 

Today, with Lifebuoy's chi wop, 

Life! ingredient, Puralin, its new, fresh 

fragrance. Buf 8.0 'ill a par- -heme, and 

certainly a part of the English language. 



13 JULY 1953 



35 




Alfred Politz (above), president of 
Alfred Politz Research, Inc., con- 
ducted media study for "Life" 



Is LIFE'S media study 
fair to radio and TV? 



"Yes!" says the media director of 8100 million agency; 
"No!" answers research director of 850 million house 



M his is a SPONSOR debate on the most controversial 
media study >et made, "A Study of Four Media," recenth 
completed by Alfred Politz Research for Life at a cost of 
some $250,000 and two-and-one-half-years' time. For a 
symposium of 24 researchers in four fields — air media, 
print media, agencies, and independent organizations — on 
the study, see "What sponsors should know about Life's 
new 4-media study," sponsor, 29 June 1953. In brief the 
air researchers condemned the study as unfair, the print 
experts praised it, most of the agency researchers inter- 
viewed thought it fair, and the independent researchers 
were cautiously "agin" it. One of the most voluble and 
articulate agencymen defended the study so strongly that 
SPONSOR decided to get a point-by-point rebuttal from an 



equally able adman of opposite inclination and publish 
their comments virtually verbatim as a fascinating exam- 
ple of what goes on in the minds of the top brass on Madi- 
son Avenue. Both men are among the top four or five at 
their agencies; both are v.p.'s; both have national reputa- 
tions as authorities in their fields. 

1 ou 11 note that this debate between two agenc\ men is 
in the form of answers to questions from sponsor I the 
questions are numbered and in bold face I . The agency- 
man who feels Life's stud\ is fair answers the question first 
(he's tagged "Life supporter" i . The comments of the 
agencyman who takes exception to Life's procedure follow 
(he's tagged "Life critic"!. A statement on the studv from 
Andrew Heiskell. publisher of Life, appears on page 38. 



LIFE study shows two TV programs had bigger cumulative audiences hut it led in repeat audiences 



CUMULATIVE AUDIENCES: 



REPEAT AUDIENCES 



MEDIUM OR VEHICLE 



J. COLGATE COMEDY HOI R* 

2. SHOW OF SHOWS* 

S. LIFE 

4. RED SKELTON* 

5. THIS WEEK 

6. TEXACO STAR THEATRE* .. 

7. LOOK 

8. JACK BENNYt 

.9. AMOS W ANDYt _ 

10. FIRESIDE THEATRE* ..... 

11. SATE) F.l'OST .. 

12. CHARLIE McCARTHYi 
J3. LADIES HOME JOl RNAL 
If. LUX RADIO THEATRES 



I ISSUE OR 

PROGRAM 

(MILL.) 



28.2 
27.6 
26.4 
23.2 
23.0 
22.4 
18.05 
18.0 
16.9 
15.9 
14.0 
12.6 
11.5 
9.8 



2 ISSUES OR 

PROGRAMS 

(MILL.) 



40.3 
39.7 
38.8 
34.9 
31.0 
33.9 
28.5 
28.7 
26.7 
24.8 
21.2 
20.3 
17.2 
16.7 



3 ISSUES OR 

PROGRAMS 

(MILL.) 



46.9 
46.3 
46.8 
42.0 
35.3 
40.8 
35.9 
36.2 
33.4 
30.6 
26.1 
25.7 
21.1 
21.8 



1 ISSUES OR 

PROGRAMS 

(MILL.) 



50.9 
50.6 
52.5 
46.8 
38.3 
45.4 
41.5 
41.9 
38.3 
34.7 
29.8 
29.9 
24.1 
25.8 



I OR 2 ISSUES 

OR PROGRAMS 

(MILL.) 



31.6 
31.0 
34.8 
32.9 
16.9 
32.6 
34.2 
33.7 
30.1 
2S.7 
22.6 
24.3 
18.0 
22.7 



3 OR 4 ISSUES 

OR PROGRAMS 

(MILL.) 



19.3 

19.5 

15.2 

13.9 

12.4 

12.8 

11.1 

8.2 

8.2 

8.0 

7.8 

5.6 

6.2 

3.1 



TV fBadla i Life" measured audiences of up to six issues but programs went off or program: repeat audience means numbei at same people reached with each succeeding 
air In summer so their measurement stopped at four. issue or show. I* it; thing to remember in this chart is scores of advertisers compete 

for the magazine's audience, but there's usually only ono sponsoring a program and be 
NOTE: Cumulative audience means number of different persons reached with each issue buys not only program but audience as well 



36 



SPONSOR 



/. (,/: /n tin- Study fair to ratlin and It f 

LIFE SI PPORTER: I ertainly, It's fa kindei to radio and 

|\ than tli<\ would have been i agazines had thej done it. 

Imagine taking radio and TV's beat shows and comparing them 
unli the magazines? Life ~ li • • 1 1 1 < I have taken the average "t ill 
ihows. II I'm an average advertiser, I don'l have lack Bennj 01 

the Colgate Comedy Hour. I have iple "I spots al 6 a.m, • ■! i 

iinkiv ol a program that nevei draws a single Hoopei point. 

I'm glad ili>- stud) was done. It's an intelligent contribution to 

media research. \ll media should spend re mone) on impro 

media selection. We'd .ill be bettei off. In this Btudj Lift 

\i- the kind of figures (al i audience accumulation) thai we've 

nevei had before, h should gel at much credit f'>r this .i- it did 
loi n- pass "ii stud) . 

I'd -a* it's the best thing that's happened in media research to 
date. I've been Mailing foi years for those Marconi Wireless people 
in get taken down a peg, and this does it Foi years they'vi been 
rlaiming everything undei the sun namely, thai the) reach ever) 
home with .i radio (now with .i TV set). Life Bhows the) don't. 
Fair t" radio and T\ ? i <•- sii ' 

LIFE CRITIC: Yes, this is a fine stud) .. splendid stud) 
.in important study: Ii i- the firsl stud) "I accumulativi audiences, 
measured in individuals, to anything besides Life. 

But, before Life ■•< anyone attempts to use the stud] to com 

pare media, let's be sure we knovi exactl] what it has measured, 

and then see if inter-media comparisons make ,nn sense. Vnd, it 

not, let's not tr) to make senseless comparisons between .i German 

ishopper and a field of Chinese dandelions. 

There are two ver) gre.it differences in the measurements: 

>li The print estimates measure entire media entire publica- 
tions; the air estimates measure single /'ices of their media single 
programs. 

(2) The print method i- the mosl accurate the medium knows 
.i recognition measurement; the air method is the mosl unreliable 
the medium knows, the recall technique and ovei a period of timi 
the industr) considers a throwback to crude earl) techniques which 
the industr) has lone, since discarded. 

What the stud) measures, it does with the beal kind ol sampli 
known to modern researchers — and so it does it well. Hut it mea- 
sures two entirely different things, and no attempt should be made 
to compare them. 

What I'ulit/ and Life did was to net two different kinds of audi- 
ence measurement (one an entire medium, one a fev< individual 
programs). The onl\ thing the two measurements hare in (amnion 
is the fact that they were l>«th obtained from the tame persons. Hut 
u i- like a surve] "I individual attitudes toward cigarette smoking 
to which ate added some questions on quantit) of eggs consumed in 
the whole family. Yes, the answers arc obtained from the same 
sample of persons, !>ut the] arc different kind- of measuri mi Ms, and 
■ ompletel) different things. 

V-. I'm delighted the surve] was made. 1 think the accumula- 
tive information represents a useful and important contribution to 
cur knowledge of media coverage. But, for gosh sakes, let's have 
the good sense not i" tr> to compare what can't be compared. \nd 

b) the wa> in passing maj I take exception to the irresponsi- 
ble statements thai seem to be the order of the da) in reference 
to the Lt/e-Politz stud) ? 

Just to mention one, among man) it is mosl irresponsible and 
unjust to claim that the "Marconi \\ ireless" people have been 
claiming "everything under the sun namely, that the) reach ever) 
home with a radio <ct and now with a TV set. Life -how- the) 
don't." 

In the lir-t place, radio and TV have never claimed an] - 
thing or. al least, do responsible person in the field has so claimed. 
Oh. in a general way. of course, they claim thai "radio" reaches 
(.■// sets in working order just like the phone compan] would no 
doubt claim that the phone system reaches all phone- in working 
order. Hut when it come- to specifics the] have coverage esti- 
mates, circulation estimates, and program audience estimates — and 
these arc all usually '"somewhat" less than "all" the home-. Life 
certain!] doesn't tell us anything about station or network accumu- 
lative audiences. SO the stud] can hardly "prove" that the\ don't 
which, even if it did. would not he "disproving" any radio or T\ 
claim, since you can't very well "disprove" a claim if the claim was 
never made in the first place. 



2. {ft tun you compart on* program with tin content i <>/ 

an entire mage -in. ' 

111 I M PPOH I I It: 

LIFE CRITIC: in m ik< 

just Ilk, you < ai jiii' tit ii •■• .i tingli i m'I' ' 

bei "i Methodist mininteri in " 

the i ompai i-"ii » Ion •• :• it ' 1 1 

1 1 you think -o, suppose, ii> \t timi 
I BS I \ on Monda) nighl w iih 
features in Lift Who 'I" you think then would have the 

est aud . ' \ n.l. radio and IN might well let 

th.- tin- biggest features in Life (although the irresponsible author 
of the line- above says thai / - 
would have he, n to the m ■ 

In othei words, it sounds fail t" radio IN to have 
prop* rties Bui this doi tire > idio I N 

Moreover, the) didn't measure the net 
rather the average t"i the* Hut for the pub 

you ,i. , . pi i;;/ 1 reading ai 
thai readers "t tome features don'l i I some otl 

'.i. tj: Isn't this comparing tin potential audience of a mag' 

azine with an nitniil delivered one in tin (««<• nf n radio nr 

1*1 program from tin- standpoint <»/ the advertiser* 

LIFE SUPPORTER: Nuts \ r Lift rculation is audit 

ed at bed delivered Your t idio and I \ 

work. 

I.I I'll C'lll'I'K : I- radio and TV audience reall) "guesswork" 

jusl I mi an-.- ii doesn't represent ' In the 

place, how man] of print'- "audited" copies ni 
wrappers? How man] times has it happened in v«ur own ht 
hold in tin- pasl few month-! 

In the second place, if the radio-TV audii *ork," 

maybe this whole argument is gless. If I' 

wh) need we debate about how ^,,...1 • i- ? \nd if the 

myriad of radio-TV audience surveys wing," then market 

researchers throughout | back t" school, and the 

besl informed companies in Vmi I'u Ponta, t ! 

tin- General Motors, and all the rest, who relj on tin- kind of 
"guesswork" for mature business decisions should surrender all 
the business they've gained bj relying on just that kind ol 
work." 

/. (J: (on any advertiser reach tin- (>H miuion readers nf 
Life's ri \x ssuuemf 

LIFE SUPPORTER: How man) people will h< 

radio's 14 million.'' 

LIFE CRITIC: Hi could reach all of "radii JDion. 

ild\ reach anywhere near all 60 million. 

.>. Qi II niildn'i ii he all. if tin- commercials are integrated? 

I.I IK SUPPORTER: w lil > minute. Von determine those 
who read an ad in Life "r an] other magazini tn if 

the) recall it. You hive to teal the radio ..• |\ commercial the 

way. You can't assume your pi gt ience is vom 

menial audiet 

I.II'E ( 1(1 IK : / didn't test the magazine audienci 

b) "recall." Win i- retail a valid measurement I'- 

pie • t. hut nonethi • it. 

\ 'ii cant assume your program audience i- v.uir comn 

audience but if you handle the commercial- properly, 
make il so. How do you do that with -ix two-inch a«l» in 
win- ivould he time 50 million l I right 

but not the two-inch 

f). O: I an JOSS UMIM the »fimc olmiil I it. ' 

lilt SI l*l*Olt'l'Elt: No, hut the) aren't nva-uring r 
mercial audiences. They mi iitmrial audiem 

and TN that's forcing the fight into one of audience of adve- 
merit v.-rsu- audience of commercial. Life didn't even preten 
do that. 

LIKE CIIITIC: end to n 



13 IULY 1953 



37 



menial audiences. But isn't that what the achertiser is really in- 
terested in? It"- of nice academic interest to know that six Life 
issues are thumbed hy 60 million souls. But how many saw m\ ail 
on page 27:' Isn't that what matters to me? 

7. Q: Rut isn't it already telling advertisers and agenda it 
reaches 54 million people with four utiles, whereat the top 

four radio and top five TV programs reach far fewer? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: Well, it's true. 

LIFE C'KITIF: Again — yes, if- true, but does the compari- 
-.iii mean anything? 1 can bin a program — who can "buy" Life? 

8. Q: Isn't there an unstated assumption there that these 
advertisers trill also he able to reach these 54 million Life 
readers — and isn't this misleading? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: No. It's misleading for radio and 
television to tell t he advertiser that their editorial or program audi- 
ence is the same as their commercial audience. This Life isn't 
doing at all. 

LIFE CRITIC: li maj not be an unstated assumption but, 
the figures would only have any real meaning for media buying deci- 
sion, if one knows how to discount for non-ad reading, non-com- 
mercial hearings. 

9. Q: Hotc about using a period when TV was the only 
medium to show a 30% growth? Doesn't this downgrade 
its ratings? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: Life picked up half a million circula- 
tion in this period, and it's all audited and paid for. Same reason- 
ing applies to it. 

LIFE CRITIC: If Life's circulation has increased some, its 
increases are dwarfed by T\ 's audience increases. TV audiences 
have grown 30% or more. Audiences in TV must have grown since 
the L'/e-Politz measurements — and in a measure that would dwarf 
any expansion in Life audience that may have come about. 

10. Q: Is it fair for Life to call networks media in its 
annual billings ad in which it comes out first — and then to 
switch to calling Jack Benny a medium when measuring 
audiences? If CBS is a medium on Life's do'lar compari- 
son chart, why isn't it used as a medium on Life's audience 
chart also? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: Why do radio and TV mislead the 
industry with their phony circulation figures? For example: count- 
ing those who listen once a week to any program as part of the 
station's or network's circulation.* How can any network prove 
any kind of circulation, especially when any night of the week the 
audience can and does switch to any of four radio and as many TV 
nets? But to answer your question: An advertiser wouldn't and 
couldn't buy an entire network 24 hours a day seven days a week, 
but he does buy space in a magazine which reaches a known num- 
ber of people. 

LIFE CRITIC: The magazine reaches a known number of 
people, the network reaches a known number of people. You can't 
buy either. All you can buy is (a) a program — with a known 
audience, (b) an advertisement — with an unknown audience. 

Why don't the publications tell us something about (b) ? That's 
what we want to know. All right, (a) isn't a commercial audience 
necessarily — but it has a helluva-site better chance to be one than 
a magazine audience does! 

11. Q: Could a comparison then be made on a dollar basis? 
Instead of comparing a $2 million issue of Life with a $25,- 
000 radio show, you take the same amount of advertising 
money spent on both and compare audiences? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: You don't have to buy all of Life to 

reach its 60 million, six-issue audience. 

LIFE CRITIC: No? How else do you do it? You sure don't 
with a half-page black and white ad in each issue — do you? 

12. Q: Would you say Life's charts shotcing its accumu- 
lated audience for six issues but averaging the audiences of 
the four radio and fire TV shows were fair or misleading? 



•This adman Is behind the times NCS and SAM both list three rateeorifs of 
listeners in their coverage services ranging from those who listen once to Uiose wtio 
listen ever)' day— SPONSOR. 



FIFE SUPPORTER (after considerable discussion with 
agency's research director) : I think Life made a mistake here. I 
can't under-tand why they did this. 

LIFE CRITIC: I don't understand the question, nor the 
answer. Life averaged cumulative audiences. I can't see what's 
wrong with that, so long as they so labeled it. 

13. Q : Would you say that using three radio comedy slums 
on one network Sunday night and four TV variety shows 
among the nine surveyed punished the air media from the 
standpoint of audience accumulation? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: We've learned that block programing 
always builds audiences. 

LIFE CRITIC: Possibly right, in accordance with 12. It 
might have fur net accumulation-, hut probably not when the data 
are averaged. 

14. Q: Then what is your over-all opinion of the study? 

LIFE SUPPORTER: I'm glad Life and Politz did it. I 

wonder what the time peddlers will have to say about it! This is a 
great contribution to media evaluation. Note I didn't say media 
comparison. Life itself says comparisons are difficult and they 
aren't trying to make them. It's a good yardstick, but it's still just 
another yardstick. We got to make the decisions in the end on the 
basis of judgment and experience. 

One thing to remember is that TV ratings will soon start drop- 
ping. / Love Lucy is going down. TV is killing 'em fast. Alan 
Young is off. Where's Ed Wynn? Red Skelton is just holding his 
own. Benny's down in radio. What's going to happen when you 
open all those new TV 7 stations? The big ratings will be cut in 
half. I know. We got some of the biggest shows on the air. Wish 
we knew what's going to happen to them — even by next fall. I'll 
bet you Lucy won't be fir-t. 

As for the Life study, I think it's great! 

LIFE CRITIC: Well, on that score, I guess we're all in 
agreement. It's "a great contribution for media evaluation (not) 
media comparison." That's an important distinction which my 
protagonist finally makes. 

For one medium a certain type of measurement is provided for a 
few top shows. For the other, another type of measurement is pro- 
vided for the entire medium. It may sound at a casual glance that 
an advantage is given radio and TV because their top properties 
were studied. However, this measurement was not compared with 
an average measurement for the publications, but wi;h a total mea- 
surement for the publications. 

Hence, the advantage, if any, is seen to be not with radio and 
T\ . at all, but with the publications. (Exaclly what the contribu- 
tion of using a recall measurement instead of a recognition measure- 
ment for radio and TV, I don't think any one really knows. With 
the recall measurement, some people may have forgotten listening; 
— while others, partially through a "halo effect" favoring top shows, 
may have erroneously claimed listening.) 

Yes, it's a fine study. But the measures are not comparable, and, 
Life would establish itself as a medium among media — with enor- 
mous courage and stalwart statesmanship — if they would come 
right out and say so themselves! 



LIFE Publisher 
Andrew HeishelVs 
statement to 
SPONSOR: 



This study represents the best efforts of the Alfred Politz 
organization and of LIFE to bring to advertisers and agencies 
further facts and figures with regard to the potential markets 
available to manufacturers. The thinking, logic, and the methods 
used are self-explanatory and will be available to the advertising 
community in general next month when the full report is 
published. The study has received an extremely high degree 
of approval from objective experts in the research and media 
fields. We trust that it will be of real use to advertisers 
and we also believe that it shows the respective, though 
different, strengths of the various media examined. 




38 



SPONSOR 







«io^ v :,;; ^ ^llT^t^ 






KLZ-TV goes on the air this autumn with the 
largest, most completely equipped operation in 
the Denver area ... a modern TV Center com- 
prising 34,000 square feet of expertly planned 
floor space. TV antenna will rise 2380 feet 
above Denver. Important, too, is the experience 
and know-how which has given KLZ-Radio a 
distinguished record for creative programming 
and public service. This, expanded to our TV 

operation, will place 
KLZ-TV in a domi- 
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ing CBS Television 
and Top Local Pro- 
grams to bring imme- 
diate audience ac- 
ceptance for Channel 
7 advertisers. 






CHANNEL 



rj T\I 



CBS TELEVISION 




-yepu^ 



President and General Monager 




DENVER 



ON THE AIR ABOUT NOVEMBER 1ST 



ALADDIN RADIO AND TELEVISION, INC 

Represented far '*»* *o*r A . 



13 JULY 1953 



39 



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ON THE AIR 



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u 



Chart covers halt-hour syndicated film programs 



Rink 


Past* 
rank 


Shows among top 20 in 10 or more markets 
Period: 1-7 May 1953 

TITLE. SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 


Average 
rating 


7-STATION 
MARKETS 


4-STATION 
MARKETS 


3-STATION MARKETS 




N.Y. L.A. 


Chi. Wash. 


Atlanta Bait. Cine. Clrve. Columbus Det. Philt 


I 2 


Favorite Story. Ziv (D) 


23.2 


72.0 8.9 

wnbt kttv 
10:30pm 8:30pm 


7 7.6 70.8 

wbbm-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 


74.8 23.3 20.3 20.5 8.8 

wrpo-tv wewe wbns-tv wjbk-tv wpti 
8:30pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 9:30pm TOOpi 


2 


', 


Cisco Kid, Ziv (W) 


23.0 


70.2 72.2 

mbt keca-tv 
7:00pm 7:00pm 


73.6 72.2 

wbkb wnbw 
2:00pm 6:30pm 


77.8 22.3 28.5 24.5 78.8 78.8 27.0 

waga-tv whal-tv wcpo-tv wnbk wbns-tv wiyz-tv urau-n 
6:00pm 7:00pm 5:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm " OOpc 


3 


3 


1Mm.ii <& Costello, MCA, TCA (C) 


22.1 


76.2 

wrbs-tv 
10:30pm 


72.2 

wnbw 
10:30pm 


73.0 20.0 7 7.8 7 7.5 

wmar-tv wlwt wlw-r wxyz-tv 
10:30pm 8:30pm in 9:00pra 


4 


7 


Foreign Intrigue, JWT, Shel. Reynolds (A) 


21.5 


78.4 75.4 

wnbl knbh 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


7 7.0 77.6 

wbkb wnbw 
10:00pm 10:30pm 


22.8 20.8 75.3 76.6 

wkrc-tv wews wjbk-tv wrau-t< 
8:30pm 10:00pm 10:00pm 10:00pi 


1 
5 4 


Hopalong Cassidy, NBC Film (W) 


21.0 


77.7 73.4 

wnbt kttv 
6:30pm 7:00pm 


73.6 70.4 

wbkb wnbw 
3:00pm 1:30pm 


73.3 76.3 77.3 75.8 79.8 74.5 20.0 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wlw-t wnbk wbns-tv wwj-tv wpu 
5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 12:00n 5:30pra - 


6 4 


Range Riders. CBS Film, Flying "A" (W) 


20.7 


7.5 70.0 

wabc-tv knxt 
6:15pm 7:00pm 


2.4 70.8 

wnbq wtop-tv 
2:00pm 1:30pm 


7 7.3 23.8 76.6 

wsb-tv wews wptz 
5:30pm 6:00pm 6 OOpc 


! 


Roston Rlackie, Ziv (M) 


19.4 


6.4 7 7.4 

wabd knbh 
9:30pm 8:00pm 


20.4 9.8 

WRn-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 8:30pm 


78.8 30.3 77.8 25.3 76.5 72.8 

wbal-tv wlw-t wews wbns-tv wxyz-tv wcau-tt 
10:30pm 7:30pm 10:30pm 8:30pm 9:00pm 7:00pn: 


7 f e 


Kit Carson, MCA, Revue Prod. (W) 


19.4 


73.4 

keca-tv 
7:30pm 


72.6 

wbkb 
2:30pm 


7 7.8 72.3 72.8 79.5 7 7.5 79.8 

wlw-a wmar-tv wnoR wbns-tv wjbk-ti 
6:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:00pm 6:30pa 


8 1 9 

1 


Willi Rill Rickok. W. Broidy (W) 


18.9 


8.9 7 7.2 

wabd ktla 
7:00pm 6:00pm 


72.0 74.8 

wbkb wtop-tv 
1:30pm 1:00pm 


78.5 77.8 79.3 74.5 25.8 9.8 26.8 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wkrc-tv wnbk wbns-tv wxyz-tv wpu 
5:30pm 7:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 5:30pm 6:30pn 


9 | 10 

1 


Superman, MPTV, R. Maxwell (K) 


17.6 


5.9 72.4 

wabc-tv kera-tv 
6:l.">pm 8:30pm 


76.8 7.0 

wbkb wmal-tv 
7:30pm 6:00pm 


70.3 76.8 7 7.3 75.3 76.3 70.8 75.4 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wkrc-tv wnbk wbns-tv wxyz-tv wcaa-ti 
5 :30pm 7 :00pm 5 :30pm 6 :00pm 6 :00pm 5 :30pm 7 :00pn 



Shows among top 20 in 4 or more markets (ranking omitted) 


Chevron Theatre, MCA, Revue Prod. (D) 


22.7 


70.9 

kttv 
7:30pm 




13.5 

wsb-tv 
10:30pm 


Hollywood Off Reat. United TV Programs (D) 


22.4 






76.8 74.0 

wkrc-tv wxel 
8:00pm 6:15pm 


Hank IHcCtme, Video Pictures (C) 


22.3 


2.3 

klac-tv 
7:00pm 






China Smith. PSI-TV. Tableau (A) 


21.5 


74.7 

keea-tv 

8:30pm 


6.2 

wttg 
9:30pm 


78.8 72.8 9.3 

wnbk wbns-tv wxyz-tv 
10:30pm 8:30pm 8:00pm 


March of Time, March of Time (Doc.) 


21.4 


4.2 4.7 

wnbt kttv 
7 :00pm 7 :30pm 


4.6 

wbkb 
8:00pm 




Gene Autry, CBS Film (W) 


20.8 


9.7 

knxt 
7:00pm 




23.5 74.8 

wews wjbk 
7:00pm 6:00pm 


Doug. Fairbanks Presents, NBC Film (D) 


20.4 


76.7 

wnbt 
10:30nm 


70.2 

wgn tv 
9:30pm 


79.5 

wwj-tv 
9:30pm 


The Unexpected, Ziv (D) 


19.4 


3.2 

keca-tv 
10:00pm 


79.6 

wbbm-tv 
9:30pm 


74.8 74.0 

waga-ti wews 
10:30pm 10:00pm 


75.0 

wcau-tr 
10:30prr 


I Am the Law. MCA, Cosman Productions (D) 


17.2 


3.2 4.4 

wabd klac-tv 
10:30pm 8:00pm 


9.0 

wtlg 
10:30pm 


74.5 75.3 

Wbal-tV WAV7 tv 

10:30pm 9:00pm 


75.0 

wpU 
10:30p* 


Heart of the City, United TV Programs (D) 


16.G 


4.9 

kttv | 
10:30pm 


8.6 

wbkb 
12:00o 


72.8 

wxyz-tv 

9:30pm 


Show type symbols. (A) adventure; (CI m,,ly; in, drama; (Doc.) documentary; (] 
<M> mystery; (W) western Films lilted are syndicated, half-hour length broa, 
or more of above markets The average rating Is an unweighted average of indiv 

. 42 A new chart w 


<) kid show; 
cast in four 
iiu.il market 

ill appc 


ratines listed 
While network 

they run. this 

>ar in the 


bove Klank indi 
Bhoivs are fairly 
is true to much 

27 July is 


rates film not broadcast in this maikel as of 1-7 May 1953. I 
stable from one month to anather. in the markets in whicb 
esser extent with syndirattd *hows This should be borne ir 

sue SPONSOR 



io n 



ilSlUDWS 



specially made for TV 



~s 



Ptm 


2STATION 


MARKETS 


I- STATION 


MARKETS 


8lrm 


Boat. 


Dayton 


Mplt 


Buffalo 


N.» Or 


Srattlo 


St. LmiIi 


'0.3 




21.8 


75.3 


23.8 




52.5 


54.3 


46.0 






wna<- tv 
10:30pm 


whin iv 
10:00pm 


9:00pm 




wdlil-t? 
9:30pm 


klnul? 




12.8 


33.5 


23.0 




12.5 


47.0 


29.0 


46.5 






wltri- tv 


6:00pm 




11 :iOim 


7 :00pm 


5:00pm 


kind IT 

7 .1 in 










79.5 


78.3 


47.5 




50.8 




7.8 






wlw-d 
8:30pm 


ksip IT 

26 


10:30pm 




klPK-lT 

!> :30pm 






20.3 






56.5 




27.0 






irnar-tv 

10:30pm 








wdsu-IT 
8:30pm 




ksd-tT 
ll :00pm 


•6.5 




20.3 


77.5 


22.3 


27.5 


45.0 


42.8 


30.5 






1 nil,,,,, 


*. 00pm 




wben-tT 

11 :30am 


Wdsll-K 

1 :30pm 


k'nu-IT 
7:00pm 


ksd-tr 
9:30am 


'4.5 




25 

ul>- ll 

1 :00pm 




23.5 

• 




52 5 

wdsu-t? 
5 00pm 


408 

klng-tT 
: Ipm 








27.8 

■nae-tv 

7 :00pm 


25.8 
trblo rt 


29.0 

9:30pm 










•so 


24 


JO. 5 


76.3 






43.5 




38.0 


ll.tprr. 


6:30pm 


wnac-tv 
5:30pm 


wlw-d 
5:00pm 






wdsu-tv 
2:00pm 




kid tv 
2:30pm 


3.0 


20 3 


10.5 


77.3 


79.3 


24.5 


47.5 


26.3 


32.5 




■ afm tv 
■: 00pm 


wnar-tT 
3 :00pm 


win l 
5:00pm 


wrro-tv 
7:30pm 


wben-t? 
1 :00pm 


wdsu-tv 
2:30pm 


klnsr-IT 
5:00pm 


ksd-K 
12:00n 


75.5 


17.3 


77.5 




76.3 


46.5 


30.0 


26.8 


31.5 




wafm-tv 
h OOpa 


wnac-l? 
6 :30pm 




kstp-tv 
6:30pm 


when -It 
7:00pm 


5 :00pra 


klnc IT 
5:00pm 


ksd-u 
5 :30pm 



















7.0 




49.5 

klng-tv 
9 :30pm 


5.0 

tO-tT 

'i :30pm 


21.5 

wbrc-tv 
9.00pm 




54.5 

wdsu-tv 
8:30pm 






'6.0 

30pm 


20.3 

wbrc-t? 
9:00pm 


50.5 

king IT 
5:30pm 


'3.3 

>>0pm 








57.0 

klng-tr 
9:30pm 


46.0 

ksd-tr 
10:00pm 






72.3 

vvnac-tv 
6:30pm 


20.3 

kSlp-tT 

9 :00pm 


55.5 

wben-tv 
9:30pm 






480 

ksd-tT 
9:30pm 


!2.0 

go-tr 
00pm 


26.5 

wafm tv 
8:00pm 


28.5 

king tv 
5:00pm 


11.5 

MVtT 

Hjai 




77.8 

wbz-tv 
10:30pm 


23.8 

kstp-tr 
S :30pm 


33.5 

ksd-tT 
10:30pm 








25.3 

WCTO-tV 

9:30pm 


43.8 

klnn-tT 
9:00pm 


15.3 

Itfai 




50.5 

TfdSU-tT 

5:30pm 


7.0 

JO-tT 

, :00pm 


7 7.0 

wbrc-tv 
1 8:30pm 


78.0 

wben-tv 
11:30pm 


53.5 

vrdSU-tT 

9:30pm 






1 mind w 


hen analyzing rating trend 
to last month's chart. 
playing onlj few of these 


from ont 

tMJ n 

markets a 


month to another In this 
larkets are covered In 
re not fully reflected In r» 


chart, 
chart. 




FEATURING 
35mm THREE CHANNEL 
INTERLOCK PROJECTION 



MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 



619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 6-0360 



New and upcoming television stations 



-Box Score- 



Total no. of U.S. stations on 
air, incl. Honolulu (as of 2 
July '53) IUU 

No. of markets covered 127 



No. of post-freeze CP's grant- 
ed (excluding 18 educational 
grants; as of 2 July '53) 
No. of grantees on air 
No. of TV homes in U.S. 



Per cent of all U.S. homes with 

TV sets (as of I May '53) .12.4% I 

Per cent of all homes in TV 
coverage areas (as of I May 
'53) 76.6% § 



384 

80 

23,»30,000§ 



I. \nv construction permits* 



CITY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 


channel! 

NO. 


DATE of 
GRANT 




21 


24 June 


KLZ-TV 


7 


26 June 





2 


1 July 


WVVW-T 


/ 35 


1 July 


KMBC-TV 


! 9 


24 June 


WHB-TV! 


9 


24 June 


WLBR-TV 


15 


26 June 




16 


24 June 




2 


1 July 
24 June 


WELI-TV 


59 





46 


26 June 


WTOC-TV 


11 


26 June 




19 


1 July 



ON-AIR 

TARGET 

DATE 



POWER (KW)' 



STATIONS 



VISUAL AURAL 



SETS IN 
MARKETt 



LICENSEE-OWNER 



ADDRESS & 
MANAGER 



Re i 
opf • 



Beckley, W. Va. 
Denver Colo. 

Fairbanks, Alaska 

Fairmont, W. Va. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Marshall, Tex. 
Midland, Tex. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Sacramento, Cal. 

Savannah, Ga. 
Utica, N. Y. 



19.5 9.77 NFA 

1 Nov. '53 316 158 2 119,000§ 

15.85 9.5 NFA 

17.4 8.7 NFA 
Sept. '53 316 158 1 298,633 
15 Aug. '53 316 158 1 298,633 
1 Oct. '54 92.8 50 NFA 

18.6 9.33 NFA 

10.5 5.25 NFA 
19.5 10.2 1 360,000 
207 107.7 NFA 

Feb. '54 258 129 NFA 

52.2 26.1 1 86,700§ 



Appalachian TV Corp. 
Aladdin Radio & TV. Inc. 

Kiggins &. Rollins 

Fairmont Bdcstg. Co 
Midland Bdcstg. Co. 
WHB Bdcstg. Co. 
Lebanon TV Corp. 

Marshall TV Corp 

Midcssa TV Co. 

Conn. Radio Foundation. 
Inc. 

John Poole Bdcstg. Co 

Savannah Bdcstg. Co. 
Richard H. Balch 



270 Park Ave.. 
N. Y. 

17th & Lincoln 
St. 
Hugh Terry 

841 Turquoise 
St.. San Die- 
go. Cal. 

119 Fairmont 
Ave. 

222 W. Ilth St. 
George Hlggins 

9th & Grand Ave. 
Don Davis 

S.'n 4. Cumber- 
land Sts. 
Lester P. Etter 
270 Park Ave., 
N. Y. 

Box 1385. Law- 
ton, Okla. 

221 Orange St. 
Richard Davis 

Securty Bldg.. 
Long Beach, 
Cal. 
Box 858 
Wm Knight. Jr. 

20 Whitesboro 
St. 



If. i%t'w stations on air* 






CITY & STATE 



Hutchinson, Kans. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Rome, Ga. 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



POWER (KW)" 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 
MARKETt 



LICENSEE-OWNER 



MANAGER 



KTVH 12 1 July 

KCTY 25 22 June 

WROM-TV 9 18 June 



19.2 9.6 CBS, DuM 
19.77 10.67 DuM 
32 16 DuM 



Howard O. Pe- 
terson 



1 45 000 Hutchinson TV, Inc. 

2 45,000 UHF Empire Coil Co. Herbert Mayer 
1 75 000 Coo$a Valle y Radio Co. Ed McKay 



HI 






Iff. Addentla to previous C.P. listings 



These changes and additions may be filled in on original chart of post- 
C.P.'s appearing in sponsor's 9 February issue, and in issues thene 



Camden, S. C, WACA-TV, ch. 14, target Jan. '54; gen. 

mgr., Tom Richards; est. sets in market, 20,000 
Cincinnati, Ohio, WCIN-TV, ch. 54, nat'l rep, Forjoe 
Davenport, la., ch. 36, new call KDIO 
Dayton, Ohio, WIFE, ch. 22, new target 15 Sep. '53 
Des Moines, la., ch. 17, new call KTLV 
Eureka, Cal., KIEM-~V, ch. 3, target I Sep. '53; to be 

CBS affil.; gen. mgr., John G. Bauriedel; nat'l rep, 

Blair TV 
Hampton-Norfolk, Va., WVEC-TV, ch. 15, new target 

19 Sep. '53; nat'l rep, William G. Rambeau 
Henderson, Ky., WEHT, ch. 50, new target Fall "53; 

nat'l rep, Meeker TV; pres. and gen. mgr., Hecht 

S. Lackey 



Honolulu, Hawaii, KONA, ch. II, new nat'l rep for 

spot sales, NBC Spot Sales 
Jacksonville, Fla., WJHP-TV, ch. 36, target Jan. '54; 

mgr., T. S. Gilchrist Jr.; est. sets in market, 

118,000 
Little Rock, Ark., KARK-TV, ch. 4, target Jan. '54; 

gen. mgr., T. K. Barton 
Medford, Ore., KBES-TV, ch. 5, new target 15 July 

'53; nat'l rep, Blair TV 
Meridian, Miss., WTOK-TV, ch. II, target 27 Sep. '53; 

est. sets in market, 5,000 
Minneapolis- St. Paul, Minn., WTCN-TV, ch. II, new 

target I Sep. '53; power 70 kw visual, 42 kw 



aural; nat'l rep, Blair TV; to be ABC affil 

sets, 360,000 
Pine Bluff, Ark., ch. 7, target late Sep. '53 

rep, Avery-Knodel 
Rockford, III., ch. 13, new call WREX-TV 
San Antonio, Tex., ch. 35, new call KALA 
San Diego, Cal., KFSD-TV, ch. 10, test target- 

August '53 
San Francisco, Cal., ch. 20, new call KBAY-TV 
San Juan, P. R., WKAQ-TV, ch. 2, commercial I' 

Feb. '54 
Wheeling, W. Va., WTRF-TV, ch. 7, target I No. 

new nat'l rep, Hollingbery; to be basic NBC 



•Both new C.P.'s and stations going on the air listed here are those which occurred between 
19 June and 2 July or on which information could be obtained in that period. Stations 
are considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. 

••Power of C.P.'s is that recorded in FCC applications and amendments of individual grantees, 
tlnformation on the number of sets in markets where not designated as being from NBC 
Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed approximate. 
{Data from NBC Research and Planning. Set figures as of 1 April 1953. Where UHF is 
not specified set figures are VHF. In box score, total TV homes figure is as of 1 May. 
Percentages on homes with sets and homes in TV coverage areas are considered approximate. 

44 



rln most cases the representative of a radio station which is granted a C.P. also ; 
sents the new TV operation. Since at presstime it is generally too early to confir 
representations of most grantees, SPONSOR will henceforth list the reps of Hie I 
stations in this column. 

^These reps have already confirmed their representation of the new TV stations. 
NFA: No figures available at press time on the number of sets in the market. 
JShared-time grant. The two Kansas City grantees will share time and facilities, bu 
maintain separate studios. 

SPONSOR 



KPTV IN OREGON PROUDLY ANNOUNCES THAT IT IS NOW A BASIC NBC AFFILIATE' 



KPTV, Oregon's television pioneer and the 
world's first commercial Ultra High Fre- 
quency station, now serves 100,000 set 
owners! Direct YOUR sales appeal to this 
SURE-FIRE MARKET! Complete merchan- 
dising and production facilities! Represent- 
ed nationally by NBC Spot Sales! Act now. 



«- 



KPTV 



IN PORTLAND 
WELCOMES 
ITS 
NEW 
SISTER 
STATION 
IN 

KANSAS CITY, 
MISSOURI 



-> 



KCTY 



Moving into the country's 17th market with 
TOP-RATED PROGRAMS! A Hooper Sur- 
vey before KCTY went on the air showed 
over 45,000 UHF sets in use in Kansas City! 
Cash in on this growing, responsive market! 
CONTACT AVERY-KNODEL NOW! 



WXEL, Cleveland ft KPTV, Portland KCTY, Kansas City 

Owned and Operated by Empire Coil Company, New Rochelle, New York 



Radio 



™d now a message ho»ouisjg« 



l>\ Hob Foreman 



M ti keeping with this issue, it has 
been suggested that I discuss what 
the '53-'54 fall season will, per- 
haps, hold for us in broadcast me- 
dia. Since memories are short and 
time is fleeting, the idea gives me 
little cause to worry. 

Therefore! This season ahead, 
I believe, in the words of John 
Keats will be one of both "mists 
and mellow fruitfulness." There 
is no doubt that many of our most 
mist-ifying problems will still be 
with us. Furthermore, correct use 
of these media will be fruitful for 
those engaged in them. 

In radio I look for even stronger 
sales appeal (to advertisers) of the 
late night and early morning hours 
— a far greater understanding of 
out-of-the-home listening and a 
much more accurate method of re- 
cording same. 

I believe, too, that radio, having 
taken the brunt of TV and most 
of the suffering so far from budget 
reallocations that TV has caused, 
will at last start to become more 
competitive with printed media. 
This is as it should be. 

There is no valid reason why so 
many advertising dollars that went 
into television had to come out of 
radio. Except for the historical 
fact that radio and TV are pri- 
marily delivered by the same fa- 
cilities, corporations, and talent, 
there is small justification for with- 
drawing automatically radio mon- 
ey to feed and clothe the new baby. 

Actually, the two media are now 
far easier to dovetail. Reaching 
non-TV homes by means of radio 
and reaching into TV homes via 
radio during the weakest TV view- 
ing hours should be comparatively 
simple to do now with most of the 
facts in and the patterns of view- 



ing fairly well established. So I 
look for more of this type of time- 
buying in the future. 

Some time ago, I recall, I pre- 
dicted in these austere pages that 
a great deal of TV-plus-radio net- 
work buying would be done in a 
way that radio coverage would sup- 
plement rather than duplicate tele- 
vision coverage. To date I've been 
pretty wrong. Advertisers aren't 
doing this except with spot radio, 
mainly because the networks them- 
selves haven't packaged a radio- 
TV time buy as yet. Evidently they 
still feel they are able to hold 
enough radio billing without so 
doing. (For another view on this 
subject see Network Radio section. ) 

As was obvious even a year ago 
the future of daytime TV is grow- 
ing brighter — and the very early 
morning hours of broadcasting, 
long successful for local radio op- 
erators, have gone over big in TV. 
I refer primarily to that slow start- 
er which is today one of NBC's 
most profitable ventures — Dave 
Garroway's Today program. This 
program, I'm sure, will be sold out 
by fall thus evoking perhaps ARC 
or CBS competition. 

Another phenomenon of this past 
year, the soap opera, seems to have 
given up the ghost pretty well. 
NBC does however seem to be out 
to revive it. CBS helped kill the 
T^V soap opera rather neatly with 
its lower cost and more popular 
audience shows, loosely formated 
talent wing-dings and "just-visit- 
in' " programing. 

This season brings us more evi- 
dence that a personality who dom- 
inates a program and does the sell- 
ing is the medium's most success- 
ful commercial approach. For one, 
I relish this. In fact. I revel in it. 



Also I feel somewhat vindicated in 
looking back on the many high- 
priced radio stars I've dealt with 
who refused even to mention a 
sponsor's name. A pox on these! 

Unfortunately, it is fairly tough 
to develop a super salesman-en- 
tertainer. But there will in the 
weeks ahead be new ones who will 
assuredly get their chance — and 
since exposure breeds familiarity 
and familiarity breeds confidence, 
we'll see some good new faces and 
sales results. For example, I'll 
wager someone will latch on to 
Mike and Buff Wallace and some- 
one will discover a disk jockey or 
two working on other-than-N. Y.- 
and-L.A.-stations, thus finding new 
folks of the caliber of Garry 
Moore, Garroway, and others. 

There will still be with us those 
"big names" who believe that mere 
mention of a product name coming 
from their lips is enough to cause 
cash registers to jingle. And there 
will still be those who insist that 
their own copy ideas are far sound- 
er than what the agency dishes up 
— this fodder turning out to be 
their own brand of nit-witticism 
and Hollywood-scripted funnies. 
This "copy" some advertisers will 
discover, to their dismay, is a poor 
substitute for a down-to-earth, ba- 
sic reason-why theme. To the per- 
petrators of tomorrow's brand of 
this sappery I suggest a course in 
Godfrey with special note paid to 
what Mr. G does to the verbiage 
but not the theme — with studied at- 
tention to how he tells his audience 
about the briskness of the tea and 
the garden vegetables in the soup 
and the medical report on the to- 
bacco and the three kinds of hair 
and three best types of curlers. 
i Please turn to pope 50) 



Do you always agree with Bob 
Foreman when he lauds or 
lambasts a commercial? Bob 
and the editors of SPONSOR 
would be happy to receive 
and print comments from 
readers in rebuttal; in ire; in 
qualified agreement. Address 
Bob Foreman, c/o SPONSOR. 
40 East 49 St. 



46 



SPONSOR 



• 



T. V. story board 

A column ipontored by DIM <»/ thr trading film /irtxltirrrt in iWrinmii 

S \ II It \ 



NEW YORK 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO )6 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




In the latesi I \ spots !<>i Luck) sh ik< . Sarra again amuses, amazi t, and 
with sioj) motion. I" Lucky's conga theme song, trademark-disk] lm< up, 
parade and 'boul fact to show "L.S M I I then dissolve into dam 
cigarettes followed i>\ a solo nun <>i the "teai down' t< il \ surprise twisi 
introduces .1 Bash <>l live action with a mil emerging horn the trademark 
bull's-eye to drive home the silts message. Produced b) s\KK\ [01 tin 
American robacco Company through Batten, Barton, Durstini i Osbom 

IlK. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 







There's tievei a let-down when Eight telecasts sinii into East-paced 1\ com 
mercials made for I'al>st l>\ Sarra. I Ik transition to the viewer's 1 
experience ol spoits activit) Followed b) relaxation with a glass ol l >« * 1 is 
made with explosive cartoon shots. \ catch) theme song leads him to 
"WHAT'LL YOU II \\ l in giani letters and the answer, "Pabsi 'Blu< 
Ribbon' Beer!" The knock-oui sales punch comes with "Sm-oo-thei 
Sm-oo-ther" appearing against a beei glass as th« oo's enlarge and turn into 
winking eyes. Fun and haul sell 1 n .\uA b) S UsR \ loi Pabsi Sales Company, 
through Warwick & Legler, Inc 

SARRA. Iiu. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




In a series ol 1\ spots just completed Ibi Salada l<i. Sarra establishea 
identity with a novel device. . . to the tick-tock rhythm of th< "Tea rime" 

theme song a pendulum wipes in, wipes oui tea making and serving situations 
and the Salada package. Animation tells th< ston ol "high mown'' it as with 
mountains and a close-up t>l tea leaves silhouetted against a rising moon \ 
reprise of the pendulum, glasses and the package gets over the s.dt- 
with dramatic impact. Produced b) SARRA foi Hermon W. Stevens \% 
and the Salada Tea Company 

SARRA, Inc. 

York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



THIS IS THE 







NANCY AEA 

Secretary to General Manager; 

island-born, graduate Kameha- 

meha Girls' School; Oregon 

State 



RONNIE MIYAHIRA 

Chief Engineer. Born and raised 
in Hawaii. Schooled in Cali- 
fornia and Washington, D. C 
12 years in radio. 



JACK BURNETT 
General Manager since 1948. Oldest 
in point of service of any Radio Station 
General Manager in Honolulu Person- 
ally supervises all National Sales. 




MARKET - PROGRAMMING -- PRODUTI 

IS NOT BORN ¥■' 

It Comes From Tireless At 



With key employees drawn from the talented islanders for 
station employees, KULA insures stability of operations . . . gu i 
loyal employee tenure. A cosmopolitan staff — Just as the 
Personnel — No wonder they all try to copy KULA. Truly ki 



JACK IRVINE 
Local Sales Manager, thor- 
oughly versed in all phases of 
merchandising. 






GORDON THOMPSON 

Transmitter Supervisor. 2-year 

residence in the territory. 



PAUL YAMAMOTO 
Merchandising and Promo- 
tional Manager, born and raised 
in Hawaii; graduate University 
of Hawaii, '50; employed 
since 1950. 



GORDON BURKE 
Chief Announcer, news editor, 
and sports director; formerly 
with ABC and Mutual. Resi- 
dent of Hawaii for over thirty 
years. Entered radio '37. 



MOST POWER - BIGGEST AUDIENCE - FINEST STAi 



UNA 



STATION 






M. YANO 
A istant Treasurer, born on 
jl of Hawaii, now in third 
a of service. Educated in 
Hawaii and California 

ihandising ■■ 
iroup 



DANNY KAWAKAMI 
Tape Editor employed since 
1949, reared and educated 
in Hawaii 



HAROLD SAKODA 

Director of Japanese Language 

Program, with KULA since 

1947 



KNOWLEDGE 



i! stent Work and Study 



lengths of service surpass those of all other 
■ng first-class service that comes only from 
)'iopolitan — Properly balanced with Mainland 
I To Serve Hawaii? 








I 



TED SCOTT 
Director of Production and Operations 
Employed since 50. Originally with 
I ABC on Pacific Coast 



MUNEO HAMADA 
Traffic Manager, born on is- 
land of Maui, graduate Univer- 
sity of Hawaii, '51, with 
KULA since 1950 



FAUSTINO A. RESPICIO 

Resident of Hawaii for over 20 

years, conducts Filipino Fiesta 

Program, which he originated 

in 1946. 




T H E 
POPULAR 
STATION 



■MOST SALES AIDS - THAT'S KULA 



OF HONOLULU 




THE NO. 



STATION 



IN RICH NEW YORK STATE'S 
SECOND LARGEST MARKET 

NBC RADIO BASIC IN BUFFALO 

Get the full story from HENRY I. Christal — New York -Chicago -San Francisco 



BUFFALO EVENING NEWS STATION 



KFELTV 



,.: ' 



AMERICA'S Fl RST 
post-freeze TV station 

ONE 






M 



EME O'FALLON 

General Manager 

KFEL-TV's transmitter site lo- 
cated atop Lookout Mountain 



year old July 18 

*T Operating on Channel 2 
on 56,500 watts 

X Application for 100,000 
watts filed June 15, 1953 

X 150,362 TV sets in Colorado 
as of June 1, 1953. (source: 
Rocky Mountain Electrical 
League) 

Represented by BLAIR TV 

KFEL'TV t 

CHANNEL 

NBC duMont 







DENVER 



As to whether film is going fur- 
ther than live or not as far in '53- 
'54, who can say? Good shows, if 
one can afford them, are going to 
he sold on film or live. Film to- 
day offers top quality. That's no 
longer a problem. Kinescopes are 
pretty good too now. The pattern 
of film reruns and so on has heen 
fairly firmly estahlished. 

As for the ever-present problem 
of the high price of living with TV, 
I honestly believe we've hit a ceil- 
ing at last. Both time and talent 
should not go up. The advent of 
ABC in the picture can only help 
give the stars and their time slots 
cause to worry. Nobody needs 
many more stations than they'll be 
able to reach by 1954. Or he can 
bicycle his show around to reach 
them if and when more exi-t. 

The copy departments of agen- 
cies have at last solved the mys- 
teries of the non-stock iris and the 
soft-edge wipe while account rep- 
resentatives no longer retire to a 
tavern when they are faced with a 
request for a fine grain. 

Agency managements are I it 
seems) starting to consider tele- 
vision as here to stay and therefore 
look with less jaundiced eyes on 
the striplings that populate their 
respective TV departments. Those 
in the agencies and advertiser of- 
fices and stations who double in 
brass have regained their aplomb 
and their sleep. Nevertheless, bul- 
letins will still whip back and forth 
on burning questions such as "Is 
15% enough?"' Union difficulties 
will still cause the more aged mem- 
bers of the ad craft to take to the 
woods. But the guys with the real 
savvy at the top of the allied busi- 
nesses have, I suspect, actually 
come to love the intruder even if 
they won't admit it. And well they 
might because color or not. tele- 
\ i-ion i- the hottest little thing that 
business has even been offered. 

If American lui-inc— i- one- 
truth as good as its enviable rec- 
ord, the amazing new sales device 
available to it now is bound to un- 
cork a lot of new wonders in the 
year ahead. * * * 



50 



SPONSOR 



Toledo's "Billion Dollar Market 



il 




The area covered by WSPD (Radio and/or Tele- 
vision) encompasses 18 counties; 3 in Michigan 
and 15 in Northwestern Ohio. 

Population 1,161,200 
Families 348,000 
Radio Homes 339,060 
Percent tuned to WSPD-AM 
Daytime 56.8% 
Nighttime 48.6% 
Television Homes 226,000 
Percent tuned to WSPD-TV 
Daytime 78% 
Nighttime 91.5% 

EFFECTIVE BUYING POWER 

Total— $1,896,407,000 

Per Capita $1,633 

Per Family $5,449 

RETAIL SALES 

Total $1,310,208,000 

Per Family $3,764 

Spent For: 

Food $321,211,000 

Gen. Mdse. $128,461,000 

Furniture & Household — $67,725,000 

Automotive $251,294,000 

Drug $35,282,000 



Toledo's Metropolitan Area ranks high in the nation's 
leading areas — 

Toledo ranks 36th in total retail sales 

Toledo ranks 36th in food store sales 

Toledo ranks 35th in gen. mdse. store sales 

Toledo ranks 48th in apparel store sales 

Toledo ranks 38th in home furnishing sales 

Toledo ranks 31st in automotive store sales 

Toledo ranks 33rd in filling station sales 

Toledo ranks 50th in building material and hardware 

store sales. 
Toledo ranks 36th in drug store sales 

SPeeDy daily entertains the people whose buying 
habits account for Toledo's high rating. 

Authority for above listening and market information 

Sales Management's Survey of Buying Power, 
Standard Rate & Data Consumer Markets 
Neilsen Coverage Service 
NBC Research 



, AM -TV 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

Represented Nationally 
by K A T Z 







Stor«r fc-oadeoiftftfl Co«too«T 



13 JULY 1953 



51 




a forum on questions of current interest 
to air advertisers and their aqeneies 



What are the important radio and TV trends 



for air advertisers to tvateh 




Mr. Kc 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

The trend in TV 
and radio is the 
same as the trend 
in any other 
branch of busi- 
ness — getting the 
cost in sound re- 
lation to the re- 
sults. When the 
old crystal set 
first began to 
talk, people said, 
"Look, it talks!" When talking pic- 
tures first came out, they got goggle- 
eyed and exclaimed, "Look, they 
talk!" Today, even when a man from 
Mars starts talking nobody gets ex- 
cited. Everybody takes it as a mat- 
ter of course. 

And why not? This is the Atomic 
Age. So advertisers now realize they 
are not in the entertainment business 
— they're in the business of selling 
goods. And they are even finding out 
that it's one thing to have a great 
big audience, and another thing for the 
show to pay off. Their minds are on 
the arithmetic of it all. So you see 
some wonderfully entertaining shows 
fold up, while small-budget shows, even 
with low ratings, pay handsomely. 

When you buy a show you've simply 
hired a hall. You have bought an audi- 
ence. And what you pay and what you 
say will decide whether it's a good 
show from the standpoint of business. 

Another thing: The wonderful re- 
sults radio and TV have produced have 
made some new advertisers lose sight 
of one little word. And that word is 
time. Thev started out without reckon- 
ing that it takes time to establish a 
product. ... It never occurred to them 



that if they could knock out a 75-year- 
old competitor in 26 weeks, another 
advertiser could iollow right behind 
and knock them out in 26 weeks. 

And so they were caught in mid- 
stream — a good idea, but no more 
money to see it through. 

To sum it up: Ask your bookkeeper. 
Hell tell you how good your advertis- 
ing is. 

Joseph Katz 

President 

The Joseph Katz Co. 

Baltimore 



Television has 
taught us much 
in the past six 
years. In spite of 
criticisms from 
all sides it has 
managed to sur- 
pass radio in 
gross network 
billings; deliver 
larger audiences; 
and to keep its 
advertisers sold on the medium. 

The trends in television have made 
it necessary for radio to become more 
inventive and creative. In effect, ra- 
dio has had to "sell" radio for the 
first time. 

Television has made deep inroads in 
the evening broadcast audience. How- 
ever, radio is still doing prettv well in 
daytime serials, service programs, and 
news and music. Network program 
participations continue to make radio 
an effective selling force. 

On the other hand, television soon 
found that hour-long musical extrava- 
ganzas were not economical, i One 
notable exception was the recent one- 




Mr. Crider 



shot, two-hour Ford fiftieth anniver- 
sary show which used both NBC TV 
and CBS TV networks.) In 1950 there 
were eleven on the air. Today there 
are none. One or two have created 
half-hour adaptations. 

There has been a marked increase in 
the number of half-hour dramatic, mvs- 
tery, and situaiion-comedy television 
shows. Many of these programs have 
gone to film. In 1950 only one show in 
these three categories was on film. 
Currently, 50% are on film. 

Fewer advertisers are taking a hiat- 
us. Many advertisers are going right 
through the summer with their winter 
shows and finding that ratings don't 
always hit the cellar in the summer. 

Television networks have exploited 
the Saturday night audience and ex- 
ploded the radio theorv that you can't 
give time away on Saturdav night. 
The audience will be there any night if 
the programing is good. 

Wickliffe W. Crider 
V.P., Radio & TV Dir. 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 
New York 



Since TV is a 
very glamorous 
and comparative- 
lv new medium, 
it is natural that 
in a n y sponsors 
plunged into pro- 
grams without too 
much realistic in- 
vestigation of the 
possibilities o f 
profitable results. 
Apparently, some of the larger spon- 
sors who ordinarily test their advertis- 
ing results carefully bought programs 




Mr. Meyerhoff 



52 



SPONSOR 



primarily to create good will and to 
establish priorit) in the medium, since 

i e "I these programs could not I"- 

justified in tii in- oi possible results. 
I look for a more sei ioua evaluation 

ol programs, T\ ti , and Belling t<-< :h- 

niques; thai is, more attention will !»<• 
paid to whethei 01 not tin- program ap 
peals to the particular audience that 
ihe advertise] i- trj ing to rea< h and to 
whethei or not th«- program can be 
used profitably to -I'll tin- Bponsor'9 
merchandise. 

Personalities with a proven record 
of their >alrs abilit) should l»<- "ii the 
increase while the pure showman per- 
sonality who doesn't do a selling job 
should be <>n the decrease. I look for 
a trend tow aid the greater use of sell- 
ing personalities and more soundl) 
planned commercials. 

There is no question about the fact 
that the size of audience does not al- 
ways govern the volume of merchan- 
dise sold b) a radio or TV program. 
Some programs with relatively small 
audience- are known to do a bettei 
selling job than some of the more elab- 
orate programs with higher ratings. 

In years of exceptional]) good busi- 
ness, advertising results are not evalu- 
ated as carefully as they are under 
more normal conditions. With compe- 
tition for business becoming more 
keen. I am sure that radio and TV 
programs will lie selected on more 
soundly analyzed result possibilities. 

Arthur E. Mei erhoff 

President 

Arthur Meyerhoff & Co. 

Chicago 



Any questions? 

SPONSOR welcomes questions from 
readers for use in this feature. 
Suggested questions will be 

evaluated for their interest to 
other readers and. if found suit- 
able, will be submitted to the 
most appropriate authorities for 
answering. Topic in the 27 July 
issue will be: "The British Broad- 
casting Company offered free 
Coronation films and tapes to 
American broadcasters, provided 
no singing commercials were 
used. Do you think jingles are 
irritating or undignified?" An- 
swerers of the question will in- 
clude agency personnel, broad- 
casters, and jinglesmiths. 



D O YOU WAN T TO KNOW . . . 

* How sponsors evaluate media? 

* What radio or TV results you can expect? 

* How to keep TV costs in line? 

* What program types rate highest? 

* How to use radio/TV research? 



Read SPONSOR regularly and get the dollars and cents 
tacts you need. Use subscription order card 
bound in this issue for your convenience. 



SPONSOR 



The magazine radio and 
TV advertisers use 



40 EAST 49TH STREET, NEW YORK 17 




PULSE RATINGS 

that make Sponsors' 
hearts beat faster . . 



\\ BNS Radio has more lis- 
teners th.in any other ( cntr il 
Ohio Station . . . the 20 top- 
rated (Pulse) programs heard 
in this billion-dollar market 
are heard on sets steadih 
tuned in to W Ii\ v 

It's no wonder Central Ohioaru get the WBNS listening habit 

. . CBS headliners lack Benny, Arthur Godfrey, .Amos n Andy, 
Lux Radio Theatre, daytime serials, plus popular local talent, 
attract listeners . . keep them tuned in hour after J-. 

Check John Blair for Pulse ratings of WBNS programs — com- 
pare with any other Central Ohio station and learn why more 
sponsors buy time on the one BIG station with a BIG audience 
of steady listeners 



N BLAIR 



CBS for CENTRAL OHIO 




COLUMBUS, OHIO 



13 JULY 1953 



53 



r~-'~ 



?:■' 



I7TF 1 




Baltimore station's new booklet contains vital market data 



An attractive 64-page booklet, pre- 
pared by the Joseph Katz Co. of Balti- 
more and New York, for its client 
WITH, shows that Baltimore ranks sec- 
ond only to New York as a foreign 
trade port. The station says that there 
are 392,263 dwelling units of which 
55% are owner occupied; there are 
2,285 wholesale establishments with a 
total of 27,589 employees; 1,785 fac- 
tories with 170,062 employees; 15,327 
retail stores employing 77,954. Balti- 



more has, according to WITH, 1,200 
people per square mile and has had 
a population increase since 1940 of 
23.5'/' . The station claims that the 
1,365,500 Baltimoreans earn $2,069,- 
431,000, spend $1,413,332,000 on re- 
tail sales annually. 

Booklet was distributed at luncheon 
meeting for timebuyers. Hosts at the 
meeting were Tom Tinsley Jr., WITH 
president, and Robert C. (Jake) Em- 
bry, vice president. * * * 



KGiVC, ttita riffo, cited for business paper advertising 



The Award of Excellence for Busi- 
ness Paper Advertising Campaigns at 
the 22nd Annual Conference of the 
National Advertising Agency Network 
was handed to KGNC and KGNC-TV. 
The competition had 299 campaign 
entries of prominent national con- 
cerns by the 30 advertising agency 
network members. 

Prize-winning entry was prepared 
for Tom Kritser, general manager of 
the station, by Henry J. Kaufman & 
Associates, Washington, D. C, and ap- 



peared in sponsor during the first 
three months of 1953. Account execu- 
tive is Jeff Abel; campaign is written 
by Ted Mandelstam, copy chief of 
HJK&A. 

Entries were judged by a group of 
experts, headed by Prof. Lloyd D. Her- 
rold, Chairman, Department of Ad- 
vertising, Northwestern University. 
Awards were made at the Annual 
Agency Network Convention in session 
at the Broadmoor Hotel. Colorado 
Springs. * * * 



l.v|toiic»i of radio to be 
super market consultant 

Stanford C. Cohen, operator of the 
largest independent super market in 
Springfield, Mass., has joined the staff 
of McMahon & Morse, super market 
consultants in New York City, follow- 
ing his sale of Memorial Super Market 
to Growers Outlet, Inc. 

Cohen pioneered a children's radio 
program, created a civic character, 
"Stan the Grocery-Man," and around 
the show built unusual promotions that 
zoomed business and reputation. (See 
"Stan the Grocery-Man's tips on using 
radio," sponsor, 23 March 1953.) 

In his new capacity Cohen will spend 
most of his time in New England, pro- 
viding promotion counsel to leading 
independent super markets. * * * 

Pittsburgh TV outlet adds 
merchandising for sponsors 

Perhaps foreshadowing the day when 
it will be getting hot competition from 
new video stations, WDTV, Pittsburgh, 
has added a merchandising plan which, 
in its first few months of operation, has 
already had important results. 

Food chains, independent retailers, 
and Sun Drug Co. outlets have all par- 
ticipated in the plan to date. Two 
prominent displays at the new Greater 
Pittsburgh Airport and some 40 in- 
terchangeable window displays which 
are spotted in key locations such as 
banks, hotels and prominent stores are 
also being used. • * • 



Two KGNC ads won Award of Excellence for Business Paper Advertising. Ads appeared in SPONSOR early this year. Shown are Bud 
Thompson, National Sales Manager, KGNC-TV; Bob Watson, Station Manager, KGNC Radio: Tom Kritser, Gen. Manager, KGNC AM & TV 



LI •OtU> SUR II TOIT, 



f THE BAWL Of THE BELLE 



V 



KGNC ... 




54 



SPONSOR 



Krtel'lii • . • 

For her eflorta in behali oi die 
> ( holarship Fund oi the Hartford \i t 
^. hool, Mai joi ie Mills, well-know n 
\, « I ngland radio personality . re 
, eived .i i itation from tin- president of 
tli,- .hi » hool. Wise Mill-, who also re- 
cent!) received a citation from the 
Lynn Chamber "I Commerce, is heard 
dail) over the New England Regional 

Network. 

• • • 

Timebuyers in New York and Chi- 
cago went oil for theii weekends re- 
centl) gayl) bedecked in colorful fresh 
(iii orchid leis which were Sown in 
from Hawaii. Flowers were the gift of 
radio station K(il and l\ Btation 
Ki'\\. Honolulu, which arc celebrat- 
ing appointment of NBC Spot Sales 
.1- their sales representatives. 
» » • 

For the second time in a row. the 
Junior Vchievemenl Radio Co., spon- 
sored l>\ Radio Station K.KYI). Min- 
neapolis, lia> won first place in com- 
petition with all other J A Radio Com- 
panies in the I .S. Junior Achievement 
i- the national, non-profit organiza- 
tion which i- supported !>\ local bus- 

ss, indu-tr\. labor, and education 
lor the purpose of giving high school 
students practical experience and train- 
mi: which will help them take their 
place in the economic life of America. 

• • * 

I In lexas Co. signed up for 17 news 
and sports program per week via 
W TAM, Cleveland, in behalf of the 
Texaco dealers of northern Ohio. Par- 
ticipating in the signing of the one- 
vear contract were Hamilton Shea. 
general manager of W'l'AM, and Wil- 
liam Dix. station sales manager; rep- 
resenting Texaco were ad manager 
Donald W. Stewart and Kudner ac- 
> ount exec Gerard Johnston. 

• » » 

Before putting into effect its decision 
to discontinue the broadcast of night 
baseball games. WIBG-FM, Philadel- 
phia, checked its listeners to see if 
they d object. The announcement was 
made three times a night for two 
Bights. Result: Dirty looks from the 
mailman and almost k,400 letters and 
telegrams from indignant listener-. 
Station, which concentrates on Store- 
cast programs of "Music to Ru\ B\ " 
during the da\. was pleased to find a 
good indication of the size of its bo- 
nus home audience — advertisers pa) 
for in-store audience only. 



WTRY 



ALBANY 

TROY 

SCHENECTADY 



One of the N.ition'i 
Finest St.it/ons 



Introdui < i 

Another Personality Whose I .<<< al Sin 1 1 
Contributes to the Continuing Strength <>t Radio 

This is Forrest Willis 

1 lis d til) hour and i half bi 
W 1 m are list< ned to b) I I 

audience in the 8-station AJban) I 
Schenectady area. Hi^ sponsors: Tobin Packing 
Co., John G. Myei I I . irtment Store, Gordon 
1.. Hayes Appliances ... Ml nationally re, 
nized leaders. II tl and public 

service success st »ries are fabulous. 1 I 
collected over $60,000.00 For the March I 
Dimes, i Forrest is one of VVTRY's man} 
-tars who hold the irea's largest aud ind 

who sell . . . all day long. 



WTRY 



CBS— 5000 WATTS 

Represented by 
HEADLEY-REED CO 



m 




r3 JULY 1953 



55 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S IJOUtee/l RADIO STATION 



WABJ ... Roanoke's LARGE 

ECONOMY SIZE 

Whether YOU use NIELSEN or 
SAMS, you'll find WDBJ's daily 
audience DOUBLE the second sta- 
tion's—at LESS than 20% more 
cost! 

WDBJ's Nielsen and SAMS re- 
ports are now available from your 
nearest Free & Peters Colonel, or 
from the station. 

Compare — then call — Free & Peters! 







**#£'£f- 



Established 1924 • CBS Since 1929 
AM • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS • 94.9 MC 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



1931 1953 

Twenty-two years 

of 

Successful 

Selling 



figL^iL.J'- ' _-_ ~r- ~" ~ ' — 



76* /tnt TKotfo State*** 



Cnn0W 



•KGVo-KRnn 



5000 Wattt 250 W«tt» 

Night II Day Night & Day 
MISSOULA ANACONDA 
BUTTE 



MONTANA 

THE TREASURE STATE OF THE 48 

Representatives: 

Gill Pcrna, Inc. 
N. Y., Chi., LA., and S.F. 



WANT TO SELL 
CANADA? 

One radio station 

covers 40% of 

Canada's retail 

sales 



CFRB 

TORONTO 

50,000 WATTS, 1010 K.C. 

CFRB covers over 1/5 the homes in 
Canada, covers the market area that 
accounts for 40% of the retail sales. 
That makes CFRB your No. 1 buy in 
Canada's No. 1 market. 



REPRESENTATIVES 
United States: Adam J. Young Jr., Incorporated 
Canada: All-Canada Radio Facilities, limited 



LIFEBUOY 

l Continued from page 35) 

Sister, Lifebuoy's only participation in 
the afternoon soap block, featured 30- 
second singing commercials in 1949. 

From 1949 through 1951, despite the 
ever-rising sales curve for toilet soap, 
Lifebuoy was still slipping. Over-all 
toilet soap sales at this time were 
mounting as follows: 1949— $143,120.- 
000; 1950 -- $142,090,000; 1951 — 
$153,500,000. The trend to super mar- 
ket selling was not a factor in Life- 
buoy's sales problems for a two-fold 
reason: ll) Lifebuoy had satisfactory 
super market distribution, as well as 
Lever Bros.' concerted merchandising 
and in-store display efforts to support 
it in its fight for choice shelf space; 
(2) the bulk of toilet soap sales still 
was made in drug stores. 

The year 1952 marked the turning 
point in Lifebuoy's 58-year-old history. 
The soap was tested with a new for- 
mula. Puralin, a new ingredient, was 
added to Lifebuoy, giving it both long- 
er-lasting anti-B.0. properties and a 
fresher odor. By June 1953, Lifebuoy 
could boast that the medicinal odor 
was gone for good. Lifebuoy was also 
repackaged. After its face-lifting, the 
soap took to the air. 

Says Warren Fales, Lifebuoy's as- 
sistant brand ad manager: "Our 1952 
effort brought about what the 1941 
campaign had failed to do: a very 
substantial sales boost." SPONSOR 
places this sales increase between 15 
and 20%, bringing Lifebuoy to num- 
ber six spot in the toilet soap industry. 

In 1952. prior to Lifebuoy's direct 
appeal to women, a Good Housekeeping 
Consumer Panel of 1,830 respondents 
placed Lifebuoy ninth on the prefer- 
ence list, with its competitors lined up 
as follows: Ivory Soap — 18.7% Dial 
Soap— 16.7%; Lux— 13.1% Camay— 
13%; Palmolive— 12.7% ; Sweetheart 
Soap — 10.3%; Cashmere Bouquet — 
6.9%; Woodburv— 6.7% : Lifebuoy— 
4.3%; Wrisley— 3.5%. 

Today Lifebuoy is banking heavily 
upon its dramatic switch from a health 
soap to a cosmetic soap, hoping that 
its 1953 advertising campaign will 
bring it further along in its bid to re- 
gain status as number one toilet soap. 

The interpretation other sponsors 
can put on the Lifebuoy approach is 
this: \\ hen your product loses ground, 
it may be wise not only to change it 
but admit to consumers that it wasn't 
up to par. * * * 



56 



SPONSOR 



HARRISBURG 

. . . A Hooper Natural! 



"/ 




THE KEY STATIONS OF THE KEYSTONE STATE 

\ / 



CBS 



Nationally represented by / 
With more than 66.000 TV sols in its m irk«M area, sol sales continue at record level. 



c»»»»> 

>»»»A 



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•viv.v 

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V V V 




saw 






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Mf + « 







• • • •••••• 

v»v«v«v»v 






.• .• .• 



• • 



• • • 

•'•V "•"•' 






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•* !•!•' "*^" ^^ ^^.^X ^ ^.^ ~ ^~ •* ^~ ^* *" 






;' 



1 



NBC's coverage tops all other networks 

The television network which can deliver the most markets and, therefore, 

the widest coverage is most in demand by advertisers today. 

NBC is that network. Day and ni^cht, the average NBC program is carried by a 

larger number of "stations, covering more television homes than any other network. 



NIGHTTIME 


NBC 


NETWORK =2 


NETWORK 


-3 


NETWORK 4 


AVERAGE NUMBER OF STATIONS 


54 


42 


31 




21 


COVERAGE U.S. TV HOMES 


86.2% 


75.1% 


66.1% 




503% 




DAYTIME 


NBC 


NETWORK 2 


NETWORK 


-3 


NETWORK "4 


AVERAGE NUMBER OF STATIONS 


51 


43 


* 




* 


COVERAGE U. S. TV HOMES 


87.3% 


80.5% 









Compared to the No. 2 network, NBC's average program reaches 12 more marl 
at night and 8 more markets during the day. It covers 11.1 | more of the total 
television market at night; ti.S' '< more by day. 

Superiority of coverage is just one reason why NBC is America's No. 1 network. 

Next week . . . further proof. 

NBC's Audience Advantage is to Your Advantage . . . Use It. 



• • • • • • • 

»♦•♦•♦ ♦•♦•♦•♦ ♦•♦;♦; 

•»•••♦ .•♦•♦., .".•♦■ 






wr 



a service of Rad 



io Corporation of America 




TELEVISION 



sources: Nielsen Television Index, .January-April, t9S 

NOTE: The accuracy of the above data has been verified by tiu A.C. »npany 

*Xo comparable daytime network sen-ice 



EVEN H AN NJB A L WATCHES 
,,,.■1 




For information on what to buy 
and where to buy it, people 
in Hannibal watch WHEN and 
then shop the Syracuse Market. 



J>.J 






Hannibal, N. Y., in the Syra- 
cuse shopping area, is only 
one community in the rich 
26-county market covered ex- 
clusively by WHEN. This heart 
of the Empire State is made 
up of more than 2V* million 
people with a high, stable 
buying income — all potential 
purchasers of your clients' 
products. You get complete 
and exclusive coverage of this 
important upstate New York 
market with its high spend- 
ability only over WHEN. 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 





agency profile 



Showalter m 'Bud" Lynvh 

President 
Showalter Lynch Adv. Portland 



If you re an angler with an e\e out for trout, don't pa>s through 
Portland without stopping by to see Showalter "'Bud" Lynch. Rea- 
son? This denizen of the Northwest, for one. is an expert with the 
fasting rod: He knows where to find fish and how to hook era, 

When Bud isn't holding forth on the one that got away, he's apt 
to be talking radio. As continuity writer, originator of program 
packages, account executive, agenc) v. p. in charge of radio, and 
finally president of his own Oregon agency, Bud's been a radio 
enthusiast for over 20 years. 

Bud's apt to get his Irish up might) last o\er what he calls the 
"termite technique'" of radio performers and salesmen. Sa; s he: 
"There is nothing wrong with radio except the people in it. Radio 
through the \ears has been its own worst enemy. It is the only ad- 
vertising medium — with the possible exception of television — where 
measurement of whether a show is good or bad depends on whether 
you or your friends are participating in it. or whether it is on your 
particular network or station.'' 

His faith in the medium has been proven time and time again with 
his own agency's success with radio. Recently, for example. Sho- 
walter Lynch bought a saturation schedule on two local stations for 
two days to plug a department store's week-long storewide sale. 

As a result of the radio advertising, the store's president reported, 
all departments showed increases over the pre\ ious year's first day 
of sales, and shoppers came in stead) crowds all day long. 

Bud's TV clients include the \pplianre Wholesalers, sponsors of 
what was probably the first live T\ show in Portland. Knox Manning 
Netvs. The show is telecast on a network of 12 stations. 

Born 48 years ago in Kansas, Bud entered advertising directly 
after graduation from Whitmore College in Walla Walla. Wash., 
doing promotion work and merchandising for the Portland Oregon- 
ian. The pattern for his future was determined when he was as- 
signed to do promotion work for the Oregonian s radio station. KGW. 
Bud then launched his own radio program package production outfit 
in Portland. t\ing in with Mac W ilkins. Cole & Weber agenc) (then 
Mac W ilkin> \ Cole I . Joining the asencx a- an account executive, he 
worked up to v. p. in charge of radio for Portland and Seattle. In 
1942. Bud's own agenc\ was born. * * * 



60 



SPONSOR 



m PITTSBURGH 




Li 



spells 

SALES 1 



len you sell to Pittsburgh you sell to the 
nation's sixth largest metropolitan market. 
An industrial area whose manufactures top 
those of 37 states. 

When you sell to Pittsburgh, you tap the retail 
buying power of 6Va million people. 

And you w/7/ sell to Pittsburgh, day or night, 
on Pittsburgh's first television station — 
Du Mont's WDTV! 

Watching WDTV is a daily pleasure with 
half a million Pittsburgh homes. 

WDTV programs are geared to Pittsburgh 
people, Pittsburgh habits, Pittsburgh tastes. 

So beam your Pittsburgh sales efforts straight 
to success — on Channel 2 — WDTV! 
First and salesmost in Pittsburgh! 



Pittsburgh's fyi/ibt Television Station 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BLDG., PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 

Owned and Operated by ALLEN B. DU MONT LABORATORIES, INC. 
HAROLD C. LUND, General Manager 



13 JULY 1953 



6' 



11 



NEW YORK CITY'S 

Sales Specialists 

No. 1 rated audience shows, 
hacked with intensive merchandis- 
ing, moves your merchandise FAST 
on WWRL where your sales story 
"gets through" to: 

1. Millions of Foreign- 
Language Listeners 

2. America's No. 1 
Negro Market 

WWRL effectively sells your product 
to New York's millions of foreign-lan- 
guage listeners in their native tongue. 
Each group a "big market'' worth going 
after with a special campaign ... or to 
add extra, profitable sales to your over- 
all New York campaign. 

WWRL sells New York foreign-Ian 
guage listeners in: 

SPANISH 

German Creek Hungarian 

Czechoslovak Polish Syrian 

Ukranian Lithuanian Russian 

WW'RL has more Spanish-Puerto 
Rican listeners than all New York sta- 
tions — network or independent — COM- 
BINED, according to Pulse Reports. 

WWRL 
New York's No. 1 
Station for America's 
No. 1 Negro Market 

WWRL has a larger audience in the 
1,001,371 New York Negro Market than 
any other station — network or inde- 
pendent — according to Pulse Reports. 

Discover today why more and more 
national advertisers are u ing WWRL's 
great Negro audience shows to out- 
sell all competition. 

Remember, New York's Negro popu- 
lation exceeds the entire population of 
Pittsburgh, Boston, St. Louis or San 
Francisco. 

Write or call today for Pulse 
Reports on Negro and Foreign- 
Language Markets. 

WWRL, Woodside 77, N. Y. 
DEfender 5-1600 

IN NEW YORK CITY 
at 5,000 WATTS 



1TO1 




*FTi 






Lawrence \Y. Bruff, advertising manager, 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., announced the 
thrice-weekly Perry Como CBS TV show will be 
taped and aired on 500 MBS stations this fall. This 
follows the Chesterfield pattern of using programs 
in both air media (Godfrey, Dragnet, baseball). In- 
dications are that the trend to tape the sound track 
of TV shows is increasing. Current users of 
technique include: Admiral (Bishop Sheen), Coca- 
Cola (Eddie Fisher), Lorillard (Two for the Money), 
DeSoto (Groucho Marx), Colgate (Strike It Rich). 



Robert E. Kintner, president, American 
Broadcasting Co., disclosed signing of deal with 
the Motion Picture Association of America under 
which MPAA will film series called Holly- 
wood Parade. Program will feature highlight 
excerpts from current top-flight screen attrac- 
tions. Said Kintner to sponsor: "This is 
another example of ABC's policy of developing 
new programs as opposed to the practice of 
raiding other netivorks for talent — a tactic 
that costs sponsors more money in the end." 



Arthur C. Nielsen, president of A. C. Nielsen 
Co., recently brought joy to many an industry 
heart with his announcement that a revised and 
improved National Nielsen Radio Index Service is 
ready to go. Heart of the new service is the 
"Multiple-Receiver Metering Audimeter" which will 
measure the activity of as many as four radio and 
TV receivers in a home simultaneously, thus giving 
a fuller report of multiple-set listening. New plan 
also calls lor reporting of network radio listening 
tour weeks each month, instead of two as at present. 



James .1. Ilahoney, formerly with ABC, is 
the new Director of Station Relations at Lennen & 
Newell. His first task is clearing time for Herb 
Shriner's Two for the Money and Fred Allen's 
Judge For Yourself, both for P. Lorillard Co. 
Thinking at the agency is that a man spending time 
individually on tough stations {one- or two-station 
markets) can get belter clearances than a network 
which has many clients to service. Jim was at ABC 
for three years, at Mutual for seven. He has a 
market and research and TV film background. 



62 



I 



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13 JULY 1953 




63 



STORER 
LEADS 




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Mailings to retailers, jobbers, brokers, wholesalers etc. 

Newspaper advertisements 

On-the-air promotions 

Sales meetings for dealers, jobbers, distributor salesmen 

Car cards 

Client follow-up reports 

Promotion consultation service 

Window streamers 

House organs 

Sales bulletins 

Illuminated billboards 

Ads in drug and grocery publications 

Personal appearances by station personalities 

Easel displays 

Use of products on give-away shows 

Booths at fairs 

Sampling 

Airplane towing 



* For further details contact your nearest Storer office 




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118 East 57 Street, New York 22. Eldorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago 1. FRonklin 2-4498 



Some Facts Interest Time Buyers 

More Than Others 



We figure a time buyer is more interested in 
salary than in the size of Big Aggie Land (WNAX's 

eountrypolitan market spread over Minnesota, 
the Dakotas, Nebraska, and Iowa). Nevertheless, the 

653,500* families of Big Aggie Land have an 
effective buying income of $2,918,419,000.* In 80% 

of their homes, WNAX-570 is heard 3 to 7 times 

a week. These data are actually pertinent to the salary 

question — WNAX-570 promotions have a way 

of leading to promotions. 

*Sales Management data. 





WNAX-570 
Yankton-Sioux City 

A Cowles Station • CBS Radio 

Represented by the The Katx Agency, 

which tee for further data. 



66 



SPONSOR 



BJp SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 



network 
radio 



CLIENTS WILL FIND FLEXIBLE BUYS, STABLE RATES 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

(| a \\ hut is the fall outlook for network ratlio? /»«?/«' M 

|l a II ow do advertisers feel about network radio? P"!l*' Ml 

\^ u How does the /.'>.">'» radio network audience compare in size with 1952? /»«?/«' M 

y. What is the extettt of national out-of-homc listening? I*""*' '»'- c > 

|^. How hare the "tandem" plans been doina? !»«?/<' ~- 

\\. Specifically, how can network merchnndisinu help an advertiser? V""*' 74 

(J. ffoir flexible icill nettvorks he this fall? !»«?/'• 7« 

(| a is it worthwhile for a radio network advertiser to hu-pass T\ markets? pane 78 

||. \\ hen will the new Nielsen multi-set ratinas he available? »»«?/<* SO 

13 JULY 1953 67 



Fall outlook 

Q What is the fall outlook for 
network radio? 

A. The networks seem very optimis- 
tic, despite the rapid growth in new TV 
stations. For one thing, there isn't the 
uncertainty and confusion about rates 
that existed last year at this time. Ad- 
vertisers were seeking guarantees on 
lower rates which the networks couldn I 
5ive and, hence, were holding off buy- 
ing. This year the networks contem- 
plate no rate changes. 

The networks are armed with more 
data on out-of-home listening and the 
expectation that network ratings will 
go up when the new Nielsen multi-set 
sample begins to affect audience mea- 
surement. 

Billings have shown an upward 
trend. Both NBC and CBS report that 
billings during the first half of 1953 
are ahead of the corresponding period 
last year. Mutual's billings have been 
climbing, too. Its 1952 figure was 
nearly 30% above 1950. As for day- 
time, both NBC and CBS expect to be 
sold out during daytime hours. 



Q. How do advertisers feel about 
network radio? 

A. To get some idea of how radio's 
big advertisers feel about it, sponsor 
contacted a dozen of the top AM net- 
work clients asking about their fall 
plans and their feelings about network 
radio. In onlv one case did an adver- 



tiser say he felt network radio was less 
effective than last year. 

This advertiser. Ralston Purina. 
which happens to be one of the most 
active, il m>i the mosl active client in 
farm spot radio, was referring specifi- 
cally to Saturday night, when Ralston 
sponsors Eddj Arnold on NBC. G. \I. 
Philpott, Ralston v. p.. told SPONSOR, 
however, that while Ralston salesmen 
feel that nighttime radio is less effec- 
tive for them than last fall, Ralston will 
continue the Eddy Arnold show. 

Here are some other answers: 

• From Oliver B. Capelle. advertis- 
ing manager for Miles Laboratories: 
"Our television efforts have not re- 
duced our radio coverage." 

• From Lowry H. Crites. director of 
media and radio and television pro- 
graming for General Mills: "Obvious- 
ly, we believe network radio is still 
valuable as we are continuing to invest 
substantial sums in it." 

Other evidence of the advertiser's 
firm belief in network radio comes 
from Broadcast Advertising Bureau's 
1 June 1953 newsletter. It cited cases 
of five advertisers who spent more 
money (according to P.I.B.) in net- 
work radio during the second half of 
1952 than the first half. They are ( 1 I 
Cannon Mills with gross time billings 
of $184,106 during the second half of 
1952 compared with $91,260 during 
the first half; (2) Emerson Drug with 
$162,065. compared with $49,341; (3) 
Manhattan Soap with $736,566 com- 
pared with $688,093: 14) Motorola 



with »l T0.562 compared with $24,450, 
and ( o i Seeman Bros, with $410,463 
compared with $258,200. 



Network audiences 



Q. What kind of cumulative au- 
dience can the advertiser get on 
network radio? 

A. A stud\ of da\time soap operas 
by the Broadcast Advertising Bureau 
this year shows that the average rad.o 
daytime serial can reach 20' < of all 
families in a market in four weeks' 
time. Each family is reached an aver- 
age of 5.8 times, and exposed to 15.7 
sales messages. These figures are de- 
veloped from Nielsen data. 

A BAB study last year, also based 
on Nielsen data, dug into cumulative 
audiences for nighttime news programs 
in TV markets. Here are the answers 
for the average evening network quar- 
ter-hour newscast aired five times a 
week: (1) In a week, newscasts reach 
9.8 /V of all families an average of two 
times each. (2) In a month, they reach 
20.7^r of all families an average of 
4.4 times each. I 3 I In 13 weeks, they 
reach 37.4 r < of all families an aver- 
age of 8.7 times each with 23.5 sales 
messages per family. 



Q. How does the 1953 network 
audience compare in size with 
1952? 

A. Ratings are down a little but the 



NEW PROGRAMING for fall includes ABC's "Horatio Hornblower" 
with Michael Redgrave. Program was developed from the network's 
showcase — "ABC Playhouse" — and produced by Towers of London 



PROGRAM COSTS will be cut by General Foods, who bought "Beu- 
lah" on CBS Radio three times a week, will re-run transcriptions of 
show. Re-runs will feature the late Hattie McDaniel, who died last year 




See list of top 10 available shows on each network, page 85 



SPONSOR 



I 



TOTAL PERSON-HOURS SPENT PER WEEK 



RADIO 



TELEVISION 



MAGAZINES 



NEWSPAPERS 



NRI, December 1952 data, and audience composition data, ARB, February 1951 

NTI, December 1952 data, and audience composition data, ARB TV, November 1952 

330,330,000 
ARB nationwide study, August 1951, protected to US population estimate. January 1953 

632,957,000 
ARB nationwide study, August 1951, projected to US population estimate. January 1953. 



1.678.fc3?.0O0 



RADiO GETS LARGEST SHARE of time people spend with major 
media, according to CBS study shown above. Radio's share, in terms 
of person-hours per week, is 1 .720.286.0C0 person-hours, or 40%. Yet, 



study points out. according to McCann-Erickson figures, of the total 
money spent in 1952 on those four media by •ovartiMrt, which cam* 
to $4,375,400,000. radio required only $722,700,003 or abo^ 



actual audience reduction is smaller 
because there are more sets and more 
people in the country. Here arc Borne 
recent Nielsen comparisons showing 
the average rating and audience for 
both daytime and nighttime. I he com- 
parisons cover the week ending 9 Ma\ 
1953 \s. the week ending 10 Ma\ 1952: 

• Average night rating, 1.1 vs. 4.9. 

• Average evening audience. 1,969,- 
000 vs. 2,097,000. 

• Average day rating, 3.5 \s. 3.7. 

• Average daytime audience, I,- 
566,000 vs. 1,584,000. 



Out-of-home listening 

Q. What information is there on 
out-of-home listening to network 



radio programs available today? 
A. I here are do ape ifi figures on 
particular programs but there have 
been a numbei "I studies indi< ating the 
amount "I out-of-home listening on a 
broad scale. \KB has done a diar) 

study, proje table to the entin n- 

try. Pulse does studies on out-of- 
home listening in majoi n arkets. 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau has 
studied the amount ol auto listening 
among cars on the road and is now re- 
fining these figures so the) can !><• re- 
lated in terms of actual traffic <>n the 
road. Mel-en has recently released 
figures on total out-of-home listening 
in the I . >.. regions of the I . S. and 
in the various states. ITiese figures 
should add to average radio ratings of 
virtual!) ever) pro-ram. 



Q. Has there been any noticeable 
trend in out-of-homc listening? 
A. I 'ill-.- out-of-home figures sb< 
stead) increase since L950. Vvers 
..I additional radio sets-in-uae f«>i more 
than a dozen large markets n<- a- fol- 
low-: 1950-51, l 1.7 : 1951 
15.2^5 : L952 13, 18.6 ["heat 

ares covei winter listening, not Bum- 
mei . 1 he 1953 listening bonus rai 
from 12. 3* I of home listening in S 
tie to 21.7', in Philadelphia. 

Radio l?a-i< - in tlii- issue. I 



Q. What is the extent of nation- 
al out-of-home listening? 
A. According t" Nielsen figures, <\f- 
veloped from, a sub-sample of the mar- 



TANDEM-TYPE plans are popular with advertisers. MBS' five Multi- 
Message Plan shows, including "That Hammer Guy," De'ow, have been 
sold out. Sponsor overflow is taken care of with other programs 



BLOCK PROGRAMING trend is increasing in network radio, though 
it has always been a potent force. NBC s 13-year-old music block on 
Monday nights, including "Telephone Hour." will continue in fall 




13 JULY 1953 Xettvork radio program Cotnparagraph appvars this Issue page H!t 



69 



keting firm's coverage study in April 
1952, the average national out-of-home 
listening bonus in terms of individual 
listeners is practically 12% of home 
listening during the week and nearly 
15% on weekends. 



Q. During what hours of the day 
is out-of-home listening highest? 

A. The biggest non-home audiences 
according to Nielsen are during the 
afternoon with 3:00-4:00 p.m. being 
the peak listening hour, during both 
weekdays and weekends. This mid- 
afternoon bulge is more pronounced 
on weekends when Saturday and Sun- 
day drivers are out in force. During 
the 3:00-4:00 p.m. period on weekends, 
total non-home listening is 31.5% of 
home listening, while auto listeners 
amount to 23% of home listeners. Dur- 
ing the weekday 3:00-4:00 p.m. seg- 
ment, the total non-home figure is 
25.1% of home listening with auto lis- 
tening about half of that. BAB's study 
of auto listening among cars on the 
road found that listening was highest 
7:00-8:00 a.m. during both weekdays 
and weekends. 



Q. Is there much variation in 
non-home listening among differ- 
ent sections of the country? 

A. Yes. Nielsen divided the U. S. 
into five sections: Northeast, East Cen- 
tral, West Central, South and Pacific. 
It was found, for example, that during 
the 6:00-7:00 a.m. period the percent- 



age of non-home to home listening 
ranged from a low of 9.7% to a high 
of 22.7%; during the noon-l:00 p.m. 
time the low was 10.1%, the high was 
10. V, : during the 11:00 p.m. to mid- 
night slot the low was 6A f 'f, the high 
12.0',. 

Regional variations also disclose 
that the Northeast, on the average, has 
the greatest amount of non-home lis- 
tening during the week and just misses 
being in first place on weekends, when 
it is a shade below the East Central 
U. S. However, on weekends, the 
Northeast has the greatest amount of 
auto listening. 

The Pacific states show the least 
amount of total non-home listening, 
although their percentage of auto lis- 
tening to total non-home listening is 
higher than the average. 

Regional differences will be impor- 
tant to regional network advertisers or 
to national network advertisers with 
regional cut-ins. 



Q. How can a network advertiser 
apply the Nielsen non-home listen- 
ing figures to his Nielsen rating? 

A. He can't, not directly, anyway. 
But he can make some educated 
guesses. Before discussing how, here's 
just a few words of explanation. The 
Nielsen non-home figures are not per- 
centage points. That is, if the Nielsen 
home audience for a program is 10% 
and the non-home figure during that 
hour is 10%, the total audience is not 
20% but 10% of 10'; or 11%. The 



non-home audience is a percent of the 
home audience. 

Also, in using the Nielsen home and 
non-home data, the advertiser must re- 
member that NRI ratings are in terms 
of homes, while the non-home figures 
are in terms of per6ons. To compare 
the two in terms of total home and 
non-home listening, Nielsen has used 
\arious estimates on the number of 
home listeners per set. These estimates 
range from 1.5 to 2.25 persons per set 
depending on the hour of the day. The 
nighttime figures are naturally higher 
than the daytime figures. 

To get back to the problem of how 
to add the non-home data to home 
listening, let's take a specific case — 
P&G, for example. It has a block of 
four soap operas on NBC radio be- 
tween 3:00 and 4:00 p.m. during the 
week. Nielsen figures show that dur- 
ing that time there is an additional 
audience bonus (or, at least, there was 
in April 1952) equal to about 25 % of 
the home audience. Can P&G be sure 
that this additional audience is listen- 
ing to its soapers? 

First, of all, it can be assumed 
roughly that every radio show on the 
air at that time increases its audience 
on the average by one-fourth. But 
P&G cannot be sure that the non-home 
audience divides its listening in the 
same way as the home audience. Half 
of this non-home audience happens to 
be in automobiles during that hour and 
auto listeners are not supposed to be so 
keen about concentrating on drama 
(Please turn to page 72) 



Average production and talent costs of 
sponsored network radio shows 

DAYTIME 



QUARTER HOUR* 



$2,229 $3,353 



HALF HOUR 



HOUR 



NIGHTTIME 



QUARTER HOUR | HALF HOUR 



$2,295 | $5,152 $15,000 

•These quarter-hour shows include weekly soap operas whose cost brings the 
average production and talent cost up considerably. 



HOUR 



Top 10 agencies in number of quarter 
hours of programs on network radio* 



RANK 



AGENCY 



NO. QUARTER HOURS 



1. BENTON & BOWLES 

2. DANCER-FITZGERALDSAMPLE 

3. YOUNG & Rl'BICAM 

4. WILLIAM ESTY _ 

5. FOOTE, CONE & BELDING 

B. NEEDHAM, LOUS & BRORBY... 

7. GEOFFREY WADE _ 

8. COMPTON 

9. BBDO _ 

9. JOHN F. MiRRAY ADVG. 



37 
34 
32 
30 
28 
27 
24 
21 
IB 
IB 



"Number of sponsored quarter hours does not necessarily Indicate supremacy in 
billings. It's measure of activity. 



Average no, of stations in network lineup, daytime: 222 • Average no. of stations in network lineup, nighttime: 220 

Source: All of these data were tabulated from SPONSOR'S Network Radio Comparagraph of 29 /une 7953. This 
chart giving essential data on net radio shows appears in alternate SPONSOR issues. Chart appears this issue page 89. 



70 



SPONSOR 




REPEAT 



rr 



SUCCESS STORY" 

20th ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

starring 

ORIGINAL CAST 



-^ H. V. Holmes, president of S. G. 
Holmes & Sons, clothiers, Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

■^ R. P. (Bud) Akin, senior account ex- 
ecutive, the KTUL Sales Staff. 



This oft-repeated scene has become a tradition 
between Clothier H. V. Holmes and KTUL Ac- 
count Executive R. P. (Bud) Akin. For the 20th 
consecutive year, these two men have swapped 
signatures on KTUL advertising contracts. The 
satisfaction is obviously mutual. S. G. Holmes 
& Sons, sponsors the 5 o'clock News, 
Mon. thru Fri., on KTUL. 



KTUL Offers 

Advertisers 

A Tradition of 

Confidence Based 

on Years of 

Consistent 

RESULTS 



KTUL has MORE LOCAL PROGRAM SPONSORS than any OTHER TULSA 
network radio station. 

LOCAL ACCEPTANCE is the "GRASS ROOTS" TEST of a Radio Station's 
SELLING POWER! 

Get the KTUL story from your nearest AVERY-KNODEL, Inc., office. 



CBS 




RADIO 



7U 

AUDIENCE 
3AC»ONr 

STATION^ 

JOHN ESAU — Vice President — General Manager 

AFFILIATE ith KFPW, FORT SMITH, Ark, and KOMA, OKLAHOMA CITY 



Network 



13 JULY 1953 



71 



while driving. Furthermore, male lis- 
tening dominates that period, accord- 
ing to Nielsen, so that's another strike 
against P&G. On the other hand, CBS 
also has a block of soap operas on dur- 
ing that hour, so maybe it's not so had 
after all. 

In other words, the advertiser has to 
add or subtract a little in his own mind 
when using these Nielsen figures. One 
advertiser may get more than the aver- 
age, another less. The advertiser must 
take into account the audience, the 
program, the attentiveness of listening 



and the season of the year (is there a 
baseball game on at the time?). Niel- 
sen used April for the survey because 
it represents "approximately the an- 
nual average of home radio listening." 

Q. How will these studies on 
non-home listening affect network 
radio advertising? 

A. A good bit of the information on 
non-home listening has pointed up auto 
listening and, what amounts to the 
same thing, the high percent of adult 
males in the non-home audience. The 



for quick, easy reference 
to your copies of 

SPONSOR 

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networks, all of whom are using non- 
home listening material in one way or 
another to sell radio, feel that the facts 
call for a revision of thinking among 
advertisers who appeal to the male 
market, especially as regards their at- 
titude toward daytime radio, when 
non-home listening is highest. These 
advertisers include auto manufactur- 
ers, refiners of gas and oil, brewers, 
tobaceo and smoking accessory firms 
and others. 



'Tandem' plans 



'tandem" 



Q. How have the 
plans been doing? 

A. Pretty well. Mutual's new Multi- 
Message Plan, which replaced the 
Mutual-MGM Hollywood star show- 
case in January, ended up the spring 
season sold out. It offers 20 partici- 
pations, four commercials on five 
shows. It is so popular now that Mu- 
tual is offering Multi-Message Plan 
prices ($1,500 per participation dur- 
ing the summer) on non-M-M-P shows 
over the hot months. 

CBS' Power Plan, which is aimed 
at late-in-the-week shoppers with 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday pro- 
grams, started off slow last fall but 
picked up this year and ended the sea- 
son practically sold out. Six of its 
nine segments, furthermore, are sold 
out through the vear. 

NBC's Operation Tandem (NBC 
started the network package idea, hence 
the generic term, "tandem") was sold 
out for part of the season, and two- 
thirds sold out during the rest of the 
time. ABC's Pyramid attracted nary a 
sponsor during the past season. The 
network's explanation was that ABC 
sponsors found other buys more at- 
tractive for their purposes. 

Q. What kinds of advertisers use 
"tandem" plans? 

A. All kinds. Mutual's cbents in- 
clude Camel. General Mills, Bromo 
Seltzer, Jacques Kreisler, Lever. Both 
Bromo-Seltzer and Lever, a recent 
member of the Multi-Message Plan 
client roster, have, in addition bought 
into Titus Wood) and \ id, (barter, re- 
spectively. CBS has P&G, Bryl Creme, 
and Nescafe through August, and 
Chesterfield was ira for a short burst 
earlv last season. Operation Tandem 
clients include Emerson Drug, Bromo 
Seltzer, Esquire Boot Polish, Buick. 



11 



SPONSOR 



r~ 



if a watt looked like this 




and there were 




of them 








/ / 

YOU'D HAVE THE GREATEST COVERAGE POSSIBLE IN A 5-STATE REGION 



// / / / 


/ / / 1 


\ \ \ 


\ \\\ 


\ 


and in the Detroit Area that's what you get with 


r M U T U A L J m 


v A 




TV 





He 



RATE OF AN 



ST A 



^ 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Rep. 



J. E. Campeau 
President 



Guardian Bldg. — Detroit 26 



13 JULY 1953 



73 



and a new client i- already signed up 
for tlif fall The Coleman Go., makers 
of space heaters. 

Q. What kind of buys will be 
available on "tandem" plans in the 
fall? 

A. So far as availabilities go, CBS 
ma\ have one bu) of three participa- 
tions across-the-board, M5C may have 
two. It is not definite whether ABC 
will have a Pyramid Plan in the fall, 
hut the web is considering offering 
daytime buys alonjj the same line as its 



Pyramid Plan. Mutual mav he sold 
out hut will probably add show- that 
can be bought on the same terms as 
Multi-Message Plan shows. 

The tandem-type plans tan he rough- 
ly divided into two kinds. CBS and 
NBC, each of which will have three 
-li>>\\- next fall, usually require a cli- 
ent to huv one participation in each 
show, although there have been excep- 
tion-. CBS. for example, has eight of 
nine announcements sold for the sum- 
mer and an advertiser can buy one. 
However, this one segment will he suh- 
ject to recapture in the event Nescafe, 




Leo J. ("Frtz") Fitzpatrick 
I. R. ("Ike") Lounsberry 



BROADCASTING 
CORPORATION 

RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 



which now has two participations, does 
not continue after August and another 
advertiser signs up for three announce- 
ments across the hoard. CBS and NBC 
also require a full network. 

Mutual and ABC will sell one an- 
nouncement. However, discounts are 
given for bigger purchases. Both of 
these nets also have five-show packages. 
I hev are more flexible than CBS and 
NBC in the matter of network lineups. 
Mutual has sold split networks hut one 
of the clients I Sauer I bought the en- 
tire plan in the South. 



Merchandising' 



National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc 



74 



Q. What kind of merchandising 
aid is offered by radio networks to 
clients? 

A. It varies. NBC, onlv network with 
a separate merchandising department, 
has 12 district supervisors who cover 
the country for NBC clients visiting 
kev retailers and wholesalers, clients' 
district sales offices, station affiliates. 
CBS merchandising spills over into 
program promotion. The network holds 
yearlv clinics with station managers 
and promotion managers to go over 
plans for the coming year. It also hits 
hard with CBS radio ads in retail trade 
papers, which not only push radio hut 
list CBS clients. Mutual holds special 
retail promotions for sponsors selling 
to super markets. Last year one was 
"Look Mom — It's a Picnic!" Last 
February it was "Wife Week. 

All networks will send out dealer 
mailings and print display material at 
cost. NBC. for example, has special 
point-of-sale material for its client- 
products with art work playing up the 
glamor of network programing. The 
nets also work at getting affiliates to 
cooperate and act as coordinators for 
network merchandising and program 
promotion. 

Q. Specifically, how can network 
radio merchandising help an adver- 
tiser? 

A. One example is the wav NBC 
helped Phillips Toothpaste break into 
the super markets last yeason. Selling 
to super markets was something new to 
Phillips" salesmen. When NBC waa 
called in. its merchandising men decid- 
ed to use as a lever Phillips current 
retail deal of two tubes for 63£. NBC 
district supervisors during 00 da\> of 
activitv saw 1 1 7 important drug whole- 

SPONSOR 



i 



DIXON HAIMI 
WIS fo*m Nems O.'.-ic./ 
1*0* l«»«rol f«<J'l O" ••• 

I . • iwacH o> nai/o 

if« o ' Utu S'af* 




CARL NEUMANN 
Acting Farm Program D"»i 
for. Plant and coordinate 
all farm programming 
former County Agent 
Graduate of Oklahoma 
AIM 



a/wt 





DAVE SWANSON 
Manogmr, Chicago Produc 
•rj Allocation. On» o' lh« 
ocif informed m*n on /!»•■ 
llocl mort»ling. Broodcai'l 
mo'ltll r«9ulo'l)' on WIS 



is no mere accident 



WLS farm programs are planned and presented by men 
and women who have spent a lifetime studying the 
problems of agriculture — know just what times are best 
for reaching the market — know just what types of programs 
are needed and wanted. A few of these specialists are 
pictured on this page — all exclusively WLS broadcasters. 

Thru years of service to the vast agricultural industry by 
these and other station-specialists, WLS has emerged 
as the undisputed leader in the Midwest. No mere accident- 
hut the result of planned programming and service by 
the largest informed agricultural staff in radio. 

• . . Se/u/tce Uvat Belli 

This agricultural leadership has solid commercial value. 
The over 4 billion dollar farm income (ll 1 :' '< of the 
nation's total) can be most profitably tapped by the 50,0(M) 
watt voice of WLS. That is why leading national and 
regional advertisers have consistently used WLS to sell the 
1,777,000 farm people whose econorm is completely 
wrapped up in agriculture. 

When thinking of the Midwest, think of WLS for effective 
coverage of this important agricultural market. Ask your 
Blair man for a complete presentation telling the 
storv of WLS and the Midwest Rural Market. 



EAR CHANNEL Home of the NATIONAL Barn Dance 




BILL MORRISSEr 
A market specialist for 30 
years. Veteran expert from 
the Chicago Union S'oci 
Vordi. Broadcasts markets 

regularly on WIS. 




WILLIAM SMAll 

In n««ipop«' ond rod'O 
jOw'no'<l« Groduo'* 
Un.wrt'ty of Ch.fOfO 



(h 




IAl*H TOMI 
AlIOC'OU id'to* o 
|n(t fd 'Of ft 
f»pe*t in t-eld of opicw' 
turol ..per, mentation 
Travelled ■ 
throughout world studying 
international lor m con 



d'tiont 



JIM THOMSON 
Monagmg fd'fo'. Pro^r-e 
former formerly held |IJH 
ilar iob vffAj State fo'm 
Bureau Magoi<ne O'odu 
ate of the Un.»» 
lfl.no>! 



£• 




PAUL JOHNSON 

M fd'io* teg 
ulor WIS commentator 
Helps formulate WIS form 
po'iCf Nationally retog 
n>t*d as ow'i'o«d «9 fo"« 
ovtho* *y 



Source CONSUMER MARKETS.. 1952-53 

BMB Study No 2 — 25-100*- penetration 



890 KILOCYCLES, SO. 000 WATTS, AIC NETWORK- REPRESS MTEO 



CHICAGO 7 



JOHN liili t COMPANY 



The 
PRAIRIE 
FARMER 

STATION 



In cash orders 
for a 
10c booklet.. 

"KEX 

outpulled every 
other station 
used on the 
Pacific Coast" 

A , 

^^ccording to the agency, 
cash orders returned by KEX's 
"Kay West" Program ex- 
ceeded those returned by any 
station in the seven other 
cities used on the Coast: Los 
Angeles, Long Beach, Oak- 
land, Sacramento, San Diego, 
Seattle, San Francisco. 

This is typical of KEX results 
in the great Pacific Northwest 
market! For spof act/on like 
this, get in touch with KEX or 
Free & Peters. 



KEX 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

50,000 WATTS 

ABC AFFILIATE 





WESTINGHOUSE 

RADIO STATIONS Inc 

WBZ.WBZA-KYW.KDKA 
WOWO.KEX.WBZ-TV-WPTZ 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, 

except for WBZ-TV and WPTZ; for the 

television stations, NBC Spot Sales 



salers, secured cooperation from more 
than 100 of them. They also contacted 
114 key drug and food chains and ar- 
ranged for special displays in 93. More 
than 50 NBC affiliates were enlisted in 
the merchandising drive. Their coop- 
eration ranged from trade mailings to 
personal solicitation. 

As the NBC merchandising depart- 
ment explained in a slide film on its 
work. "When the power of NBC adver- 
tising was proper!) presented to these 
retailers, they ordered extra stocks of 
I'hillips Toothpaste — set up displays to 
cash in on the demand created by 
Stella Dallas and Young Widdvr 
Brown radio programs." 

Q. What specific sales results 
can networks point to as a result 
of merchandising? 

A. As an example, take Mutual's 
"Wife Week." It was run from 9-14 
February, the latter date being St. Val- 
entine's Day. The idea behind the 
promotion was that the little woman 
was entitled to a vacation from shop- 
ping and housework and that the rest 
of the family should take over. 

The campaign was divided into two 
parts. On-the-air promotion plugged 
the idea of "Wife Week"' via announce- 
ments and network stars introduced 
and interviewed wives. On the retail 
level, Mutual brought in as its primary 
partner the Independent Grocers' Al- 
liance. Mutual and local station-adver- 
tised grocery products were featured 
in special window and shelf displays 
and "Wife Week" point-of-sale mate- 
rial was supplied each cooperating 
store with space for call-letter imprint. 

To fully measure the result of the 
promotion, Providence and WEAN 
were chosen as the models. The store 
group involved was the Roger Williams 
Grocery Co., wholesalers for 85 IGA 
stores in the Connecticut-Rhode Island- 
Massachusetts area, but the testing con- 
centrated on nine Providence super 
market-. 

Store sales in the nine super markets 
jumped 25% over the normal sales 
w eek. Store volume in the smaller IGA 
establishments rose 15' < . Sales of all 
10 Mutual-advertised brands tripled. 



Network flexibility 

Q. How flexible will networks be 
this fall? 

A. The trend has been to greater 



flexibilit) of networks, though many of 
the big network users prefer to buv al- 
most the full network, especially on 
CBS and NBC. Continental Baking 
uses a small CBS network but has been 
doing so for years. Locke Stove Co. 
will >tart on CBS 13 August in evening 
time with a 25-station lineup for 13 
weeks. Locke is on an NBC Southern 
regional network now and had asked 
NBC for a similar network in the eve- 
nings but NBC turned it down. 

1 he rea-on foi \ BC"> refusal is their 
sales polic) relating to network flexi- 
bilit). This provides that, during net- 
work option time, an advertiser can 
buy whatever stations he wishes — pro- 
\ided the gross time billings equal at 
least 75'i of the full network gross 
billings. Locke's order would not have 
equalled this. Daring station option 
time, which Locke has now. NBC i- 
more flexible and the only barrier 
standing in the way of an advertiser's 
getting what he wants is the refusal of 
stations to go along. 

At CBS the Standard Facilities Plan 



PHSS\HG 




To Rochester Sport Fans — and 
they love him! . . . Jack Buck, 
WVET's Ace Sports Announcer 
play-by-plays the Rochester Red 
Wings, Sponsored by Budweiser. 

P. S. WVET IS THE HOME OF 
CHAMPIONS NETWORK, TOO 

We're really on the hull for our 

clients. All baseball adjacencies 

bate been sold. 

■4 — >- 



The Swing 
is to WVET 



M^-T 



U"A L 



IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



76 



SPONSOR 



Use this 
low-cost KBIG 

A )TO prescription 

to test the Southern 
California market 



"000.000 people from every state— 4% of America! 

Young in spirit, they are open-minded — ready to try. 

With S\ 1,000.000.000 net income, they are ready to buy. 

It's the biggest market west of Chicago. 

One-half live in big cities — Los Angeles, Long Beach. San Diego. 

A quarter in 100 outlying cities and communities . . . 

A quarter in rich rural regions, 

including America's #1 agricultural county. 

The dollar-wise way to test your product or service is to use KBIG, 

which completely covers this urban and rural area. 

John Pooh Broadcasting Company • KBK. — K.BII- — KIK 
'.-.in Sunset Boulevard — Hollywood 28, Calif. • Telephone: II<>. '■ 
Representative: Robert Meeker Issociates, l>x. 

10,000 watts -740 on the dial 
Giant Economy Package of Southern California Radio 



ff 



. 




R 



Prescription \-i 
Announcement Packages 



KBIG I). ui\ Dozen Announcements 

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"KBK i Weeklj Packag 

from 36 spots I 

to 200 spots for 1120 

KBIG MonthI) Pack 

from 4s spou foi 
to 200 spots for. 



R 



Prescription N-l 
Newscast Packages 

20 KBIG 5-minute Newscasts 

within one week 

total cost $432. 

50 KBIG 5-minute Newscasts 

within one month 

total cost $902. 



R 



Prescription I > I >- 1 
Double Dose 



Add KBJJF Fresno -900 K( 
1000 watts -to an) KBIG 
Announcement Package. 

For just 25 r > more than the cost of 
KBIG alone . . . you get America's 
greatest agricultural section— th< 
five county Central San Joaquin 
Valley, added to America's third 
largest market. 



Ask your Meeker man or KBIG sal 

JOHN POOl I BROADi VSIING ( O 

KBK. • KHIt- • KPIK. 
sunset Blvd.. Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Fetepbofte Hollywood 



13 JULY 1953 



77 



requires the advertiser to buy the ba- 
sic network of 2!! stations "plus such 
other stations as are required to com- 
pose a network satisfactory to CBS 
Radio." However, under the Selective 
Facilities Plan the advertiser can buy 
an) station combination "acceptable to 
CBS Radio"' provided the advertiser 
will make his program available to the 
entire network so that CBS can sell the 
unsponsored stations to non-competi- 
ti\e clients. 

Mutual and ABC have no set policj 
on network flexibility. Each case is 
examined on its merits. An advertiser 
who wants a small network in a prime 



time slot prohahlv wont get it. even 
if it happens to be unsold at the time. 
Both networks will also take into con- 
sideration the advertiser s future plans. 
I hat is. will the advertiser enlarge his 
network if his initial broadcasting ef- 
forts are successful'.'' 



Q. Can an advertiser buy a radio 
network in non-TV markets only? 
A. Ml networks permit advertiser- to 
by-pass TV market-. There are still 
plontv of non- 1 \ market-. \ count, by 
networks, of stations in non-TV Amer- 
ica shows: \BC. 176: CBS. 114: MBS. 




SCIENTIFIC AGRICULTURE RESULTS IN 
MORE PRODUCTS IN HAMPTON ROADS, VA. 



Your Advertising is MORE PRODUCTIVE 



in America's 
Miracle 
Market 

The great strides that have been, and 
are being made, in the development of 
more productive farms means that 
agriculture is playing an even bigger 
part in this market's economy. 

Get your share of the increased 
retail sales in Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Hampton. Newport News and Warwick 
— America's 26th market. 

WTAR: NBC Affiliate 
WTAR-TV:AII Networks 




NORFOLK, VA. 



H6; NBC. 107. In the case of NBC it 
is not possible that the 75' '< formula 
will permit an advertiser to by-pass 
ever) TV market because that part of 
the NBC network that covers non-TV 
America will not add up to enough in 
the wav of billings. 



Q. Should a radio network adver- 
tiser by-pass TV markets? 
A. There is much evidence which 
points to the fact that it is actually 
expensive for a radio network adver- 
tiser to by-pass TV markets. There 
will still be plent) radio-only ho: 
in the fall, even in the large market-. 
The New York metropolitan area, for 
example, has about a million radio- 
onl) families alone. 

In an address before the Proprietan 
Association last month. John J. Karol. 
vice president in charge of CBS Radio 
sales, pointed out. "Radio's abilit\ to 
produce big audiences at low cost is 
just as real in television markets as 
outside television markets . . . 35' < 
of the national audience to four of our 
major evening programs comes from 
the CBS Radio stations located in the 
10 biggest television markets. And the 
cost-per-1.000 for this audience is low- 
er even than the low national cost-per- 
1.000." Among the shows referred to 
were Amos 'n Andy and Charlie M< - 
Carthy. The figure- are from Nielsen. 
December 1952. 

Also using Nielsen rating data from 
December. \BC came up with figures 
showing that for 32 shows on all four 
networks 10' ', of the audience came 
from non-TV areas. I See. "is drop- 
ping your radio show in a TV market 
false economy?" sponsor. 1 June 
1953.1 

The breakdown b\ networks is as 
follows: ABC tsix programs), .51.7' f 
audience in T\ areas. 48.3' , audience 
in non-T\ areas: CBS (15 programs > . 
50.5'; and 49.5',: MBS (two pro- 
grams I . 36.1'; and 63.9',: NBC 
i nine programs I. 51.0% and 49.0',. 

As an example of the false econoim 
in dropping T\ markets from a ra- 
dio shows station roster, take the case 
of Colgate's 1/r. & Mrs. North. Last 
vear Colgate dropped eight radio sta- 
tions in I \ markets from the show - 
lineup. Colgate discovered that while 
i! saved <".7' , of the cost of the show, 
it lost 18.2% of the audience. The 
show's eost-per-1,000 thus increased 
1 1.6' , . Result, in January of this year. 
Colgate reinstated the ciaht stations. 



78 



SPONSOR 




U. S. Census of Agriculture ranks Maricopa 
County (Phoenix Metropolitan Area) fifth 
in the United States in value of agricultural 
products. 

Approximately $160,000,000 this year! 

This area supports some 350,000 people. 

Best way to capture this market -use KOY. 



Ttlcm&ex 
MUTUAL-DON LEE 

ancCKecf State** 

I THE ARIZONA 
NETWORK 





PHOENIX-550kc 



V^m^*^- A^oh^^^A^ tk^^A 



*A4fL— 



13 JULY 1953 






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elf 
ca 
dr 
ti 



WIB A Leads 
On Total of 
Listeners 



The daily radio audience listen 
ing to Station WIBA continues to 
be greater than that of any other 
station heard in Madison during 
all three segments of the day 
morning, afternoon, and evening- 
according to the results of a Hoop- 
er Broadcast Audience survey 
made last month in Madison. 

The Hooper study also reveals 

that standard radio listening in 

Madison had increased 3.1 per cent 

over a similar period in 1951. 

«■ ♦ ♦ 

Station WIBA's share of the 
morning radio audience, Monday 
through Friday is 35.2 per cent, as 
compared with 28.9 per cent for 
station "B"; 16.7 per cent for sta 
tion "C", and 6.4 per cent for sta- 
tion "D", according to the survey, 
which was made by C. E. Hooper, 
Inc., nationally recognized audi- 
ence measurement firm of New 
York City. 

In the afternoon WIBA has 38.8 
per cent of the audience, while 
station "B" has 18.1 per cent; sta- 
tion "C" 24.4 per cent, and station 
"D" 4.8 per cent. 

At night WIBA has 36.8 per cent, 
station "B" 24.5 per cent; station 
"C" 20.9 per cent; and station "D" 
3.9 per cent. 

The all-day, Monday through 
Friday, average shows WIBA with 
39.93 per cent; station "B" with 
23.83 per cent; station "C" with 
20.7 per cent; and station "D" with 
5.03 per cent. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

In addition to maintair'ng the 
to^ p'i. c,f ' " in •'"ar- 3 !! wn- 



on 
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tor 

1 



Reprinted from The Capital Times, 

MaHlson, Wii-onsin, April 16, 1953. 

Free reprints sent on request. 



YEARS'. 



ftRST IH 




WIBA-AM 



WIBA-FM 



5000 WATTS ON 1310 

Established 7 925 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

REPRESENTATIVES 

BADGER BROADCASTING COMPANY 



MADISON, WISCONSIN 



As an added inducement for network 
advertisers to keep TV markets on their 
schedule, Mutual provides that six 
months after a TV station comes on the 
air, evening rates for its affiliates in 
such a market will he cut SOS'. 



Q. What will the network allow 
the advertiser in the way of cut- 
ins? 

A. The policies vary from one net- 
work to another. ABC and Mutual not 
only permit them but sometimes use 
their liberal cut-in policy to sell clients. 
NBC and CBS are more strict. The for- 
mer controls all cut-ins on network 
shows and handles the planning, copy 
routing, hilling and other problems in- 
volved. CBS only takes care of authori- 
zations, leaves other details to client 
and station. 



Research round-up 

Q. What's new in the measure- 
ment of multiple-set radio listen- 
ing that will interest air advertis- 
ers this fall? 

A. Plenty. Nielsen is going ahead 
with the installation of Audimeters 
which can measure audiences on as 
many as one TV and three radio sets. 
This follows the recent signing of con- 
tracts with the national radio networks. 



Q. When will advertisers be get- 
ting results on multi-set radio lis- 
tening? 

A. While it may take as long as 12 to 
18 months to complete installation of 
the MRM (Multiple-Receiver Metering I 
Audimeters. since the Nielsen sample 
is being changed, ratings will be 
weighted during the interim period to 
take into account new figures on multi- 
set ownership which were ohtained dur- 
ing last year's Nielsen coverage survey. 
Advertisers will probably be getting 
the results of these weighted ratings in 
the immediate future. 



Q. To what extent will the 
weightings and revised sample af- 
fect network radio ratings? 

A. Predicting ratings, even average 
ones, is a dangerous business. How- 
ever, there is no question but that the 
ratings will he up because the propor- 
tion of multi-set homes is up. Esti- 
mates of the increase range from r> to 



<'!' , of '"old st\le" ratings, with Art 
Nielsen himself favoring the lower fig- 
ure. The increase, of course, will lower 
cost-per- 1.000 figures for all network 
programs. 

Q. What changes will be made 
in the Nielsen sample as a result 
of the greater emphasis on multi- 
set listening? 

A. Nielsen is always making changes 
in its sample to reflect changes in the 
population makeup and movement. 
Furthermore, Nielsen measures multi- 
set listening now, too. Here's how the 
new Nielsen multi-set count compares 
with the old: New — 56.3% one-set 
homes, 31.9% two-set homes, 11 
three-or-more-set homes. Old — 71 . 1 
one-set homes, 27.6% two-set homes, 
1' < three-or-more set homes. 



Q. To what extent do the various 
research services currently reflect 
multi-set radio listening? 

A. Pulse recently made a comparison 
of its own New York area figures 
against Nielsen and Hooper. It found 
that its own average sets-in-use figures 
were pretty close to Nielsen's when the 
two services were measuring the same 
type of sample, while Hooper's figures 
were substantially lower than both. 

In making the comparison. Pulse 
used average sets-in-use figures from 




• | Reasons Why 

_. The foremost national and local ad- 

^g vertisers use WEVD year after 

^M year to reach the vast 

£ Jewish Market 

10 of Metropolitan New York 
I. Top adult programming 
^S 2. Strong audience impact 

00 3. Inherent listener loyalty 

g0i 4. Potential buying power 

Send for a copy of 
•WHO'S WHO ON WEVD" 
HENRY GREENFIELD 



117-119 W.st M>lh St. 

New York 19 
Manapin§: Director 




80 



SPONSOR 







^ STATION' 



KYA'S PERSONALITY PROGRAMMING For instance > the 

"George Ruge Koffee Klub" leads all 
REALLY PAYS OFF IN THE 

San Francisco independents from 

SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND AREA 6:00 to 9:00 a m ( Pulse 

March-April). Ruge is first in eleven 
out of the twelve quarter hours, second in the other. 






More important, Ruge sells more merchandise, too. 
Any KYA salesman or representative can cite you success 

stories and satisfied customers. 









:•!••• 



But here's the clincher for agency time buyers 

•. * ••• and advertisers. George Ruge's Koffee Klub 

has more San Francisco sponsor's than any other 

San Francisco station. 



m 

personality 



;•.. 



• • 




Represented Sationally by CFORCf W. CLARK, INC. 



I In- San Franci-cn ^• 

"KYA's George Ruge 
Tells How He Does It" 

. Morning Program 
Has Most Listeners. . . 

By Dorothy Beck, 
News radio columnist. 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. since Hooper 
measures only between those hours. 
Furthermore, Pulse <!iil not use its own 
figures on listening in homes with 
three-or-more sets because it felt the 
current .Nielsen sample for the New 
York area (56 counties vs. Pulse's 12) 
would contain, like Nielsen's current 
national sample, few homes with three- 
oi-more sets. 

Here are the figures Pulse com- 
pared: Hooper sets-in-use for January 
through March. 1953, 8.9%; Nielsen 
sets-in-use for January, 1953, 14.7; 
Pulse January. 1953, sets-in-use for 
one-set homes, 13.9% (Pulse for one- 



plus two-set homes was 16.7%). The 
implication was that Hooper under- 
estimates radio listening; Pulse point- 
ed to its high degree of correlation 
w ith Nielsen. 

Pulse also pointed out that its fig- 
ures would normall) be higher than 
either Hooper's or Nielsen's because 
it measures total audience during a 
given quarter hour while the other two 
services measure average minute audi- 
ences. That was another reason win 
Pulse did not use homes with three-or- 
inore sets. If Pulse had used the three- 
or-more set homes its figures would 
have been much higher, since Pulse 



ISgSS 



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►«r to imc • o t « or 



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WREN has used every adjective in the book to tell you 
about our effective, sales-producing Merchandising Program. 

And now, The Skinner Manufacturing Company does it for 
us. FIRST PRIZE in Skinner's Raisin-Bran merchandising 

contest for all competing stations goes to WREN! We are 
pleased to receive the award . . . pleasantly surprised to find 

that after all our ad-writing, a client would say it better 
for us. 



PS. — Illustration is copy ot 100 check given WREN as first-place award. You can't cash it 
. . . but you can cash in on WREN's selling power. See your Weed & Company man. 




5000 WATTS 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 



WEED & CO. 



82 



found out the following about multi- 
set ownership: ill 32.9% of New 
York area families owned one set. i2i 
28.2' ; owned two sets, and (3) 38.'' . 
owned three-or-more sets. It found 
out, in addition, that these three-or- 
more set homes account for more than 
half of all radio listening in N. Y. 

One moral you can draw from the 
Pulse study: The rating "muddle."' 
where ratings of different services dis- 
agree markrdK. may be due not to in- 
accuracy of the research itself but to 
failure of the sample to keep up with 
the growth of multiple sets. The new 
Nielsen sample, which increases the 
proportion of homes with more than 
on set is an important step. 

Q. What's been happening among 
research services in audience mea- 
surement? 

A. In radio, the most important de- 
velopments are the increased empha- 
sis on out-of-home listening and multi- 
set listening I see other questions in 
this section I . 

Since sponsor's la.-t round-up on the 
various research services, Coffin. Coop- 
er & Clays Tele-Que reports for Los 
Angeles and San Francisco were 
merged into \RB. ARB has discontin- 
ued \\ ashington, D. C. radio reports. 

Hooper has been developing the 
telephone-coincidental-plus-diarv meth- 
od for in-city TV ratings. Its 40-city 
coverage will be increased to 50 cities 
in October. The coincidental-plus- 
diary technique is used as a correction 
for inflated or deflated diary ratings. 

The formula works as follows: The 
average diary T\ sets-in-use figures 
during a certain control period I such 
as noon to 6:00 p.m. Sunday I is di- 
vided into the average coincidental 
sets-in-use figure during the same con- 
trol period. The resulting figure is ap- 
plied against a diary rating for a spe- 
cific program. If the diary rating is. 
sa\. 50. and the resulting figure men- 
tioned above is .5, then the Hooperat- 
ing would be 25. 

Nielsen has discontinued giving per- 
centage ratings for TV shows in its 
public releases, now shows onh homes 
reached. Percentage ratings for radio 
-hows were dropped some time ago. i 
Reason for dropping ratings (they are ■ 
-till supplied, of course, to Nielsen 
clients l was that the broader radio 
base tail radio homes) tends to de- 
flate radio compared with TV i base: 
homes which can receive the program). 

SPONSOR 



COVERAGE 

5000 watts (full time) » 
on 630 kc, blanketing 
NEW ENGLAND'S SEC- 
OND LARGEST MARKET, 
and also covering the 
rich Fall River-New 
Bedford, Mass., mar- 
keting area with a sig- 
nal greater than 2 mv. 



more 



ew Englanders 



isten to WPRO 



AUDIENCE 

An active audience, 
loyal to a BALANCED 
schedule of TOP-RATED 
CBS and local programs 
— programs designed 
for PRIMARY listening 
attention. Important 
because — listeners who 
really LISTEN, are buy- 
ers who really BUY! 



an any other 



station. 



o reach the 
}*st buyers, 



BUY BASIC 



WPRO:i 

PROVIDENCE • 630 KC • 5000 W 



13 JULY 1953 



83 




In this 5-Station Market, 
Any wo/ you look at it 






PULSE OF SYRACUSE 

April, 1953 




NBC Affiliate • Write, Wire, Phone or 
Ask Headley-Reed 



WSYR-AM-FM-TV-r/ie Only Complete Broadcast Institution in Central New York 



84 



SPONSOR 



r 



j_ 



Top 10 available program* oa each of i/i<» radio networkg 



Top fo ■«ailabili<ie« on ABC K«i<fi» 



TITLE 

1 TURN TO A FRIEND* 

2 STARR OF SPACE 

3. WHEN A GIRL MARRIESt 

4. THREE CITY BY LINE 



5. DON CORNELL SHOW! 



6. NEWS OF TOMORROW* 

7. HERITAGE* 



8. YOUR DANCING PARTY* 
9 AMERICAN MUSIC HALL' 
10 NO SCHOOL TODAY* 



Morn. 
Eve 



Eve. 



TYPE 

Ami I'.irti- 



Sf rial drams 

News 

MutleVaNety 



Evr. 
Evo. 



Drama 



APPEAL tINI.IH 

Family 30 nm 

Juvenilr 2'i m n 2 wk 



Worn, n 

Adult 

Family 

Family 

Family 



Sat eve Mumc 



Sun rvr. Music- Variety 
Aft Varlrty 



Family 
Family 
Juvenile 



15 


min 


.« 


IS 


mln 


l .k 


15 


mm 


1 wk 


1 


mln 


l .. 


30 


mln 


i wk 


2 


hr». 


1 wk 


2 


hrs 


1 .k 



Nl I P 

Mr is. 

mln ,rgmt 

$1,500 per 25- 

mln srgmt 

$1,150 

$800 

$1,250 

$3,850 

$6,000 

$7,880 



ASA I ION 

Contestants —I au>,tlea- to h<lp 



tart*. of the it>-> investigator, la t$M 

Story »t young marriage, impted by flame Call la»j la w 
Hy Gardner I Kupclnrl. Sheila Graham with lat.it geulp 



$725 



Musical star D.n Cornell Haft latMVf... guc,- 
Gordon Eraser ouart.rbark, a l.» tram of ABC Kuan 
Documentary dramas produced in conjunct. e- . 
Too hours of danecable mu> r far Saturday «n 
Bur,,,, Meredith I, host Snow l> Mid alt* ia MfaMfrti 
Big Jon and Spark ■ . ptarta* 



Top fO (ii'«ii/(if>ifi(i«'.v on C'ff.S ftoti'io 





TITLE 






TYPE 




APPEAL 




LENGTH 


GROSS PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


1 


BROADWAY IS MY 


BEATt 


Evr. 


Detective 




Adult 


30 


mln. 


1 wk 


$3,150 


Detective's adventures behind Broadway t bright lights 


2 


CRIME CLASSICS! 




Eve. 


Mystery 




Adult 


30 


mln 


i wk 


$4,015 


Dramatization, of actual crimes famous and obscure 


3. 


DECEMBER BRIDE' 




Sun rvr. 


Situation 


comedy 


Family 


30 


mln. 


1 »k 


$4,550 


Spring Bylngten cast as marriageable mother la law 


4 


ESCAPE' 




Eve. 


Drama 




Family 


30 


min. 


1 at 


$2. GOO 


New and old stories dralitg with high an. 


5. 


GANGBUSTERSt 




Eve. 


Detective 




Adult 


30 


mln. 


1 ok 


$3,850 


-rive stories based oa true crime tape* 


6. 


GUNSMOKEt 




Evr 


Western 




Adult 


30 


mm 


1 wk 


$2,875 


Eultlai-but-lltarata stories of Oodge City la Old Waal 


7. 


JUNIOR MISSt 




Evr 


Situation 


comedy 


Family 


30 


mln. 


1 vtk 


$3,750 


The doings of aa irrepresilble teenager and her family 


8 


ON STAGE* 




Eve 


Drama 




Family 


30 


mln. 


1 »k 


$4,010 


Cathy A Elliott Lewi, star la eft beat mystery dramas 


9. 


ROGERS OF THE GAZETTE* 


Eve. 


Orama 




Family 


30 


mm 


i wk 


$3,885 


Wir R^vger, Jr m tales of a country newspaper editor 


10. 


TWENTY FIRST PRECINCT* 


Eve. 


Detective 




Adult 


30 


min 


1 wk 


$3,475 


N Y crime as seen through eye, of a preelnrt captala 



Top in availabilities on rfft.S 



TITLE 




TYPE 


APPEAL 


LENGTH 


NET PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


1. 


BOBBY BENSON* 


Alt. 


Western 


Juvenile 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$1,500 


Far many years a favorite show of small fry hsteaert 


2. 


SQUAD ROOM* 


Sun eve. 


Detective 


Adult 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$1,750 


la-Ufa re-enactment of working, of big e ty pel Ire 


3. 


UNDER ARRESTt 


Sun aft. 


Detective 


Adult 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$1,750 


Stories of a homicide sauad caa'ala salving aria 


4. 


WONDERFUL CITY* 


Aft. 


Aud. Partic. 


Fam.ly 


30 min. 


5 wk 


$5,000 


Nra participation snow featu-i.g Harry Wltmer as m c 


5. 


JOHNSON FAMILY SINGERS* 


Aft. 


Musical 


Full) 


30 min. 


5 wk 


$1,750 


Famous Southern singing family Pa. Ma. Betty 4 bars 


8, 


MAN OF MYSTERY 


Evr 


Mystery 


Adult 


15 mln. 


5 wk 


$1,350 


Two m.-n suspense sterlee. featuring actor Joan Griggs 


7. 


KNIGHTS ADVENTURE 


Eve 


Mystery 


Adult 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$1,800 


Lee Bowman stars as sleuth ia these mystery adeeatana 


8. 


DEADLINE— 30* 


Eve. 


Mystery 


Adult 


30 mln. 


1 wk 


$1,750 


•ires of a n<w pas lag crlsae beat 


9. 


HIGHWAY. U.S.A. 


Eve. 


Drama 


Family 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$1,750 


High adventure, romance bler.d m t*-.is new dra-- 1 


10. 


WHERE IN THE WORLD 


Eve. 


Aud. Partic. 


Family 


M mm 


1 wk 


$2,000 


S g kind of qui/ gam* alt questions d'- 



Top 10 ncailnbilinVs' on NBC Radio 



TITLE 
I. BOB HOPE* 



2. FIBBER McGEE 4 MOLLY* 



TYPE APPEAL LENGTH 

Comedy Family 30 min I wk 

Eve. Situation comedy Family 30 min I wk 



Eve. 



NET PRICE 
$11,000 



EXPLANATION 
Irrepressible Robert In new earned) -variety prrseatatioa 



Domestic comedy series, long a favorite oa NBC Radio 



3. MARTIN 4 LEWIS* 



Eve. 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min I wk 



Hollywood s ranlest pair. L-wis clowns. Martin rm 



4 BEST PLAYS* 



60 m n i wk 



$3,500 per 30- Outstanding radio adaatatlaa of Broad. 
■ in. srgmt 



5. MY SON JEEP* 

6. ROSEMARY CL00NEY* 



7. EDDIE CANTOR* 





Situation comedy 


Family 


30 min 1 wk 




Comedy adventure, of a young bay aad his widower father 








Eve. 


Musical 


Family 


13 m.- 


$3,000 


Rosemary tints popular favorites Guest stars aaarar 


Eve. 


Rtcard Show 


Fsmily 


30 mm 1 wk 


$2,500 


Eddie spins records, tells seewbusi—ss recollect, oes 



a. 


CONFESSION- 


Eve. 


Drama 


Adult 


30 mia. 


1 wk 


$2,500 


True-ta-llfe stories of high drama laid la fsrstpersaa 


9. 


JASON 4 THE GOLDEN FLEECE* 


Sun aft. 


Drama 


Adult 


30 mia. 


1 wk 


$2,500 


MacDenald Carey sails Sena Seas aw ' Golden Fleece'' 


10. 


G.I. JOE- 


Eve. 


Situation comedy 


Adult 


30 min. 


i wk 


$2,500 


Hilarious adventures of group of tafdlert la US Army 



•As selected by the networks at SPONSOR 5 request. 



'Means show has been on the air 



13 JULY 1953 



85 



Where 
there's 
smoke 
there's 
radio - 




/ 




Today, no one anywhere has to be shown what a cig- 
arette looks like — or how to smoke it. Lighting one 
is the first thing many people do in the morning. 
Putting one out i> the last thing they do at night. 

Everywhere people are smoking more cigarettes 
than ever before. Some 3 trillion since the war. An 
expected 400 billion this year. They have more 
choice than ever before. Regular. King-Size. Tipped. 
Filtered. Flavored. And some 27 brands. 

That's Where Advertising Conies In 

For the people who sell cigarettes know that a brand 



P 



is by and large a state of mind. And that adverti 
ing creates this state of mind . . . turns a product in 1 
a brand . . . and slips it in the customer's pocket. 

They know that a brand is no brand at all win 
it's in a market advertising doesn't reach. 

And they also know that as advertisers, they ha\ 
le>s than Vz4 a pack (taxes. 8c plus) to win the 
share of the market. 

That's Where Radio Comes In 

Of all media, radio alone exactly parallels th 
requirements of the cigarette industry — and of an 
industry that wants to speak to everyone, ofta 
economically. 

Like cigarettes, radios turn up everywhere 
except in subways and the public library. Lik I 
smoking, listening knows no boundaries — ge< I 
graphic, economic, or educational. 

And just as people are buying more cigarettt 
than ever before, they're buying more radios tha 
ever before. Some 100 million since the wai 
Another 14 million indicated for this year. An 
among some 50 makes, radio sets also offer mor 
choice than ever before. Auto. Portable. Clock. Cor 
sole. Combination. 



Natural l\ these radios command .1 lot oi listening, 
it nil markets. Da) and night, the average famil) 
istens some 20 hours a week. For radio, as 1 1 1 « ■ \ -.is. 
iatisfies .iml . . . 

lis Radio Sat is firs Best 

)n CBS Radio, advertisers tmd their biggest audi- 
tnoes — .iikI .1 cost per thousand that's 20 per cent 
ower than on any other network. Consequently, CBS 
tadio make- even smaller that "fraction <>t a cent 
vhieli most rapid turnover, cumulative profit pred- 
icts ran afford to spend on advertising. 

Perhaps that's wh) nil of the five major cigarette 
ompanies — American tobacco, Liggett & Myers, 
.orillanl. Philip Morris, and R. J. Reynolds are 
ising CHS Radio in 1953. \n»l wh) cigarette bill- 
ngs on CHS Radio are up 33 percent over last year. 

or III Mass Products, Radio Is a Basic 
Medium 

Whether the product costs pennies or thousands. 
V\ hether it lasts for a week or a lifetime. For exam- 
)lc soap, ikiu sponsoring 32 CBS Radio broadcasts 
\cr\ week. \nd drugs and cosmetics, sponsoring 
>•■>. Or household furnishings and appliances, toda) 




investing I -'I per cent more on 4 BS Radio than last 
year. < 'i autvnn biles, with two a< 1 ounts new t« • Bis 
\\ai\ in tin- \ im 1 .1 lone. 

The i/iillm vote from advertisers of nil kinds 
running 25 pei cent Urongei t<>r thet /-' s Radio Set- 
work than !<>/ mil nearest competitor. 

Whatevei youi product, it you're lookii 
low-budget wa) to maintain present market loyal- 
ties and to reach <>nt to urn customers ... it youi 
advertising requires frequency, and economy, and 
impact, strike up .1 matt li w ith radio. 





Where 
there's 
smoke 
there's 
radio - 

and no 

radio 

matches 

CBS RADIO 






ANNOUNCES 

THE 

APPOINTMENT 

OF 



JOHN BLAIR 

AND COMPANY 
as National Representatives effective July 15, 195; 



IN announcing the addition of WTCN Minneapolis-St. Paul to its list 
of important stations, John Blair & Company underscores "Personality 
Programming" as the key-word to the sales success of this station. 

WTCN's policy of block programming of highest-rated local shows 
from noon to 6 p.m. has made a fact of WTCN's slogan: "Town Crier of 
the Northwest". WTCN now has more familiar and established person- 
alities under one roof than any other station in this market: men whose 
salesmanship matches their talent . . . men who build one result story 
after another on their own shows at selected time periods. 

John Ford, tremendously popular newscaster who has held two of his 
sponsors for eleven years, sets the pace at noon. Then, for the next five 
hours, advertisers are assured of steadily increasing impact with Sev 
Widman, voted "Top Northwest Disc Jockey" . . . audience favorite 
Daryl Laub . . . Jack Thayer, rated among America's first ten disc jockeys 
. . . music-man Jim Boysen who pulled over 5,000 mail entries in two 
weeks in a recent contest. 

And these are just a few of the WTCN personalities who sell within a 
65-mile radius of the Twin Cities, where over 70% of all retail advertising 
dollars in the state are spent. 

For positive results in this market, call your John Blair man today! 



WTCN 

American Broadcasting Company Affiliate 
3,000 Watt* Day 1 ,000 Watti Night 1 2 80 KC 



JOHN 
BLAIR 

& COMPANY 



REPRESENTING LEADING 
RADIO STATIONS 

NEW YORK ■ BOSTON ■ CHICAG 
ST. LOUIS • DETROIT • DALLA 
SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELI 

SPONSOR 



mm 



issues. It will appear next 10 August 1953 



RADIO C 



NOTE- This data last brought up to date for 30 June issue. 



SUNDAY 




MONDAY 



Nick Carter 

, .,ibby. McNeill 

1st Libby till 7/12 

N 8-6:23 L 

JWT $1850 



Bob Considine 

Mutual of Omaha 
■ SON L 

B&J $1500 



Cecil Brown news 
State Farm Mut'l 
479N 6:25-30 L 
NL&B $500 



I Meet the 

N 



Squad room 

mystery 

N T 



Listen to 

Washington 

Wash L&T 



American music 
hall 

Host: Burgess 

Meredith 

Var. 7-9 L&T 






American music 

hall 

7-9 

(cont'd) 



Guy Lombardo 
Ainer Tub: 

lucky strike Treasury 

209H Tl varieties 

rl2:30-lam I Wash 



Veep 
T 



Pre-coronatlon 

series 

(17, 24, 31 May) 



BBDO 



$3500} 

Richard Diamond- 
private det 
Rexall Drug: | 
all drug pr I 
21 OH L&T 

plus 32 CBC stms 



BBDO 



$1850 



Concert music 
Canada L 



Junior Miss 
H L, 



My little Margie 

Philip Morris: 

)hilip morris cigs 

200H r 

rll:30-12m 



Biow 



$4000 



Hawaii calls 
music 



Enchanted hour 

music 
C T 



Juvenile jury 
N L 



We saw tomorrow 

UN series 
N L&T 



Tony Martin 
RCA: radio, TV 
»ets, phonographs. 

records 

I'.inh l 

1-10:30-11 



JWT 



$7,500 



Best plays 

N L&T 

8:30-9:30 



A Jackson news 

etropolitan Life 
ION m-f L 
Y&R $1250 



No network 
service 
m-f 6-7 



News m-f 



Headline edition 

co-op 7:05-15 
171N m-f L&T 



Elmer Davis co-op 
206\Vash m-f L 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mis: D-F-S 
153 D m.w.f L 
Amer Bakeries 
36W m.w.f T 
TW sl-are $ 6500 
News m-f 7:55-8 
L&M: chesterflds 
C&W 332N $750 




TUESDAY 



You and the 

world 

N m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Lowell Thomas 
Kaiser-Frazer 

L75N m-f L 

Wm H 

Weintraub $3750 



Keynote Ranch 
N in - f T 

(part of network) 



Family Skeleton 
Toni Co, LB, 
Manhattan Soap 
202H alt das T 
SB&W $5175 



Johnny Mercer 

show 

H m-f L&T 

7:15-45 



Edw R Murrow 
Amer Oil: amoco 
Katz share $ 5000 
9SN m-f L 

Hamm Brewing 
C-M share $5000 



Bobby Benson 
Kraft Foods 
ra-5:30 show 



Bill Stern 

sports review 

f m-f L 



Fulton Lewis Jr 

co-op 
342Wash m-f L 



This week 

inside Russia 

N L 



G Heattcr; Amer 
Hm Pr: bisodoit 
526Var m,w L 
SSCB '/ 4 hr $1500 



Newsreel; co- 
N m -f 7:45-5 5 
Titus Moody 
N m-f 7:55-8 T 



Henry J Taylor 
Gen Mtrs 159N T 



Kudner 



$600 



Field & stream 

N T 



American concert 
studio 



Crime classics 
H L&T 



The Falcon** 
Gen Mis: klx 
Tath am-Laird 
R J Reynolds 

Esty camels 

Lever: rayve 
(direct) 
_. ISDN t 

Arthur Godfreys! M ulti-messg pin 
Talent Scouts 



Trios J Lipton: 

tea. soup mixes 

170N L 

rll:30-12 n 



Y&R 



$8500 



Hall of fantasy 

mystery 
N co-op T 



No network 
service 



No network 

Ben ice 

m-f 



Three star extra 
Sun Oil: sunoeo 
34Var m-f L 
HOBM $2750 



News Parade 

Pure oil Co 

40N.W m-f L 

LB $3000 



No network 

service 

m-f 



M Beatty news 
Miles: rll:15-30 
173Var m-f I 
Wade $3500 



One man's family 
Miles: rll-11 :J 
175H m-f T 
Wade $6500 



Railroad hour 

Ass'n of Am RR 

197H L 

rll:30-12m 



B&B 



$6000 



Voice of Fire- 
stone 
Firestone Tire & 

Rubber Co 
156N L 



S&J 



$8500 



Jackson news 
Metropolitan Life 

■f (see monj 
Y&R 



No network 
service 
m-f 6-7 



New s m-f 7- 7 :0c 
Headline editior 

co-op 7:05-15 
171N m-f L&l 



Elmer Davis 

co-op 

206Wash m-f I 



Starr of space 
11 7:30-55 1 



L Griffith news 

Liggett & Myer; 
C&W m-f 7:55 



Three-city 

by line 

H.C.N 'J 



D iscovery 
C 1 



Literary greats 

N 



' 



You and the 

world 

N m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Lowell Thomas 
Kaisei 

m-f (see mon) 
Weintraub 



Family Skeleton 

Toni Co. LB; 

Manhattan Soap 

SB&W alt das 



Johnny Mercer 

show 

N m-f L 

7:15-45 



Edw R Murrow 
Amer Oil— Katz 
(Iamm Brewing— 
CM 



People are funny, 

Amana Refrig: 

food freezers 

206N 1 

1-10-10:30 

Maury, Lee & 
Marshall $4500 



Mr & Mrs North 

Colgate: 

halo, palmolive 

204N 1 

rll:30-12m 



$4501 



Songs of the 
B-Bar-B 

N tu-f L 

(part of network) 



Keynote 
ranch 

N in I T 

(part of network) 



Fulton Lewis Jr 

co-op 
342Wash m-f L 



Hazel Market 

co-op 

Wash ] 



Gabriel Heatter 

Credit Union 
522N tu only 
JWT '/ 4 hr $1500 



Newsreel: co-op 

N m -f 7:45- 55 T 

Titus Moody 
N m-f 7:55-8 T 



Mickey Splllanc 

mystery** 
Gen Mills: kix 
Tath am-Laird 
R J Reynolds 

Esty camels 

Lever : rayve 
J73N T 

Multi-messg plan 



High adventure 

co-op 
N 1 



Bill 
sporti 



N 



Three 
Sun 
m-f i 
HOBM 



New 
Pure 
m-f 
L Bur 



No 



News 

Mil 

rn I 

Wade 

One m 

Mil 

m-f 

Wade 



Eddi 
Coca 
197N 
D'Arcj 



Rosem 
X.H 



First 
H 
(Opel 



Walter Winchell 
(Jruen Watch Co 1 
325N L 

McE w/Tv $15,000 

T Grant news 
I" Lorillard: old g] 

LSN $100 



X S 30 9:15 



December 
bride 



S. Marine 
band 



Best plays 
(cont'd) 



The adventurer 
2 1 (IN L&T 



Escape 



Paul Harvey news 
C co-op L 



London Column 
L&T 



I Chautauqua Story 
I N T 



Songs by Fisher 
T 



' 



Answers for 

Americans 

forum 

N L 



Lux radio 
summer theatre 

Lever Bros : 
lux soap, flakes 
183n 
31 CBC stns 

(return 8/8; 

show sus in 

July) 



Bill Henry news 

•Tohns-Manvillc 
bids. ind'I prods 
444 W 9-9:05 I. 
JWT m-f $750 

Reporter's r'ndup 
Var co-op L 



Telephone hour 

Bell Tel System 
195N L 

rH 12:00-12:30m 



Ayer 



$8000 



America's town 

meeting of the 

air 

co-op 

26 8N 1 

9-9:45 



Confession 
H I, 



Jan Peerce 

show 

N L&T 



On and off the 

record 

co-op 

N m-f L 



JWT 



$15,000 



Band of America 

Cities Service: 
petroleum prods 
115N L 

Ellington $6500 



Monitor & new 
Chr Sc Publ Sua 
30Bost I 

W-B $35( 



Robt Q Lewis 

Waxworks 

Webster -Chicago:, 

phonos, record's j 

equipment 
48N Tl 



London studio 

melodies 

N T 



FSR 



$1800 



Edw P Morgan 
A 111:30-35 T 
Listen to Korea 
X 10:35-45pm 



John Durr 

Sports 

N T 



Barrie Craigfi 
Emerson Diug: 
L& N bromo sitzr 
Knomai k : esq pol 
Mog ul (see bel) 
196N T 

Tandem : 3 shows 
per wk $15,000 



News of tomorrow 
Var L 



Walk a Mile 
R J Reynolds 

camel cigs 
185N 



Frank Edwards 

AF of L 

127W m-f I 
F.F $1750 



Virgil Pinkley 
H m-f 



I- Esty 



5.285" X 



Elton Britt 

songs 
m-f L 



Hollywood 
showcase*; 

L 

Oper Tandem) 



News of tomorrow 
Var I 



Virgil Pinkley 
H m-f L! 



Little symphonies 
Canada T 



Meet the press 

Discussion : 

.Martha Ruuntiee, 

moderator 

Wash T 

$1500 



Edwin C Hill 
Pliilco: 10:30 35 
297N m-f L 

i CI 1 :30-35 

Hutc hins $ 2580 

Brevard music 

festival 

N 10:35-11 T 



Chas Collingwood 
N m-f L 

10:30-35 
C Adams 10:35-45 
S uiotone- m only 
Kudner $2000 



Eddie Fisher 

Coca-Cola Co 
lOON m.th T 
D'Arcy 



Clifton Utley 

10:30-35 
C m-f L 



Dance orch 
N 10:45-11 L 



Dance 
orchestra 



LN 



Stars from Paris 
10:35-11 T 



Edwin C Hill 

Philco Corp 
m-f 10:30-35 
Hut chins 

Orchestra 

Var 10:35-11 I 



Yours truly, 
Johnny Dollar 

Wrigley Co: 
spearmint gum 
194N 1 

A Meyerhf $375( 



Bill Henry news 

Johns-Manville 
JWT m-f 9-9:05 

Search that never 

ends 

science fiction 

N 



Martir 
Unset 

che; 
100H 

rl2 



C&W 



21st precinct 



On and off the 

record 

co-op 

N m-f I 



Louella Parsons 

Colgate: lustre ci 
184N rl2-12:15 1 
L&N $1501 



Frank Edwards 

AF of L 
127 Wash m-f L 
Furman. Feiner 



Sammy Faye 

show 

H Jl 



Elton Britt 
songs 
N m-f 



Two 
I 

P. Loi 
gold, e 
I93N 



Chas Collingwood 
N m-f 1 

10:30-35 
C Adams sus tu-f 
Mp 10:35-45 1 



Bands for bonds 
N L 



Clift 

1C 



Star 

Var 1 



Dance orch 
N I 



Late news 

L 



Art & Dotty 

Todd 

H L 

Orchestra 
| Var L 



News 



Fred Collins 

news 

N L 



Ebony & Ivory 
H m-th L 



News & analysis 

co-op 
N m-f L 



Baukhage talking 

co-op 
Wash m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Ebony & Ivory 
H m-th L 



News & analysi 

co-op 
N m-f I 



Baukhage talking 

co-op 
Wash m-f L 



Clifton Utley 

news 

C L 



Late sports 

roundup 

Detr m-f L 



News of world 

Morgan Beatty 

Var m-f J, 



Late sports 

roundup 

C.Detr m-f L 



News 
Morga 
Var 



Dance orch i Dance bands 

Var T 



News ll:55-12m 
IX L 



Orchestra 
Var 11:30-55 L 



Dance bands 
Var ni-f L 



News 11:55-12 
N m-f L 



Dance 

orchestra 

Var m-f L 



urprise serenade 
<' L 



Orchestra 
Var 11:30-55 L 



Dance bands 
Var m-f 



Dance music 
Var m-f L 



Ho 

Pal 



News ll:55-12m 
X m-f L 



/Voles and explanations to help you use this churt Sponsors listed alphabetically tvith agency and time on air 






COSTS: cover talent and production only, do not include commercials or time charges. They 
are gross (include the 15'; agency commission) to the client for one broadcast. All costs 
weekly unless otherwise designated. 

TIME: all times, including program repeat times, are Eastern Daylight. 
CITY ABBREVIATIONS: C, Chicago; Cine, Cincinnati; D, Detr, Detroit; H, Hollywood; 
Ind. Indianapolis; Mp, Minneapolis; X. New York; Rich, Richmond; St L. St. Louis; 
W. Wash. Wash ngton. D. C. ; Var, various. 

OTHER ABBREVIATIONS: alt. alternate; m, midnight; n. noon; pr, products; r, repeat 
broadcast; E. east coast; SE, southeast; MW. midwest; L, live; T. transcribed; TBA. to he 
announced; 100N means show is carried on 100 stations and originates in NYC 
3 ABC: Betty Crocker; cost ($2900) for 9 programs weekly. M. W, F: 8:55-9 am; 2:30-35 pm; 
4:25-30 pin. Breaktast Club. M-F 9-10 am (not listed on chart); sponsors: O'Cedar, Turner 
Adv. : Philco, Hutchins Agency: Swift, JWT; Toni, Weiss & Geller. 30-min. cost: $4000. 
* CBS: Godfrey, M-F. 10-11:30 am; simulcast M-Th 10-11 am, sold as simulcast: time plus 
talent: $1,400,000 annually for 2 TV quarter hours and 2% radio quarter hours per week per 
advertiser. 11-11:30 am segment is radio only as is entire Friday broadcast; cost: $6500 per 
quarter hour. 190-205 radio stations, originates NYC. other points: repeat 5:15-0:45 pm. 
t-owor Plan: W, Th, F 8-8:30 pm (FBI in Peace and War, M-et Millie. Mr. Keen). Cost: 
SI55IIU per client weekly. Has 3 nartic. sponsors (see chart). Road of Life. Ma Perkins are 
carried on 24-26 CBC stations. Road of Life, cost ($3250) covers CBS and NBC airings. 
** MBS: Capitol Commentary originates Washington. 484 stations live. Multi-Message Plan: 
M F 8-8:30 pm. Cost: $1500 per participation per sponsor based on minimum purchase of 3 
a week. 8. C. Johnson, 5 news strips: sold as package, time and talent $23,000 a week. 
'! NBC: Operation Tandem: Hollywood Showcase. M 10:15-30 pm; First Nighter. To 8:30-9 
pm; Scarlet Pimpernel, W 10-10:30 pm : Judy Canova, Th 111 10-30 pm ; Bob and Ray. 
F 9:30-10 pm. Cost: $3S5i; per participation per sponsor; Just Plain Bill. M-F 5-5:15 pm, 
Whitehall, ait basis. M. W. K one wk. T. Th next; Carter. Th on. wk, M. 1 next. Oris. 
NYC 150 stations live. Front ''age Farrell. M-F 5:15-30 pm. Amer. Home Prods., alt 
days. Rest sustaining, 
t Other products In addition to those mentioned are plugged on this program. 



AFofL. Furman. Feiner; MBS. M-F 10-10:15 pm 
Allis-Chalmers, B. S. Gittins: NBC. Sat 1-1:30 pm 
Amana Refrig.. Maury. Lee & Marshall: CBS, 

Tu 8-8:30 pm 
Amer. Bakeries, Tucker Wayne: ABC. M, W, F 

7:30-55 pm 
Amer. Home Prods.. John F. Murray: CBS. M-F 

12:30-1 pm; 



NBC. 



MBS. M. W 7:30-45 pm ; 

alt days 5-5:30 pm 
Amer. Oil Co.. Jos. Katz: CBS, M-F 7:45-8 pm 
Amor. Tob. Co., BBDO: CBS, Sun 7-7:30 pm; 

CBS. Th 10-10:30 pm 
Animal Fdtn., Moser. Cotins: CBS. Sat 10-10:15 am 
Armour & Co.. FC&B: NBC. M-F 2:30-45 pm 
Armstrong Cork, BBDO: CBS. Sat 12-12:30 pm 
Ass'n of Amer. RR. B&B: NBC. M 8-8:30 pm 
Bell Telephone, Ayer: NBC. M 9-9:30 pm 
Billy Graham. W. F. Bennett: ABC. Sun 3:30-4 pm 
Campana Sales Co.. Wallace-Ferry-Hanly: CBS, 

Sat 11-11:05 am 
Campbell Soup Co., Ward Wheelock: ABC. M -F 

11:30-55 am 
Cannon Mills. Y&R: CBS, Sat 11:30-12 n 
Carnation, Erwin. Wasey: CBS. Sat 12:30-1 pm 
Carter Prods.. Bates. NBC. Th 5-5:15 pm alt wks; 

M. F 5-5:15 pm alt wks; SSCB: CBS, Sat 

1:30-55 pm 
Chesebrough Mfg.. McCann-Erkkaon: CBS, W 

8:30-9 pm 



Christian Ref. Church, Glenn-Jordan-Stoe 

MBS. Sun 9:30-10 
Christian Sc. Monitor, Walton-Butterfield: J 

Tu 9:45-10 pm 
Church of Christ. R. Roy: ABC. Sun 1-1:30 r 
Cities Service, Ellington: NBC, M 9:30-10 pi 
Clinton Foods (Snow Crop). Maxon: CBS. M-F 

10:15 am (alt days) 
Club Aluminum, Buchen: ABC. Sat ' 
Coca-Cola. D'Arcy: NBC, Tu. F 8-8:15 pm; X; 

M. Th 10:30-45 pro 
Colgate-Palm. -Peet. Sherman & Manr 

Tu 8:30-9 pm; L&N: CBS. Tu 10 

Est* ; NBC, M-F 11-11 :45 an 
Continental Bkg.. Bates: CBS. M-F 
Corn Prods.. C. L. Miller: CBS 
Cream of Wheat: BBDO: CBS. Sat 11 
Credit Union. JWT: MBS Tu " 
Dawn Bible Students. Wm Ql< 

11-11:15 am 
DeSoto Motor. BBDO: NBC. W 
Dr. T. Wyatt. Century: ABC, - 
Electric Cos.. Aver: ABC. F <• 30-10 pm 
Emerson Drug. L&N: NBC. Sun 10-] 

8:30-9 pm; Th 10-10:30 pm 
Eno-Scott & Bowne, Atherton & C Tier: CBS. 

Th, F 8-8:30 pm (Power Plan) 
Ex-Lax. Inc., Warwick & Legle: : 

5:45-6 pm 



OMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 




Nightt 



WEDNESDAY 



tetwork 

rvlce 

Stern 

review 

m-f L 

network 

nice 

if 



star extra 
Oil Co 
see mon) 



THURSDAY 



No network 

service 
m-f 6-7 



You and the 
world 
m-f L 



Jackson news 
iletropolltan LIfi 

I i gee tnon I 
Y&R 



No network 
m-f 



s parade 
Oil Co 

see imin) 
nett 



network 

•rvlce 

m-f 



of world 

■s Labs 
see mon) 



in's family 

es Labs 
see mon) 



Lowell Thomas 

Kaiser-Frazer 
in i i jee in' n » 
Welntraub 



News m-f 7 7 DO Family Skeleton 
Headline edition' 
co-op 7:05-15 

N m-f L&T 



Ton! Co, LB, 
Manhattan Soap 
SB&W alt-das 



Songs of the 
B-Bar-B 

ii lu-f L 

network) 



Keynote 

ranch 

IS' m-f T 

part of network) 



Elmer Davis coop 
■J niiWash m-f L, 

Lone Ranger 
Gen Arts ; 133 stns 

D-F-S m.w.f 

\m likrj; 36 stns 
Tucker Wayne 
m.w. f (see m on) 
L Griffith news 
Liggett & Myers 
CAW m-f 7:55-8 



e Fisher 
Cola Co 
tu.f T 
$12,000 



iry Clooney 
tu.f I 



nighterr 

] 
Taiiilem) 



& Lewis 
t & Myers 
terflelds 

T 

1 2 -30m 



$11,000 



Three-city 

by line 

H.C.N I. 



TBA 



City of 
Times Square 
L 



Johnny Mercer 

show 

N m-f L 

7:15-45 



Gabriel Heatter 
Am Home Prod 

tn.u i see mon) 
SSCB 



Edw R Murrow 
Amer Oil— Katz; 
Hamm Brewing — 
C-M m-f 



FBI peace A war' 
Eno Scott.Bowne: 

AAC bryk reem 
Nestle Co: 

S & M nescafe 

I'm; 

Blow lava. lilt 

195N rl2-12:30m 
Power plan 



Fulton Lewis Jr 

co-op 
342Wash m-f L 



Men's corner 

men's fashions 

co-op 

S T 



No network 

sfl Virt- 



Bill Stern 
sports review 
m-f L 



No network 

service 
m-f 



. Jackson news 
Metropolitan Life 
m-f (see mon) 
YAR 



No network 
lervice 
m-f 6-7 



You and the 

world 

N m-f L 



Three star extra 

Sun Oil Co 
m-f (see mon) 
HOBM 



News parade 
i'ure Oil Co 
m-f (see mon) 
L Burnett 



No network 

service 
m-f 



r ij-. 



Lowell Thomas 
Kaiser-Frazer 
m-f (see mon) 
Weintraub 



News in f 7 7:05 Family Skeleton 
Headline edition! Toni Cc, LB; 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Newsreel: 

N m -f 7:15-5 5 T 

Titus Moody 
N m-f 7:55-8 T 



Crime flies of 

Flamono"" 
(8/8: Deadline) 

Lever: rayve 
(direct j 



Mr President 

co-op 

H Ll 



n Willie 



Crossfire 

co-op 

Wash L 



Dr Christian 

(.lean Heislmli I 
Chesebroue.il Mfg 

vaseline prod 
186N L 

rll:30-12m 
McE $7000 



Philip Morris 

playhouse 
Philip Morris 

* Co. Ltd 
194N L 



$4000 



FC&B 



Kreisler 



Carter: an 
Bates 

Multi-messy 
475C 



Crime fighters 

co-op 

N L 



News of world 

Miles Labs 
in f (see mon) 
Wade 



One man's family 
Mile* Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Walk a mile 
R J Reynolds : 

camel cigs 

189Var L 

rl0:30-ll 



Esty 



$4000 



The great 

Gildersleeve 

Kraft Foods : 

narkay. velveeta 

175H L 

rll:30-12m 



Bill Henry news 
Johns-Manviile 

JWT m-f 9-9:05 

( see mon ) 

Family theatre 

H L 



Rogers of the 
Gazette 

L&T 



On and off the 
record 
co-op 
N m-f L 



Frank Edwards 

AF of L 

127Wash m-f I 

Furman. Feiner 



NLAB 



$8000 



7:0: 
f L&T 



Elmer Davis 

co-op 

206Wash m-f L 



Manhattan Soap 
SB&W alt das 



Starr of space 
H 7:30-55 T 



m-f 7:55-8 
Cng'hm A Walsh 



Songs of the 

B-Bar-B 

N tu-f L 

(part of network) 



Keynote 

ranch 

N m-r T 

(part of network] 




No network 
service 



Bill Stern 

sports review 

N m-f L 



No network 

service 

ra-f 



Fulton Lewis Jr 

co-op 
342Wash m-f L 



Johnny Mercer 

show 

N m-f I, 

7:15-45 



L Griffith news Edw R Murrow Ntwsreel; 

Liggett & Myers Amer Oil— Katz " 



Three-city 

by- line 

H.C.N I 



TBA 



23 IN 



Heritage 



The best of 

Groucho 
DeSoto Motor 
div Chrysler 
198H 

rl2-12:30m 



Mike Malloy 



Hamm Brewing— 
C-M ra -f 



Rukeyser reports 

financial news 
N co-op L 



Gabriel Heatter 
Motor I'r:deepfrz 
525N th only L 
RWC '/„hr $1500 



co-op 
N m-f 7:45- 55 T 

Titus Moody 
N m-f 7:55-8 T w »de 



Three star extra 
Sun Oil Co 
m-f (see mon) 
HOBM 



No network 
service 
m-f 6-7 



A Jackson news 
-Metropolitan Life 
m-f (see men j 
Y&R 



You and the 
world 
m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



News parade 
i'ure Oil Co 
.if (see mon) 
L Burnett 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Elmer Davis 

co-op 

20'iWash m-f L 



News of world 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



One man's family 

Miles Labs 

m-f (see mon ) 



Meet Millie 

Eiio-Scc/t. Bow no 

AA C byrlc reent 

Nestle Co: 

S& M nescafe 

P&G: 

Blo w lava , lilt 

198N rl2-12:30m 

Power Plan 



GE Playhouse 

General Elec: 

home appliances 

205H i. 



YAR 



$4000 N 



L-H 



Romance 



Official Det." 

R .1 Reynolds 

Esty camels 

Lever : rayve 
(dir ect) 

J Kreisler 
FCAB 

4S0N L 

Multi-messg pin 



John Steele, 
adventurer 
co-op 



R Rogers 8-8:23 
Log Cabin news 

8:25-30 

Gen Fds : cereals 

log cabin syrun 

164H 1, 

rll:30-12m 



New s in f 7- 7:05 
Headline edition 
<P 7:05-1. 

171 N m-f L&T 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mills 
D-F-S 153 sins 
Jni Bkrs; 36 stnj 
Turk:r Wayne 
iiM'.t (see mon) 
L Griffith news 
-'.iegelt & Myers 
C&W m-f 7:55-8 



Three-city 

by line 

H.C.N L 



BAB 



$7500 



Father knows best 
Gen Fds: cereals 

post-tens 
164H T 

rl2-12:30m 
BAB $5000 



BBDO 



$7500 



Truth or conseq 
Pet Milk Co: 
pet evap milk 
171H L 



Gardner $7000 



Time capsule 
N Ll 



Bill Henry tews 

•lohns-Manville 

JW T m-f 9- 9:05 

L Rod & gun club 

of the air 

co-op 

9:05-30 



Cathy A Elliot 
Lewis on stage 

N T 



The Amer way 

(Horace Heidt) 

American Tob 

lucky strike 



On and off the 

record 

co-op 

N m-f I 



My son Jeep 
N L 



TBA 



Lowell Thomas 
Kaiser-Frazer 
m-f (see mon) 
Weintraub 



Family Skeleton 

Toni Co, LB; 

Manhattan Soap 

SB&W altdat 



Johnny Mercer 
show 
N m-f 

7:15-45 



Songs of the 

B-Bar-B 

N tu-f I 

(part of network) 



Keynote 
ranch 
N m-f 

(part of networl 



Fulton Lewis Jr 

co-op 
342Wash m-f 



Di.iner date 
music 
N m.f 



Edw R Murrow 
Amer Oil — Katz 
Hamm Brewing- 
C-M m- 



Mr Keen" 
Eta c- Scott.Bowne 

A A C brylc r eeu 
Nestle Co 

S& M nescafe 

P&G: lava, lilt 
Biow rl2-12:30n 
198N i 



Platterbrains 
N L&T 



Eddie Cantor 
show 



Frank Edwards 

AF of L 
27\Vash m-f ll 
Furman. Feiner 



I Meet 

Corliss Archer 
.Electric Cos Ad 
1 Progr 

32511 

$2500! Ayer 
moval 




Ozzie & Harriet 

Lambert Co: 
LAF liste rine 

Hotpoint Inc 
M x n applia nces 
Ea_ spun alt wks 

Ind TV $35,000 



Heatter: Mcnnen 
quinsana powd 
473N fonly . 
Grey '4hr $1501 



Newsreel: co-oe 
N m -f 7:i:.- 55 
Titus Moody 
N m-f 7:55-8 1 



Take a number" 
Gen Mills: kil 
Tatham-Laird 



rayve 



Lever: 
(dir ect) 

J Kreisler 



The world 
dances 



Judy Canova<1 

, E » m M r l on Dru , g: ' News ° f tomorrow 
L&N brnmo sltzr« y ar 



Capitol cloakroom 
Wash 



On & off the 

record 

co-op 

N m-f I 



Frank Edwards 
AF of L 

2>:\Vash m-f rj 
Furman. Feiner 




zel: 
BC, 



Its. 



BS. 
pm; 



Faultless Starch. 
11-11:15 am 



Brewer 



Tu 
mi 
W, 



Firestone Tire & Rubber, Sweeney & James: NBC 
M 8:30-9 pm 

French Sardine Co.. Rhuades & Davis: CBS M-F 
10:15-30 am 

General Electric. V&K: CBS, Th 8:30-9 pm 

General Foods. B&B: CBS. M-F 12-12 15 pm • 2- 

: : .!;1 ,"",'- "' VI; lliS M F B -5:15 urn: Sun 
8 SO 9:15 am; Y&R: CBS. Sal 1:55-2 Dm: 
B&B: NBC. Th S-U pm; Y&R: NBC. M-F 
10:30-45 am 

Genoral Mills. Tatham-Lalrd: MBS. M. T, F 8- 
8:30 pm (Multi-Message Plan); D-F-S : ABC 
M. \V. F 8:55-9 am; 2:30-35 pm; 4:25-30 pm' 
r:30-55 pm; Knox-Reeves: ABC M W F 
10:25-45 am; 12:30-45 pm; M-F 3-3:15 pin 
General Motors. Kudner: ABC M 8-8:15 run ' 
Frigidalre. FC&B: CBS. Tu, Th. alt F 10-30- 
1 5 am 
Gillette Safety Razor. Maxon: ABC. F Hi 

pm; Sat 4-4:30 pm 
Gospel Bdcstg. It. 11 Alber: ABC, Sun 4-5 pm 
Green Giant. Leo Burnett: CBS. F 3:30-15 pm 
Grucn, MrCann-Erirksun: ABC. Sun 9-9:15 pm 
Thoo. Hamm Brewing, Campbell-Mlthun: CBS 

M-F 7:45-8 pm 
Holland Furnace, direct: MBS. M-F 10:35-11 am 
Geo. A. Hormel. BBDO: CBS. Sat 2-2:30 pm 
Hotpoint. Maxon: ABC. alt F 9-9:30 pm 



CBS, M-F 10-10:15 am 



Cellucotton, FC&B: 

(alt days) 

Johns-Manville. JWT: MBS. M-F 9-9:05 pm 
S. C. Johnson & Son. Needham. Louis & Brorby 
MBS, M-Sat 10:30-35 am; 11:25-30 am; 2:25- 
30 pm; M-F, 12:15-25 pm ; 5:55-6 pra; Sat 
o:o0-6 pm 

Kaiser-Frazer, Weintraub: CBS. M-F fi:45-7 pm 
Kellogg Co., Leo Burnett: CBS, Tu. F 3:15-30 
pm 

Knomark Mfg., Etnil Mogul: NBC. Sun 10-1030 
pm; Tu 8:30-9 pm; Th 10-10:30 pm (Oper 
Tandem) 

Kraft Foods Co.. Needham. Louis & Brorby: NBC 

W 830 9 pin: JWT: MBS. M 5:15-30 pm ' 
Jacques Kreisler. FC&B: MBS \y Th F 8-830 

pm (Multi-Message Plan) 
Lambert Co. (Listerine), Lambert & Feasley: 

ABC. nit V 9-8:30 pm 
Lever Bros., JWT: CBS, M 9-10 pm; McCann- 

Krlckson: CBS. M. W. alt F 10:30-45 am; 

JTC&B: CBS, M-F. 12:15-30 pm; N. W. Aver: 

CBS. M, W, Th 3:15-30 pm; no agcy: ABC 

Sun 8:65-9 pm 
Liggett & Myers (Chesterfield). Cunningham & 

Walsh ABC, M-F 7:55-8 pin; CBS, M-F 

111.". ::n an,: NBC. Tu »-D:30 pm 
Libby. JWT: MBS. Sun 6-6:20 pm 
Thos. J. Llpton. Y&R: CBS. Mon 8:30-9 pm 
Lonqmes-Wittnauer Watch Co., Virtnr K Bennett 

■'lis. Sun 2-2:25 pm 



P. Lor i I lard. L&N: ABC. Sun 6:15-30 pm; Sun 
9:15-30 pm; MBS. M-F 11:45-12 n; NBC. 
Tu 10-10:30 pm 

Lutheran Laymen's League. Gotham: MBS. Sun 
1:30-2 pm 

Manhattan Soap (Sweetheart). Scheideler. Berk & 
Werner: NBC, .M-F 4:15-5 pm; CBS. T Til 
alt F 3:45-4 pm (alt days); 7-7:15 pm (alt 
days) 

Mennen Co.. Grey: MBS. F 7:30-45 pm 
Metropolitan Life. Y&R: CBS. M-F 6-6:15 pm 
Miles Labs. Geoffrey Wade: CBS. M-F 5:45-6 pm • 

3-3:15 pm; NBC. M-F 7:30-8 pm; MBS. M-F 

12-12:15 pm 
Motor Prods. Corp.. Roche. Williams & Clears- : 

MBS. Th 7:30-45 pm 
Motorola, Inc.. Aubrey. Finlav. Marley & Hodg- 
son: MBS, alt Sun 5:30-6 pm 
Mutual of Omaha, Bozell & Jacobs: NBC. Sun 

6-6:15 pm 
Natl Biscuit. Burnett: CBS. Tu 8-8:30 pm 
Nestlo Co.. Sherman & Marquette: CBS. W Th 

F S-8:30 pm (Power Plan) 
O'Cedar. Turner: ABC. M. \V. F 9-10 am 
Owens-Corning Flberglas, Fuller & Smith & Boss: 

CBS. M-F 10:15-30 am 
Pet Milk Co.. Gardner: NBC. W 9:30-10 cm: sat 

10:30-11 am 
Philco Corp.. Hutchlns: ABC. M-F 9-10 am: M- 

Tli 10:30-35 pm 
Philip Morris A Co., Blow: CBS. Sun 8:30-9 pm: 

W 9-9:30 pm 



Plllsbury Mills, 
pm: M-F 10 
CBS. M -F ■ 
Procter A Gamble. 
CBS. M-F 11: 
2:45-3 pm (alt 
Biow: CBS. W. 
10-10:30 am 
Prudential Life In! 
McClinton & Si 
Pure Oil. Burnett 
Quaker Oats Co. 

Tu, Th 11:30 
Radio Bible Class, 

Sun 10-10:30 
RCA. JWT: NBC. 
Ralston- Purina Co., B 
pm; ABC. Sat 103 
Realemon Puritan C«.. 

M. W, F 11 
Rexall Drug, BBDO: ( 
R. J. Reynolds Tob.. E«t 
pm ( Mu it i- Message, 
Mi; : NBC Sa: 'J ?■' 
Scholl, Donahue .V C« 
Seeman Bros.. Wm. H 

2:30-45 pm 

Serutan. Kletter: NBC. 

Skelly Oil. Henri. Hun 

Sat S-S:15 am; Sat 

Sonotone Corp.. Kudoa 

M 10:35-45 pm 



ISfew and renew 



HUM 




l, 



2. 



\i'tr MM I • 

SPONSOR 

Amir Cik Cm 
i Pall Mall' NY 

Avco Mfg Corp. Cinci 

Campbell Soup Co. 
Camden. N| 

Carter Prods. NY 

Cats Paw Rubber Co 

Bait 
Commercial Solvents 

Corp. NY 
Converted Rice. 

Houston. Tex 
Gillette Safety Raior 

Co. Boston 
Hoover Co. Chi 
Int'l Shoe Co. 

St Louis. Mo 
Kayvoodic Pipes. 

NY 
C. H. Masland Co 

Carlisle Pa 
Norgc Div. Borg-Warncr 

Ccrp. Chi 
P&C. Cinci 'Tide' 

Revlon Prods. NY 
Scrutan Co. Newark. 

N| 
Shwaydcr Bros. NY 

Simoniz Co. Chi 

Spcidcl Corp. 

Providence. Rl 
Tom Co. Chi 



AGENCY 

' SSCB NY 

Benton Bowks NY 
Ward Wheclock Phila 

SSCB. NY 

S A Lcvync. Bait 

Fuller Smith 

Ross. NY 
Leo Burnett Chi 

Maxon NY 

Leo Burnett. Chi 
DArcy. NY 

Crcy Adv. NY 

Anderson Cairns NY 

| Walter Thompson Chi 

Benton & Bowles. NY 

Wm H Wcintraub NY 
Edward Klcttcr NY 

Crcy Adv. NY 

SSCB. NY 

SSCB NY 

Leo Burnett, Chi 



SPONSOR 

Amer Machine & 

Foundry. NY 
Frigidaire Div. Cen 

Motors. Dayton Ohio 
Greyhound Corp, Chi 

Pillsbury Mills. Mpls 

Scott Paper Co 

Chester. Pa 
Tide Water Assoc Oil 

Co. NY 
Vitamin Corp of Amer. 

Newark. N| 



AGENCY 

Fletcher D. Richards. 

NY 
FC&B. Chi 

Beaumont Cr Hohman. 

Chi 
Leo Burnett. Chi 

|. Walter Thompson. NY 

Lcnncn & Newell. NY 

Kastor. Farrell. Chcslcy 
& Clifford. NY 



STATIONS PROGR/ ' • duration 

NBC TV 58 Doorway to Danger all F 9 9 30 pm 3 Jul • -> 

NBC TV 72 N.irm That Tunc alt M I 8 iO i 

NBC I. TV Soundsfagc F 9 30- 10 Bit 

7 wks 
CBS TV 55 Anyone Cm Win all T 9 9 30 pm M Jul 13 

CBS TV 56 Garry Mc I 30 45 pm IV, 

CBS TV 38 Rid B.rbu Sat 6 45 7 pm 12 Sep 13 wks 

CBS TV 54 Carry Moore Show; F 1 30-45 pm. II V, 

NBC TV 67 Sports Ncwsrecl F 10-10 30 pm 3 |ul thru 

CBS TV 47 Carry Moore Show M I 45-2 pm 14 Sep 5. -■ 

Du Mont y Tom Corbitt Sj ill Sat II 30 1 2 noon 

29 Aug. 20 wks 
NBC TV 59 B ck thi Bink T 8 30-9 pm 23 |u-- 

with 5 Day Deodorant Pads' 
CBS TV 51 Carry Moon Sho-v M I 30-45 pm 7 S . 

CBS TV 63 Carry Moore '.how Th 1 45 2 pm 10 Sep ' 

NBC TV 62 On Your Account T W F 4 4 30 pm I |ul 

13 wks 
CBS TV 33 TBA. Sat 10 30 11 pm 19 Sep 52 »• 

NBC TV 21 luvi rntr |u'v M 9-9 30 pm 6 |ul H -• 

NBC TV 58 Show of Shows Sat 9-10 30 pm; 10-min 

Sep. 13 wks 
NBC TV 58 Doorway to Dane r ill F 9-9 30 pm 3 |ul. 6 

NBC TV 72 Name That Tunc; alt M 8-8 30 pm 6 |ul 8 wks 

NBC TV 34 Place the Face; Th 8 30-9 pm 2 |ul 8 wks 



STATIONS PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

CBS TV 72 Omnibus; Sun 5-6 30 pm: partic sponsor 4 Oct 

26 wks 
CBS TV 59 Arthur Godfrey Tirrt T Th 1030-45 am 9 |ur 

52 wks 
CBS TV 72 Omnibus Sun 5-6 30 pm ; partic sponsor 4 Oct 

26 wks 
CBS TV 58 Arthur Godfrey & Friends alt W .8-8 30 pm 1 

Jul 26 telecasts 
CBS TV 72 Omnibus Sun 5-6 30 pm ; partic sponsor 4 Oct 

26 wks 
Du Mont 12 B way to Hollywood Th 8 30-9 pm ; 23 |ul 13 wks 

Du Mont 10 



Paul Dixon Show; M 3 45-55 seg 15 |unc 13 wks 

(For New National Spol Badi I T"V B /'"-'' - 






> 




3. 



%<lt*crl t.vifif} ,-ljj 

NAME 

Ben Alcock 
Eleanor Amanna 
Divid B A-nold 
Walter R Avis 

Wilmot T. Bartlc 
Mark Becker 



:i# /'ri'siiiii 

FORMER AFFILIATION 

B ow NY chg TV comml prodn dept 
Huber Hogc NY asst timcbuyer 
G-ay & Rogcs Phila media dir 
Zippo Mfg Co Bradford. Pa adv mgr 

Cities Sc-vice Petroleum NY adv dept 
Benton & Bowles. NY, memb Tide acct group 



NEW AFFILIATION 

•Ko vr> 
Same. radio-TV fimcbo. 
>iso partner 
•d & Assoc Chi sr assoc chg creative 
act • 
Morcy. Humm & lohnsfonc NY sis prom dept 
Same acct exec Ivory Snow 



In iuxi iuate: N™ «»!</ Re n e i ved <>n Radio Vetwork*. V» 
lional Broadcast SaleM Executive*, Sem tgenej tppouttmemt* 



J 






13 JULY 1953 



95 



.\«»ir and rvneir 



KML ft*. 








\ilrrrt i.Vl ><<; If/ettcij Personnel ffiai.- 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Thelma Beresin 
Gerald S. Corwin 
Lee Currlin 
Larry Donino 
Fred D. Dwyer 
Diane Fairbrother 
John R. Gillinghan 
jerry Gordon 
John B. Gray 
Jeremy Cury 
Alvin | Hetfield 
Stanley G. House 
James R. Johnson 
Crofron Jones 
Wauhillau La Hay 
Alfred A. Lawton 
Charles L. Lewin 
Tyler MacDonald 
Ken McAllister 
Ford C. McElligott 

William O. Mincher 
William A. Murray 

Albert Nahas 
Louis J. Nicolaus 
William E. Pensyl 
Dan Rodgers 
Ann Roush 
H. Richard Seller 

John M. Sharp 
jack Sinnott 
William Wall 
Orin E. Weir 
Roy Winsor 



Gray & Rogers, Phila, pub rel dir 

KVWO. Cheyenne, Wyo, sis consultant 

Wm. H. Weintraub, NY, timebuyer 

Ben Sackheim, NY. timebuyer 

Ingalls-Miniter. Bost, acct exec 

KSTP. KSTP-TV, Mpls, staff memb 

Electrical mfr, LA, adv mgr 

Sun Ray Drug Co, NY. sis prom mgr 

Maxon, Detr, copy chief 

Ted Bates, NY, sr copywriter 

N. W. Aycr, NY, acct exec, memb plans bd 

Labor Rel Inst, Wash, DC, ed-in-chief 

Campbell Soup, Camden, NJ, adv mgr 

Specialist, ind'l & tech prods mktg 

N. W. Ayer, NY, dir radio-TV publicity 

Whitehall Pharm, NY, prod mgr 

David D. Polon Co, NY, partner 

Authority, consumer sis & mdsg 

Benton & Bowles, NY, acct exec P&C Camay 

John H Riordan. LA. sr acct exec 

W. Earl Bothwell, NY. acct exec, asst to pres 
Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance, Detr, space 

buyer 
Huber Hoge. NY, radio-TV prodn 
Alan Radcliff Co, NY, mdsg consultant 
Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Pittsb, copy chief 
Biow, NY, acct supvr Whitehall Pharm 
Hockaway Assoc, NY, acct exec 
Don Allen &Assoc, Portland, Ore, sr acct exec, 

secy of bd 
Albert Frank-Guenther Law, NY, copywriter 
BBDO. NY. timebuyer 

Morey, Humm & Johnstone, acct exec Sinclair Oil 
Weir & Assoc. LA, owner 
Biow, NY. chg creative prog for radio & TV 



Sponsor Personnel Chant; 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Ambrose J. Addis 
John A Andrews 

Max Cohen 
John D. Davis 
William K Eastham 
William H. Ferriss 

R. J. Cunder 
Alden James 
Haskell Lowenstein 
Henry Markus 
Harry E. McCullough 

C. F. McGraw 

L. B. O'Loughlin 

A. B. Peterson 
William H. Scully 
Joseph L. Stevens 
Alfred F. Trell 

Raymond F. Underwood 
Robert Waddell 



Lever Bros. NY, adv vp, Pepsodent Div 

Landers, Frary & Clark, elec housewares div distr 

mgr, Houston 
Mogen David Wine Corp, Chi, pres 
Clopay Corp, Cinci, adv mgr 
Le«er Bros, NY, brand mdsg mgr. Lever Div 
Cen Shoe Corp, Nashville, copy chief, men's adv 

dept 
Hamilton Watch Co, Lancaster, Pa, sis prom mgr 
P. Lori Hard, NY, dir adv, memb bd dir 
Mogen David Wine Corp, Chi, sis dept 
Mogen David Wine Corp, Chi, exec vp 
Crosley Div, Avco Mfg. Cinci. sis mgr for radio 

& TV 
Crosley Div, Avco Mfg. Cinci, mgr for radio & TV.i 

Atlanta zone 
Electric Auto-Lite, Toledo, asst sis mgr. Spark 

Plug Div 
Leve: Bros, NY, mdsg vp, Pepsodent Div 
Lever B.-os, NY, adv mgr Good Luck Div 
Lever Bros. NY, asst sis mgr. Lever Div 
Hoffman Beverage Co, Newark, NJ, mgr in sis 

dept 
Lever Bros, NY, sis vp, Pepsodent Div 
Hamilton Watch Co, Lancaster, Pa, dir adv 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, also partner 

Manson-Gold-Miller, Mpls. creative dir. acct supvi I 

Benton & Bowles. NY. timebuyer P&C act 

Kenyon & Eckhardt. NY, timebuyer 

Same, also vp 

David Inc. St. Paul. radio-TV dir 

Walter McCreery. LA, acct exec 

Sherman & Marquette, NY, mdsg dept 

Same, also vp 

Benton & Bowles. NY. vp. copy sujvr 

Hicks & Creist, NY, dir mktg & res 

Harry W. Craff Inc, hd new office Wash, DC 

BBDO, NY, acct exec 

Hixson & Jorgensen, LA, vp chg ind'l mktg 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY, dir women's service div 

Paris & Peart, NY. asst acct exec 

Rockmore Co. NY. vp, dir radio & TV 

Hixson & Jorgensen, La, vp & acct supvr 

Same, acct supvr 

Ford C McElligott & Assoc. LA, owner inew 

fi:mi 
Rhoades & Davis. LA, vp. dir of mdsg 
Geyer Adv, media dir Detr office 

Same, radio-TV timebuyer 

Paris & Peart, NY. grocery mdsg dept 

Same, creative dir 

Same, also vp 

SmiMi, Hagel & Snyder, NY, acct exec 

H. Richard Seller Adv, Portland, Ore, owner inew 

firm I 
Paris & Peart. NY, asst acct exec 
Benton & Bowles, NY, timebuyer P&C acct 
W. B. Doner. Detr. acct exec 
Also Wes'.ern Adv. LA vp 
Same, also vp 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, mdsg vp, Pepsodent Div 

Same, sis devel mgr, elec housewares div 

Same chmn of the bd 
Simoniz Co, Chi, brand adv mgr 
Same, adv mgr Cood Luck Div 
Temco ' furnaces' . Nashville, adv mgr 

Same, dir adv & s!s prom 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, pres 

Same gen sis mgr for radio & TV 

Same, prod sis mgr for radio 

Same, sis mgr. Spark Plug Div 

Same, sis vp. Pepsodent Div 
Same, adv vp. Pepsodent Div 
Same, field sis mgr 
Same, asst gen sis mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr. Lever Div 
Same, dir pub rel 




ifafion Changes (reus, tietworh affiliation, poteer increases) 




KPQ. Wenatchee. Wash, new nat'l rep, Forjoe 

KQV Pittsb. now CBS Radio affil formerly Mutuali 

KSAN, KSAN-TV, San Francisco, new nat'l rep. McCillvra 

leff 1 Aug '53l 
KVOS, KVOS-TV, Bellingham, Wash., new nat'l rep. Forjoe 
WBAL-TV, Baltimore, power incr from 27 to 100 kw 
WBEL. Rockford. III. new rep. Don Rich, NY 
WBMS. Boston, new nat'l rep, Wm. C. Rambeau 



WHBQ. Memohis. new nat'l rep, John Blair 

WHYU, WACH-TV. Newport News. Va, new nat'l rep, Avery- 

Knodel 
WKTV, Utica. NY, power increased to 221.8 kw 
WMMN. Fairmont. W. Va.. sold by Storer Bdcstg Co to 

Peonies Bdcstg Corp 
WORZ Orlando. Fla. new nat'l rep. 0. L. Taylor 
WVDA i formerly WNAO. Boston, now ABC Radio affil 



\ umbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new ca/egor\ 

Charles R. Lewin 1 3 1 

R. /■'. I nderwood i 1 1 
//' . k. Eastham (4 » 
William If all < 3 > 
Jeremy (iur\ (3) 

Hired F. Trell I H 
Stanley House (3) 
R. J. (, under I 1 I 

//. McCullough I ti 
Km. H. Scully I 1 1 




96 



SPONSOR 




Five television stations offer an audience within 
"WHO-land". We say "an audience" because 
WHO's 0.5 MV area is 244.4% larger than the 
five TV markets combined! 

The largest all-Iowa TV market has 131,964 tele- 
vision homes (see Telestatus, Page 45 in Broad- 
casting-Telecasting for June 22). The 1952 SAM 
Report credits WHO with 625,546 daytime 
families, 600,255 nighttime families — about half 
of whom bate two or more home radio sets' 

50,000-watt WHO is an old-established lowi 
institution which for almost thirty \ears has 
meant "good listening" to millions of people — 
"a good buy" to thousands of advertisers. What's 



more. WHO likes its advertisers, and our adver- 
tisers like us because of results. Nov. more than 
ever, WHO is Iowa's greatest advertising value! 



WHO 

+ for Iowa PLUS + 



Dm Mo! 




Moihm . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer. President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident .Manager 



I HI I 8 PI II K». INC. 
N.i i inn. 1 1 Repreeeatatrvea 



13 JULY 1953 



97 



Wh.. H. S»i«s *• •-* 



Memphis Spins the Dial to 560 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES JOHN BLAIR & CO., INC. 



98 



SPONSOR 








lick Covington Does More-Much Afore -Than Spin Records 
...He Sets Sales Records! Here's Evidence... 

(R. C. A. Victor Distributor) 

"Covington's Corner top pop record show in Memphis and 
Tri-State area.'' 

— A. J. Kisner, Manager 

R.C.A. Victor Record Deportment 

(M.G.M. Distributor) 

"The Dick Covington record show the most effective means 
of promoting and exploiting the M.G.M. record label in 
Memphis and Mid-South." 

— Bill Taylor 

Sales Representative 

(Decca Distributor) 

". . . according to our sales figures . . . there's no question 
about which Pop Jockey' is champ in this area.' 

— Bob Adams 

R. L. Adams, Manager 
Record Department 
Stratton-Warren Hardware Co. 

(Columbia Distributor) 

"... When I hear Dick play one of our records (Columbia) 
I feel assured of being able to move a considerable quantity 
of this particular record . . . not only a large listening audi- 
ence, but more important ... a buying audience." 

— Woodson, Bozeman, Inc. 
Bob Byr n 
Record Department Manager 

Why not add a proven salesman to your sales staff? 




Memphis' Mutual Station/ Hotel Chisca 

560 kc, 5000 Waffs Day, 1000 Watts Night 

John Cleghorn, General Manager 



and soon . . . 






tt 




13 JULY 1953 



99 




ATLANTA 



WAGA 



5000w 590kc 

CBS 

RADIO 



ONLY A COMBINATION 

OF STATIONS CAN 

COVER GEORGIA'S 

MAJOR MARKETS 



THE G 



E " GVA TRW 



MACON 



WMAZ 



10,000w 940kc 

CBS RADIO 



*< 



K 



ATLANTA 



SAVANNAH 



WTOC 



CBS RADIO 



SAVANNAH 






MACON 



s 

\ 
t 
v 



\ 

i 

* 

i 

v 






the TRIO offers 

advertisers at 

one low cost: 



CONCENTRATED 

COVERAGE 

• 
MERCHANDISING 

ASSISTANCE 

• 

LISTENER LOYALTY 

BUILT BY LOCAL 

PROGRAMMING 

• 

DEALER LOYALTIES 



represented 
individually and 
as a group by 


X--' 

in 3 major markets 


THE K ATZ 


AGENCY, INC. 


NEW YORK CHICAGO 


DETROIT ATLANTA DALLAS KANSAS CITY LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 


100 


SPONSOR 



E223 SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 




radio 




f 



WITH DAYTIME CROWDED, NIGHTTIME UPSURGE MAY BE DUE 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

U. How do .vpof rarfio availabil ities shape up for lull? P*'*l*' "'- 

U, Is nighttime spot radio increasing in vnlue? P»ge 194 

MM- Will there he any not€thle rate trends this fall? /»'"/«' l#S 

|| B How have the "singU'-rate" selling plans been doing? pugv lll.'t 

JUm What iicir gardstieks are used todag to hug spot ratlio? />"<?<' 'W» 

||. What role are transeriptions. libraries p'rn/inr/ in spot? P"<7<* ""»' 

l{. \re there ang new developments in \egro programing? P"f/<' l'-H 

|J. ffoir do advertisers Seel about Storecasting? P<*qe ISC 

|| a Is Transit Radio on the wag out? pnge I.IR 

13 JULY 1953 101 



Availabilities 



Q. How's the pattern of spot ra- 
dio time availabilities shaping up 
for fall? 

A. SPONSOR editors learned from both 
buyers and sellers of spot radio that 
the picture will l>e \er\ similar to that 
of fall 1952. Here's how it shapes up: 

1. Morning slots: Like last year, 
morning radio availabilities are the 
most sought-after item in spot radio 
with squeeze play centering on 6:00 to 
9:00 a.m. period. Newscasts, or one- 
minute slots next to newscasts, are still 
most popular with advertisers; high- 
rated morning participation shows run 
a close second. 

W hat complicates the picture is that 
there are more advertisers and agen- 
cies chasing fewer openings in the 6:00 
to 9:00 a.m. period than there were a 
year ago. 

Naturally something's got to give. 
1 sually its the station's nighttime rate 
card (see section to follow on rate out- 
look) or the station's morning traffic 
schedule that's modified. 

"We've got all of our national spot 
advertisers on a rotating schedule be- 
tween six and nine in the morning," 
the top sales executive of a leading 
radio rep told sponsor. "That's the 



only way we can fit the majority of 
our clients into morning schedules." 

The attractiveness of morning radio 
is easy to understand. I Perhaps it's 
too easy, some shrewd buyers feel.) 
Morning radio faces little TV compe- 
tition, or else shows up way ahead 
of TV. It's true that prices have moved 
upward as morning's advertising popu- 
larity increased, but larger audiences 
are often delivered due to radio home 
growth. Audience composition includes 
a sizable number of men as well as 
women. Except for the obvious hassles 
of turning up good availabilities, time 
Inning presents few mental hurdles or 
involved research calculations (one 
reason why so many spot radio clients 
like it). 

2. Late a.m., afternoons: Well-rated 
slots become easier to find in spot ra- 
dio during the late morning. Reason: 
The male element of the audience nose- 
dives after 8:30 or 9:00 a.m. in most 
major markets as the man of the house 
leaves for his job. Thus many adver- 
. tisers who have a product to sell pri- 
marily to men via morning spot radio 
(such as Mennen Shave products. Sil- 
ver Star Blades, or Armstrong Tires) 
lose interest in the morning segment 
of spot radio after 9:00 a.m. 

Also many advertisers who seek a 
combined male-female audience I like 



1IIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



KEY SPOT RADIO TRENDS 



NIGHTTIME RADIO 



Definite move is on among major agencies and 
spot clients to re-explore value of nighttime 
radio. TV j right is beginning to wear off 



MORNING RADIO 



//'5 standing room only on many stations as pop- 
ularity of breakfast-time segments continues. 
Some clients will buy only the early mornings 



SINGLE RATES 



Between a third and a half of radio outlets in 
TV-saturated areas have switched to a single 
rate card for day and night. More will follow 



YARDSTICKS 



Scientific buying is the rule, not the excep- 
tion, among top agencies and advertisers, with 
heavy use made of NCS and SAM coverage data 



TRANSCRIPTIONS 



Trend is on to lowered prices of e.t. shows for 
spot use. Producers are also luring sponsors 
uttli extensile merchandising, promotion services 



the non-filter-tip cigarettes, beer firms, 
candy concerns I will ease their re- 
el uests for morning slots after nine. 

This by no means leaves the avail- 
ability field wide open. Food compa- 
nies, soap companies, and drug adver- 
tisers are active in spot radio all 
through morning and afternoon, par- 
ticularh seeking minute spots or chain- 
breaks next to well-rated network or 
local shows. 

However the noon hour, like the pre- 
breakfast hours, shows a sizable male 
audience and thus is fairly tight as re- 
gards availabilities. 

3. Evenings, late night: From the 
timebuyer's viewpoint, the easiest por- 
tion of the day in which to buy a time 
slot is between the hours of 7:30 and 
10:30 p.m.. as it was last year. Reason: 
It is during these hours that tele- 
vision's biggest inroads on radio, as 
measured by the existing rating and 
coverage services, have been made. 

However, station rate adjustments 
and more extensive research into the 
size, composition, and behavior of the 
evening radio audience are producing 
many excellent buys for advertisers. 

In order to lure many of radio's T\ - 
shy advertisers back into the evening 
fold, stations are grouping their eve- 
ning availabilities (usually, chain- 
breaks next to network shows and min- 
ute spots next to local programs) into 
package arrangements with attractive 
prices or sizable discounts. 

Another factor which affects the 
value, if not the amount, of evening 
radio spot availabilities is the "single- 
rate" price structure, in which evening 
prices have come down to the same 
level as daytime rates. (This will be 
discussed later in this report.) 

Since the number of radio homes in 
the nation (nearly 45 million I is at a 
near-saturation level and since TV 
viewing takes a big drop after 10:30 
p.m., the value of late-night and all- 
night radio has climbed. And as the 
value has increased, many stations 
have pushed their sign-off further and 
further ahead, meanwhile experiment- 
ing with a variety of different late- 
night program formats. 

Timebuvers have an increasing choice 
in the hours between 10:30 and mid- 
night, and between midnight and dawn, 
of shows which range from all-night 
classical music through the standard 
disk jockev formats to nightclub inter- 
views of celebrities. 

Reps reported considerable interest 
in late-night and all-night radio on the 



102 



SPONSOR 




Station Heps l.vsii. spot clinics further umh-r vf a nrfiiif; of hoth htiuvr autl seller 

Throughout the year, groups oj station reps and admen are b 
together by the Station Representatives Issociation in 
informal monthly sessions to discuss problems oj buying and selling 
spot radio, and neu ways t" streamline complex procedures, fu- 
ture* above show several of these meetings. Top left: i/. to r.\ 
R< g Rolhnson. SR I: Rn hard F. Goebel, advertising mat 
nestle (o.: Donald ( inl\. general advertising and merchandising 
manager ot Westle; Art McCoy, ivery-Knodel ; John Beaton, John 
Blair Co. Top right: i seated I Stan I'ulver. director of broadcast 
media. Lexer Bros.: Tom Flanagan, SRA; 'standing) David O' Mara, 
Lever Bros.; Taylor Eldon, Branham Co.; William Wilson. J. E. 
Pearson Co.; Joseph Daly, Lever Bros.; Fred Weuberth, I 
Knodel; John Doyle, ilton Copeland, Lever Bros.; Rollinson, *>R t 
Middle left: Rollinson. SRA; Don WcVickar, a t Inderson & 
Cairns agency; John Dugda/e. advertising manager, Rootes ' 
Victor Seydel, radio-TV dir.. A&C; Tom Campbell, Rranhu- 
Middle right: Rollinson, SRA; R. Stewart Ro\d. advertising man- 



John Blair 
■npert. advertising mana% 
\at'l I mpbell, Branhan I Lower /« " lunch- 

eon meeting with SSC&B C 

SRA: T. Richards ' Curran, T. II- Reed 

SSC&B; S 

Robert ' - - ' S 

T. Flanagan, SR t F. Mind 
' S Lower right: Rollinson, >R 1 

'. Robert : e manager. 

'■ 

•*R I and admr 
\ City at the 

Flanagan and Rollin* 

go on to dis 'ating pri 

amount oi agent t-rep pa and other related spot I 



13 JULY 1953 



103 




Under auspices of Broadcast Music Inc., nearly 50 radio clinics have 
been held in various parts of U.S. At these sessions, radio broad- 
casters and personnel exchange ideas, learn new techniques and hear 
panel discussions by experts. Left: Managers Carl Vandagrift, WOWO; 



Lester Spencer, WKBV; W. Rippetoe, WBOW at Indianapolis radio 
clinic. Right: Don McKee, comml. mgr., KOEL; Jack Kerrigan, pro- 
gram dir., WHO; Managers Bob Dillon. KRNT; Art Skinner, WSAl; 
also Cliff Jones, WHO; Ed Jenkins, KOEL, at Des Moines radio clinic 



part of leading advertisers, but most 
told sponsor that there was still a wide 
choice of late p.m. availabilities at 
low prices. 



Nighttime spot radio 

Q. Are there any new trends or 
developments in nighttime spot 
radio at the buyer level? 

A. Although nighttime spot radio is 
still viewed by many agencies as being 
a second-class buy (Y&R, for example, 
terms it "unstable' 1 and prefers morn- 
ing and afternoon slots), the tide of 
advertiser interest seems about to turn 
again to where it used to be. 

An increasingly typical view of 
nighttime spot was voiced to SPONSOR 
by Mike Donovan, one of McCann- 
Erickson's top timebuyers. He said: 

"We and our clients have been 
looking at nighttime radio with much 
more interest than in past seasons. We 
are looking for 'efficiency" in all time 
segments of radio. We're trying to 
avoid concentrating on any arbitrary 
'curfews' which limit us to morning or 
afternoon buying." 

Q. What's behind the revival of 
advertiser interest in nighttime 
spot radio? 

A. Two things — research and rep 
salesmanship. Several of the leading 
reps— John Blair, CBS Radio Sales. 
Katz. Petry. to name some of the most 
active in this respect — have prepared 
extensive research investigations into 
nighttime spot. The results are now a 
basic part of the fall selling by these 
rep outfits. 

I air last month Blair fired off the 



first round of promotion ammunition 
concerning nighttime spot with a series 
of trade paper ads. mailings, and per- 
sonal pitches. 

Blair's research arsenal is an analy- 
sis of evening and early-morning radio 
sets-in-use, individual station ratings, 
and listeners-per-set prepared for the 
rep firm by Pulse and Nielsen. These 
were the highlights: 

1. The study covered a dozen Blair- 
represented radio outlets, all in major 
radio-TV markets that ranked within 
the top 50 U. S. market areas. 

2. The regular monthly Pulse. Inc. 
rating reports were averaged for the 
periods 6:00 to 9:00 a.m. and 6:00 to 
9:00 p.m.. Monday-Friday. Sets-in-use. 
ratings, and listeners-per-set were com- 
pared. A similar study was done for 
the Pacific Coast states, covering Blair- 
represented Don Lee Network, using 
the Pacific Coast Nielsen Radio Index 
as the basis. 

3. All the stations covered in the 
s'udy are on a "single-rate" basis, with 
night rates equaling day. 

4. Result: Blair's research chief. W. 
Ward Dorrell, soon learned that in 
every instance sets-in-use. ratings, and 
listeners-per-set averaged higher dur- 
ing the evening period under study 
than during the daytime period. Fig- 
ures: Nighttime sets-in-use ranged from 
5% to 125^? higher. Ratings were 
higher in a range from 9' < to 15.V< . 
Lhteners-per-set were 6 r v to 28' < 
higher than daytime. 



Q. To what extent do clients in- 
sist today on arbitrary "curfews" 
in radio? 

A. A surprising number of clients 
and agencies have cut-off points in ra- 



dio. Generally this is based on the 
theory that morning or daytime radio 
i? the only low-cost buy in the spot 
radio medium. 

But timebuyers today agree that this 
situation will probably change in the 
near future as clients re-evaluate radio 
generally, and as the rep selling pres- 
sure behind nighttime spot radio con- 
tinues. Single-rate selling, higher 
morning prices, and the general squeeze 
for morning and daytime availabilities 
are already leading up to relaxation of 
such "curfews'" as these: 

Old Gold — Since Old Gold seeks a 
male-female audience at low cost, the 
Lorillard tobacco firm virtually insists 
that its agency timebuyers observe an 
8:00 a.m. "curfew." Old Gold dropped 
nighttime chainbreaks completely last 
year. But every indication is that the 
cigarette firm will change its mind and 
its buying policies when fall rolls 
around. 

Pall Mall — Like several other ciga- 
rette firms (Camel. Chesterfield I Pall 
Mall uses 8:30 to 9:00 a.m. as its cut- 
off point in spot radio and rarely buys 
anything else. Reason: same as Old 
Gold's theory. 

Liptons Frostee — This Lever-owned 
food account let reps know recently 
that it wasn't interested in spot radio 
after 2:00 p.m. General Foods made 
a similar statement, telling reps they 
wouldn't buy spot radio "after the 
hour Kate Smith conies on NBC T\ . 

Other accounts — In interviewing a 
number of leading timebuyers, spon- 
sor was told that most large soap, 
food. drug. beer, baked-goods. and 
grocerv-sold products have shown a 
basic preference for morning (6:00 to 
9:00 a.m. I slots and will buy after 

The general situation is more likely 






104 



SPONSOR 




Area sales clinics were held by Broadcast Advertising Bureau in co- 
ordination with BMI. Here are two recent meetings. Above, left: 
Ben Gimble, WIP; Bill Ryan. BAB; Bill Dawson. WARM; Don Thorn- 
burgh. WCAU; Bob Teter, KYW; Ralf Brent, WIP; John Booth. WCHA 



Above, right: Hartford. Conn, clinic. Bob Feldman. WHYN Dick 
Chalmers. WICC; Cy Kaplan. WONS; Gary Hatg.r. WICC Davd 
Kenney. WICC; Walter Johnson. WTIC Denial Kops (chairman of 
the station panel). WAVZ William Ry«n, presidont of BAB. Inc. 






to change in favor o\ "We'll bu) what- 
evei looks good rather than "We bu) 
uiiK between certain hours ol the day" 
i- new research and new prices catch 
MP lo advertiser buying habits. 



Itato oni look 

Q. What changes, if any, are an- 
ticipated for fall in spot radio 
■ates? 

\. \ year ago, tin- words "rate cut" 
>articularU as applied to nighttime 
•not radio brought "no comment* 9 re- 
gies from broadcasters and reps. 

This year however the situation is 
lifferent. and nighttime rate-cutting 
ias become an established part of the 
all -pot radio picture. 

Between 30 and .">()', of the major 




radio outlets in I \ areas, sponsor 
learned in a checkup with all leading 
reps, have adjusted theii rate sti u< ture 
to a "single-rate" basis. I ndei this 
system evening rate- parallel daytime 
rates, bringing them in line realistical- 
l\ with the audiences stations have i" 
ofTei during the da) and night. \n 

other LO to I '•>' ■ of the nation's radio 
station- in video markets, SPONSOR'S 

sources felt, will make the "single- 
rate" changeovei between the summer 
and fall ol this year. 

Far from squelching the news "I 
such rate re\ isions reps toda) are using 
them as the basis for man) aggressive 
selling campaigns and are [reel) recom- 
mending the "single-rate" price struc- 
ture to most of their stations which 
face heav) TV competition. Exception: 
Stations that now have sizable spol ra- 






Comparison Don I,ee Averagp Ratings and Seta :n Use 
• 9 I' M Mom. Fri « 9 A M ■ ■ , Mia 100 , 



loar. 




KI6HT 




DAY 



NIGHT 



Hep firms help spur 
revived enthusiasm 
for niuhttime spot 

I hart .ll left was rtrenth 
Compiled for John Itlair rep 
li nil ;i« part of series of 

comparisons of daj unl flight 
radio in Blair markets. \a 

figure- reveal, lioth ratings 
and -i-t--in-u-e are up during 
evening hours in Hon I • 
area. Other reps like Kai/. 
CBS Radio Spol Sales, Petri . 
Weed and others «re active!} 
promoting nighttime spol 
radio for fall campaigns 



Oon L## Av»,nq« Rotingt 



I JULY 1953 



Selt in Ut* 



. ontrai ts -it nighl and siz 
nighttime audiences are not lik<K i.. 
tamper w 1 1 h nighttime rates. 

( in the othei hand, there ma) !«• 
Borne upward revisions .>r reclassifica- 
tion of r j l ■ . r r 1 1 m - rates, path, ulaih in 

1 ning -I"!-. But, as in evening 

n \ isions, stations w ill attempt these 
morning pi ii e Ink.- onl) if the < om- 
petitive situ ition justifies an in< n 

Q. What factors usually govern a 

changeover to a "single-rate" price 

structure? 

A. I Inn'- no Bel pattern. I he - 

moment at whit h a station is iik»-l % t" 

bring nighl rate- in line h ilh i\.i\ 1 

depends on several thii 

1 . hit ertiser pressure: I ithei di- 
re il\ . 01 through ients to- 
da) are exei I ood deal of 

sure on -1 itions to esl iblish "sii 
rate" Belling. I it ms like l'\i '.. I ever, 
< olgate, and Bristol-Myers have often 
n ade their feelings • lear. I he -tt 
■ •-1 lure, ol ••■in-.- 1- the promise, di- 
re* l "i implied, that there'll I..- ■ 
business f'>r the station if the i 
lime i, it.-- ... doH n. < in.- lead 
rette firm, spom - - un\. h a 

standing "lT.-i t.- radio stations in l\ 
- not now i>n a one-rate basis, ihe 
«.lTer: Double the number of annou 
ments running on the station if the 
"single-rate" -tru< lure i- established. 

2. />'• p pre si Most stations lo- 
• it.-.l outside the advertising < enta i 
Mew ^ ■ -rk. Hollywood, .m.l Chi 
look t.. theil • fatherh .\-\\ it <■ 
about what's inside the larg- 

md client offices. Tl 
fore the recommend il at ition 

>t of weight in the matter 
lowering nighttime and ra;- 

105 



morning radio rates. It's traditional 
that a good rep knows what the traffic 
will hear — as well as what it won't. 

3. Radio research: At all levels of 
the s|>ol radio medium today — clients. 
agencies, reps, and man) stations — 
rating charts and coverage figures are 
being \iewed the way a fruit farmer 
watches the frost forecasts. When the 
figures show that a station's nighttime 
ratings arc looking more and more like 
the daytime levels, a changeover to 
single-rate selling often gets under 
way. Reps and stations both realize 



today that this changeover is usually 
beneficial to business. 



Spot radio yardsticks 



Q. Are the yardsticks used to buy 
radio today different than those of 
last year? 

A. Both buyers and sellers today are 
making wide use of new research tools 
in the radio field, such as: 

1. New coverage data: Instead of 
1949 BMB statistics with penciled-in 



The NOSE-ZEST 




All Pittsburgh just has to listen to Radio Pittsburgh — the station 
with a nose for news. Sharp, documented news coverage ALL 
DAY by HERB MORRISON and his WJAS news staff, estab- 
lishing WJAS as Pittsburgh's radio NEWS leader. 

FIRST — with a report of the Steel settlement ... A FULL SEVEN 
MINUTES BEFORE the wire services. 

FIRST — with on-the-spot interviews with the principals in the 
steel dispute. 

FIRST — with on-the-spot reports of the Worcester, Mass. tor- 
nado disaster. 

No wonder all Pittsburgh naturally turns to WJAS ALL DAY 
for complete news coverage. 



Serving the 
GREATER PITTSBURGH 
5000 Watts Metropolitan 

1320 KC. r , 

Area... 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Georae P. Holiinoberv Co. 



projections, timebuyers this year are 
using the new Nielsen Coverage Ser- 
vice or Standard Audit and Measure- 
ment Service data for both) in pur- 
chasing spot radio. Particularly among 
NCS-using agencies, coverage data are 
being used to pick not only the radio 
stations with the best coverage and 
circulation stories but also to pick sta- 
tions on the basis of their ability to 
attract audiences from different socio- 
economic or geographic levels. 

2. New data on out-oj-home: Pulse. 
Inc. has expanded its out-of-home 
checkups on radio to the point where 
this "bonus audience" is measured in 
virtually all the Pulse-rated areas (see 
Radio Basics section I. Also the Niel- 
sen Coverage Service and the Broad- 
cast Advertising Bureau have done 
studies on auto listening — out-of- 
home's biggest single component. 
These reports are helping timebuvers 
to choose stations and availabilities 
with big out-of-home audiences as well 
as aiding advertisers in determining 
the best time to reach motorists. 

3. New ivays to project ratings: 
Many of the old formulas for project- 
ing essentially unprojectable radio 
ratings I Pulse. Hooper) against the 
coverage of a station to get cost-per- 
1.000 homes are being discarded in 

1 favor of a newer technique developed 
b\ the Station Representatives Associ- 
ation. I See "Needed: a way to project 
ratings" 18 May 1953 SPONSOR, page 
37 i . Under the SRA formula — now in 
use by a number of agencies — radio 
gets a much fairer shake. 

The process is essentially this: The 
total number of radio homes in a 
station's home county is divided by 
the weekly day or night number of 
homes that regularly tune the station. 
I A daytime weekly audience figure is 
used if the purchase is a daytime one: 
nighttime figures if time buying is done 
for nighttime slots. 1 The result of this 
long division is a figure by which the 
station's total weekly audience I again 
dav or night) is multiplied. Then the 
untouched rating is projected against 
this figure for a cost-per- 1.000 homes. 



Transcribed shows 






106 



Q. What are the latest trends in 
the transcribed radio program 
field? 

A. A check of the major transcribed 
radio program firms establishes the 

SPONSOR 



TtL /?W and Dad 



]fl/e had grig QJicuui Snow fbdau ■•■• 

This Spring, at the specific request of the Armed Forces, a troupe of WSM 
Grand Ole Opry Stars flew to Korea to bring a hit of home to the hoys in the 
fox-holes, half a world away. They went because of all the entertainment 
available in the nation, our soldiers preferred the Grand Ole Opry. 

This letter, written by one of the many thousands whose lives were lifted out 
of the fox-holes by the Grand Ole Opry for a little while, tells a compelling 
story of what a single program on a single station has come to mean to a whole 
people! 

Kimpo A ir Base, Korea 

"Another day gone and another one ready to take its place. It soon gets s<> one da] 
is like the other. (I just looked at the calendar and saw it's Saturday, r'rida> "here \ on 
are. ) 

Today was sure different than any so far since I've been here. What accounted lm it f 
Well, I'll tell you. We had one grand show today. Ernest Tuhh and his Texas Trout). i- 
dours. Hank Snow and Lew Childre, and other Grand Ole Oprj st.us rcilh ^.i\< n- .1 
good show. Hank Snow opened the show, singing "I'm Movin' On," "Golden Rocket," 
and other songs he mad- famous. Then the Troubadours took over for a while. Ernie 
Tubb gave his show, Lew Childre gave us laughs, songs and Ins imitation dance, then tins 
all got together and cut up and acted a fool for a while. The whole show lasted almost 
two hours. I almost felt like crying when they had to stop. That's how much I liked it. 
I guess it's because we don't have much to do for entertainment, and when we get some- 
thing good for a change, just don't want to let it go. And too, it reminded DM <>i Satu r day 
nights at home. We sure did have us a time. Surprised me how main hillbillies then ..u 
here at Kimpo. We were in an open theatre, and I mean it was packed. 

I guess it seems funny to you, us going crazy over a simple show that >ou hear e\i rj 
Saturday, but over here it's something special to us." 

(Name on Request' 



No wonder WSM and WSM's Grand Ole Opry has become the greatest single 
selling force in America. Tom Harrison, or any Petry Man, can fill in the de- 
tails for you. 




13 JULY 1953 



107 



fart that business is good. \\ ith the 
bigger-than-ever spot radio business 
and the still-high costs of TV, more 
and more advertisers have been bank- 
rolling transcribed shows. There is a 
new trend, noted over the past year 
especialh by the Harry S. Goodman 
and Charles Michelson organizations, 
toward multi-sponsorship of tran- 
scribed programs rather than single 
sponsorships. This reflects tightening 
of radios belt on the local level. 

Business is up 21', since last year, 
reports the Frederic W. Ziv Co. which 
continues to produce transcribed shows 



on a lavish scale and surrround them 
with merchandising and showmanship. 
Last January it re-issued its Guy Lom- 
bardo show in a big promotional 
splash involving the giving away of 
fistfuls of Gruen watches to winners of 
a "Mystery Melody" contest. Just a 
few weeks ago, Ziv put a new drama 
show, Movietoivn Radio Theatre, on 
sale and at presstime had already sold 
it to over 250 stations. Ziv will an- 
nounce a new show shortly which, it 
states, is to be "the largest ever pro- 
duced" by the company. 

The 450 sponsors who used the 



DONT BE FOOLED 




ABOUT ROCHESTER 



IN ROCHESTER Pulse surveys and rates the 422 weekly 
quarter-hour periods that WHEC is on the air. Here's the 
latest score: 



STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION 

WHEC B C D E 



FIRSTS 267 



TIES 



32 



103 
30 



12 

1 



STATION 

F 



Station on 
'til iumtt only 



WHEC carries ALL of the "top ten" daytime shows! 
WHEC carries SIX of the "top ten" evening shows! 

LATEST PULSE REPORT BEFORE CLOSING TIME 
BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 



WHEC 



■MMMbwc EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc. N«w York, CMcooo, LEE F. O'CONNEll CO.. Lo< Ang«(ei, San Francisco 






eJ&l 



NEW YORK 
5,000 WATTS 



syndicated shows produced by RCA 
Recorded Program Services the first 
six months of 1953 represent a 20' '< 
increase over the same period last year, 
according to A. B. Sambrook. manager 
ol the division. In TV markets, the 
use of RCA transcribed radio shows 
has dropped off, temporarily, the com- 
panj feels, with the high costs of video 
restoring demands for low-cost syndi- 
cated programs on radio. The number 
of stations using RCA shows is 1(1' I 
over 1952; Sambrook forecasts a 25'; 
increase in dollar volume the last half 
of 1953. 

Everett Goodman of the Harry S. 
Goodman organization states that the 
number of stations using their shows 
has risen at least 10'; over last year. 
"We are selling a lot more shows to 
radio stations today than ever before 
in our history." he savs. "Not only are 
more stations buying from us. but the 
unit sales have also risen: Where we 
used to sell one show to a station, we 
new sell five or six. Though our dol- 
lar volume is only slightlv higher than 
last year, our contract volume is wa\ 
up due to more sales at lower prices, 
mostly in TV markets." 

The stations in turn, states Good- 
man, are selling the shows to more ad- 
vertisers than ever before, but are in- 
creasingly allowing multiple sponsor- 
ship of the program-. 

Goodman has worked out a special 
sales package plan for advertisers 
called "Operation Buckshot" which en- 
ables national or regional advertisers 
to buy any one or more of 11 tran- 
scribed shows for multi-market use at 
a much lower cost than prev iouslv l for 
details, see "cost" question below 1. 

Charles Michelson says that business 
has increased over 30^ since last 
year; the firm's production budget, 
however, has decreased. 

The trend toward the selling of 
transcribed programs to several par- 
ticipating local sponsors by stations 
has been noted by Michelson, too. Sta- 
tions are selling as many as five par- 
ticipating announcements on a half- 
hour program, he reports: three one- 
minute pitches — opening, middle, and 
closing: and two announcements be- 
fore the opening and after the closing 
commercials. 

Ziv. on the other hand, has not noted 
any special trend toward multiple spon- 
sorship of its shows, but there may be 
some indication of another trend in its 
report that more than 70 of the 250 
sales so far of Movietoivn Radio The- 



108 



SPONSOR 





We measure by results. Because 
WIP gets results.* 
More advertisers than ever before, 
recognizing this, are buying WIP. 
Why don't you . . . See for yourself ! 



'Proven success stone* on request 



W I 




610 KC 



Jllaiional ftefitesenfaiives 
EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



P H I I A I 
13 JULY 1953 



E L P H I A ' S 



PIONEER 



VOICE 



109 



aire have been to station;- which are 
using it for on-the-air promotion of 
their sponsors and programs. The ex- 
tensive exploitation scheme available 
with the program may be partly re- 
sponsible for this way of utilizing the 
new Xi\ drama show. 



Q. What advertisers are using 
transcribed programs? 

A. All four of the transcription firms 
surveyed reported healthy increases in 
the number of advertisers buying their 
shows. Xi\ records 600 different ad- 
vertisers as using or having used its 
Communist for the FBI program, now 
in its second year. These include such 
national names as General Electric. 
Kaiscr-Frazer. Corn Products Refining 
(Mazola) and. regionally, Carolina 
Power & Light, Mid-Continental Oil. 
and Farmers Insurance Group. RCA 
boasts among sponsors of its shows 
such firms as Borden, General Elec- 
tric, Frigidaire, Charles Antell. Proc- 
ter & Gamble, and Jacob Ruppert 
Brewery. 

Brewers (at least 150), auto dealers 
and bakeries are the leading categories 
of sponsors using Charles Michelson's 
productions. Pabst Brewing is spon- 



soring the Phil Rizzuto Sports Caravan 
program in several markets; Lever 
Bros, uses the firm's soap operas in 
markets not covered by its network ra- 
dio and TV purchases; other Michel- 
son advertisers include Pontiac Deal- 
ers, Nash Dealers, General Motors, 
Qualitv Bakers of America. General 
Baking (Bond Bread), Blackstone 
Washing Machine and Squire-Dingee 
(new Midwest advertiser, maker of Ma 
Brown food products). 

Q. What are the current costs of 
transcribed programs? 

A. As always, costs of transcribed 
syndicated programs vary widely, de- 
pending on the station and the size of 
the market. Both Ziv and RCA report 
a sponsor can buy their shows for 
about the same as last year (RCA pro- 
grams range from $3 to $150 per pro- 
gram). But Goodman and Michelson 
point to reduced costs. An advertiser 
can purchase a Goodman soap opera 
for from $3 to $75 per program; a 
dramatic show for from $6 to $200 a 
stanza. Michelson says that since sta- 
tion time rates have gone down some- 
what and since his shows are based on 
time rates, there has been a 5 to 10/r 




YOUR PRODUCT I N 
TEXAS' LARGEST SPANISH- 
LANGUAGE MARKET! 



40 National Accounts 



ARE NOW USING KCOR, SAN ANTONIO TO SELL 
THE BIG 45 COUNTY MARKET 



Anacin 




Cheer 




Jax Beer 


Black Flag 




Coca Cola 




Joy 


Bordens Milk 




Crustene 




Lone Star Beer 


Breeze 




Dickies Clothes 




Lucky Strike 


Camay 




Fab 




Lilt 


Camels 




Falstatf Beer 




Lydia Pinkham 


Cameo Starch 




4-way Cold Tablets 


Maxwell House 


Carnation 




Feenamint 




Mercury 


Champ Dog Food 




Folgers Coffee 




Mejoral 


Charles Antell 




Crand Prize Beer 




Oxydol 


* WRITE 


FOR 


THE NEW 


BELDEN LATIN-AAv 



Packard 
Pearl Beer 
Purasnow Flour 
Royal Crown 
SSS Tonic 
Shinola 
Stanback 
Steins Clothes 
Supreme Crackers 
Tide 



SURVEY 



5000 Watts Day — 1000 Watts Night 
KCOR Bldg., San Antonio, Texas 



Richard O'Connell 

KCOR New York Manager 
New York, N. Y. 

Harlan J. Oakes & Associates 

Los Angeles, San Francisco & Chicago 

TEXAS' FIRST AND MOST POWERFUL 
SPANISH-LANCUACE STATION 



reduction in his program costs to ad- 
vertisers. 

In an attempt to reduce costs not 
oidy a small percentage but a great 
deal for a national or regional adver- 
tiser interested in selected multi-market 
use of a transcribed show, Goodman 
has worked up a special sales plan 
called "Operation Buckshot." Ordi- 
narily, if an advertiser wants to use a 
transcribed show in. say, 80 markets 
(says Goodman i , the usual syndication 
procedure is to add up the prices for 
each city requested, then give the ad- 
vertiser a discount on the total amount; 
but even after allowing a substantial 
discount, the cost usually turns out to 
be quite prohibitive. 

Under "Buckshot," the advertiser is 
charged for his list of markets not on 
a syndication basis, which takes the 
markets one by one. but on a network 
basis, in which only the number of 
markets is considered. This number 
is applied as a proportion of a total 
network price I which Goodman re- 
gards as the price for about 300 mar- 
kets). Under this scheme, the adver- 
tiser pays only a nominal amount ex- 
tra I $1 or $2 per market I for (1 I each 
market which has over 250,000 popula- 
tion; (2) each 50.000-watt station. 

"Buckshot"' embraces 11 shows of 
half-hour and quarter-hour length, in- 
cludes soap operas, dramas, mysteries, 
musicals, religious hymns, and a kid 
show. The thing that these programs 
have in common is that they do not 
come under the AFTRA regulations 
and so can be rebroadcast indefinitely 
at no extra cost. An advertiser can 
purchase anv one or more of the shows 
to get the "Buckshot" benefits. 

( An interesting sidelight here is that 
one of the "Buckshot"' programs, a de- 
tective show called 30 Minutes To Go, 
is being produced in Australia with 
American actors; this production 
abroad sidesteps the AFTRA salary 
regulations calling for re-use payments, 
points up another wa\ of bringing 
transcription costs down. I 



Library services 

Q. What new developments has 
this year seen in the library service 
field? 

A. Sales curves at the radio library 

services are up again this year, accord- 

I Please turn to page 126) 



110 



SPONSOR 




The Station that 
Serves Well, 
SELLS WELL! 



Like a strong, willing hand, ready to help when 
ever and however its needed most that s the way 
Milwaukee looks at WEMP Civic and religious 
groups have recognized many WEMP public service 
endeavors with plaques, certificates and other 
awards. Two more firsts were added recently by 
the Milwaukee County Radio TV Council. 

WEMP is proud to serve the groups you see here 
Many must have fast results to make their cam 
paigns successful That's why they lean heavily on 
WEMP, the community station. 

Advertisers, too, who want real results depend 
upon WEMP to deliver the goods around the clock 
24 hours a day and all through the year. Get in 
touch with your Hcadley Reed man for full infor 
mation about Milwaukee's outstanding fulltime 
independent. 



24 Hours of Music, 
News, Sports 



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M ■ . Art Initltuta 

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M - • !<•> > Club 
Mil. . hip Gaaaaa 

M.t. ..,.., Caunla Ana tar Blind 

■ fit. Am* far Duablaa) 
Milan ■ v. 

Mil.aua... '.-•, l-i-k Caaaaitalaa 
aunt* Haapitali 

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Mil.. . I aaaalialaa 

Mil. a. a.. Hralth Orpt 

M'l.auar* Cali-r Drat 

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Mllaaukaa Urban l.a«ur 

km Public I 
Mt Oh. 
Maltla.li 
MuwulaJ 
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NatlM 

Natianal Cant af ChMatiana . 
National Cauaril at Churthat 
N'trt C*llr-n,r Fund 
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WEMP-FM 



13 JULY 1953 



111 




t WAUSAU -- Electrical Equipmentgj IRONWOOD, MICH. 
112 



TRAVERSE CITY, MICH.- Canning 



SPONSOR 



, Jl 

'p I CARROLL I 



\ Osslpe* | 

' s BELKNAP \ 



S. P*ri» . / 



, 



^A**m / AN3R0SCOG3.N V 

1 / \ / , 'V- * 

j CUMBERLAND 1 / AA««^- / 



! * 



: YORK i 



w . > o 







» 



Funkl.n "" < 



Son 



CONCOR 



V* 



/'ROCKINGHAM/ c„, 

50.000 WATTS ; 

"V, ' t'Po'tvmou 



850 KC 



M«rck«tttr° I 



t • . . 9 



Derry 



Ntthu«® 



*«Msex 



p.^.^1 LOWELL® 

RmJ, "90v P..body 

fiwy^. c.i. 

- 




J \ ®Uwrtnc« ESSEX 



N»w*ort 0\ 



?< V 







win. Ii KM ti r - f Willed in the 

/• . ..iiiimii 

tl '" On ill.- -I 

ll- - 

the mi. .in.. I> ile .in. I ii" 
itintry. K idio, in i tittle 

mil) I familj 

north "f Portland 

■ , .it the -.mi'- time the (amil) toulh ol 
P Rhode I- 1 

K\ south ol Pro*iden 

this i- ill*- n 

all 

«lii. I » «"•' 



SUR^E'rWiTH THE FRINGE INCLUDED 



C*«ioaO 

Mo^j.1. ; NORFOLK 

■ISM* r -.'.dO 

U ^, Q I BRISTOL 

JE U ** , °OV 4 j!y, F.H, ® 

CaMral F« ' p | , -•- •" Tiunton 

^ . ,*» — v. o ' j oBt»-»bo«t> 

L i . mm. k "o**d««<« I — ^ 





radio station's primary 
coverage area i» composed 
jf many parts that make 
up the whole. In the past, 
the immediate concern of 
mam stations has been their metropoli- 
tan or city area, generally measured month- 
ly or hi-monthly by a rating service. 
But what about those people outside the 
metropolitan area, the uncounted ones that 
live — listen — and — buy? For example, in 
the WHDH primary coverage area, there 
are twenty-five counties with 1,423,500 ra- 
dio homes. In the CITY AREA of Boston 
(which lies wholly within the 25 county 
area) there are five counties with 871,670 
radio homes. Until now those 551,830 
families in the other 20 counties have 
not been counted by the same organiza- 
tion which surveys the Boston listening 
habits. 

For the purposes of this analysis, the 25 

county area will be called the TOTAL 

AREA; and the five county Metropolitan 

loston area will be called the CITY AREA. 

'Figures for the Total Area are taken from the 

PllUe of WHDH Area. January 1953. 

Figure, for lite City Area are taken front 

Pulse of Boston. January-February 1953 



H^H 







The TOTAL ARE \ I which includes the CITY AREA) 
is the mosl important area in the jour New England 
Male- ol Maim-. New Hampshire. Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island because it represent-: 

<u' , * oi the t-it it - ol over 10,000 population 

71%* "l the i"i;il population 

67%* of the families and 

* of the purchasing power of these states 

i \rronliii« to Standard Rate and Data Service 
Consumer Markets, 1951-1952, these people bought 
over FIVE WD V THIRD BILLION DOLLARS 
WORTH of Retail Goods.) 

Carrying it even Further to the six New England States, 
this 25 count) area contains: 

527c* of the cities of over 10,000 population 
of the total population and 

53.7%** of the purchasing power of all New England. 

To this area — its bays, its beaches, its streams, and 
ponds — come an average of 000.000 additional people 
a da\ during the summer months. 1 his brings the 
population up to 5.598,974. This is an area that knows 
no buying hiatus. This is an area of importance 
to everyone who has a product to sell! 

*U. S. Census 1950 
"Standard Rale and Data Service « ..n -ihu.t Markets 1951-1952. 



To verify the continuing effectiveness of 
Radio, PULSE, INC. was employed to extend 
the Pulse of Boston five county survey to the 
twenty-five counties, and to conduct this 
TOTAL AREA survey in the same way as the 
normal Pulse of Boston is conducted so that 
the CITY ratings and the TOTAL AREA 
ratings might be compared, (ft is impossible 
to do this with a different type of survey for 
the TOTAL AREA as opposed to the Pulse of 
Boston for the CITY AREA.) 

The interviews were conducted in the follow- 
ing 25 counties with the percent of interviews 
per county being exactly the same as the per- 
cent of the county's population as applied to 
the Area. 



% OF INTERVIEWS 



COUNTY 


70 ur INI 

Si POPUL 


MAINE 




Cumberland 


3 


Knox 


% 


Lincoln 


% 


Sagadahoc 


% 


York 


2 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Barnstable 


1 


Bristol 


8 


Dukes 


Vj 


Essex 


10 


Middlesex 


21 


Nantucket 


% 


Norfolk 


8 


Plymouth 


4 


Suffolk 


18 


Worcester 


2 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 




Belknap 


% 


Hillsboro 


3 


Merrimack 


1 


Rockingham 


1 


Strafford 


1 


RHODE ISLAND 




Bristol 


v-i 


Kent 


i 


Newport 


i 


Providence 


ii 


Washington 


% 



TOTAL 



lOO 



We realize th 
this is not tin 
coverage area of 
every Boston 
radio station, 
but it is the 
New England are 
with which 
advertisers sho 
he concerned. 

Therefore, wc arc 
taking the liberty 
of seeing the 
effect which 
Major Boston 
stations have 
on this 
important area. 



Among other 

tiling, the 

answers t<> 
sei i'i al major 
questions which 
.11 e continually 
asked, have 
been found 
in this survey. 



1 . I" Radio short* hanged when Homes I ting Radio figun - of tin- i I I *i 
AREA are applied to the I'M \| \|;| \ - 

ire tin- radio listening habits tli< same in the < I'M .1- in the 
rOTAl Mil \ 

2. Do Listeners-per-home in the Cll "> MM \ diffei from those in. tin- 
T0TA1 MM V? 

3. Does television penetration affect the ( I I ^ \R\ Vl 
than it does the K)l M. Mil \ 

4. \n<:i'li ratings of Network affiliates indicative of their TOTAL MM \ 
ratings? 

5. Me C1T\ ratings of Independent stations indicative of theii TQ1 M. 
AREA ratings? 

6. What are tin- possible limiting factors in projecting Network 'in 
ratines to the TOTAL MM. \? 




IS RADIO SHORTCHANGED WHEN HOMES- 
USING-RADIO FIGURES OF THE CITY AREA 
ARE APPLIED TO THE TOTAL AREA? 



Are the radio Iisteniii" habits the same in the M h ,i~ in lh< |(t| \| MM \- 




The ajoining tabulation -bow- tin- average liourK 
M Homea>Uaing>Radio* 1 figures (al borne only) of 
the CIT1 VREA aa compered with TOTAL \KK\. 

Comparing the Monday through Friday hourly figures it 
is evident that in the morning hours — with the exception 
of the hour from «even lo eight — the pereentage of Homes- 
: the I'M \| MM \ ire "id\ «lit>htlv larger 
than those in the < TH MM \. 

However, al noun, the d 

nt i I al the hour from 7:00-8:00 P.M., the Hif - 
ference ' the figures foi the MM MM \ and 

the TOTAL MM \ is \:2." 

It should be kejit in mind thai in order to I -t th< 

Cm MM \ From I'M/, to the I'M M MM \ 

[here must I- ible differ 

in the J11 counties outside the ' IH MM V It tal 
30.6' ' in the 2" outside < ounl 
with the I n MM \ to obtain the . 



\t all limr. il .h>nld t.r r. 

part .f iIm >h.l 



-.1 ih.t Ihr '111 

■ mni \ hi v 




The accompanying tabulation shows 
hour by hour the listeners per home. 
With the exception of two of the day- 
time hours, the listeners per home 
figure is greater for the TOTAL AREA 
than for the CITY AREA. 

Adjoining are two examples of the re- 
sult of projecting CITY AREA figures 
of "Homes-Using-Radio" to the TO- 
TAL AREA or 1,423,500 radio homes. 
The hour from 6:00 to 7:00 P.M. was 
chosen because of the great difference 
in "Listeners-Per-Home." The hour 
from 7:00 to 8:00 P.M. was chosen 
because of the great difference in 
"Homes-Using-Radio." 



DO LISTENERS PER HOME OF THE 
CITY AREA DIFFER FROM THAT 
OF THE TOTAL AREA? 



HOURLY LISTENERS 



PROJECTING 

i II ^ FIGURES 

TO AREA 

22.2 


6:00-7:00 P.M. 

MONOAY.FRIDAY 

Homes ii-lnj: radio 


ti /( \t 

TOTAL AREA 

FIGURES 

25.1 


PER HOME 
Monday - Friday 


316.017 


Radio Hon 


.157.298 


CITY 


VS. 


TOTAL 


1.64 


Liatcneri prr home 


2.00 


AREA 




AREA 


518.268 


Total I.iMrlli-r- 


711.596 










Difference in Liateneri PI 1 S 196,328 


TIME 


AREA 


CITY 




Percent of Iliff. I 


PI 1 S :t7.8° 


6 OO AM 


1.72 


1.51 








7.00 

BOO 


1.75 
1.63 


1.78 








1.62 


PROJECTING 

CITY KICl RES 
TO AREA 


7:00-8:00 P.M. 

HONDAY.FRIDAY 


li 11 II 

TOTAL AREA 

1 If. 1 RES 


9 OO 

IOOO 
IIOO 


1.49 
1.42 
1.43 


1.33 
1.30 
1.31 


19.6 


Home- using radio 


23.8 


12:00 


1.49 


1.33 


279,006 


Radio llonie- 


338.793 


1 :00 PM 


1.42 


1.27 


1.80 


Li-lener- prr Home 


1.88 


200 


1.39 


1.24 


502.210 


Total Listener* 


636.930 


3:00 


1.50 


1.38 




Differenee in Listener* PLUS 1 I 1.720 


4:00 


1.52 


1.39 




Percrnt difference in 
listeners 


PLUS 26.8% 


5:00 


1.54 


1.56 








6:00 


2.00 


1.64 


THE MARGIN OK ERROR IN 


PROJK 1 INC 


7:00 


1.88 


1.80 


Cm ROMES-USING-RADIO" 


K.I RES TO 


8:00 


1.90 


1.82 


THE TOTAL ARI \ MH SHORT 


I 11 Wit 


9:00 


1.85 


1.82 


DIO AS A 


MEDll'M Hi V> Ml (II 


as 37.8% 


10:00 


1.89 


1.74 








11:00 


1.57 


1.55 




DOES TELEVISION PENETRATION AFFECT 
THE CITY AREA TO A GREATER DEGREE 
THAN IT DOES THE TOTAL AREA? 



The divergence between Homes-Using-Radio 'figures of 
the CITY AREA, and the TOTAL AREA from noon 
(where the major difference first begins to show) to 
11:00 P.M. probably results from: 

(a)— A difference in CITY AREA and TOTAL 

AREA Listening Habits, 
(b) — The difference in Television saturation between 
the CITY AREA and the TOTAL AREA. 
The latest figures on Television sets in the TOTAL AREA 
I Broadcasting, April 6, 1953) shows from reports in the 
two cities that contain the three Television stations in 
Eastern New England: 

Providence 284,000 

Boston 1.029,151 

TOTAL 1.313.151 



These figures include sets in taverns, hotels, restaurants, 
in dealer and distributor inventories, and obsolescent 
sets, as well as those actually in operation in homes. 
According to Telepulse of Boston, conducted simultane- 
ously with this Area survey, Television penetration in 
the CITY AREA is 71.3%. 

Other available studies have shown that as you 
get away from CITY areas exposure to the visual 
medium decreases. Even if you apply the 71.3% 
penetration factor to the TOTAL AREA. 28.7% of 
the families do not have television . . . some 
308.000 families. These 308.000 families to whom 
Television isn't available, and who are included in 
this TOTAL AREA survey are responsible for over 
a BILLION DOLLARS per year* in retail sales. 



•Standard Rate and Data Service Consumer Market- 1951-1952. 




ARE CITY RATINGS OF NETWORK 
AFFILIATES INDICATIVE OF 
THEIR TOTAL AREA RATINGS? 



here Follows a graphi iparison "I tin- 

\t-lloim-" ratines ol the foui Boston net- 



work affiliates. I he graphi • ompare the < 1 n 

\!!l \ with the TO! M. MM I 




ARE CITY RATINGS OF INDEPENDENT 
STATIONS INDICATIVE OF 
THEIR TOTAL AREA RATINGS? 




AM 6 8 lO 12 2 4 6 8 IO 1 2 PM 



From this graph comparing 
CITY AREA and TOTAL 
AREA ratings, the correla- 
tion and interweaving of the 
curves of the Independent 
station when compared with 
the divergence between the 
curves of the network sta- 
tion ratings make it appar- 
ent that an Independent 
station's City ratings may 
be indicative of the Inde- 
pendent station's Total Area 
ratings. 

♦Margin of error: 

less than 3% 




lUESTION 



WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE LIMITING 
FACTORS IN PROJECTING NETWORK 
CITY AREA RATINGS TO A TOTAL AREA? 




NETWORK COVERAGE 

One network's coverage of 
Eastern New England showing 
lines <if signal equality between 
the Boston outlet and encroaching 
affiliates of the same network. 
The solid line indicates the 
Boston affiliate's 0.5 MV/M 
daytime contour. 



KEY 

— BOSTON AFFILIATE 
.... PROVIDENCE AFFILIATE 
._. WORCESTER AFFILIATE 
0000 MANCHESTER AFFILIATE 

— PORTLAND AFFILIATE 



■ — 1 Area in which network programming receives 
' — ' strongest signal from Boston affiliate. 

Area in which network programming receives equal 

' — ' or stronger signal from affiliates other than Boston. 



We have seen that an Independents City ratings may be 
indicative of its total area ratings. Why is this not true 
of Network affiliates? It is principally because of en- 
croachment of stations within the fringe area having 
the same network affiliation and carrying the same net- 
work programs. 

The adjoining map shows how four affiliates of the 
same network encroach upon the primary coverage of 
the Boston affiliate. 

Obviouslv. listeners seeking the same program are at- 
tracted to the stronger signal. It is therefore reasonable 
to assume that listeners in the shaded areas might be 
tuned to the stronger signal of the closer network affiliate. 
This would seem to be an explanation of wh\ the Boston 
affiliate's TOTAL AREA rating is lower than its CITY 
ARF.A ratino;. 



SO Ml < II FOR Till PROJECT \l<ll. 
YY\ OF R UlNGS Now, what's the 
standing <>f the Station*? The following 

how the comparison bet%t 
\UIDII and ili<- f«.ur Boston Network 
Outleta rating wise, at-home and out-of< 
home combined in the total ■ 
From the tabulation .m<l the graphs, ii 
i> apparent thai . . . 

(hit of .'>()(> quarter hourt 

Hondo) through Sunday 

WHDH 

ii 

1st 283 QUARTER HOURS 

(57.2', OF THE TIME) 

1st OR 2nd 460 QUARTER HOURS 

(92', OF THE TIME) 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

PULSE OF WHDH AREA 

January 1953 

6:00 AM- 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
b] <|uarl«T hours 

Ai llutiir ami Oui-of-Ilumr Combined 
TIME WHDH WBZ WEEI WLAW WNAC 



10 



10 



00 AM 


4 


.1 


.8 


.1 


.3 


15 


.6 


.2 


.9 


.1 


.2 


30 


8 


.6 


1.0 


.3 


.5 


45 


15 


.8 


1 5 


.7 


.6 


00 


3.5 


1.3 


3.1 


.6 


1.0 


15 


3.5 


1.7 


2.9 


.6 


1 1 


30 


48 


2.5 


4 1 


1 


1.4 


45 


4.8 


2.7 


4.1 


12 


18 


00 


46 


28 


4.5 


1.0 


2.6 


15 


4 4 


2.2 


3.7 


1.0 


2.3 


30 


4.7 


2.6 


3.9 


.9 


2.1 


45 


5.2 


2 2 


4.3 


1.0 


1.3 


00 


4.9 


16 


4 3 


3.7 


2.5 


15 


4 5 


1.6 


4 1 


3.6 


2.3 


30 


4.7 


1.6 


3.9 


3.7 


2.7 


45 


4 7 


18 


3.8 


3.5 


2.4 


00 


5 1 


2.5 


65 


3.0 


1.9 


15 


5 1 


2.6 


7.0 


2.9 


1.2 


30 


5.0 


2.5 


6.7 


3.1 


1.1 


45 


48 


2.3 


6.5 


2.9 


.9 


00 


49 


2 4 


6.8 


1.2 


1.1 


15 


4.6 


2.2 


7.0 


1.4 


11 


30 


4.7 


2.1 


6.8 


2.0 


15 


45 


45 


19 


6.7 


1.8 


1.6 


00 


4.0 


2.1 


7.0 


1.6 


1.6 


15 


3.5 


14 


7.1 


1.5 


1.4 


30 


2 8 


1.4 


65 


1.4 


1.7 


45 


2.8 


1.7 


6.1 


1.4 


20 


00 PM 


25 


1 7 


5.5 


1.4 


2.5 


15 


2.8 


1.6 


6.0 


14 


1.8 


30 


3.5 


1.8 


6.2 


1.1 


1.3 


45 


3.0 


18 


6.2 


1.2 


1.6 


00 


3.7 


1.6 


54 


1.2 


1.2 


15 


4.1 


1.6 


48 


1.2 


.9 


: 


4.1 


1.7 


15 


1.1 


.8 


45 


4 1 


2.1 


4.1 


.9 


9 


00 


4 5 


3.0 


3.3 


.8 


1.1 


15 


4 1 


3.0 


3.2 


.8 


12 


30 


4.2 


3.7 


3.1 


.8 


14 


^5 


45 


3 6 


2.8 


10 


1.2 


00 


48 


3.4 


2.6 


.9 


1 3 


15 


57 


42 


2 4 


9 


14 


30 


64 


4 2 


3.2 


.9 


12 


45 


6.9 


4 1 


3 6 


.8 


1.1 


00 


6 7 


3.8 


25 


14 


16 


15 


6 1 


3.6 


2.6 


1.1 


1.6 


30 


66 


4.0 


3 4 


1.3 


1.7 


45 


65 


3 1 


3 2 


1 4 


1 5 


00 


62 


3.3 


5 5 


2.2 


2 4 


15 


59 


3 4 


3.9 


19 


2 


30 


5.6 


3.7 


39 


1 5 


2.8 


45 


5.7 


3.7 


4 6 


1.5 


2.8 


00 


39 


1.9 


38 


18 


2.0 


15 


3 7 


1.8 


38 


1.9 


1.9 


30 


3.7 


2.5 


3 9 


S3 


2.2 


45 


3 6 


3.0 


4.7 


3.2 


17 


00 


35 


3.1 


4 5 


24 


2.4 


15 


3.3 


2.9 


4 6 


2.3 


2.2 


30 


3.4 


3.6 


46 


2.3 


23 


45 


34 


3.3 


4.6 


2.2 


2.3 


00 


35 


4.3 


49 


2.2 


2.0 


15 


3.6 


3.9 


4.7 


1.9 


19 


30 


38 


4 3 


4.9 


2.1 


1.7 


45 


4.4 


4 1 


4.7 


2.1 


14 


00 


4.8 


2.5 


3.7 


2.2 


2.2 


15 


4.1 


2.2 


3.6 


1.9 


19 


30 


3.9 


2.0 


3.1 


1.7 


1.7 


45 


3.9 


1.6 


2.6 


1.5 


1.3 


00 


3.6 


1.4 


28 


1 4 


1.6 


15 


3.3 


1.3 


22 


1.1 


1.0 


30 


25 


1.1 


19 


.9 


.9 


45 


2.0 


.8 


16 


.7 


5 



WHDH VS. NETWORK STATIONS 
PULSE OF TOTAL AREA - MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

6*00 IA1 /-' 00 Wdmighi 

ll Hi, mi- mill fhll Of Ilium 

COMBINED RATINGS 
■ whom _^^^^ •.!!.•, UK STATIONS 





I I I I I 


WHDH VS. WBZ 


r 


\f 


^ 


•v/*^ 


f 



AM 6 8 10 1 2 2 4 6 

I I I I I I 

WHDH VS. WEEI 



lO 1 



AM 6 




10 

- 9 

- 8 
7 
6 

- 5 
4 
3 

- 2 

- 1 

2 PM 

- 10 

- 9 

- 8 
7 
6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 



10 12 



WHDH VS. WLAW 




AM 6 



8 



10 



lO 1 



J 


^uuuuuu^mu^urakuuuuuuuuuuuwmmmmm 


sA 


"V 


WHDH VS. WNAC 


V 


A 


f\ 


y^ 


"\ 


y^ 


rt 



PM 

- 10 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 



2 PM 

- 10 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 



1 






SATURDAY 

PULSE OF WHDH AREA 

6:00 AM - 12:00 MIDNIGHT 

At Home and Out of Home Combined 



10 



12 



10 



IME 


WHDH 


WBZ 


WEEI 


WLAW 


WNAC 


:00 AM 


.8 


.5 


.5 




.3 


:15 


1 1 


.5 


.5 




.5 


:'0 


1.1 


.8 


.8 


.5 


.5 


:45 


1.5 


1.0 


1.3 


1.1 


5 


:00 


1.5 


1.0 


1.3 


1.1 


1.1 


:15 


2 3 


1.5 


1.5 


1.0 


1.1 


:30 


2.5 


2 3 


2.8 


1.5 


1.3 


:45 


3 5 


2.1 


2.6 


1.5 


1.3 


:00 


4.1 


2 1 


4.1 


1.3 


1.1 


:15 


4.0 


1.8 


3.3 


1.1 


1.0 


:30 


4.5 


2 


3.3 


1.3 


1.8 


:45 


4.5 


1.5 


3.1 


1.5 


1.6 


00 


4.8 


1.8 


3.3 


2.3 


3.0 


15 


5.1 


1.8 


3.6 


2.1 


2.8 


30 


5.3 


1.8 


3.0 


2.0 


2.5 


45 


5.3 


1.5 


2 8 


1.8 


2.1 


00 


7.0 


2.0 


3.0 


1.5 


1.5 


15 


7.3 


2.3 


3 3 


1.3 


1.5 


30 


7.0 


3.0 


2.8 


2.0 


1.1 


45 


7.1 


3.1 


2.5 


2.0 


1.1 


CO 


7.3 


2.3 


25 


1.8 


1.1 


15 


7.3 


2.6 


2 3 


1.8 


1.1 


30 


8.0 


2.5 


2.3 


1.8 


1.3 


45 


7.8 


2.3 


2.5 


1.6 


1.1 


00 


6.3 


2.5 


3.5 


2.1 


.8 


15 


6.3 


2.0 


3.3 


2.1 


.8 


30 


5.3 


1.0 


3.6 


1.8 


1.3 


45 


4.5 


1.0 


3.8 


1.3 


1.3 


00 PM 


3.8 


.8 


3.5 


1.6 


2.1 


15 


3.5 


.8 


3.8 


1.3 


1.8 


30 


3.5 


1.6 


3.8 


1.6 


1.6 


45 


4.0 


1.6 


3.3 


1.3 


1.6 


00 


4.0 


2.0 


3.3 


1.3 


1.3 


15 


4.5 


2 3 


3.6 


15 


1.3 


"0 


5.0 


2.0 


3.8 


2.1 


1.6 


45 


4.6 


2.1 


3.5 


2 3 


1.0 


00 


58 


2.6 


3 8 


2.3 


.8 


15 


5.8 


2.6 


3.8 


2.1 


1.1 


30 


5.6 


2.8 


3.6 


2.3 


1.3 


45 


5.0 


2.3 


3.5 


2.3 


1.5 


00 


5.0 


1.8 


3.3 


2.0 


1.3 


15 


5.3 


1.6 


3.5 


2.3 


1.3 


30 


5.8 


1.6 


3.6 


2.1 


1.8 


45 


5.8 


15 


3 8 


1.8 


2.0 


01 


6.5 


1.8 


3.0 


1 3 


1.8 


15 


6.8 


16 


2.6 


15 


1.6 


30 


7.1 


1.0 


2.1 


1.8 


1.6 


45 


6.5 


1.0 


1.5 


3.3 


1.8 


00 


6 5 


2.3 


2.0 


2.0 


1.8 


15 


6.1 


2.3 


1.8 


1.6 


1.8 


■o 


4.3 


2.3 


1.8 


1.3 


1.8 


45 


5.6 


2.1 


3.0 


.8 


1.3 


03 


5.1 


2.6 


3.0 


1.6 


l.S 


15 


4.8 


2.3 


2.6 


1.3 


2.3 


30 


5.1 


2.3 


3.5 


1.6 


2.3 


45 


5.3 


1.8 


3.8 


1.3 


2.5 


00 


4.1 


2.6 


5.5 


1.5 


2.8 


15 


4.1 


2.8 


4.8 


1.5 


2.8 


30 


3.8 


3.1 


5.3 


2.1 


3.3 


45 


3.8 


3.0 


4.5 


2.1 


3.6 


00 


3.3 


3.0 


5.3 


2.1 


3.3 


15 


3.0 


2.8 


4.8 


1.8 


3.1 


30 


3.6 


3.5 


4.1 


1.8 


3.3 


45 


3.8 


3.1 


4.1 


1.6 


2.8 


00 


4.1 


2.8 


3.3 


1.8 


3.1 


15 


3 8 


2.6 


3.0 


1.6 


2.8 


:o 


3.8 


1.8 


2.6 


1.3 


2.8 


45 


3.6 


1.6 


2.0 


.8 


2.6 


00 


3.6 


1.3 


2.3 


1.3 


2.1 


15 


3.3 


.5 


1.6 


1.1 


1.8 


30 


2.5 


.5 


1.0 


1.1 


1.0 


45 


2.0 


.5 


.8 


.8 


.5 



WHDH VS. NETWORK STATIONS 

PULSE OF TOTAL AREA- SATURDAY 
6:00 AM -12:00 Midnight 
At Home and Out Of Home 

COMBINED RATINGS 



NETWORK STATIONS 



« 


1 1 1 1 1 


**/ 


A/N 


■HHMB 

V 


WHDH VS. WBZ 


> 


'W 


Av 


\J 


^ 


~*>j 



AM 6 



8 lO 12 



AM 6 



2 4 

I 
WHDH VS. WLAW 




AM 6 8 10 12 2 4 6 

I I I 1 1 

WHDH VS. WNAC 



8 



lO 12 




Rating 

- io 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 




- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 

PM 

- IO 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 



SUNDAY 


PULSE OF WHDH AREA 


7*00 AM - 12M0 MIDNIGHT 


It Home and Out <>/ Home Combined 


TIME WHDH WBZ WEEI WlAW WNAC 


7 


00 AM .5 




15 5 




30 .5 8 .3 .3 




45 1.1 8 


3 3 


8 


00 16 .5 


8 8 




15 18 .6 


6 .3 




30 2 3 1 1 


8 .5 8 




45 2.6 .8 


8 .5 11 


9 


00 3 18 1 


.8 .8 


15 36 13 1 


5 .8 .5 


30 38 10 1 


5 8 .5 


45 43 10 1 


3 5 .5 


10:00 4 5 1.3 1 


.3 5 




15 48 13 1 


.5 .5 




30 5 3 10 1 


3 .8 .6 




45 5 15 1 


6 .5 6 


11 


00 53 8 1 


3 .3 6 




15 48 .5 1 


3 .3 .3 




30 56 .8 1 


8 .5 .3 




45 5.3 .8 1 


6 .5 .3 


12 


00 48 1.8 1 


8 15 8 




15 48 18 15 .8 .8 




30 53 10 2.1 8 10 




45 48 1.0 18 10 10 


1 


00 PM 4 3 15 18 11 13 




15 4.5 13 15 11 13 




30 36 2.1 13 1 1 10 




45 4.1 2.1 13 13 .5 


2 


00 38 1.0 2.1 .8 1.0 




15 43 1.0 25 .8 1.0 




30 45 10 26 5 15 




45 4.3 10 2.8 .3 13 


3 


00 4 8 1.0 2.6 .3 13 




15 4.5 8 28 .3 1.6 




30 53 1.6 2.6 .3 13 




45 53 1.6 25 .3 16 


4 


00 58 3.5 1.8 5 18 




15 5.5 33 2.1 .5 1.6 




30 5 6 4 1 2.3 .5 2.0 




45 51 38 2.3 .5 2.3 


5: 


00 55 48 25 .8 2.8 




15 51 4.3 2.8 .8 2.8 




30 5.1 4.3 3.6 16 3.5 




45 4.5 3.8 3.6 1.6 3.3 


6: 


00 4.0 3.3 4.1 2.6 3 8 




15 35 2.8 3.5 2.3 3.5 




30 33 2.5 4.6 21 3.3 




45 31 23 4.0 1.8 3.1 


7: 


00 1.3 1.8 9.5 1.6 2.8 




15 1.0 2.0 86 16 26 




30 .5 3.0 7.8 13 18 




45 .5 3.3 7.3 1 3 1.5 


8: 


00 .3 4 5 7.0 2.0 1.8 




15 .3 45 7.0 18 1.6 




30 .8 45 6.5 23 2.5 




45 .8 -»3 6.1 1 8 2.3 


9: 


00 15 38 5.5 5.0 13 




15 2.1 4.3 61 35 1.0 




30 2.3 4.0 5.3 2.6 1.3 




45 2.6 4 4.5 2.1 1.6 


10. 


00 2.8 3.3 31 2.5 1.6 




15 2.8 28 28 1.8 1.6 




30 25 18 2.6 1.0 1.6 




45 2.0 1.3 2.3 .8 1.0 


11: 


00 2.0 1.3 2.1 .8 16 




15 1.5 13 18 .5 11 


: 


30 1.1 .8 1.3 .3 .5 




45 .8 .8 


8 .3 .3 



WHDH VS. NETWORK STATIONS 

PULSE OF TOTAL AREA SUNDAY 

7*00 Ml 12 oo HUnlgki 

It lloux mill Out Of Hom* 
COMBINED RATINGS 



Aaltnf 



AM 6 



AM 6 



AM 6 




Of increasing importance to advertisers is the Out-of-Home listening. 



In this total area survey, the Out-of-Home listening was added FOR THE FIRST TIME 
to the At-Home listening to give the TRUE rating figures. 




Taking the normalh reported Mondax through 


Saturday At-Home listening as 10(1',. the 


Out- 


of-Home listening adds the following 


audience to: 






HOMES USING 


RADIO 




6-12 AM 


19.0' , 




12- 6 PM 


19.6' 1 




0-12 I'M 


17.8% 




Avera-r 


18.7% 




WHDH 


VS. NETWORK STATIONS 


PULSE OF TOTAL AREA— MON. 


-SAT. 




6:00 AM - 12:00 Midnight 






At Home and Out Of Home 






COMBINED RATINGS 




TIME 


WHDH WBZ WEEI WLAW 


WNAC 


6:00 


.4 .2 .8 .1 


.3 




15 


.6 .3 .8 .1 


.3 




30 


.8 .6 .9 .3 


.5 




45 


1.6 .8 1.4 .7 


.6 


7: 


00 


3.1 1.3 2.8 .6 


1.0 




15 


3.3 1.7 2.7 .7 


1.1 




30 


4.5 2.5 3.9 1.1 


1.4 




45 


4.6 2.6 3.8 13 


1.7 


8: 


00 


4.5 2.7 4.4 1.1 


2.4 




15 


4.3 2.1 3.7 1.0 


2.1 




30 


4.7 2 6 3.8 1.0 


2.1 




45 


5.1 2.1 4.1 1.1 


1.3 


9: 


00 


4.8 1.7 4.1 35 


2.6 




15 


4.6 1.6 4.0 3.3 


2.3 




30 


4.8 1.7 3.8 3.5 


2.7 




45 


4.8 1.8 3.6 3.2 


2.3 


10: 


00 


5.4 2.4 5.9 2.8 


1.8 




15 


5.5 2.6 6.4 2.6 


1.3 




30 


5.3 2.6 6.1 2.9 


1.1 




45 


5.1 2.4 5.9 2.7 


.9 


11 


00 


5.3 2.4 6.1 1.3 


1.1 




15 


5.0 2.2 6.2 1.4 


1.1 




30 


5.3 2.2 6.1 1.9 


1.4 




45 


5.0 2.0 6.1 1.7 


1.5 


12 


00 


4.3 2.1 6.4 1.6 


1.5 




15 


4.0 1.5 6.5 16 


1.3 




30 


3.2 1.4 6.0 1.4 


1.6 




45 


3.1 1.6 5.7 1.3 


1.9 


1 


00 


2.7 1.6 5.2 1.4 


2.4 




15 


2.9 1.5 5.7 1.4 


1.8 




30 


3.5 1.7 5.8 1.1 


1.3 




45 


3.2 1.7 5.7 1.1 


1.6 


2 


00 


3.8 1.7 5.1 1.2 


1.2 




15 


4.1 1.8 4.6 1.3 


.9 




30 


4.2 1.8 4.4 1.2 


.9 




45 


4.3 2.1 4.0 1.2 


.9 


3 


00 


4.7 2.9 3.4 1.1 


1.1 




15 


4.4 2.9 3.3 1.0 


1.2 




30 


4.4 3.5 3.2 1.0 


1.4 




45 


4.6 3.4 3.0 1.2 


1.3 


4 


00 


4.9 3.1 2.8 1.1 


1.3 




15 


5.6 3.7 2.6 1.1 


1.4 




30 


6.3 3.7 3.3 1.1 


1.3 




45 


6.6 3.7 3.7 .9 


1.2 


5 


00 


6.7 3.4 2.6 1.4 


1.6 




15 


6.2 3.2 2.6 1.2 


1.6 




30 


6.7 3.5 3.1 1.4 


1.7 




45 


6.5 2.8 2.9 1.6 


1.6 


6 


00 


6.2 3.1 3.3 2.1 


2.3 




15 


5.9 3.2 3.5 18 


2.0 




30 


5.5 3.5 3.5 1.4 


2.7 




45 


5.7 3.4 4.4 1.4 


2.6 


7 


00 


4.0 2.0 3.6 1.7 


2.0 




15 


3.9 1.9 3.6 1.8 


2.0 




30 


3.8 2.4 3.8 3.0 


2.2 




45 


3.9 2.8 4.6 28 


1.8 


8 


00 


3.6 3.0 4.6 2.2 


2.5 




15 


3.3 2.7 4.5 2.2 


2.3 




30 


3.4 3.4 4.6 2.3 


2.4 




:45 


3.6 3.2 4.4 21 


2.5 


9 


00 


3.5 4.1 5.0 2.1 


2.2 




15 


3.4 3.7 4.8 19 


2.0 




:30 


3.8 4.2 4.7 2.0 


1.9 




:45 


4.3 4.9 4.6 2.0 


1.6 


10 


:00 


4.3 2.5 3.7 2.1 


2.3 




:15 


4.0 2.2 3.6 18 


2.0 




.30 


3.9 1.9 3.0 1.6 


1.8 




:45 


3.9 1.5 2.6 1.4 


1.4 


11 


:00 


3.6 1.3 2.7 1.3 


1.6 




:15 


3.3 1.2 2.1 1.0 


1.1 




:30 


2.5 10 1.8 .8 


.9 




:45 


2.0 .7 1.5 7 


.5 





RATING 


POINTS- 


—PROJECTED 


TO RADIO HOMES 






BASED ON 


1.423.500 IN 


WHDH 


AREA 






AND 


COST PER 


THOUSAND PER 


SPOT ANNOUNCEMENTS AS 


INDICATED 




PROMOTED 


















RATINC TO RADIO 


















PTS 


HOMES 


$12 


515 


S20 S24 


530 


S35 


540 


545 


1.0 


14.235 


$84 


SI 05 


SI 40 SI 68 


S2 10 


52 45 


52 81 


53 15 


1 1 


15.658 


76 


95 


1 27 1 


53 


1 91 


223 


255 


2 87 


1.2 


17 082 


70 


87 


1 17 1 


10 


1.75 


2.04 


2 34 


2 63 


13 


18.505 


64 


81 


1 08 1 


29 


1 62 


1 89 


2 16 


2 43 


1 4 


19 )29 


60 


75 


1.00 1 


20 


1 50 


1 75 


200 


225 


1.5 


21.352 


56 


.70 


.94 1 


13 


1 40 


1 64 


1.88 


2 10 


16 


22.776 


52 


.65 


.87 105 


1 31 


1 53 


1 75 


1 97 


17 


24.199 


49 


.62 


.82 


99 


1 24 


1 44 


1 65 


1 86 


18 


25.623 


46 


58 


.78 


93 


1 17 


1 36 


1 56 


1 75 


19 


27.046 


44 


55 


.73 


XK 


1.10 


1 29 


1 47 


1 65 


20 


28.470 


.42 


52 


.70 


Hi 


1.05 


1 23 


1 40 


1 58 


2 1 


29.893 


40 


50 


.66 


B0 


1.00 


1 17 


1 33 


1 51 


22 


31.317 


38 


47 


63 


76 


95 


1 12 


1 27 


1 4} 


23 


32.740 


36 


.45 


60 


7! 


91 


1 06 


1 21 


1 37 


2 4 


34 164 


.35 


43 


.58 


70 


87 


1 02 


1 17 


1 31 


2.5 


35.587 


.33 


42 


56 


67 


84 


98 


1.12 


1 26 


26 


37.011 


32 


40 


54 


6-4 


.81 


94 


1.08 


1 21 


2.7 


38,434 


31 


39 


52 


62 


78 


91 


1 04 


1 17 


28 


39.858 


.30 


.37 


50 


60 


.75 


87 


1.00 


1 12 


2.9 


41,281 


.29 


.36 


.48 


58 


.72 


84 


.97 


1.08 


30 


42.705 


.28 


35 


.47 


56 


.70 


82 


94 


1 05 


3.1 


44.128 


.27 


33 


45 


54 


67 


.79 


.90 


1 01 


3 2 


45.552 


.26 


.32 


.43 


s: 


65 


.76 


87 


98 


33 


46.975 


.25 


.31 


.42 


51 


63 


74 


85 


95 


3.4 


48.399 


.24 


30 


.41 


19 


.61 


72 


82 


.92 


35 


49.822 


24 


30 


.40 


IS 


.60 


.70 


80 


.90 


3.6 


51.246 


23 


.29 


39 


46 


58 


.68 


78 


87 


3 7 


52.669 


.22 


28 


37 


45 


.56 


66 


75 


85 


3 8 


54.093 


.22 


27 


36 


4-1 


55 


.64 


73 


83 


3 9 


55 516 


21 


.27 


.36 


42 


54 


63 


.72 


81 


4.0 


56.940 


.21 


.26 


.35 


12 


52 


61 


70 


.79 


4 1 


58.363 


.20 


25 


.34 


41 


51 


.59 


68 




4.2 


59.787 


.20 


.25 


.33 


40 


50 


58 


67 


75 


4.3 


61.210 


.19 


.24 


.32 


39 


49 


.57 


.65 


73 


4 4 


62.634 


.19 


.23 


.31 


38 


.47 


56 


63 


71 


4.5 


64,057 


18 


.23 


.31 


37 


46 


.55 


62 


70 


46 


65.481 


.18 


.22 


.30 


36 


45 


53 


60 


68 


4 7 


66.904 


.17 


.22 


.29 


35 


44 


.52 


.59 


66 


48 


68.328 


.17 


.21 


.29 


35 


43 


51 


58 


65 


49 


69.751 


.17 


.21 


.28 


34 


42 


.50 


57 


64 


5.0 


71.175 


.16 


.21 


.28 


33 


.42 


49 


56 


63 


5.1 


72.598 


.16 


.20 


.27 


33 


41 


48 


55 


62 


5.2 


74022 


16 


.20 


.27 


3: 


.40 


.47 


54 


.60 


53 


75.445 


.15 


.19 


.26 


31 


39 


.46 


53 


53 


54 


76.869 


15 


.19 


.26 


31 


39 


45 


52 


58 


5 5 


78.292 


15 


.19 


.25 


30 


.38 


44 


51 


57 


5.6 


79.716 


.15 


.18 


.25 


30 


.37 


43 


50 


55 


5.7 


81.139 


.14 


.18 


.24 


29 


.36 


43 


49 


55 


5.8 


82.563 


.14 


18 


24 


29 


.36 


.42 


48 


54 


59 


83.985 


14 


.17 


.23 


28 


35 


.41 


47 




6.0 


85.410 


.14 


.17 


.23 


28 


i5 


41 


47 


52 


6.1 


85.833 


13 


.17 


.23 


27 


34 


.40 


46 


51 


6.2 


88.257 


.13 


.16 


.22 


27 


33 


39 


45 


50 


6.3 


89.680 


.13 


.16 


.22 


26 


.33 


39 


44 


50 


64 


91.104 


.13 


.16 


.21 


26 


32 


.38 


43 




6 5 


92.527 


.12 


.16 


.21 


25 


.32 




43 




6.6 


93.951 


.12 


.15 


.21 


25 


.31 


37 






6.7 


95.374 


.12 


15 


.20 


25 


31 


36 


41 




6.8 


96.798 


.12 


15 


.20 


:- 




36 


41 


46 


69 


98.221 


12 


.15 


.20 


24 


.30 


35 


.40 




7 


99.645 


.12 


.15 


.20 


14 


.30 


35 


40 





A 1 1 1 1 1 1 • . 

• h.il.-h I;. 

nd of 
■ 
the • ihou- 

uund in 1 1 . • olumn 
undei ihi 
M a n I 10 | 

Fxamplf ' 
■ M. 

YOl 

IF THE Ml SI 
SPOT «.i i \ 

COS! l!\IIN<. 

IS... OF. . . 



112 


1.2 


15 


1.5 


20 


2.0 


2 1 


2.1 


30 


3.0 


SS 


;{..-> 


10 


1.0 


15 


1.5 



CONCLUSION 



1. This is the first TRI E TOTAL 
AREA surve) ever made by an in- 
dividual radio station including both 
At-Home and Out-of-Home ratines 

2. It shows that the listening habits of people in 
the areas outside the City Area differ from those 
of the City Area. 

3. Listeners-per-Home in the CITY AREA differ Iron, 
those in the TOTAL AREA. 

4. Television penetration affects the CITY AREA to a -rearer 
degree than it does the TOTAL AREA. 

5. The projection of City Area ratings to the Total Area can 
produce a margin of error overrating network stations up to 40%, 

6. Because of Non- duplication of programing, an Independent Sta- 
tion s City Area ratings may be more indicative of its TOTAL 
AREA ratings. 

7. The City Area ratings of a network affiliate are not indica- 
tive of its Total Area service, because of encroachment 
of the affiliates of the same network in its fringe 
area. ° 

8. THE COST PER THOUSAND OF NET- 
WORK STATIONS MUST RE CONFINED 
TO THE \1 MBER OF RADIO HOMES 
IN THE AREA IN WHICH THE 
SURVEY WAS TAKEN 




50,000 WATTS 



BOSTON 



S50 KC 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY BOSTON HERALD-TRAVELER CORP 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 



BIG MIKE... 



proves 



_ ifie timebuyers Assistant... 
'Me NEBRASKtS NoJ STATION 



_ 5 I 



« 



s_> 



^ 



J 



\ 



/ 



jC? 



«5^ 



sV^ 



^S> 



Sfi*S^ 



N^^ 



ss^- \^^^ 



\And remember the bonus coverage of KFAB — 
warts of 6 states around Nebraska 

\BIG MIKE is the physical trademark of KFAB. 
INebraska's most powerful station 



,Ooo] 
\TTS\ 



fe-4 



KSS NEVVS p fR'0DS LEAD 
MORE TIMES THAN ANY 
OTHER STATION 
"* KFAB- CBS LEADS IN ALL 
NETWORK QUARTER HOURS 
IN THE MORNING 

* KFAB-CBS LEADS IN 7?°/ 
^ QUARTER HOURS IN AFTERNOON 

* KFAB-CBS LEADS IN 66°/ 
QUARTER HOURS AT NIGHT 

▼ KFAB-CBS LEADS IN ALL 
HALF-HOUR PERIODS SUNDAY 
AFTERNOON AND 62* y 
SUNDAY NIGHT 




Everyone seems to be agreed that . . . one of the m<-\t important 
yardsticks tor the successful purchase of radio advertising and the 
Corresponding placement of commercial radio tin:, is dipend- 

able audience measurements and suntn. 

Just recently released is the first complete area Hooper Report 
Covering BIG \llkl S home state I his sur\c> COVetl all ol the 
State ol Nebraska (ever) COUnty) and the cits ol Council Bluffs. 
(Iowa). I his is the first complete, and thorough measurement o4 
Nebraska Market and proves conclusiscls that BIG Mlkl is the 
most powerful, influential salesman and entertainer in the area 
the " 1 imebuyer's Assistant". BIG Mlkl is proudh pointing out kes 
results of this survey. Hear more about BIG MIKI and the first 
REAL measurement of Nebraskan's listening preferences from 

free and Peters or get the facts from Harrs Burke. General 

Manager. 

v \\\U 1 1 i / / / / , 

fcSK\\\\\\lll/A Tmfa 



3 



y 




fO.OOo WATTS OMAHA CBS RA D'0 



SPOT RADIO 

{Continued from page 110 I 

in» to a spot check. Program-hungry 
stations with network time on their 
hands have been eager to obtain pro- 
grams tlic\ can sell to local advertisers 
I and keep 100% of the advertiser's 
dollar rather than the 60 r /c which the 
network allows I . They have been mak- 
ing hea\ \ use of tbese low-cost pro- 
gram offerings. 

In talking with executives at the top 
Library sen ices, there was strong in- 
dication that the term "library'' may 



soon be passe when referring to them 
because they are actually developing 
more and more into "programing" 
services. They not only supply sta- 
tions with program and commercial 
material but are constantly expanding 
their services to aid radio stations with 
local selling. According to John Lang- 
lois. sales manager of Lang-Worth Fea- 
ture Programs, "The library services 
have streamlined themselves to help 
the radio station get the local adver- 
tising dollar."' 

In line with this, Lang-Worth estab- 
lished a complete commercial depart- 




DENVER 



Y A K II 



KIT* 



[jy The experienced time buyer will normal- 
ly regard Denver as one of the more de- 
sirable of the top sixty U.S. markets. 

But for the client seeking coverage in 
other than major markets and the areas 
they influence — we say, "after Denver, 
comes Yakima." 

Yakima, Washington, is the hub of a 
clearly defined agricultural-industrial 
market. In recent years the economy has 
been augmented by a multi-billion dollar 
atomic and electrical power industry and 
millions of acres of newly reclaimed Col- 
umbia Basin farm lands. It all adds up to 
a tidy 200 million dollar radio market 
which more national advertisers each 
year regard as increasingly important. 

1 YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 



*5*- 



CBS 




THE BRANMAM COMPANY 



GEORGE W. CLARK 



K II IMI A 

WEED AND COMPANY 



126 



ment about eight months ago; this de- 
partment analyzes local advertising 
from the merchant's viewpoint, deter- 
mines how he can be sold, makes plans 
for campaigns for the advertiser to use, 
and generally acts as a clearing house 
for commercial problems. "We have 
become much more commercial than 
previously," says Langlois, "and the 
number of advertisers using our shows 
i- definitely up." 

Similarly, the World Broadcasting 
S\-tem notes that they have been put- 
ting greater emphasis on merchandis- 
able programs this year — producing 
only shows that lend themselves easily 
to merchandising and servicing the 
stations with the ideas and aids to do 
the job. World reports its business in 
renewals and new contracts is up 41V [ 
over last year. 

RCA Thesaurus, which also fur- 
nishes its station-subscribers with a 
whole battery of promotion kits, audi- 
tion disks, market bulletins as well as 
a jingle library la basic offering of 
iimisI library services), notes a 75' , in- 
crease in advertiser use of its shows 
during the first six months of 1953. 
It has had a 25 r f increase above 1952 
in both dollar volume and the number 
of station subscribers. A. B. Sambrook, 
manager of RCA Recorded Program 
Services, points out that the general 
increase in music used by radio sta- 
tions in TV markets has brought about 
much greater use of library-built musi- 
cal programs and features. 

Associated Program Service, in line 
with the help-stations-sell drive, offers 
as part of its basic library a recorded 
sales course series by its former V.P. 
Maurice B. Mitchell I now chief exec- 
uti\e of Encyclopaedia Britannica 
Films I. APS. according to General 
Manager Edward Hochhauser Jr.. has 
instituted many changes in its services 
during the past year to meet new pro- 
graming emphasis and broadcasting 
economics. For instance, it has com- 
pleted the job of recording original ar- 
rangements of undated music stand- 
ards las of 31 December 1952 I so that 
its library is now a "permanent" one; 
and it has discontinued new musical 
releases since. sa\s Hochhauser. "APS 
subscribers no longer need them. 
When it found that very few stations 
were using the scripts of its scripted 
shows on any regular basis i preferring 
to tailor shows to their own local audi- 
ences ) APS eliminated script service. 
These, plus a few other innovations, 
enable stations to buy the APS library 

SPONSOR 




Black on map shows a portion of 
the vast market covered by 
KVOO. Consult Nielsen Map for 
entire coverage. 



1715 



THAT 



Since 1925 KVOO has been the dominant Voice 
of Oklahoma serving an ever-increasing 
audience with a continually increasing level of 
income. KVOO, alone, blankets the important 
Tulsa Market Area, and provides concentrated 
coverage in the rich adjoining counties of 
Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas which depend, 
to a large extent, upon Tulsa for shopping 
headquarters. 

For the statistically minded — here are the 
Nielsen figures: 




Doyj Per Week 

6 or 7 Days a Week 

3 or More Days per Week 

1 or More Doyi per Week 



Weekly NCS Circulation 
Doylime Nighllim* 

277.720 168.650 

347.780 267.120 

405,560 378.900 



Here are Pulse Reports for Tulsa County for 
April, 1953: 



Station 


6 


AM-12 


Noon 


12 Noon 6 PM 


6 PM 8 


KVOO 




35 




40 


43 


"B" 




20 




19 


23 


"C" 




18 




16 


16 


' D 




10a 




9 


a 


"E" 




8 




8 


5 


"F" 




6 




5 


5 



o Does not broodcost for complete 6 hour period ond 
shore of audience is unodiustcd for this situation. 



By every measurement of audience size, audience response, 
audience loyalty, KVOO always leads. By every measurement 
of advertiser satisfaction, KVOO continually stands far out in 
front. For proof, ask any National advertiser who has used 
Oklahoma's Greatest Station,- ask any local advertiser (and they 
are legion) and you'll get firm, enthusiastic affirmation of KVOO's 
enviable position of dominance in Oklahoma's No. 1 market. 

For further details write KVOO or see the KVOO Ad 
in Sales Management's 1953 Survey of Buying Power 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



^1 



50,000 WATTS 



N8C AfflUATE 

EDWARD PETRY AND CO.. INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA 



13 JULY 1953 



127 




we want to blow 
our own horn . . . 
and yours too 



1 
2 

3 



wqxr is America's leading 
good music station. 

WQXR gives its advertisers 
a half-million pre-selected 
homes in the nation's No. 1 
market. 

Nearly 200 advertisers 
have found wqxr a profit- 
able medium this year. 

4 The good music of wqxr 
is so much in demand out- 
side Metropolitan New 
York that 17 stations in 
Connecticut, Pennsylvania 
and up-state New York re- 
broadcast most of its pro- 
grams. 

There's more to brag about- 
let us tell you how wqxr can 
blow your horn, too. 



WQXR 

The Rodio Slolion of The New York Timet 
229 West 43rd Street • New York 36, N. Y. 



al a lower cost llian previously. 

APS indicated it's doing better than 
ever, and both Sesac and C. P. Mac- 
Gregor report business increases of 
about 20' , since last year. 

Q. What do library services offer 
to sponsors and what sponsors are 
buying library offerings? 

A. Musical programs are still the ace 
offering of the library services, though 
some of the firms offer other types of 
scripted shows. World, for instance, 
offers quizzes, audience participation 
shows, and documentaries. Two pro- 
grams which World produced this year 
— because of their high merchandising 
value — are Whose Birthday Is This 
l which ties in the birthdays of famous 
people with the birthdays of the pro- 
gram's listeners I. and You Win, a tele- 
phone quiz. These have achieved high 
popularity already, says World, along 
with such established shows as Steam- 
boat Jamboree, Chapel by the Side of 
the Road (religious). Freedom is Our 
Business (documentary!, and Country 
Fair (hillbilly music). 

Advertisers using World programs 
include Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer, B. F. 
Goodrich, First National Stores. Singer 
Sewing Machine Co., Farmers and 
Merchants Bank of Arkansas. 

Big-name musicals, such as The 
Freddy Martin Show, Wayne King 
Serenade, Phil Spitalnys Hour of 
Charm, and audience - participation 
shows such as Baseball Today and the 
Sammy Kaye "So you want to write a 
song" contest, head the RCA Thesau- 
rus popularity list. 

Among Thesaurus sponsors are 
Manischewitz Wines, Pure Oil. Pepsi- 
Cola. Royal-Crown Cola, General Elec- 
tric Dealers. Chevrolet, Ford Motors, 
Cities Service Dealers, and Mvndall 
Cain Cosmetics. 



Negro radio 

Q. What is there about the Ne- 
gro market that warrants special 
attention from the advertiser? 

A. The basic fact is that there are 
15 million Negroes in this country 
who have a total income in excess of 
$15 billion annually. Statistics on the 
distribution and living habits of this 
group are currently being made avail- 
able by the U. S. Census Bureau and 
Department of Commerce. (A detailed 
analysis, complete with success stories 



and specific sales problems will appear 
in a special section of sponsor, 24 Au- 
gust 1953.1 



Q. What's the biggest mistake 
advertising executives make in try- 
ing to reach the Negro market? 

A. One of the first tilings advertisers 
musl accept is that it is a fallacy to as- 
sume that they can sell second-rate 
products to this group and that they 
can talk down to Negroes and get awa\ 
with it. There is a growing realization 
that psychological factors are involved. 
The Negro, fully conscious of his mi- 
QOlit) position, insists on obtaining 
recognition b\ purchasing top-grade 
products and displaying them to his 
neighbors. As Time recently said: 
"'The Negro is a good customer. He 
wants to feel that he can buy the best.'" 



Q. To what degree are Negroes 
ceasing to be "second class citi- 
zens?" 
A. World War 1 1. had a lot to do with 

'"emancipation"' for American Negroes. 



BEST! 



LOUISIANA PURCHASE 



-SINCE 1803 



WMRY. New Orleans' 
Negro Market Station 

Based on latest morning Pulse and 
published announcement rates, you 
pay less, far less, per percentage of 
listeners, with WMRY. 

% OF COST PER % 
STATION LISTENERS LISTENERS 



WMRY(Ind) 







128 



SPONSOR 



In Pittsburgh ... .- 



EVENING 




IS 



EVEN 



BETTER 



.es, evening radio time is even better than early morning, a period which is 
obviously a great buy considering number of listeners per Bet, audiei 

over and family-type audience. 

A study* of the three-hour periods 6:00 9:00 P.M. M. 

Monday through Friday reveals this eye-opening comparison: 

29 c /c higher average ratings on WWSW in the evening. 

51% more homes using radio in the evening. 

17.59c more listeners per set in the evening. 

And remember, this kind of evening listening exists in spite of thon 

television penetration in the Pittsburgh ana! 

Such percentages are equally true of many other radio markets throughout 
the country . . . including mature television markets . . . where evening radio 
gives you a far greater audience than early morning, and the cost per thou 
comparison is extremely attractive. 

These facts more than warrant a closer look into nighttime radio by 
advertisers and their agencies. We say it's today's biggest bargain, and we 
can prove it in markets coast to coast. 

For the whole story, phone your John Blair man t<>< : 



particularly on WWSW, Pittsburgh's Leading Independent Station 



In Pittsburgh, Evening is Even Better 

WWSW Average Ratings Hornet Uting Radio 



Liitenert Per Set 



129% 



100% 




6-9 A.M. 



6-9 P.M. 



151" 



100% 






6-9 A.M. 



6-9 P.M. 



100% 



JOHN 
BLAIR 



S & COMPANY 



117.5% 



6-9 AM. 



6-9 P.M. 



Comparison WWSW Average Ratings, Homes I'sing Radio. 1 
Per Set 6—9 A.M. vs. 6—9 P.M. Mon.— Fri. 6—9 A.M. equal- 



♦Source: Pulse of Pittsburgh, March-April 1953 

This is one in a continuing John Blair &. Company series of advertisements based on regular 
syndicated audience measurement reports. To achieve a uniform basis of measurement, the 
stations chosen for this series are all John-Blair represented outlets ... all in major markets, all 
in mature television markets 



REPRESENTING LEADING 
RADIO STATIONS 

NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 
ST LOUIS • DETROIT • DALLAS 
SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 



I lic\ not onh aot a chance to live like 
the "other half" in the military service 
but many of them got an opportunity 
lu get off the farm and into industry. 
There, working on a par with white 
workers, the Negro found hi* earning 
power greatly increased. 

Consequently, the Negro has made 
strides since 1940. Times figures show 
that among U.S. skilled workers and 
foremen, 4% are now Negroes, up 
from 2%'' in 1940; among clerical 
and sales personnel, 3^>$ a re now 
Negroes, up from 1% in 1940; among 



women professional and technical 
worker-. 7' , are now Negroes, up 
from I 1 -', in 1940. 



Q. Are advertisers aware of this 
trend? 

A. No, to a great exent. These ad- 
\ antes have been ignored bj many ad- 
vertisers. On the other hand, the lead- 
ing companies in many fields have 
been the first to go after this market 
aggressively. The list of advertisers 
who are making specialized appeals to 
the Negro reads like the "blue chip" 




QUALITY PAYS OFF 

— in the Kansas faw Market 

Right now, here's what's happening all across Kansas. 
Farmers check the quality of their harvested wheat 
and are pleased. They're finding plump, firm, heavy 
grains . . . top quality wheat that will bring top 
prices . . . give them more money to spend. 

And when advertisers check the quality of WIBW, they 
too are pleased. Their sales charts show RESULTS that 
bear out the findings of unbiased, independent surveys* 
that consistently show WIBW to be the Number One 
listening choice of Kansas farm families. 

Boost your Kansas sales with this powerful combina- 
tion of a Quality Station in a Quality Market. 



♦Kansas Radio Audience '52. 



WIBW 



Vir 



Serving ond Selling 

'THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

Sep.: Copper Publicolionj, Ik. ■ BEN LUDY, Gen. Mgr ■ WIBW ■ KCKN 




list of national companies. Among 
them are: General Electric. RCA, 
Goodyear, Miller High Life. Ac\P. Ar- 
mour, Borden, Carnation. General 
Foods, General Mills, Griffin, Maxwell 
House. Lipton's. Colgate. Miles Labora- 
tories. Sunkist, and Wildroot. to name 
just a handful. 



Foreign-language radio 

Q. How big is the foreign-lan- 
guage market? 

A. The latest U.S. census I 1950) 
showed 10,147,000 foreign-born whites 
in the U.S. at the time. However, to 
this figure, the sponsor interested in 
reaching the foreign-language market 
must also add the number of immi- 
grants admitted into the U.S. during 
the past three years under the quota 
system, as well as the even more im- 
portant segment of the U.S. population 
who are second- and third-generation 
American. In the latter group, partic- 
ularly Italian- and Spanish-speaking 
persons, the advertiser will find loyal 
foreign-language audiences. With 1952 
per capita income among foreign-born 
persons averaging over SI. 500. adver- 
tisers find that the foreign-language 
market can be estimated at well over 
$16 billion for 1953. 

Q. Can a sponsor reach all the 
components of the foreign-lan- 
guage population cheaply via for- 
eign-language radio? 

A. Emphatically yes. Since 1950 the 
number of radio stations programing 
in foreign languages has grown from 
384 to 423, with over 30 languages 
included in their regular programing 
schedule. Here's a run-down on the 
number of stations programing in the 
major foreign languages: 



Spanish 189 

Italian 124 

Polish 100 

French 41 

Czech 35 

Greek 33 

Yiddish 32 

German 30 

Hungarian 16 

Swedish 15 

hlovene 



Lithuanian 14 

Portuguese 13 

Ukrainian 12 

Slovak 11 



Serbo-Croatian 

Russian 

Norwegian 

Finnish 

Arabic 

Chinese 

5 



11 



Q. Where are the foreign-lan- 
guage populations of the U.S. con- 
centrated? 

A. Predominantly in large metropoli- 
tan areas like New York. Buffalo. Phil- 
adelphia. Boston, Chicago. Detroit, 
Cleveland. Pittsburgh. New Orleans, 



130 



SPONSOR 




What 

TEXAS 

takes... 



TAKES Texas! 



ASK a hatter . . . for a wrap-up, show a man a hat like 
the one he's wearing! To take this largest, richest market in the Southwest, 
prescribe WFAA — the station of his proved preference — and 
a WFAA formulated and produced program or adjacency (in every 
instance it's Pulse-rated No. 1 or 2). Ask a Petry man. 



WFAA-820 MARKET 



WFAA-570 MARKET 



based on 25%- 100% coverage. SAVS Spring. 1952 Report 



Population 4,288,700 

Families 1,263,200 

Effective Buying Income .... $5,386,771,000 

Retail Sales 4,438,038,000 



Population 2,303,500 

Families 685.900 

Effective Buying Income .... $3,167,857,000 

Retail Sales 2,547,677,000 



Food Sales 

General Merchandise . 
Furniture, Household, Radio. 
Automotive Sales . 
Drug Sales 



996,408,000 
610,899,000 
223,263,000 
971,442,000 
140,546,000 



Food Sales 

General Merchandise 
Furniture, Household, Radio 
Automotive Sales 
Drug Sales 



558,514,000 
412.762,000 
125,106.000 
510,777,000 
81,008,000 



jgtment. May 10, 19531 



EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY 
National Representatives 



50,000 WATTS • NBC - TON 

WFAA 



5000 WATTS • ABC • TON 



) 



ALEX KEESE, Station Manager • RADIO SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



13 JULY 1953 



131 



San Francisco, and L<>^ Angeles. How- 
ever, equall) important are the grow- 
ing Spani>li--|H akinu populations of the 
Southwest (including southern Texas, 
Arizona, and California), as well as 
the stable German-speaking market in 
the northern Midwest area. 

Neu ^ ork. as the biggest single mar- 
ket, bears further analysis. In this 
area, Spanish lias become increasingly 
important, while Yiddish lias been los- 
ing li>tenershi|> over the past three or 
four years. One out of 20 people in 
New ^ ork is Puerto Rican. In 1950 
the T'.S. census showed 350.000 Puerto 
Ricans in New York: however, it is 
estimated that this group has increased 
b\ 53$ since that time, and further 
estimates place the rate of growth until 
1001) at 50.000 a >ear. Fortunately 
the increase in Puerto Rican popula- 
tion has been accompanied by an up- 
swing in per capita income in this 
group as Puerto Ricans have gone into 
higher-priced trades such as building 
and needlework. During the past year 
manv have found employment in fac- 
tories. TV set penetration among the 
Spanish-speaking group in New York 
is proof of rising incomes: over 50' , 
of the Spanish-speaking New Yorkers 
own TV sets. 



New ^ * n k population and radio 
home figures tell an impressive story 
for other major language groups: 

Group Radio homes Population 

German 4. r >4.620 l..vil,000 

Italian 141,420 1,900,000 

■ 099,800 J. ■■■:>-, 000 



Q. What are the trends in for- 
eign-language broadcasting? 

A. \ irtuallv every major English-lan- 
guage radio sponsor is using some for- 
eign-language adverti-ing today. Na- 
tional sponsors include: 

Bayer Aspirin, Schaefer Beer. Bab 
lantine Beer, Pepsodent. Willys Mo- 
tors, Flotill. Federal Home Savings, 
Petrie Cigars. Manischewitz Wine, 
Kirsch Beverages. Planters' Peanut Oil. 
P&G. Carnation Milk. Babbitt. Best 
Foods Corp.. Florida Citrus Exchange. 
General Foods. American Home Prod- 
ucts. Nestle. Gallo Wine. Sabena Air- 
lines. RCA Victor. Busch Kredit Jew- 
elers. Eastern Airlines. Pepsi-Cola, 
Quaker Oats. Lucky Strike. Bond 
Bread. Ronzoni. Gem Oil. National 
Shoe, International Mineral Corp.. Red 
Cross Salt. La Rosa Macaroni. Knick- 
erbocker Beer. Canadian-Pacific Rail- 
road. Bulova Watch. 

\- assimilation and Americanization 



fiferybodyi into/einKC! 




LISTENERS love KUDL programs in Kansas 
City. 

ADVERTISERS love KUDL results in Kansas 
City. 

EVERYBODY'S in love with KUDL in Kansas 
City. 

Top Programming and all 
the COVERAGE you need 

1000 WATTS... 250 WATT RATE 




KUDL GREATER KANSAS 

CITY TRADE AREA 



KOKO 



KUDL— KANSAS CITY 
KOKO— WARRENSBURG 
KDKD — CLINTON 



KDKD 



Covers The Greater Kansas City Market 



are making their inroads among sec- 
ond generation members of certain for- 
eign-language groups — noticeabh Yid- 
dish, German — other groups are being 
consistently supplemented by fresh 
\\a\es of immigrants. The growing 
market, in terms of recent immigra- 
tions, anil in order of importance where 
sponsors are concerned are: Spanish 
(overwhelming first) ; I krainian, Lith- 
uanian. Latvian. Hungarian. Russian 
(the four latter restricted principally 
because of immigration quota limita- 
tions!. Italian continues to hold its 
own today. 

Foreign-language programing has 
been improving steadily, and today 
many of the foreign-language shows 
are on a par with the best in English 
shows. Two examples over WOV. New 
l ork — La Grande Famiglia and // Vos- 
tro Paese, both taped in Italy and 
plaved across the board on the New 
^ ork station. The trend has been to- 
ward more foreign-originated program- 
ing, to such a degree, in fact, that WOV 
has increased its fleet of mobile units 
in Italy to five this year. 

Q. What results can sponsors ex- 
pect from foreign-language radio? 

A. Frequently write-in requests made 
by foreign-language personalities out- 
pull English-language radio. A typical 
example were two 60-second announce- 
ments sponsored in Spanish over 
YA WRL — these two announcements 
brought over 4.000 replies in March 
1953. 

To jack up usually lax summer busi- 
ness. Caruso Products Distributing Co. 
ran a premium offer of a retractable 
ball point pen for coupons from one 
gallon of Caruso Oil plus 25£ — repre- 
senting a total expenditure of S4.25 by 
the consumer. This offer was made for 
four weeks on Caruso's late-morning 
comedv show Mondav through Satur- 
da\ over WOW New York. The Ital- 
ian-language broadcast drew 8.755 cou- 
pons, or a consumer expenditure of 
837.208.75 in four weeks. 

Q. Who are the foreign-language 
experts? 

A. Notables in the Spanish market 
are: Hank Hernandez. Los Angeles: 
Harland G. Oakes & Assoc, Los An- 
geles: Leonard Shane Agency. Los An- 
geles: Joseph Belden & Assoc., Vus- 
tin. Tex. 

In the New A ork area the major 






132 



SPONSOR 



I/, RADIO j\, i & 

Vic profit Uiehm bays: 



l i v 




. . . the 

Team of Viekm! 



nu{ 



yVHLM 



u 



mMm - ■: fci) <&k 



.1/ 



m 






^ 



^ 



■*-«. 

^ 



Year after year the team of Diehm in Hazlcton, Blooms- 
burg and Allentown in the Pennsylvania League and 
Biddeford-Saco in the New England League have been 
Champions of the radio airways. Their consistent pro- 
fessional performance is the reason why radio time buy- 
ers buy these stations, for they know their clients will 
get sparkling fielding, smart base running and powerful 
offensive performance when the team of Diehm takes to 
the field to put a sales message across. Depend on 
Diehm to deliver results ! 






|>r f 



w 



1 



HAZLETON. PA NBC MBS ALLENTOWN. PA. CBS BLOOMSBURG. PA BIDDEFORD-SACO. ME MBS YANKEE 

(Represented by Robert Meeker Associates). (Owned and Operated by Harry L Magee) (Promotion Rep Robert S. Keller). 




Comes Fresh-Frozen Now 

Spear fishing once supplied 
Hawaii's food but today Mrs. 
Hawaii shops in air-condi- 
tioned super markets. In fact, 
Hawaii spends more per capita 
for food than any state except 
one. 

What's more, Honolulu ranks 
with the top fourth of the 
states in per capita retail sales, 
apparel, automotive, home fur- 
nishings, general merchandise, 
gas-oil, and drug store sales. 

Honolulu is a paradise of a 
market * . . . and to reach 
Paradise its KGMB-KHBC's 
all-island coverage, the 'ONE 
radio buy covering all Hawaii. 

In television, KGMB-TV, Ha- 
waii's first station, provides the 
shows that win customers . . . 
35 network shows . . . 64 local 
... 23 syndicated. 

In either AM or TV, KGMB's 

merchandising and promo- 
tion is keyed to Hawaii. 

" Honolulu estimated buying income: 
549 million dollars. 1952 retail 
sales: 340 million. 



KGMB 

AM-TV 

Honolulu 

KHBC 

CBS IN HAWAII* 



" Channel 9 also carries top NBC 
and ABC programs. 



Call Free and Peters Inc. 



foreign-language advertising agencies 
are: Emil Mogul Co., 250 W. 57 St.; 
Pettinella Advertising. 29 Washington 
Square West; Furman, Feiner & Co., 
1 17 W. 46 St.; Joseph Jacobs, 1 E. 42 
St. Major New York foreign-language 
radio reps are: National Time Sales. 
17 !•:. 42 St.; Forjoe & Co.. 29 W. 57 
St. Seek thein out for counsel. 



FM 



Q. What's the fall outlook for 
frequency modulation radio? 

A. The N\RTB is currently taking 
steps to lick the medium's primary 
problem: circulation. Last Christmas, 
the NARTB initiated a campaign of 
announcements suggesting FM sets as 
Christmas gifts. More than 100 sta- 
tions participated. The drive increased 
manufacturers' FM set distribution as 
much as 100'X over the preceding 
Christmas season. (One manufacturer 
reports sales climbed to 990.6' < over 
the corresponding period in 1951 dur- 
ing the fourth week of the announce- 
ment campaign.) The NARTB is con- 
tinuing to furnish some 130 stations 
with similar announcements each 
month, linking appeal to seasonal in- 
terests. This drive should help bring 
new circulation to the medium. 

Q. What does FM do for adver- 
tisers? 

A. Recent findings of the NARTB 
and the RTMA show many people 
listen to FM not because they prefer 
the tone, but because they have to. 
These include listeners living in areas 
where the AM signal is diminished by 
industrial static, weather, foreign 
broadcasts. FM. therefore can be used 
to fill holes in radio coverage for ad- 
vertisers. Its better-known function, of 
course, has been to reach specialized 
audiences such as the people who like 
to hear good music. 

Q. Do most FM stations carry 
same programing as AM? 

A. Although FM's high fidelity in re- 
production and freedom from static 
make it a "natural'" for broadcasting 
fine music, a large percentage of FM 
stations have been almost completely 
duplicating AM program schedules 
with cut-aways limited to public serv- 
ice sustainers. However, the NARTB 
is now encouraging FM stations to 
program more music and local events. 



and to build schedules which will co- 
incide with (hanging family living hab- 
its including ownership of TV sets. 
The NARTB is issuing a suggested 
"music and news formula" for FM 
stations, indicating what hours of the 
da\ are best for what type of program- 
ing. It reports that the majority of 
successful FM stations are those with 
separate programing. 

KX\ Z. Houston, until recently 
broadcast virtually the same program- 
ing on AM and FM. Last fall it in- 
stituted dail) four-hour separate FM 
program schedules emphasizing music, 
has sold out time segments on the 
separate schedule. 

Another FM station. KWPC-FM. 
Muscatine, Iowa, is garnering larger 
audiences and larger profits with com- 
plete broadcasts of semi-monthly citj 
council proceedings. Its interested in- 
dustrial advertisers in sponsoring the 
program as means of identification 
with the community's life and progress. 

Q. What's the outlook on FM set 
production? 

A. FM set production is beginning to 
pick up; the FM tuner business is 
booming to the extent of 30.000 sales 




Ik ii ww 



Represented by: 
NATIONAL TIME SALES 




134 



SPONSOR 



When you want to go calling in the Greatei Indianapolis 
Market, call on WFBM to open doors for you. W I BM leads 
all Indianapolis stations in cit) and count) audience, as well 
as total \\ eekl) audience, nighttime. 




WFBM 



MM W VPOLIS 



BS NE1 UURK 

REI-R1MMH) \Mlil\Mn H\ lilt KM/ \(.f\M 



13 JULY 1953 



Affiliated WFBM-TV; WEOA WFDF WOOD AM & TV 

135 



pej month. Man) manufacturers are 
meeting this competition 1>\ reinstating 

I \l on radio models. Admiral, Zenith. 
General Electric, and RCA arc expand- 
ing FM production. Other leading 
manufacturers are also planning to re- 
instate FM on radio models soon. 

A new development in FM, the auto- 
mobile converter unit, is now under 
production by the Hastings Products 
Co., may prove to he a new feather 
in the medium's cap. Unit is expected 
to sell for approximately $99, allows 
switching from AM to FM reception. 



Q. What advertisers are making 
successful use of this specialized 
FM audience? 

A. One of the highest time contracts 
in FM history — a 52-week contract for 
I! hours per week I all day Sunda) I 
was signed recently by the May Corn- 
pans department store over WITH- 
1 VI. Baltimore. The all-day block fea- 
tures recorded music, including sym- 
phonies, instrumental arrangements, 
complete operas. Commercials pitch 
merchandise '"appealing to the discrim- 
inating buyer." The May Company 




. . . and they act fast when you tell 'em and sell 'em on 
TV in the single station Baton Rouge market. Tell 'em 
and sell 'em too on WAFB AM and FM, the Mutual 
affiliate in the same bonanza market. 



Here's a little free association exercise that 
tells the market story: 



Baton Rouge . . . petrochemicals . . . plant expansion 
. . . industrial empire . . . .fat payrolls . . . booming 
retail sales . . . that's the New South, and we're typical 
in every detail. 



Want more data? Call Adam Young, 
our representative, and talk it over, 
over coffee, cafe royale or cocktails. 
But soon! 



WAF8-TV-AM 

BATON ROUGE, LA. 



is promoting its programs with floor 
displays, newspaper ads, and a series 
of luncheons for various local music 
societies. 

Zenith recently bought two 55-min- 
ute shows aired simultaneously over 
WQXR and WQXR-FM, New York 
{Midday Symphony, 1:05-200 p.m. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday; Sym- 
phonic Matinee. 3:05-4:00 p.m., Mon- 
day, Wednesday. Friday. I Different 
commercials are used on the AM and 
FM versions of the shows: On AM, 
commercials plug FM radios; on FM, 
the AM-FM Zenith clock radios are 
featured. 

WABF. New York, reports "All com- 
mercial time was completely sold out 
for the month of May."' The sellout 
comprised 15-minute. halt-hour, and 
hour programs, and announcements. 

Storecasting 

Q. What does Storecasting do for 
its sponsors? 

A. Storecasting is a seven-year-old 
combined broadcast and merchandis- 
ing service for grocery and drug manu- 
facturers with super market outlets. It 
currently reaches over 750 super mar- 
kets in five major areas: Southern New 
England, Chicago, Northern New Jer- 
sey, Pittsburgh, and Philadelphia. The 
Storecast Corp. of America now bills 
about $850,000 annually, up about 
$100,000 from last year.' 

Inherent in the Storecast service to 
sponsors is its extensive merchandising 
and promotional activity geared to 
benefit both store and advertiser. Mer- 
chandising specialists make more than 
450 personal calls to super markets 
each week to see that Storecast prod- 
ucts are well stocked, and have de- 
sirable shelf positions. A recent exam- 
ple of the corporation's merchandising 
activity was a series of "Better Living 
Displays"' erected in 388 super mar- 
kets in Philadelphia and Northern New 
Jersey for Philip Morris. The display 
unit consisted of two dump bins, side 
by side, with a dinner table motif in 
the background. One bin was filled 
with cartons of Philip Morris king-size 
and regular cigarettes. The other bin 
was reserved for the chains' own label 
items. Displays remained up two weeks. 
Store inventory substantially increased 
on the cigarettes: sales of cigarettes 
and snacks jumped. 






136 



SPONSOR 



the ONLY radio voice 



BLANKETING 

ALL 3 

RICH 
MARKETS 




* ROCKFORD 

* BELOIT 

* JANESVILLE 



YOUR "PLUS" STATION 

Per Family Income WBEL MA* S5712 00 

Per Family Income National Average 5086 00 

YOUR "PLUS" (AboTe Average) $ 626.00 

Retail Sales Per Family WBEL MA - $4128 00 

Retail Sales Per Family National Average 3584 00 

YOUR "PLUS" (Above Average) $ 544.00 

Retail Food Sales Per Family WBEL MA' S1013 00 

Retail Food Soles Per Family 

National Average 878.00 



YOUR "PLUS" (Above Average) 



S 135.00 



£~KAA/S 



&/PO0HEAD 



V/LLE9 






0ECA7VA//CA 
j&JDA • i 



SOUTH BELOVT 



OQOCKFOA.O 



\TC0iWGNE 



* WBEL Metropolitan Area Two Counties 
79.000 lamihes in WBEL metropolitan area. 

NEWS AND MUSIC... 
speaking an urban 

and rural voice that 

MOVES MERCHANDISE! 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



DON RICH • 35 E. 64th Street • New York 21 , N. Y. 



BUtterfield 8-7676 



cm& 



1380 BASIC INDEPENDENT 
Studio* <uut 0^icC4. 

TALCOTT BLDG. • NEWFIELD BLDG. 

ROCKFORD. ILLINOIS BELOIT. WISCONSIN 



13 JULY 1953 



137 



THE FACTS 

speak for them- 
selves about 

'HOMETOWN 
AMERICA" 

on WFBR 
in Baliimore! 



IN THE FIRST 4 WEEKS 



28,338 

Labels Were Bid In Radio 
Telephone Auctions 

511 

Calls Were Made By Our 
Sales Servicemen 

278 

New Retail Grocery Outlets 
Were Opened For Sponsors 

410 

Store Positions Were 
Improved For Sponsors 

469 

Stores Are Now Cooperating 

And Displaying ''Hometown, 

America" Display Material 

401 

Individual Displays Were 
Built For Sponsors 



THIS 15 ONLY 
THE BEGINNING! 



F^^" ,00m hometown, Amer.«o 
live sponsors on Horn eff f „ e 

\" w c BR -the greatest, dev i $ e<l! 

\on WFBK ofI on eve. r i 

VfV'XorP^e yo- **« 

Unte,-^^ 




Q. Who is using Storecasting to- 
day and what are some of the 
results? 

A. A variety of nationally advertised 
brands are included in the 300 food, 
grocen. and druj: products now signed 
up for the Storecasting service. Among 
the newest to join the Storecast roster 
are: Tetley Tea, Fritos and Baken-ets, 
Thrivo Dog Food, Good Luck Mar- 
garine. Reynolds Aluminum Foil. Shef- 
field milk and cheese, Ehler's Coffee, 
Rockwood & Co. chocolates, and In- 
stant Dip I silver cleaner). 

Representative of the results of 
Storecast service are the experiences 
of chocolate and dessert topping manu- 
facturers. The chocolate firm, a new 
Storecast sponsor, reports a shipment 
increase of 89' < during the past four 
months of Storecast participation in 
comparison with the same period a 
year ago. The dessert topping manu- 
facturer shows an increase of 21' < 
in shipments during the first five 
months of this year over same period 
last year, before it had Storecasting. 

Storecast renewals point to favorable 
results achieved for the majority of its 
clients: The current renewal rate is 
about 70/{. To help advertisers see 
exactly what results it's obtaining for 
their products, Storecast Corp. has set 
up a "reporting" system, whereby its 
merchandising men fill out an activities 
report, day-by-day. store-by-store. 



Transit Radio 



Q. What is the current status of 
Transit Radio? 

A. This year, Transit Radio, Inc., 
suspended operations in five cities, 
leaving a total of four in which it is 
now 7 beaming programs to buses and 
street cars. The FM broadcast service 
still exists in Kansas City. Trenton, 
Worcester, and Tacoma. It has been 
dropped recently in Washington. D. C, 
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and 
Des Moines. The mediums current 
slackening-off is attributed to two fac- 
tors: The year-long Supreme Court 
litigation (which ended last May in a 
decision favorable to Transit Radio) 
scared off main advertisers and would- 
be advertisers. Other sponsors were 
deterred from use of the medium b\ 
riders' complaints that their rights 
were being violated, despite what the 
Supreme Court said. Today. Transit 
Radio has three or four national spon- 
sors, some 50 local sponsors. 



Q. What is the outlook for Tran- 
sit Radio's future? 

A. Savs R. A. Crisler, president of 
Transit Radio, Inc.: "Some day Tran- 
sit Radio will definitely be revived and 
in effect all over the country. For the 
time being, we're trying to preserve 
and encourage existing markets. But 
we expect Transit Radio to be estab- 
lished in other cities without predicting 
any date or time, because it is cer- 
tainly a medium which reaches many 
people effectively." 



Station research 



Q. What are stations contribut- 
ing to the changing yardsticks in 
spot radio time buying? 

A. Some of the burden of finding a 
good method of projecting ratings to 
a station's entire coverage area is be- 
ing borne increasingly by stations 
tbemselves through the use of "area 
studies" rather than just rating reports. 
One of the most recent has been a 
Pulse stud\ for 50 kw. independent sta- 
tion WHDH in Boston. Prepared in 
January of this year, the study was a 
measure of the total audience to the 



WERD- 

SALES RINGER 
in ATLANTA 



WERD delivers a vast, scarcely 
tapped market — Atlanta'* great 
"Negro audience! 

WERD stimulates sales. Its listen- 
ers go out anil lil'Y I They 
have confidence in their station — 
the only Negro owned and 
operated radio nutlet in the UJS. 

WERD wants the opportunity to 
sell for you. Write for our "Proof 
of Performance.'' We're loaded 
triti, success stories. Surprising — 

WERD u your ,/..,,■,? economical 

radio hay in Atlanta. 

Call nr unite far details. 



WERD Atlanta 

loan ]\atis • 860 on evcrx Atlanta dial 

J. B. BLAYT0N. JR., Gen. Mgr. 

RADIO DIVISION 

Interstate United Newspapers Inc. 

Represented nationally by JOE wootton 



138 



SPONSOR 



station, program-by-program, within 
\\ IIDII '9 '...-nullixnli line. Dufl includ- 
ed .in area "I some 25 > ounties in ioui 
itates. 

I imebuyers who have seen ilii-- stud) 
i and others like ii i have praised ii 
highly. ""Oni radio clients like t < > see 
.in accurate cost-per-l,000-homes fig- 
ure « hen thej buj Bpol radio. \\ ith a 
stud) like ilii>. where a rating is in- 
stantl) projectable to a station's entire 
area, such cosl figures are possible with 
,i minimum "I error, the chiel time- 
buyei "I a New York ad agency stated. 

Advertisers however shouldn'l ex- 
pect to see .i spate of sw h studies from 
radio outlets, even though thej usually 
show radio to better advantage than an 
ordinal*] Bet of metropolitan-area rat- 
ings. I he) are quite costl) ; a sta- 
tion might pa) up to seven times as 
much for an area stud) as it would for 
an ordinary rating report. Neverthe- 
less indications are that more and 
more stations will be underwriting 
Buch area measurements during the 
latter half of 1953 and during 1954. 



Coverage services 

Q. Why does the radio and TV in- 
dustry have two coverage services? 
A. Neither of the two existing cover- 
age services are run b) the "industry." 
I he\ are two separate competing firms 
set ui> l>\ private organizations. Essen- 
tially the) measure the same thing, 
but using different methods. Standard 
Audit & Measurement Service (SAM) 
most resembles the old industry-spon- 
sored coverage service Broadcast Mea- 
surement Bureau (BMB). SAM uses 
a mail ballot technique to survey a 
cross-section ol Americans as to their 
radio and TV use pattern-. The se 
ond private coverage survey, Nielsen 
Coverage Service (NCS) is conducted 
l>\ the A. C. Nielsen Co. It- technique 
i- ba ed mainly on personal interviews. 
Thus radio and T\ advertisers who 
went without a coverage measurement 
between demise of BMB and establish- 
ment of SAM can select one of tw to 
use today or even employ both. The 
pattern, as seen In sponsor in the past 
spring months, has been for agencies in 
the larger billing brackets to use NO 
while medium and smaller-sized agen- 
cies have used SAM. Reason: V \M is 
furnished to agencies without charge 
since stations pa) for it. NCS, on the 
other hand, is subscribed to In agen- 
cies, can mean considerable expense. 



til \ 1 hi ti In 4 i* ij 



The 



WOND 



erful 



Music Station 



llriitijs 



Sl>EBSIt1 I4I3I4I I His ii its 



John Struekell, General Manage/ 



9 Out of 10 Families in Atlantic County Listen to WOND 

(Adverts • 
****** 

NEWS EVERY HOUR GOOD MUSIC AND SPORTS 



DON RICH. NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVE 
35 E. 64TH ST.. NEW YORK 2 1. N. Y. BUTTERFIELD 8-7676 




CLEVELAND'S 
STATION 





5,000 WATTS — 850 K.C. 

BASIC ABC NETWORK 

REPRESENTED 

BY 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES 



* iyj;ian *T 

The Key to a '*" 

$4,000,000,000 - 



\ 



4 




Hempstead. Long Island. N Y 

More people listen to WHLI 
during the day in the Ma|or 
Long Island Market than to 
any other station, network 
or independent 

f{i l>r<-iiiliil If Kami" an 
Paul CodofUy Pr C ! 



13 JULY 1953 



139 



*ffifoe*az aieaf. 




Sales Yiliinw with KTY1-TV 



HERE ARE THE MAGIC MERCHANDISING KEYS IN ARIZONA 

that will ring up spectacular results for your client's products in the 
nation's most prosperous economic area! 

• PRIMARY NBC programming and DuMont! 

• ANTENNA HEIGHT 1 550 feet above average terrain . . . four 
times higher than any other Arizona station! 

• COVERAGE AREA blanketing 63.2% of the state's free- 
spending population! 

• UNPARALLELED RECEPTION . including a clear picture 
in areas where other Arizona stations don't even register a signal! 

• MERCHANDISING department that not only talks about 
merchandising, but actually gets the job done! (Note: Ask your 
Avery-Knodel man for proof of the remarkable sponsor cooperation 
techniques that KTYL-TV has perfected with smashing success.) 

• PROGRAMMING — network, live and outstanding film 
packages — that's pulling in an avalanche of fan mail and "rave" 
notices from local TV editors! 




NBC and DuMont Affiliate for 
Phoenix and Central Arizona 



KTYLTV 



ZONA 
IS TIRST 

... in Retail Sales Growth 

... in Population Growth 

in Per Capita Income Growth 

... in Employment Growth 

... in Bank Capital Growth 

... in Truck Registration 

... in Farm Income Growth 

'Source: Research Department, 
Valley National Bank 

First in Everything 
That Spells More Sales! 



See your Avery-Knodel man . . . or Phone or Wire Collect to KTYL-TV, 4420 N. Central Avenue, (AMherst 6-4483) Phoenix, Arizona 



Sell Mor^OrT © 

KRON-TV's 




NOW you can be sure of reaching the largest group of 
consumers in the rich Northern California market over 
Channel 4. Now you can take advantage of KRON-TV's 
4-POINT SUPERIORITY. 



• HIGHEST ANTENNA in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay 
Area, with effective transmitting height of 1441 feet, 
gives you maximum clearance of local obstructions. 



• HIGHEST POWER allowed by law for Channel 4 gives 
you added thousands to see and hear your sales message. 
Viewers as far away as 200 miles report fine reception. 

• LOW FREQUENCY on Channel 4 gives you a more 
efficient wave length and more effective coverage over 
a wider area. 

• GREATER DEPENDABILITY. Your advertising benefits 
from the unmatched protection of a double antenna 
system and an automatic standby generator to insure 
against telecast failure. 



Add it all up and the answer is: You get better coverage... 
more complete coverage ... more dependable coverage in 
Northern California on Channel 4. Take advantage of 
KRON-TV's 4-POINT SUPERIORITY for 

SUPER SALES from a SUPER-SIGNAL 



FREE & PETERS 
Notional Represcntativ 



. llcII w q 

SAN FRANCISCO WLM 



13 JULY 1953 



147 



KnUIYI brings CBS 
programs to the 
RICH, BOOMING 




m sum in 

OU DEL •>ORTE 

COUNTIES. dif.r.t. 

CUIKI .(.tin 

...> 



KHUM s Redwood Empire has a ereatei 
population than anj one ol 68 ol the 'Mu 
largest cities Usti-.l by Sales Managemenl 

Retail Sales 98.236.000 

Food Sales 25,345,000 

Automotive 18,859,000 

When you buy KlfUM you get a bonus 
population in the 1.500,000 tourists 
passing through the famous Redwood 
Umpire — KHUM talks only to people! 
Reaches them — where they are. 

John E. Pearson — Western Radio Sales 



CHANNEL 

n 



KVOS'TV 
KVOS 
ftPQ 



10 00 WATTS 
790 K C 

5 000 WATTS 
560 K C 




Here's 55.4Z of 

WASHINGTON STATE'S 

CA SH FARM 1NC 0M 

^J-orjoe C7 1 Co. 



MEN, MONEY 

i Continued from page 20) 

\n\ summer tryout has it tough. 
But the corned) summer tryout is the 
most severer) handicapped hopeful of 
all. It took Jack Benny three years to 
put himself over in radio in the old 
da\s. hut the average television comic 
todav is expected to put himself over 
in three routines, using his regular sa- 
loon material (leaned up for a family 
television audience. 



The referenee to saloon material is 
warranted. It is precisely in the field 
of saloon entertainment that the mod- 
ern comic is obliged, there heing no 
vaudeville or burlesque anymore, to 
get his actual stand-up experience. A 
letter from an unnamed correspon- 
dent of Jack Hellman of Hollywood's 
Daily Variety put the problem in pic- 
turesque theatrical lingo the other day, 
and we now quote from this canny Mr. 
Anonymous. 

* * • 

"Assorted vice presidents and su- 
pervisors are flocking to saloons to 
scout for what they call new talent. 
I nder the spell of bar Scotch they are 
lulled into believing that a monologist 
doing a rapid patter of blue jokes 
and discarded Hope and Allen mate- 
rial is a good TV bet. Ten years of 
batting around third-rate night clubs 
is supposedly proper seasoning for 
'new faces.' He's slapped into a sum- 
mer show and a few clean old jokes 
are substituted for dirty old jokes and 
another hopeful bites the dust. 'He 
just didn't have it." they say. But in 
all fairness the man might have had a 
chance with proper help." 

* -» * 

How exquisitely and painfull) true! 
On short notice, on short dough, on 
short tolerance by big network offi- 
cials who expect push-button miracles, 
promising funnymen are given a "try- 
out." But are they really? Is it not 
more like the ordeal by fire? I nder 
the superstitious jurisprudence of the 
middle ages, if vou could pass hare- 
fooled over hot coals v ou were inno- 
cent. If you can stand up. in summer 
tryout, to the makeshift production, the 
bored writers and the bet-you-can't- 
make-us-laugh challenge of the execu- 
tives, then v ou are O.K. ^ ou've got it. 
Got it? Boy. if you can do all that. 
you're a genius and no mistake. * * * 



MEN'S STORES 

We are interested in information re- 
garding the use of television by men's 
clothing and apparel stores of the bet- 
ter class. Locally, most of the stores 
or chains using the medium are in the 
low price, bargain appeal category. 
Many of vour case histories are in the 
same field. 

The only "fine store" on the Pacific 
Coast who is a consistent TV sponsor 
is Pauson's of San Francisco. They 
have been on the air for five years with 
a news commentator program. Have 
you anv report on the result of their 
operation? Our client is not interested 
in an institutional approach but ex- 
pects his TV effort to make direct sales. 

Anything that you can tell us that 
we might pass on to a client would be 
appreciated. 

Larry Lewin 

The Mayers Company. Inc. 

Los Angeles 

• SPONSOR hi- published several ca-.- historic* 

on the use of television by better rla« men", 
eluthinc stores. These are to be found in ihr 
1953 edition of TV Results, a book of rase 
histories. 



MARKET INFORMATION 

\\ e are attempting to gather as much 
possible information concerning viewer 
program preference and other statisti- 
cal market data for a number of mar- 
kets. 

Our client is interested in anv ma- 
terial which vou can send us pertain- 
ing to Denver. Colorado Springs, and 
Pueblo, Colo.: Cheyenne, Wvo.: Salt 



49TH b MADISON 

{Continued from page 18 1 

MEDIA STUDY 

I would like to compliment vou on 
vour very excellent Media Basics ar- 
ticles. Without doubt they are the most 
comprehensive and concise appraisals 
of the various media, which are avail- 
able to advertisers, that 1 have seen. 

If we gave due credit to sponsor, 
would vou have am objection if we ex- 
tracted the salient portions of these ar- 
ticles and sent them out to clients and 
prospective < lienN ? 

James L. Tabor 
Vice President 
Simonds, Payson Co. In< . 
Portland. Me. 

• SPONSOR Is granting permission, upon re- 
quest, to reproduce suitable portions of it- All- 
Media study. On completion in SPONSOR of all 
18 articles comprising the media series, it *ill 

lie pull lUlied in book form. 



148 



SPONSOR 




' Trm voice o/f Ba£&mrt&' 



The Most- Listened -To* Radio Station in Baltimore 




"The Pulse of Baltimore 
Jan., 1952 thru April, 1953 



HERE'S HOW BALTIMORE RANKS 
IN THE MARKETS OF THE NATION 

Population 6th 962,900 

Effective Buying Income 10th $1,390,929,000 

Retail Sales 9th $1,262,101,000 

Drug Store Sales 9th $41,901,000 

Food Store Sales 7th $330,550,000 

General Merchandise Store Sales 9th. $245,986,000 

Furniture, Household, Radio Sales 10th $70,960,000 

Automotive Store Sales 13th $153,777,000 

Figures from 1953 Solei Monogemenl Survey of Buying Power 



It adds up-this billion dollar market plus the 
most-listened-to station is a winning combination! 



All programming is simulcast by WCAO-FM (20,000 wafts) at no additional cost to advertisers 



CBS BASIC • 5000 WATTS • 600 KC • REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



13 JULY 1953 



149 



Lake City, Utah; Albuquerque. Santa 
IV. Clovis, and Roswell. \. ML; Las 
\ rgas. \e\ .: Phoenix ami I UCSOn, 
\ri/.: \niaiillo and El Paso, Tex.; 
Hutchinson and Dodge City, Kan. 

We realize thai a few of these mar- 
kets are not on the air yet, but you 
might have some data which we have 
been unable to obtain. \n\ help that 
\ou can extend to us will be highlv 
appreciated. 

Jack Ht u. 

Kostka, Bakewell & Fox, Inc. 

Denver 

• This issue will be useful in this connection. 
h Includes a lO^pasie section on TV markets 
(see page 205). 



FILM COMMERCIALS PRODUCERS 

licfore too long we will be in the 
market for television film commercial-: 
hence, we would like to know just who 
the leading producers of film commer- 
cials are around the countiy . I assume 
that New York has a good supply, and 
would certainl) be our quickest contact. 

Will you help us out by giving us a 
list of the most important producers 
of TV film commercials in and around 
New York. We will certainlv be grate- 



ful to you for this help. 

II \rwood Hull Jr. 
Executive Vice President 
Publicidad Hadillo, Inc. 
Santurge, P. R. 

• A list of producer* which appeared in a past 
issue of SPONSOR wa» sent to Mr. Hull. This 
type of -cniir i- available through SPONSOR'S 
Reader's Service Dept. 



SPANISH-LANGUAGE STATIONS 

It would be deeply appreciated if 
you could send me a list of all radio 
stations carrying Spanish-language pro- 
grams in the Southwestern states; 
namely. Texas, New Mexico. Arizona, 
and California. . . . 

Sam Resnick 
Advertising Manager 
D'Franssia Laboratories 
Los Angeles 

9 SPONSOR'S list of Spanish-language stations 
i —rill available to subscribers requesting it. 



r- shows which are running in the Roches- 
ter area, we are anxious to obtain any 
audience ratings you might have on 
this particular market. 

Knowing sour intimate knowledge 
of the television industry, we are hope- 
ful that you might have some data 
which would help us in evaluating the 
popularity of the film shows in this 
Rochester market. 

H. Stitzlein 

Norman Malone & Associates 

Akron 



SPONSOR-TELEPULSE RATINGS 

We notice from a recent mailing 
piece that you are offering an exclusive 
SPONSOR-TelePulse rating on top tele- 
vision film shows. As we are presently 
very much interested in the Western 



t) Closest market surveyed i- Huff ale 
SOR-TelePnlsc raiiim. appear monthly. 



s|'(l>. 



ADDRESS REQUEST 

I read in a recent edition of SPONSOR, 
in the P.S. column, of the existence of 
a pamphlet put out b\ SRA explaining 
the use of the new method for project- 
ing radio ratings i 15 June 1953. page 
24). 

However, I was unable to find the 
address of the Station Representatives 
Association and I wonder if you coufd 
send me addresses for the Nielsen Cov- 
erage Service, the Standard Audit and 
Measurement Service and the Station 



Buy 



"large 
economy 



size" 
WIOU 



on 



::. 



mm 




$9.00 

1 MIN. OR 20 SEC. 
ANNCT. DAYTIME 



60c 



PER 1000 FAMILIES 



$8.40 

1 MIN. ANNCT. 
NITETIME 



91* 



PER 1 000 FAMILIES 



$19.60 

y* HOUR 
DAYTIME 



$1.30 



PER 1 000 FAMILIES 





Any "package" on WIOU is the large economy size. WIOU delivers audiences, not by the 
person but by the FAMILY. For example, 17,326 FAMILIES listen to WIOU three or more days per 
week . . . 9,768 FAMILIES listen three or more nights per ueek (Standard Audience Report, 
1952). WIOU, in the heart of Indiana's 18 most prosperous counties, serves a multi-million dollar 
trading area. Farm income in the WIOU area is 36% higher than the national average. 
You'll get more for your money on WIOU I 



CBS RADIO NETWORK 
John Carl Jeffery, 

( ,i neral Manager 

Weed & Co. 

National Representative 




Kokomo, 
Indiana 



150 



SPONSOR 




Just as easily and frequently a> Detroiters 
turn their radio dials to W W J. you can 
turn your products into profits in the 
great Detroit market. 

Compare rates and ratings and you'll see 
that \Y\VJ costs you le-^ than the 
average cost-per-1 hou- 
sand listeners for 
radio t i 
Detroit I 



Basic NBC Affiliate 



IM-iSa KILOCYCLES — 530(1 Wim 
FM— CHANNEL ?4C — S7.1 HEGKTCLES 

Atsocrof* 
T./.v/ww. Station WWJ-TV 



Survey* show'hat Detroit*! 
V* -million cor radios are 
turned on soon as the motors 
are started up. And in Detroit 
more people depend on the 
auto for spot-to-spot trans- 
portation than in any other 
major metropolitan area. 



THE WORLD'S FIRST RADIO STATION • Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS • Nat^al Sepreientativ,,: THE GEO. P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



13 JULY 1953 



151 






New England's 

fasfesf 

growing 

3 K63 is Eastern 
Conn... Served best 
by its largest city 

'NORWICH thru 



Some of Eastern 
Connecticut's big 
installations include 

• DOW CHEMICAL 

(Six miles from Nonuich) 

• ELECTRIC BOAT CO. 

(Submarines) 

• SUB BASE, GROTON 

(Ten miles, nearly 15,000 people) 

• PHIZER CHEMICAL 

• AMERICAN SCREW CO. 

• U. S. FINISHING CO. 

• AMERICAN THERMOS CO. 
and hundreds more. 

Here is the #1 Hooper 
station with the best Local Music 

and NeWS programming and 

Now 
one low rate 

6 00 AM-10 15 PM 



force of j 
Eastern l 
Conn. 



representatives Association. For some 
reason none of these organizations have 
addresses or phone numbers listed in 
tlir Manhattan directory. 

G. H. Mathtsen 

Foreign Advertising Dept. 

Colgate-Palrnolive-Peet Co. 

Jersey City 

• We arc happy to tend a ropy of SPONSOR'S 
radio und TV dictionary which contain* not only 
the Information requested hut a lifting of ad- 
dresses and telephone number! of advertisers, 
agencies, research organizations, music and tran- 
scription services, station representatives, and TV 
film service organizations in New York and 
Chica S o. 



TV DICTIONARY/HANDBOOK 

I am very anxious to secure prices 
on the booklet you publish entitled 
"TV dictionary/handbook for spon- 
sors." 

Ken Pottle 

Vice President 

Knox Reeves Advertising 

Minneapolis 

• The "TV dictionary /handhook for sponsors" 
is included with a subscription to SPONSOR. Ad. 
ditional copies cost S2 each up to four copies; 
$1.50 each up to nine copies; SI each up to 24 
copies, and 50c each for 25 copies or more. 



contact John Deme, Mgr. 

^Norwich 37,633 New London 30,367 



TV UNIONS 

With reference to your recent article 
on unions ("Unions and the cost 
spiral" 4 May 1953, p. 27), I'd like 
to add a few comments on the writer's 
place in total costs. 

Now that the television set has re- 
placed Father as the lord and master 
of the American home, and made the 
front door almost obsolete since no- 
body seems to go out of the house 
anymore, strange rumblings can be 
heard echoing from the front offices of 
the advertisers, the men who foot the 
bill for the entertainment fuel needed 
to nourish this new household pet 
called "TV." 

Sponsors no longer ask one another 
how thev feel. Their only question is, 
"Why the high cost of TV?" 

Who is to blame? The unions have 
frequently been mentioned as the cul- 
prits. Is the advertiser just in placing 
the blame on the technicians? What 
about the huge salaries paid to writers? 

Allow me to list a breakdown of a 
normal filmed one-half hour coast-to- 
coast television show. For example, 
we shall take a budget arrived at by 
contracting various shows of high cali- 
ber. Shall we say the over-all budget 
is $60,000? This is a figure familiar 
to all national advertisers. Here is a 
list of where the money goes: 



SI 0,000.00 
S 550.00 

$ 125.00 

$ 750.00— $1,500.00 
$ 750.00— $1,500.00 
$ 8,000.00 

$ 900.00 

$ 850.00 



Air Time: $20,000.00 

Hi-Ion -the-line costs 

< drew, lab, films, 

etc. I : 
Director (scale) : 
1 rlars i supporting, 

per day i : 
Singer : 

Leading lady or man: 
Star of show: 
Music 1 15-piece 

orchestra i : 
Orchestra leader & 

arrangements: 
Musicians' Relief Fund 

(5% over-all costs. 

Not air time) : $ 2,000.00 

Writers' budget, (2-4 

men ) : $ 3,000.00 

The last item on the breakdown 
sheet is my sole concern. S3.000.00 for 
the men who create the script. This 
adds up to one-twentieth of the over- 
all cost of the show, including air time. 

All along in my figuring I have re- 
ferred to a filmed show. A live show 
would be slightly cheaper, and a net- 
work stop-and-go kine would run about 
the same, only here there would be no 
residuals. 

\\ hat has the writer done to keep 
the cost of television down? He writes 
his creation in accord with the budget. 
His characters are kept to a minimum. 
He calls for as few set changes as 
possible. Sometimes this hampers the 
quality of his work, but he obeys the 
dictates of cost. 

No, there is no featherbedding as 
far as the writer is concerned. And 
what is his reward? If the show is a 
flop, the critics invariably place the 
blame on the script. If the show is a 
smashing success, the kudos are be- 
stowed on actors, producer, director. 

However, occasional tongue lashing 
from irate critics is not the real prob- 
lems of the television scripter. More 
important are such issues as residual 
rights, a basic minimum wage scale, 
the protection of rights and property 
of the writer, better working condi- 
tions, and adequate copyright legisla- 
tion. These issues are being dealt with 
through a program of collective bar- 
gaining set up by the Television \$ rit- 
ers of America, the only guild com- 
posed of writers working exclusively 
in the field of television. The solution 
to these problems will take time, but 
once achieved, it will make for better 
understanding between the writer and 
the sponsor, whom anv clear-thinking 
scripter will agree is the only indis- 
pensable man in TV. 

John Fenton Mi rray 

I ice President 

Television Writers of America 

• See the section on TV unions, pape 188. for 
an up.to-date report on the union picture. 



152 



SPONSOR 



The Story of WGY, 
Don Turtle, and 



the Farmer 




Don Tuttle is as well-known as Perry Como to the 
more than 100, 000 farmers in the 45 counties ser\ ed 
by WGY. And Don is much more important to his 
listeners in the l 7 th State*. 

Don is editor of the FARM PAPER OF THE AIR. 
heard over WGY Monday through Saturday from 
12:30 to 1 P.M. Now mid-way through its 27th year. 
Farm Paper of the Air has become a habit with farmers 
in the areas around Schenectady, Albany, and Troy. 
Even busy farmers stop for lunch, and they take Don 
Tattle along with their dessert. 

From Don they learn the latest auction and market 
prices, latest developments in labor-saving equipment, 
vital weather information, and important farm news 




from the State Extension Service and the Department 

of Agriculture. 

FARM PAPER Ol THE AIR pulls more than 
20,000 responses annually, one of the reasons i: 
became the cornerstone ol \\ ( . i s l.irm programs. Its 
listening area is more populous than s2 of the nation's 
48 states and it is heard over the only station in the 

area which has scheduled regular programs <>f interest 

to farmers. 

The FARM PAPER OF THE AIR presents an 
excellent opportunity for an advertiser to cultivate an 
unusually fertile held — the large and prosperous farm 
audience of W( rY. 



USE THE CHARM. INTIMACY AND INTEREST OP DON TUTTLE S 
FARM PAPER OF THE AIR TO PUT ACROSS YOUR SELLING 
MESSAGE TO THE LARGE RURAL AREAS SERVED BY WGY 



On their way to Europe as International Farm Youth Exchange 
student delegates, Robert Sweetland of Cazenovia and Evelyn 
White of Hudson Falls, N. Y., stop long enough to talk with Don 
Tuttle (right) on FARM PAPER OF THE AIR. 



WGY AND THE FARMER 




Number of farms in the WGY area 


96.550 


Average value per farm 


$10,828 


Number of farms owner-occupied 


77,265 


Number of trucks 


54,643 


Number of tractors 


75,013 


Number of autos 


89,947 



50.000 WATTS 

WGY 

A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 

13 JULY 1953 



" The WGY area i» »o named be- 
cause it$ effective buying income 
i» exceeded by only 16 ttotei 



Studios in Schenectady, N. Y. 



The Capital of the 17th State 

Represented Nationally by Henry I. Christal, New York — Chicago — Detroit — San Francisco 



1 53 



IN NORTHERN OHIO 

Almost Everyone 
Rings In at P 



mm 



1,721,845 on the job in 
the area served by the 
50,000-watt voice of 



>jJg** 



VHCO_ 






^0,000-00 



C ^SU^^N,AA1^3 

CoV oho8° C **!*' 

i »^ tt $ 6000 • • • • 357.A60 
° ve ' ,6000-- 537,303 
^°°° .A000.--- 177^. 



THE BEST LOCATION IN THE NATION 
has MORE PEOPIE (4,517,000 persons) 
in MORE JOBS (Employment 1,721,845) 
with MORE MONEY (7'/i billion!) 

WGAR reaches MORE 
listeners MORE effectively 
MORE often I 



THE SPOT FOR SPOT RADIO 

Cleveland 
50,000 watts 



Eastern Office: at 

665 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 

Represented by The Henry I. Christal Co. 

In Canada by Radio Time Soles, Ltd., Toronto 



LIFE ARTICLE 

Regarding your article "What spon- 
sors should know about Life's new 
l-media study," the manuscript ar- 
rived while I was traveling. I read it 
first in print in your June 2') issue. 

If I had seen it before publication, 
here is what I would have said: 

ill It has no place in the media 
series, as you originally outlined it. 
If you want to do an article on the 
Life study, that's up to \<>u. But to 
assume that a panel of people — at least 
one of them — who take their advertis- 
ing seriously, could have examined the 
Life Study (which hasn't been pub- 
lished yet) sufficientl) to know if the) 
agreed with your article is expecting 
a lot. 

(2 I On the point of bias, you inter- 
viewed 10 "air researchers'" — twice as 
many as from any other category. 

Significantly, the most disinterested 
commenters vou quoted — the agencv 
men — made the most important, the 
most thoughtful, and the most favor- 
able comments. 

About one point. I get a little red in 
the neck. 

The most constant warning of the 
critics is that the audience of a maga- 
zine is not the audience of an ad. 

Come, now, does one segment of the 
media business reallv believe that we 
don't know 7 that? 

Do they think Life doesn't know that 
we know it? 

We even know that there are other 
media measurements than mere size. 

Sure, discussion of this Life Studv is 
wholesome, because the Studv is sig- 
nificant. 

But. first, let's all sit down quietly 
and examine. Perhaps we might even 
get some competent, disinterested 
group to examine it. too. 

Most of the reactions in your arti- 
cle surprise me no more than if all 
the Bourbon drinkers reported Ken- 
tuck v to be their favorite state. 
Henry Sc.hachti: 
Advertising Director 
The Borden Co.. New ) oil, 



• Mr. Srharhtc is a member ..f SPONSOR-, All- 
Media \,Ki-<,r> Board. SPONSOR regrets that he 
,li,l not yet a chance to review the article on Liff. 
which is part ,,f the Ill-Media Evaluation Scries, 
in adi ance. 



Do you always agree with SPON- 
SOR articles, editorials, depart- 
ment*? SPONSOR is always 
huppy to receive and print com- 
ments and suggestion* from 
readers. Address correspondence 
to SPONSOR. 40 East 49 St. 



We believe... 



. . . a radio station has a 
duty, to its advertisers 
and listeners— and tliat a 
statement of our beliefs 
and policies is important 
to both our listeners and 
our clien ts. 



We have one rate card. All \V(,AK 
advertisers pay the same amount of money 
for similar services. 



!1 



\\ >• l>f-ln-\r that an\ attempt to bus 
listening hy offering prizes as a reward is 
a deception not in the public interest. Our 
high listenership is created and maintained 
through the exceptional entertainment and 
informational value of our program-. 



™ Everj day, Cleveland's Friendly 
Station is invited into hundreds of thou- 
sands of homes in Northeastern Ohio. 
Therefore we strive to act as a becoming 
guest. No advertising matter, programs or 
announcements are accepted which would 
be offensive, deceptive or injurious to the 
interests of the public. 



\\ e believe in fairness to responsible 
people of all convictions. Those of different 
religious faiths broadcast freely . . . and 
free . . . over our facilities. Balanced con- 
troversies are aired regularly without 
charge. We practice freedom of expression 
without penalt) to those whose opinions 
differ from our own. 



'f We believe that we serve our advci- 
tiscrs more effectively by broadcasting 
no more than a single announcement 
between programs. 

• 
If you are not advertising on 
WGAR, we invite you into the 
good company of those who are. 



THE SPOT FOR SPOT RADIO 

Cleveland 
50,000 watts 



Eastern Office: at 
665 Fifth Ave.. NYC. ' 
Represented by The Henry I. Christal Co. 
In Canada by Radio Time Sales, Ltd., Toronto 



154 



SPONSOR 



A New BMI Service 



TV Film Licensing 

With the establishment oi a nevi I \ I a \i Ln i nsinc 
Department, BMI enlarges its service to Television. 

The Facilities <>l this new department are available 

to TV producers, advertising agencies and their clients. 

TV film distributors, directors, limsie conductors and 
everyone in TV concerned with programming. 



A Partial List of Som 


e Top TV Shows 


Using BMI'Licensed 


Music Regularly 


BOSTON BLACKIE 


LIFE WITH LUIGI 


BURNS AND ALLEN 


MR. & MRS. NORTH 


CAVALCADE OF AMERICA 


MY FAVORITE STORY 


DANGEROUS ASSIGNMENT 


MY FRIEND IRMA 


DINAH SHORE SHOW 


PRIVATE SECRETARY 


FIRESIDE THEATRE 


SCHLITZ PLAYHOUSE 


GROUCHO MARX SHOW 


THE UNEXPECTED 


1 MARRIED JOAN 


THIS IS YOUR LIFE 


LIFE OF RILEY 


YOU ASKED FOR IT 



This new BMI service will: 

• Assist in the selection or creation <>f music for films — 
theme, background, bridge, cue or incidental mood 
music • Aid in music clearance • Help protect music 
ownership rights • Extend indemnity to TV stations that 
perform our music on film • Answer questions 

concerning copyrights, music rights for future 
residual usage, and help solve all other problems 
concerning the use of music in TV. 



Lei BMI give you the TV Music Story today 
Call or write 



BMI 



TV FILM 

LICENSING 

DEPARTMENT 



RICHARD KIRK. Director 
Broadcast Musi Inc. 

\ \ in< So 
Hollvwood 28, Calif. 



DE BARRE1 

Broadc LSI 

580 Fifth A ■ 

\ V 



-vice Department: HFA'RY KATZMAN, Dir» ' r \« ^ rl I 



13 JULY 1953 



155 




"One sponsor has used over 4500 newscasts on KTMS'' 

"Harry S. Baird, District Manager of Golden State 
Dairy Products, tells us that his AP news programs 
are doing a fine selling job and that they help him 
inform his customers of new products available 
in different seasons of the year. 

"KTMS is continually trying to 
schedule more news because news sells 
KTMS and the advertiser's products." 



CHARLES A. STORKE, Owner and Operator 
KTMS, Santa Barbara, California 



quantity 
quantity 
quantity 

AP NEWS produces quantity sales 

quantity 
quantity 



I 




"Purity Bakeries now uses 16 

AP news programs weekly — started with five." 

"Purity has been a continuous sponsor of AP news 
on KOAL for more than 13 years. And AP news 
has been a continuous 'leader' at our station. 



"The success of our formula . . . AP . . . 

outstanding news personalities . . . complete local 

coverage ... and promotion ... is demonstrated by the sharp 

increase in listening registered on the 

Hooper ratings every time we broadcast the news. 

Our 12:30 P.M. AP newscast holds the record 

for daytime listenership in this area." 

ODIN S. RAMSLAND, Commercial Manager 
KDAL, Duluth, Minnesota 



For full information on how you can join The Associated Press, 

contact your AP Field Representative or write 



Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride 



RADIO DIVISION 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N.Y. 




"THIS STATION IS A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS." 



156 



SPONSOR 



I 

I 




I 



RADIO KEEPS GROWING: 110,000,000 SETS NOW 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the 11 pages of this report 

\£ m How many V.&. homes are radio-equipped? »"?/«' ' 

(J a W hat does out-of-home add to in-home listening? |»«f/«* - 

\£ m How docs radio's eircttlatioM compare with other media? />«?/«' 3 

\^ m To what extent tloes audience composition vara by hours? |>«?M* ' 

l{. How much radio listening do TV homes, areas contribute? f>"f/<* ' 

\\ m How do network radio program tapes compare in "people reached"? »«?/'' # 

||. Where are radios located in the arerage I ..S. radio home? pane it 

|J. If oir ifiiit'li money has heen spent recently in netuork. spot radio? page I / 

13 JULY 1953 157 



1. How many American homes are radio-equipped? 

SOURCE: June 1953 Joint Radio Network CommiHee Report, for January 1953 




98% have one or more radios 

(44,800,000 homes) 



m 



1 



m 



2% have no radios 

/OTA AAA I \ %&$ 



U.S. listens to ov>er 
1 10,000,000 radios 

Figures at left are new estimates 
for U.S. calculated by committee 
composed of research chiefs of 
four major radio webs. They rep- 
resent saturation of radio as of I 
January 1953, measured against 
estimate of total number of U.S. 
homes as of that date. 



(970,000 homes) 



liH!! 






2. What percentage of radio homes now have more than one radio set? 



SOURCE: Nielsen Coverage Service (Copr. 1953) 




One set 
56% 



Two sets 
32% 






mm 

Three or more 
12% 



1! 



11 



m 



a 



\ early half of radio 
homes have extra sets 

Basis of true strength of radio is 
that nearly one out of two homes 
has more than one radio. These 
figures reflect incidence of mul- 
tiple-set homes as revealed by 
Nielsen Coverage Service in its 
100,000-home survey in spring of 
1952, with extra-set trend con- 
tinuing, especially in TV homes. 



•All othei A. C. Nielsen data in thi> section similarly copyrighted. 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllfllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllUIIIIIM 

3. How are the 110,000,000 sets divided as to home, non-home locations? 

SOURCE: In-home, auto, public place figures are as of I January 1953 computed by Joint Radio Network Committee in June 1953 



IN-HOME 
RADIO SETS 



AUTOMOBILE 
RADIO SETS 



SETS IN 
PUBLIC PLACES 



74/800,000 



26,200,000 

9,000,000 



1h*o sets amount to 
24^ c of U.S. receivers 

As Joint Network Committee fig- 
ures show here, nearly one out of 
four U.S. radios is in an automo- 
bile. Car figure at left is higher 
^han NCS figure of 24,964,000 
working auto radios, lower than 
BAB figure of over 27,000,000 
(based on Pulse studies and esti- 
mates by RTMA and Auto Manu- 
facturers Association). 



o A U I U d A ; • v 5 page l 



4. How do '53 sets compare with '46; is production continuing at fast pace? 

SOURCE- n of SOU- 

data' January 1953 from Joint Notworl Comi 



Over »w , more radios in '53 (linn ' l« 



10.000.000 



*SS radio ial prodactioM up UJ' , over '52 



57.750.000 



Automobile Sets 
Secondoru, Home 
Sets, and Sets 
In Public Ploces 



Primary 
Home Sets 



20.200.OOO 



9.000,000 



74.800.000 



Automobile Sets 



Set 1 ) lr 
Public Places 



Home Sets 



16.250.000 



34.000,000 



TOTAL SETS TOTAL SETS 

Jonuary 1946 Jonuory 1°53 



• 



1952 

(IV Or) 



1953 

(IstQr) 



1952 

( 1st Qr ) 



1953 

( 1st Qr ) 



Home Sets and Portables 
1.562,000 I 



Automobile Sets 



807,000 






5. How much does the out-of-home audience add to in-home listening? 



SOURCE' r lie Janua-y and February 1953 



f M -ft O III <> 



Ottf-of-Noote 



litis />/ us 



PHILADELPHIA 

NEW YORK 

B S T N 

LOS ANGELES 

B A LT I M R E 

SAN FRANC I S C 

ATLANTA 

C I N C I N N A T I 

C H I C A G 

D A L L A S 

D E T R I T Q 

W A S H I N G T N 



16.1 35 | £21.7% 

4.0 | ±20.7% 



19.3 



19.2 



21.3 



3.8 | +-.19.8% 

+-19.7% 



4.2 



16.7 



3 2 1 +19.2% 

20.9 3.9 | +-.18.7% 



18.6 3.3 | + 17.7% 



rz 



17.7 3.1 l ±17.5% 



18.5 



3.1 | +.16.8% 



20.1 3.3 | 



18.5 30 | +:l6.2% 



198 3 2 | ±16.2% 

1 



M INN ,- ST . P A U L 

B I R M I N G H A M 

M I A M I 

S E A T T L E 



20.3 3.1 | ±15.3% 



22.3 3.2 | ...+ 14.3% 
22.5 2.9 I ± 12.9% 



22B 23 | ±12.3% 



i.VTcrnKc quarter-hour sets-ln-us* cH in hew mt Quarter-boar 

sets-in-use of out-of-home radio li>("nlnit jut- All fiiures In thli thai 



RADIO BASICS 



6. How does out-of-home radio listening vary with the hour of day? 



SOURCE: Pulse study for The Katz Agency winter 1952 in 18 markets, all mature radio-TV areas 

Hon- out-ol'-home listening "plus" vitries 6 a.m.-l I p. hi.; Sat. at 3 p.m. is high point 



.10 



25 



20 



15 



III 



HOUR 

BEGINNING 6 

AM 



MONOAY FRIDAY 



"i SATURDAY ] SUNDAY 






i 



!0 



1! 12 



1 
PM 






10 II 



The "plus" Is calculated by getting ratio of out-of-home to in-home listening as in Pulse chart on p - ol Radio Basics. Foi reseat basl 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll!!l!llllllillllllllllllIlllllllllillllllllllllll!U 



7. How does radio's circulation compare with that of other ad media? 



SOURCE: Various trade and industry sources, as itemized in footnotes 



Dimensions of all major ad media 





MEDIUM 


NUMBER 


CIRCULATION OR HOMES 


% OF POP. REACHED 


COST RISE 1942-52 


1952 EST. AD VOLUIWEi 


1, 


Newspapers 

i dailies) 


1,786" 

(l-l-'53) 


53,960,6 75 


85^ _ 


29.8% - 


$2,458,500,000 




(ABC cite.) 




(milline rate) 




?. 


Direct mail 








Unknown 


$ 7. 7 1.400.000 






:t. 


Radio 


2,400 

(3-4-'53) 


44,800,000 homes' 


98% 


-23.3% 8 . 


$722,700,000 






i time and talent ) 


i 


Magazines 

(gen. & farm i 


250 


158,842,000 


82.5% families 


78.5 f f J 


. $614,100,000 




(ABC only) 
(1-1-'S3) 


(ABC cite.) 


68.9' i persons 
75 and over 






TV 


188 


23,256,000 homes 


52 % 

(NBC est.) 


-67.8% 5 


$580,100,000 




(6-30-'53) 


(NBC est. 4-W53) 




1 time and talent 1 


u 


Business 
papers 


1,829 . . 


28,295,268 


Unknown 


40% 6 


$335,600,000 




<7-l-'53) 


(total distrib.) 






7 


Oiildoor 

[panels 1 


300,000 


16,000 towns 


Unknown 


22 r c~ ... 


$767,600,000 




(1-1-'S3) 









M ' urn Erickson Central Research Dopt. estimates prepared for "Printers' Ink." 
-Klitnr and Publisher Intl. Yearbook 1953. 'Estimate released 25 June 1953 by 
Joint Network Committee composed of research chiefs of the four major radio net- 
work! It Beets till situation In 1 s. as of 1 January 1953, updating previous figures 
of Nielsen Coverage Service 'Magazine Advertising Hureau data for 44 mags. 1947- 
mld 1952; combines black and-uhite and color. CBS estimates "Life" l-co'.or page 
rose 11.6% In cost (from $2.79 to $3.20 per 1,000 circulation) in past 4 years. &CBS 



estimate based on rost-per-1,000 TV homes 1 Jan. 1919 against 1 Jan. 1953. a drop 
from $:!.:>:! per 1,000 sets to $1.60. On 30 ti.in Class A tune rusts. CBS TV Net- 
s' from $3,930 to $33,733): TV homes rose 2.100% (from 
1.000.000 to 21.141.000) in same 4-year period. "1940-1952 period on cost -per- 1.000 
circulation basis, estimate by Angelo R, Venezian of McOraw-Hlll Pub. Co. 'Since 
1939. AXA estimate. 8Cost-per-l,000 homes 1 Jan. 1913-1 Jan. 1953 from original 
B i i Advertising Hureau study prepared for SPONSOR. 



r$ A ■;> \ k ::> \ b P a 9c s 



8. How does audience composition (men vs. w omen) vary by hour of day? 

SOURCE- Pulse study for Tho Katz Agency, winter 1952 in 18 markers, all n 

Female radio listeners per 1,000 Pulse-measured homes; )i.-i . at lit a.m. is bleft point 1 




9 10 II 



Mole radio listeners per 1,000 Pnlse-measared homes: San. «< « p.m. is alen poinl 



300 



250 






200 



150 



100 



MONDAYFRIDAY 



"] SATURDAY ] SUNDAY 



50 



MOUH 





11 


















.< — 







• 7 • 

AM 



« 10 11 



12 



The charts above are a breakdown of a new audience measurement 
concept: listeners per 1,000 radio homes. The computation, based on 
Pulse sets-in-use and weighted by listeners-per-set, diffe-s from the 
usual audience composition figures and reveals a striking pattern of 
radio listening by sexes throughout the day and .light. A timebuyer, 
for example, who ; s planning a schedule designed to reach male listen- 
ers, can learn from the charts above that the best daytime hour to 
reach male ears on weekdays is between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m. However. 



the same chart above also shows that the number of male radio listen- 
ers per 1.000 radio homes is up sharply at night. In fact. bet*, 
hours of 9:00 and 10:00 p.m. there are 4T< MORE male 
than during any daytime period. Si.mlUr study of the chart on fema'e 
listening shows that mid-morning radio reaches a large number of 
women, but virtually the SAME number can be reached during the 
8:00 to 9:00 p.m. period. It's interesting to note that on weekends, 
ratio of men to women is almost balanced at all hours of the day. 



RADIO BASICS 



YOU MIGHT GET A 175-LB 
WOLF- 



% 



BUT... 



YOU WON'T GET MUCH 
IN WESTERN MICHIGAN 
WITHOUT THE 
FETZER STATIONS! 



WKZO-TV 

WKZO-TV, Channel 3, is the Official Basic CBS Televi- 
sion Outlet for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids. WKZO-TV 
effectively serves more than 300.000 television homes 
in 27 Western Michigan and Northern Indiana counties 
— a far larger television market than is available in and 
around such "big*' cities as Miami, New Orleans or 
Houston. New Videodex, Nielsen and Pulse Reports 
prove that WKZO-TV is far ahead of the next Western 
Michigan TV station. One example: The April, 1953 
Pulse shows that WKZO-TV gets far more than tivice as 
many morning viewers (138.5% more) as Station "'B'" 
— 108.09c more afternoon and evening viewers! 

WKZO-WJEF RADIO 
WKZO. Kalamazoo, and WJEF. Grand Rapids, give you 




maximum radio coverage of Western Michigan, at 
minimum cost. 

The March, 1953 Nielsen Report credits WKZO-WJEF 
with a 12-eounty audience of 130,530 nigh'.time homes 
— 151,050 daytime homes. In Kalamazoo and Grand 
Rapids, alone, February, 1953 Pulse figures show that 
WKZO-WJEF get 11% of the morning audience. 41% 
of the afternoon, and 40% of the nighttime, while the 
next-best two-station combination ge'.s only 24%, 20% 
and 29%. Yet WKZOW JEF cost 12.2% less than this 
same '"''competitive" combination'. 

Write direct or ask your Avery-Knodel man for all the 
Felzpr facts. 



*A wolf weighing slightly over 175 pounds was killed on Seventy Mile River in Alaska. 



WKZO-TV 



fapAm GRAND RAPIDS U^ 4 m WESTERN MICHIGAN ftfliu KALAMAZOO 
and KENT COUNTY AND NORTHERN INDIANA and GREATER 

1 ■■ , ' _J WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(CBS RADIO) ■ npr (CBS RADIO) 



ALL THREE OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

FETZER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC., EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE? 



it Hndi o listvninfj habits 

1. How does listening in radio homes differ hour by hour? 

SOURCE: Pulse study for The Kat: Aqency, winter 1952 in 18 markets, all rr 

Total ratlio listeners per 1.000 I'ulse-ineasuretl lunnes: Sun. at H p. in. i\ /ii(/fi point 



500 



300 



100 



HOW 



| MONDAY FRIDAY 


; SATURDAY | SUNDAY 
















w 






























































- 






















































•n 


































































.il 

































UGINNING 6 



« 9 



ii n i 



6 7 1 * 10 11 



■ 



2. How many hours do homes Ksten per day? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co.. Apr!' 1952-Apri' 1953 

Iverage total hours of ratlin use per home per tlay 



3.13 


2.84 


2.69 


2.71 


2.49 


2.75 


2.86 

• 


3.11 


2.89 


3.16 


3.16 


3.11 


2.83 


■ 






• 




• 












- 





APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. 

1952 



DEC 



JAN. 
1953 



FEB. MARCH APRIL 



S ! II ■Mill t tbovc shows II 

It.S. and mlio T\ • ihc 



010 8Ai 



3. How does 1953 listening compare with 1952 by hours of the day? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. 

% of A Lis homes usiny radio, showing portion radio-TV ancf radto-otift/ homes contribute 

23.5% 

11 7<>/ n 

21.4% 

19.8% 



. Al1 21.6% 

homes 



Amount 

radio-TV, 

homes 

contribute 



Amount 

radio-only 

homes 

contribute 



MARCH 




1952 



1953 



10 A.M.-I2 NOON 
M.-F. 



1952 1953 

12 NOON-2 P.M. 
M.-F. 



1952 



1953 

2-4 P.M. 
M.-F. 



1952 1953 

4-6 P.M. 
M.-F. 



1952 1953 

6-8 P.M. 

M.-F. 



1953 
8-11 P.M. 
ALL EVES. 



Radio's potrer to hold audiences is almost equally distributed through the day 



Despite sizable increases in the number of U.S. homes equipped with 
TV, radio is holding its audiences almost as well at night as during 
the day, as the above comparison of March 1952 vs. March 1953 listen- 
ing shows. Nielsen figures show a drop-off between the two compared 
figures, but do not show that the total number of radio homes and the 
total number of U.S. radio sets has increased, thus producing audi- 
ences (if not percentages of all homes using radio) often as good today 



as those of year ago. With definite trend toward "single-rate" selling 
underway at stations, timebuyers should note that the 1952-1953 losses 
at night (down 3.1 percentage points) aren't much larger than the 
losses during that favorite of spot clients, mid-morning (down 1.0 per- 
centage points). Incidentally, not shown on this chart is the fact that 
radio listening in the 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. period is up over last year 
which helps explain great popularity of early morning-spot time slots. 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



% homes 

using radios ^M ■■ Nighttime 6 p.m. 

Jin 


1 1 


low has radio listening 


, as 


measured by Nielsen, varied 


mo- 


12 mid. ^^^™ Daytime 6 a.m. -6 pm. L 


4U 

on 


law 


**. 


X 
















■»^' 


S 


*^« 


» w 




















- 


30 








\ 


s 


s* 


-- 


/ 


0* 


.«*' 






w < 


'V 


s 


s 








^s 


y 


.** 


— I 


on 






^t—-\ 


lu 










> 


»** 






















* mt 


■Ml 


+* 






K 


m 










IU 


















































J 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAS 
1949 1950 195 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. NOTE: Although listening as shown above drops, chart does not reflect (act that base of radio homes toward which percenta 



B A 1 BASICS 



page 6 



5. How much radio listening do TV homes and TV areas contribute? 



SOURCE Puis© and January February l<*S3 

Evening radio listening: I \ ■•>. r*Mllo-nnJn hmmct 



All Homes 
TV Homes 
R-0 Homes 



All Homes 
TV Homes 
R-0 Homes 

All Homes 
TV Homes 
R-0 Homes 

All Homes 



New York 



17.0 



Chicago 





15.3 | 










WM 


Los 


Angeles 






W'jP* 






17.1. 





Philadelphia 



TV Homes [ 
R-0 Homes 



160 | 



sou* 

"„ l\ (irccix vniilrlbuH' In utnliriur 



HI l» 



IV A' 



ABC (6 programs) 



r,i.7"„ iii.:i"„ 



CBS (15 programs) 



50.5% 10.5% 



Mutual (2 programs) 


36. 1% u:i.u»„ 


NBC (9 programs) 


52.3% J 7.7% 


Average for all 


5/.0% 10.0 "„ 



^^ Char* above shows that sponsors who try to route 
network radio programs around TV areas, in an attempt 
to save money, may be making a big m'stake. An aver, 
ago for all full-network commercial radio shows of half 
hour length reveals that more than half (51%) of the 
listoning done to them occurs in radio and TV areas 
Yet, as has been proven In individual cases, the costs of 
both time and talent to cover radio-TV areas is a good 
deal less than half of the full-network eipenses involved 
with show and may amount to a third or I. 



A Pulse figures at left, prepared for CBS TV Research 
show that nighttime radio listening (Sunday through 
Saturday. 6-11 p.m.) holds up well in radio-TV homes even 
in the largest video areas. In Philadelphia (which, Inclden 
tally, has the highest per-home amount of ojtof-home lis- 
tening of any U.S. major city) there are only 12% more 
•adio-only homes tuning to radio receivers than there art 
radio-TV homes dialing radio. Even in New York. TV-home 
listening is almost 60% as good as in radio-only homes. 









lmth during recent seasons (January 1949 through March 1953)? 



Nighttime 6 p.m. -12 mid. 



Daytime 6 a.m. -6 pm. 



% homes 

using radios 



40 



30 



20 



10 



*MAY JUN. JUL AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. IvIAR. APR. MAY JUN.JULAUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. 

1952 i°S3 

rig. Moreover this \% sets-in-use on basis of present Niels' 




RADIO BASICS 



6. How do network radio program types compare in number of people reached? 

SOURCES: Home base: A. C. Nielsen Co.; listeners-per-set: Pulse, Inc.: other calculations by SPONSOR 

Average number of people reached by program types, 1-7 Feb. 19S3 

OKCE A-WEEK EVENING (25 minutes or more duration) 



SITUATION COMEDY 



GENERAL DRAMA 



MYSTERY DRAMA 



CONCERT MUSIC 



POPULAR MUSIC 



VARIETY MUSIC 



VARIETY COMEDY 



OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 



6,010,000 




7,300,000 



4,560,000 



MULTI-WEEKLY DAYTIME 



ADULT SERIALS 



CHILD PROGRAMS 



OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 




4,330,000 



4,250,000 



3,040,000 



Chart above is based on A. C. Nielsen Co. figures for number of radio HOMES reached 
by various basic network radio program types, multiplied by Pulse estimate of 1.3 



persons-per-radio-set during the daytime (8 00 a.m. to 0:00 p.m.) and 1.7 persons- 
per-Rpt in the evening (6:00 p.m. to midnight). Pulse average is for the entire U.S. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I[lll!lll!lllllllllllllllllll!ll!!lll!lll!!lll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lll!lllllllllli 



7. Where are radio sets located within the average U.S. radio home? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., NCS Study in spring 1952 



Less than half of radios are located in living room 



















ITlLU-do 










26% 


jP~MM e»fcUkooM r j 












20% 


□ 

c 






•f- 


u 


■*■ 


fc w /o *- 
&EOEOOM r«« T J 


r F E- 


v. 






r 

1 42% ! 


-o/ J porch, ■ 

*'° ft OTHERS* | ; 






LIVIUG TZ.OOM I i i° 











Radio is "diffused'' in typical 
l.S. multiple-set radio home 

Floor plan at left shows room locations of radios when 
the total picture of radio-only and radio-TV homes 
is considered. Actually, radio-only homes tend to 
have fewer radio sets than radio-TV homes, and to do 
more listening in the living room, less in other rooms. 
Radio-TV homes show a higher incidence of multiple 
radio sets. According to NCS study in spring of 
1952, M'r of the one-set homes are radio-only homes; 
36^ of the one-set homes are radio-TV. In the three- 
set (or more) category, 50*7 of the homes are radio- 
video. TV therefore further "diffuses" radio, allows 
for personal-set listening to radio while TV is on. 



•Includes dens, playrooms, workshops, garages. 



RADIO BASICS mge s 



MMM Cast af r tut Up advertising 



1. Whaf s the cost-per-1,000 homes of network programs by types? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. NRI Report* 17 Februor/ 1953 



ONCEAWEEK (U mlnutci or mor« duritlOD) 



SITUATION COMEDY 

GENERAL DRAMA 

MYSTERY DRAMA 

CONCERT MUSIC 

POPULAR MUSIC 

VARIETY MUSIC 

VARIETY COMEDY 

OUIZ. & AUD. PARTIC. 



$4.73 (7.9 rating) 
3.540,000 homes 



$5.40 (7.2 rating) 
3.220,000 homes 




$9.28 (45 -ating) 
2 15: 000 homes 



$4.40 (6.0 rating) 
2.681,000 homei 



MULTI-WEEKLY DAYTIME 

ADULT SERIALS 

KID PROGRAMS 

OUIZ & AUD. PARTIC. 




$1.72 (5.7 rating) 
2,550.000 homes 

$2.17 (5.6 rating) 
2,500000 homes 



$3.18 (4.0 rating) 
1,790 000 homes 



NOTE: These are cost-per-l.000-homes figures as 
calculated from Nielsen data which do not fully 
measure multiple radio s< I * C. 

Nielsen has, however, moved to change it-, 
pie to more fully cover two- and three 
Probable result: Radio "■ go up f« 

these levels: cost-per-l .COO downward. 






2. What are some typical talent-production costs for network radio shows? 



* - 



SOURCE: Nerwo'k Radio Com para graph which appears in alternate issues of SPONSOR 



MYSTERY-CRIME DRIMl 

The Shadow $5,500 

Dragnet $8,000 

Nick Carter $1,850 

Johnny Dollar $3,750 

Mystery Theatre $1,500 

Big Story $6,000 

B'way Is My Beat $3,150 

Gangbusters $3,850 

Under Arrest $1,750 

Squad Room $1,750 

Jason & The Golden Fleece $2,500 

SITl 4TIOV COMEDY 

December Bride $4,550 



Junior Miss $3,750 

My Little Margie $4,000 

Harris-Faye $12,000 

Fibber McGee $12,500 

Corliss Archer $3,250 

Ozzie & Harriet- $35,000 

6E1VER if. nn i>i i 



Dr, Christian $7,000 

Armstrong Theatre $4,000 

Escape $2,600 

Gunsmoke $2,875 

Rogers of the Gazette ... $3,885 

Highway, USA $1,750 

Best Plays $7,000 



•Radio and TV "All figures refer to weekly costs even when show Is oo more than once t week. 



ii mi \< i p iimii ir viio\ 



You Bet Your Life 


$7,500 


Truth or Consequences 


$7,000 


House Party 


$6,000 


Welcome Travelers 


$5,000 


Double or Nothing . 


$5,000 


si RJ If lift UJ 


L 



Rosemary $2,700 

Wendy Warren .... $4,250 

Ma Perkins $3,250 

Perry Mason $3,500 

Road of Life . . $2,750 

Pepper Young . . $2,700 

Backstage Wife ... $2,500 

Stella Dallas $2,800 



• rontinues next pagt 



RADIO 8 AS 







to 






IT'S 



(or any other season) 



NBC OFFERS THE BEST IN CO-OP RADIO AND TELEVISION PROGRAMMING 

300 satisfied, continually-renewing local, national and regional advertisers sponsor these out- 
standing NBC CO-OP RADIO & TELEVISION PROGRAMS — available for local sponsorship on the 
nation's most desirable radio and television stations. 



RADIO 



WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP (Mon-Sun) 
Early A. M. domestic and foreign news highlights 

PAULINE FREDERICK REPORTING (M-F) 
Midday reports and commentary 

NEWS PARADE (M-F) 

Headlines, Washington Report and special analysis 

NEWS OF THE WORLD (M-F) 
Late night news 

H. V. KALTENBORN (Sat) 
Authoritative comment on the week's news 

BILL STERN'S SPORTS REVIEW (M-F) 
Leading sports news and commentary 



FOOTBALL GAME OF THE WEEK (Sat) 
Best in collegiate football 
(Starts Sept. 12) 

HOWDY DOODY (Sat) 

Most popular kid-show personality 

in full hour program 

PEE WEE KING (Sat) 
Folk music jamboree 

THE JANE PICKENS SHOW (Thurs) 
Half hour, big-time musical 

BOB & RAY SHOW (M-F) 

A new approach to late-night disc jocky show 

by famed comics 



TELEVISION 



EDDY ARNOLD SHOW 

Folk music by a master 



AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR 
America's leading forum show 

THE GABBY HAYES SHOW 
Western kid show 



WHO SAID THAT? 

Walter Kiernan and famous guests with quotes 
from the news 

IT HAPPENED IN SPORTS 

Bud Palmer and film clips of famous moments 

in sports 




For Full Details call, write or phone 



30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, New York 




13 JULY 1953 



51 



SERIAL DRAMA (emmt.) 

Lorenzo Jones $2,750 

Doctor's Wife $2,750 

CONCERT »fl SIC 



I'ort i. \n m sh 



Voice of Firestone $8,500 

Railroad Hour $6,000 

Telephone Hour $8,000 

Band of America $6,500 

!'\ MVr 



Rosemary Clooney . . . 


... $3,000 


Dinah Shore 


... $3,500 


Eddie Fisher 


...$12,000 


Vaugi-n Mcnroe 


... $5,000 


Grand 0!e Opry 


$5,000 


Edd'e Arnold 


$2,500 



\ If.'ff I \ < (Ml/ fM 



Bing Crosby $16,000 



Bob Hope 
Jack Benny 
Martin &, Lewis 



$11,000 
$15,000 
$11,000 



M \\ s \SD COMMKST \R\ 

Walter Winchell- $15,000 

Morgan Beatty $3,500 

Frank Edvards $1,750 

Gabriel Heatter $1,500 

Lowell Thomas $3,750 

Man en the Farm $750 



3. What can you buy with various typical ad budgets in spot radio? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR calculations based on Spot Radio ! 



BUDGET 



PROBLEM 



CAMPAIGN 



1 1 

I . I 

Sponsor with 

I rinnnnn I 

I 

I 
I 

l_ 

r 



i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

L 

r 



$100,000 



to sprnd 



Sponsor with 



$600,000 



to spend 



1 

Sponsor icith 

I $1,200,000 I 

I 



to upend 



Advertiser wants intensive 
short-term promotion In 
reach women in marines of 
over 500,000 population 



Advertiser wants year-round 
schedule of 15-minute neus- 
casts to reach mixed audi- 
ence in markets of 100,000 
up to 250,000 population 



Idvertiser wants strati y. 

52-ueek campaign of minute 
announcements in tts many 
markets as possible over 
25.000 population 



► 






L 



\ single dttytime minute announce* 
mint tin one network affiliate in 

each of the 38 markets of this 

>c, ii ill i nsi ii total of about 
si. IK). Therefore, with discounts, 
the s loo.ooo budget hays about 
16 announcements per we a k on one 

station in each of these lop 38 
markets for six icerks. ilmtime. 



On highest-priced station in each 

of 70 such markets, neicscast campaign 

comes to about S2.H(>:i for one time. 
A thrice-iceekly schedule on year- 
'round basis would be about 
$446,628. For extra impact campaign 

could be expanded to one inde- 
pendent Station in 56 markets 
of the 78. This would mean an rxtra 

$200,000. < ampaign would then cost 

a total of about SfiOO.OOO. 

Since a single minute annnuiu rment 
tut one network affiliate station 
in each of 2*>l markets of ''n» 
IBM (of a I S. Ii'lal <•/' 313 ) 

comes to about $3,085, tin budget 

m $1 £00,000 a ill bu) about 500 

announcements on each of the 2'>l 

outlets. Spread out our a year. 
this uill menu about 10 announce* 

aunts per li eel, on tin b of 291 
station* in marl. its of 25,000 

population or moi > 



Hi 



PRINTS OF R MHO BASICS are available on request. Special price lor quantity orders 



RADIO BASICS I ■ 




1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net radio '48-'53? 

SOURCE: Publisher's Information Bureau 



NETWORK 



1948 







$44,304,245 



$62,265,105 



$22,728,802 



$69,697,590 



1 949 



$42,342,854 



$63,403,583 



$18,040,596 



$64,013,296 



1950 



$35,124,624 



$70,744,669 



$16,091,977 



$61,397,650 



1951 



$33,708,846 



$88,784,773 



$17,900,958 



$54,324,017 



1 952 



$35,023,033 



$59,511,209 



$20,992,109 



$47,927,115 



1953 
First 5 Months 



$13,242,116 



$26,009,035 



$9,347,594 



$20,753,318 



YEARLY TOTALS 

/ 1930 1 $27,694,090 




19351 $49,293,901 







$190,930,336 



$198,995,742 



'J950J $183,358,920 
j±"Sll $174,718,594 



flHO] $96,455,603 IJWfj $187,800,329 




19521 $163,453,466 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! 



iiiiimiiii - 

2. How much money have advertisers spent for spot radio time ( T 47-'53)? 



SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates 




1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 

$98,581,241 $104,759,761 $108,314,507 $118,823,880 $119,559,000 $124,300,000' $1 30,000,000 b 

Dollar fiKurcs show national spot revenues of station* AFTER trade discounts of fre- "SPONSOR estimate based on preliminary data of FCC for 19."2 released April 1953. 

quency and dollar volume: BEFORE commissions to reps, agencies, brokers. t>SPONSOR estimate based on industry and station rep forecasts. 



S b '<''. \i\ 8 & K I ft S page 1 1 



3S 




Wi 



Ye<» 



-,dflV'" 



er * e °* 

b dff 
r of te' 




More people listen to WTOP 
than any other Radio station 

in the Washington 
metropolitan area* 



wtop 



WASHINGTON'S ONLY 50.000 WATT RADIO STATION 




^ 



The Washington Post- Represented by CBS 
CBS Radio Station Radio Spot Sales 





With the fastest growth 
in agency history... 



What does SSC&B offer 
advertisers today? 



WE'VE BEEN TOLD that ours has been the fastest 
growth in agency history . . . from 3 l / 2 million dollars 
the first year to over 20 million dollars this year. 

This, we feel, would be of little interest to you if it 
weren't for this one fact: 

More than half of our record growth has come 
from old clients . . . from increased appropriations 
based on increased sales. 

It is certain, of course, that advertising alone was not 
responsible for such a record. We have been blessed with 
products of outstanding merit, made and sold by aggressive, 
intelligent manufacturers. It is equally certain, however, that 



without the proper kind of advertising a record like this 
would have been highly unlikely, if not impossible. 

We'd like to talk to any advertiser whose products do 
not conflict with those we are now handling — in a straight- 
forward, down-to-eaith manner. For we are not a group of 
high-pressure "new business men" with a pat "new business" 
program. In fact, this is the first advertisement we have ever 
written about ourselves. 

All we'd like to do, is to discuss with you how we have 
tackled the problems of our present clients and to describe 
the methods we use to get such outstanding results. 

It you'd like to hear how we would approach your adver- 
tising and sales problems, please write or telephone us. 



Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell «.v Bayles, Inc. 



437 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK 16 



PHONE: OKeeon 9-2500 



AMERICAN CIGARETTE AND CIGAR CO., INC. 

Pall Mall Famous Cigarettes ' La Corona Cigars 
Antonio y Cleopatra Cigars 
AMERICAN FETROLEUM INSTITUTE 

Oil Industry Information Committee 

CARTER PRODUCTS, INC. Arrid - Rise Shave Cream 

FILBERT, J. H., INC. Mrs. Filbert's Margarine and Mayonnaise 

IEVER BROTHERS COMPANY Silver Dvst • Lifebuoy Soap 



CLIENTS OF SSC&B, Inc. 

NOXZEMA CHEMICAL COMPANY 



Noxzema Skin Cream 



RUBSAM & HORRMANN BREWING COMPANY 

R & H Crown Premium Beer 

SIMONIZ COMPANY Simoniz Pasle for Cars • Bodysheen 

Simoniz Liquid Kleener ' Simoniz Floor Wax 
SMITH BROTHERS, INC. Smith Brothers Cough Drops & Cough Syrup 
SPEIDEL CORPORATION Speidel Watchbands 

WHITEHALL PHARMACAL CO. BiSoDoL Mints & Powder 



172 



SPONSOR 



ESP SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 




THE BIG ONE-STATION MARKETS ARE ON THE WAY OUT 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 



i|. Will it he easier to clear time far live network pf frawn flii.s- loll? 

|| a Wliol otte-station markets trill he two'Statiou markets this gear? 

\J. If oh* hig trill networks he this fall? 

\^ u What has heett found out ahottt actual set growth in new T\ market*: 

l|. \\ hut ore the .«<*< circulofion ond conversion trends in I HI markets? 

(J. lr«» there any figures on the nettml number of ! lit sets in use? 

||. Whol or<» lli«» TV network cost trends? 

IJ. Ilnw will new IV stations affect the c :st of on advertiser's show? 

(J a At what point should an advevtiser ad I a netv station to his network' 



13 JULY 1953 



ostme 111 

page 111 

page I Hi 

page 111 

page 180 

pttge I It I 

page 182 

page lit'.t 

page lit'.t 

173 



One-station markets 

Q. Will it be easier or harder to 
clear time for live network TV pro- 
grams this fall? 

A. Advertisers can breathe easier. 
The single-station market problem is 
headed for solution faster than had 
been expected. Advertisers who 
knocked their heads against the wall 
last season because they couldn't clear 
good time for their network shows will 
find that by the end of the year more 
than 20 of the biggest one-station mar- 
kets will be two-station markets. 



Q. What explains this sudden so- 
lution of the one-station market 
problem? 

A. Until fairly recently the FCC time- 
table indicated that the one-station 
market problem would not be solved 
until well into next year. However, 
the commission is now working at top 
speed and has authorized a large num- 
ber of new stations in these problem 
markets. Besides the fact of acceler- 
ated hearings, merged applications by 
competing broadcasters and drop-outs 
have eased the situation. 

Q. What one-station markets are 
likely to be two-station markets by 



the end of the year? 
A. According to the latest NBC es- 
timates, the following 23 markets, all 
of them with one station last April, 
will have at least two stations by the 
winter of this year: Pittsburgh. St. 
Louis, Milwaukee. Buffalo. Indianapo- 
lis, Providence, Kansas City, Charlotte. 
Schenectady, Seattle, Houston, Mem- 
phis, Rochester, Huntington, Norfolk. 
New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Miami. 
Des Moines, Greensboro, Jacksonville. 
Tulsa, and Portland. 



Q. Will the new stations in the 
markets mentioned above actually 
be located in the markets or will 
they be in adjoining towns? 

A. Most of them will actually be lo- 
cated within the market, but a few 
will be located outside. Providence's 
competition will come from Fall River. 
Schenectady's from Albany, Hunting- 
ton's from Charleston, Norfolk's from 
Hampton, Miami's from Ft. Lauder- 
dale, and Greensboro's from Winston- 
Salem. Ft. Lauderdale's WFTL-TV, an 
NBC affiliate, is already on the air. 
and is now interconnected. The new 
Pittsburgh station, WKJF, is also on 
the air. WFBG-TV in Altoona also 
serves the Pittsburgh area with its 
316.000-watt power. WCTY-TV. Kan 
sas City is on. The new Milwaukee and 



Charleston stations are expected to go 
on the air this month. (This list does 
not take into account the fact that 
KGUL-TV, Galveston, CBS TV's new 
basic affiliate, has been covering Hous- 
ton since 22 March. I 



Q What important one-station 
markets will not have any TV com- 
petition this year? 

A. Taking the 28 top single-station 
markets (according to NBC set pene- 
tration figures), the following five 
markets will not have any TV competi- 
tion this year: Toledo, Richmond. 
Nashville. Frie. and Binghamton. 



Q. Will the new "second sta- 
tions" be interconnected right 
away? 

A. New stations in markets which al- 
ready boast interconnected stations 
will, of course, be tied into network 
service quicker than a station start- 
ing where such service does not exist. 
It does take a little time, however, for 
the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Co. to make the necessary connections 
even where the city already has net- 
work service and there are occasionally 
problems in getting the equipment. 
Where a "second station" is in a town 
outside the already-connected TV mar- 
ket, the time it takes to connect it is 
greater. 



KEY NETWORK TV TRENDS 



1 -STATION CITIES 



It's expected that by Christmas 23 of the 28 
largest single-station markets (in terms of 
TV set penetration) will have two stations 



NETWORK SIZE 



TV networks will reach about 125 stations by 
the fall. The big programs are expected to 
be heard on 100 stations, maybe even more 



| Competition will be keener than ever with 

PROGRAMING = NBC's entry into late morning time and ABC's 

I new personalities battling existing TV shows 



| While new station costs are high at first 

TIME COSTS 1 decreasing cost -per-1, 000 for established TV 

1 out'ets will help offset them on national basis 



TV SET GROWTH 



Studies have confirmed that set groivth in new 
markets is rapid. Where a I'HF station has 
] IIF competition, problem is more complicated 



Q. Can advertisers on the new 
"second stations" depend on 
reaching the established TV audi- 
ence from the beginning? 

A. Not necessarily. Most of the new 
"second stations" mentioned are UHF, 
which means that set owners must con- 
vert. Two of the 23 new stations men- 
tioned above (as well as KGUL-TV) 
are VHF. They are KOMO-TV, Seat- 
tle, and KOIN-TV, Portland, both of 
which are scheduled to go on the air 
sometime in the fall. While new VHF 
stations will have an advantage over 
new UHF stations in markets where 
service is already established, Port- 
land's KOIN-TV will come into a one- 
station UHF market, now serviced by 
KPTV. This rare situation, which will 
become more common as time goes 
on, is still, however, not the same as a 
UHF station coming into a VHF mar- 
ket. TV sets start out as either VHF 
sets later converted to I HF or all-wave 
sets which can receive both I'HF and 
\ HF signals. 



174 



See list of (op 10 availablv shows on <>arfi network page 186 



SPONSOR 



I. Among ABC's stable of personalities signed 
up to battle CBS and NBC at night, Danny 
Thomas hat been bought by American Tobacco 



2. Among last soason's program casualties are 
the alternating week shows, "City Hospital," 
right, and "Crime Syndicated." CBS offering! 



'" 



3. Late afternoon and early evening remain 
top time slots for tho kiddies. At right is 
"Captain Video," Du Mont's only evening strip 



4. Switched from late afternoon to late a.m., 
"Hawkins Falls" leads off NBC's lineup of 
soap operas, is aimed at CBS a.m. supremacy 



Since tin- basic problem of an adver- 
tiser buying UHF station time in an 
established V HF market is the Bpeed of 
conversions, the question is: What has 
beep tin- normal rate of set Conversions 

to I UK in Other markets? The an-wcr 
is: There is DO "normal' rate of con- 
version. The rate has \arieil consider- 
ably. (The experience of other cities 
where I HF conversion has been a 
problem is covered later on in this 
same section.) 

Q. What effect will the new 
two-station markets have on net- 
work programing? 
A. Generally speaking, it will effect 
network programing most in those time 
segments where the. top-rated shows are 
slotted. Uthougb there have been ex- 
ceptions, advertisers have been reluc- 
tant to spot a show opposite / Loir 
Lucy, for example, not onrj because 
the Philip Morris entry is so popular 
hut because, until recently, the adver- 
tiser 1 \i\ i nii opposite Lucy was <>nl\ 
able to clear that particular time slol 
in one-third of the markets. 

One specific effect of the new two- 
station markets will be to boost NBC's 
late-morning selling efforts. If the one- 
station market problem remained a 
serious one for next season, NBC's 
drive to compete with CBS from 10:30 
a.m. to noon would have been slowed 
down because of CBS' head start. It 
would have had a more difficult time 
luring awa\ the one-station markel sta- 
tions to carr\ it- new morning -how-. 

Conversely, since NBC has been gen- 
erally regarded in the past as more 
successful in clearing nighttime peri- 
ods, the other networks have more to 
gain from the new two-station markets. 

The new two-station markets will 




13 JULY 1953 



\etwork TV Com paragraph appears this issue page I II 



175 



bring to an end alternate-week showing 
of two popular programs originating 
on different nets. They will also do 
away with kines spotted in marginal 
(to say the least) time segments. 
WDTV, Pittsburgh, for example, has 
slotted kines of the Colgate Comedy 
Hour on Saturday morning and Milton 
Berle on Wednesday afternoon. 



Network lineups 



Q. How many interconnected TV 
stations will there be in the U.S. 
by this fall? 

A. The exact number is not easy to 
pin down. The American Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. sometimes gets or- 
ders that are later canceled. Last month 
(June) there were 137 stations in 91 
cities interconnected by AT&T coaxial 
cable or radio relay facilities. The com- 
pany has firm orders to connect 10 sta- 
tions in eight additional cities and ex- 
pects work to be finished by October 
or November. That will make a total 
of 147 stations in 99 cities. However, 
new firm orders may come in over the 
summer involving stations which can 
be quickly linked. 



Q. How does the number of in- 
terconnected stations compare 
with last fall? 

A. The figures as of 1 October 1952 
were 110 interconnected stations in 67 
cities throughout the country. 



Q. Does it make any difference 
in the reception of a network pro- 
gram whether a station is con- 
nected by coaxial cable or radio 
relay? 

A. No. The quality of reception is the 
same. At present about half of the in- 
terconnected stations are linked by ra- 
dio relay and half by coaxial cable. 



Q. How many stations will an ad- 
vertiser be able to reach on a single 
network in the fall? 

A. Since the FCC freeze was lifted 
and new stations have been coming on 
the air, network TV has been in a 
pretty fluid state. Facts about new sta- 
tions — their power, their coverage, 
their audience, their affiliation — are 
surprisingly hard to come by — things 
have been happening so fast. Even the 
networks find it difficult to give hard- 
and-fast answers to questions about 
latest affiliation data. Fall estimates 
are even more vague. One expert esti- 
mate is that it will be possible for an 
advertiser to get around 125 stations 
through one network buy by Septem- 
ber with perhaps 95 of these stations 
interconnected. 



Q. How many TV stations are 
network advertisers likely to be us- 
ing in the fall? 

A. Since network advertisers will still 
be facing somewhat of a single-station 
market situation in the fall, only those 
advertisers with top-rated shows will 



be able to clear the maximum network 
lineup, assuming the) want that many 
stations. The way it looks right now, 
some advertisers will be using almost 
twice as many stations as were bought 
for the large network lineups last fall. 
Last moil li Maxwell House bought 
over 100 stations for the Red Buttons 
Show on CBS. 

Prudential and the Electric Compa- 
nies Advertising Program, which will 
alternate on You Are There every Sun- 
day evening at 0:30, have ordered 96 
CBS stations for the fall. (According 
to the 18 May sponsor TV Compara- 
graph, You Are There was seen on 40 
live stations in the 6:00-6:30 p.m. 
period opposite Revere's Meet the 
Press. It was sponsored by ECAP on 
alternate weeks.) 

Some of the live CBS lineups give 
a good indication of how TV networks 
have been growing recently. Toni was 
on 87 stations in its Godfrey segment 
and used the same number for its 
Racket Squad program. Goodrich had 
78 stations during the alternate weeks 
it sponsored Burns & Allen. Only the 
very top shows in the season previous 
came close to that number. 



Q. What criteria can advertisers 
use in determining whether to add 
post-freeze TV stations to their 
network lineups? 

A. With new stations going on the 
air at an ever-increasing clip I the rate 
has been nearly one a day in recent 
weeks i. time buying presents a pile of 



Average production and talent costs of 
sponsored network TV shuns 



QUARTER HOUR 



DAYTIME 



HALF HOUR 



HOUR 



$4,098 $9,124 $13,700 



QUARTER HOUR 



NIGHTTIME 



HALF HOUR 



HOUR 



$8,693 $13,445 $28,803 

Average no. of stations in TV lineup, daytime: 38 



Top 10 itgencles hi number of quarter 
hours of programs on network TV* 



RANK 



ACENCY 



NO. QUARTER HOURS 



I. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

.». 
6. 
7. 
7. 
8. 
8. 



WILLIAM ESTY . 

I) I VCER-FITZGER iLD-S i UI'LK 

BBDO _ 



BENTON & BOWLES... 

YOl VG & Rl BICAM 

HIOW 

./. WALTER THOMPSON 

LEO HI RNETT 

N. W. AVER 

TED BATES 



27 
22 
21 
13 
17 
16 
II 
14 
10 
10 



Kumbei ftrter hours does do) necessarily Indicate supremacy in bill- 

[I mej t activity 

Average no, of stations in TV lineup, nighttime: 31 



Source: All of these data were tabulated from SPONSOR'S Network TV Comparagraph of 7 5 lune 7953. This chart 
giving essential data on net TV shows appears in alternate SPONSOR issues. Chart appears this issue page 141. 



176 



SPONSOR 



problems. I he situation i- furthei 
complicated 1 > \ the fad thai ei ei j ad* 
vertiser's problem is different. Bui 
there is one kind oi information ih.it 
c\ ei \ bodj wants to know ; the 'I' 
of set penetration in .1 new I V mai ket, 
including Mil'' < om ersion, plus the 
extent in which nearb) l\ stations 
d\ ei lap. I In- |n cililcm ill c>\ i'i lap is .1 
greatei one than It used to be as new 
l\ Btations begin filling in holes in 
the broadcasl landscape. 

( mce thi 1 facts on sel penel 1 bI ion and 
overlap are gotten, an advertiser can 
compare degree ol penetration with his 
sales figures. Mien he tnusl End ways 
of estimating future l\ set growth. 

Some advertisers are by-passing for- 
mulas and adding new stations as the) 
come <ni in establish time franchises. 
Maxwell House is an example of this 
with iis avid purchase <>f almosl an) 
T\ station. 

Another important criterion is cost- 

per-1,000. In new market-. cn-l-per- 

1,000 starts out higher than in estab- 
lished markets and Mime advertisers 
have been waiting until audiences oi 
COSts reach a predetermined level be- 
fore the) bu) a new market. If the n< w 
market i- a one-station market, the j<\- 
vertiser with a strict formula takes a 
chance, <>l emir e, that a competitor 
will lie up the time segment he wants 
for an indefinite period in the future. 

In estimating what new market- will 
cost him, advertisers should take into 
account that adding new stations in- 
volves some indirect savings. The new 
market- ma\ put him in a higher dis- 
count bracket, for one thing. For an- 
other, the) involve no new production 
co-Is. Or, to put it another way, his 
talent and production co-is per market 
go dow n. 

In planning for the future, network 
advertisers must look at more than just 
current set penetration. Not onl) must 
the) consider the estimated rate ol 
growth, but they must take into ac- 
count market potential. If an adver- 
tiser must choose between one of two 
stations, the market with 20,000 -el- 
and a potential of 100,000 ma) be a 
better bu) than a market with 30,000 
sets and a potential of 60,000, other 
things being equal. i.See Spot T\ 
tion, starting page I'M. for other dis- 
cussion ol when it is mosl advantageous 
to bu\ into a new I\ market. 1 



Q. How can an advertiser esti- 
mate the rate of future TV set 



growth in a new market? 
A. I he ln-i thiiiL' to find oul 1- w hat 
pasl 1 owth has been and thai 1-1 I 
eas) a- it sounds, Nobody, obviousl) 
has been out 1 ounting I \ -it- one b) 
one -oi .1I1. 1950 < ensus and a lot ol 
Bets have been I ought sin< e then. Niel- 
sen Covers Service < one up h ith 
figures projei ted from a sample in 
\ 1 - 1 1 1 1952, hut thai was befi 1 
new Btations 1 ame on the air. 

\ in" kel pie e, prepared b) the < BS 
l'\ Research Department, has used the 
census and \ ielsen data to proje 1 I \ 
Bel nw nership b) 1 ounties as oi Mi 
1953. ■ NB< ma) 1 ome oul an) da) 
now with a similai stud) based on 
N ielsen and adjusted to reflo 1 sel Bales 
-hi. e \|n d 1952 .1- reported b) 1 1m- 
Radio- 1 ele\ ision Manilla, hirers \ - 
ciation. 1 

The ( BS ( ount) figures based on the 
census and Nielsen data were used 
onl) foi pre-freeze 1 ounties bul oul oi 
these figures plus some othei I 
I BS researi hers 1 ame up w ith - 

tgh answei s f oi I \ sel penetration 
in new video markets. Here is what 
1 BS did: 

I 1. 1 counties served b) pre-freeze 
stations, ' in ves wen- 1 hai ted based on 
three points: the <\<ii<- the station went 
mi the air. the census and the \' S 
daia. In 1 ases where \ ( S figures were 
applied to 1 minis 1 lusters, < BS applied 
the sel penel ration figure for the clus- 
ter to each count) . CBS 1 ould have 
used the actual sel penetration fi 
for each count) but fell thai the indi- 
vidual count) sample was too small. 
Typical growth curves were drawn 
based on these three points. 

Rathei than la! oriousl) draw ii s 
curve Ini e.e h count) . CBS < 1 1 \ ided 
them into five gri - ording to the 
date telecasting began. The five groups 
were 1 1 1 helm.' |anuar\. 1948, 
first six months of 1" 18, '• I last six 
months of 1948, 1 • 1949, 
[our months of 1 * > ". « ► . I hese were fur- 
thei di\ ide 1 into four nr five levels of 
curves, making a total of 23 1 urves. 
\\ ith these 2 I • urves, 1 BS - »le t" 

determine a I mints '- average I lt( 

growth between M.r 1952 and the 
-ame month "I I 1 

\\ hen ii came tn post-freeze • ..untie-. 
the problem was a litlle different. With- 
out reference points, CBS had to be 
theoretical aboul it. Resea 
amined the five groups ■ 
-. ribed above and found that the later 
television • omes to a county, the I 
people bu) sets. Researchers .d- 



amined the experience ol Denvei and 

I'm tland, wh< 

the ail first and when 

• penetration < ould be studied. 

I 'lilt in • ih. to 

gcthcr, ml 

tion starts "If with 2'i penetration 

• BS charted one 12-month curve foi 
sel 1 1 in all ■ 

deciding what counties to appl) thin 
1 I - 11 ed it- • d< 

partmenl • ontours on signal 

and del ided. .11 hilrai lis . thai H | 

these 1 ontours in< luded more than I 
the 1 mints population, thai 

dered sei ved \<\ le\e\ isioi I 
elusions drawn from the < BS data ap 
pen mi. In nexl question. ■ 

Mans estin 
have been based on NBC's monthl) 
iin - oi I \ set ow nership bs markets 
I In- NBC figures are themselves 1 
mi K I M \ data which show shipment* 
b\ manufai turers NBl fi tiret 
I .nil ul ii Is s aluable in (hat w ill, 
monthl) referem i E wth 

• h.ni i- fait Is eas) to projei i. How- 
ever, -ii ce I Vpril M!( ! has 
tinned it- iimiithls figures 

imw given oul quarterl) - not 

make estimates for not NB( markets 

Q. What has been found out 

about actual set growth in new 

TV markets? 

A. I he CBS pi 

ownership b) counties shows thai 

w here a | mints 

fur the fust time iftei Vpril 1952 tin 
sel growth vsill be approximate! 

|n||nS\-: 

Vftei one month <<i I \ sen i- e, -t 

penetration is aboul fta tw< 

ths, aboul 8.5' - : after three 

months, aboul IV, ; after four months, 

about 22 ibout 

-i\ iin. nth-, about '■ 

after seven months, aboul 

eight months 

months, aboul I' nths, 

after lie iboill 

54 ' : if tei 

The I - show a much more 

rapid growth than SOUK 
mal ' whi< h that 

newer T\ mark. 
than older • 
ii . , -• imate found 

that average set growth in . 
I \ ■ arkets went fxoi 
alter the first \rar to 62 after fi\e 
liile the new markets showed 
i fieun turation after 



13 JULY 1953 



177 



year. And it was felt, on the basis of 
talks with broadcasters, that maximum 
saturation — 809^— would be reached 
in four years. 

Q. How accurate are the projec- 
tions of set growth? 

A. CBS will be the first to admit that 
its growth chart for post-freeze TV 
counties is far from the final word but 
CBS researchers feel it was the best 
they could do with available informa- 
tion. One CBS research executive felt 
it would be safe to assume that set 
growth in new TV counties would be 
slower in the South than in the North- 
east but the lack of details prevented 
CBS researchers from breaking down 
the single growth curve into various 
component parts. 

Another complicating factor that 
couldn't be taken into account is the 
difference in set penetration between 
VHF and UHF markets. A UHF sta- 
tion coming into a virgin market does 
not present the same problems as a 
UHF station coming into a market al- 
ready receiving a VHF signal. 

The validity of the CBS figures rest, 
to a certain extent, upon the assump- 
tion that the most important factor in 
determining the growth of a television 
station is the date it went on the air. 
This factor undoubtedly is important 
but there are other factors, too. They 
include the wealth of the community, 
its stability, and the section of the coun- 
try in which it is located. Grouping 
stations by socio-economic factors and 
determining future growth characteris- 
tics by these factors used to be done 
in radio, but much more research has 
to be done in TV. 

The NBC figures on set penetration 
take into account shipments by RTMA 
members, wholesaler inventory (which 
indicates how many sets shipped by 
RTMA were sent on to retailers and 
how many are lying around the ware- 
house I and checks on TV set sales by 
Dun & Bradstreet. 

While NBC figures are considered 
highly reliable, researchers have point- 
ed up two weaknesses in the market 
data. One is that not all TV set manu- 
facturers belong to RTMA and an- 
other is that these days you can't be 
sure that if a set is bought in market 
A, it will be installed in market A. The 
latter criticism is based on the fact 
that with new stations filling in holes 
in the telecasting landscape, the likeli- 
hood of their being close together geo- 




178 



SPONSOR 




that's just what your sales problem is 
for the WLW-Stations. They're famous for 
bulldozing the stubbornest sales to success be- 
cause only the WLW-Stations have the Client 
Service Department composed of advertising and 
merchandising specialists who study and solve your 
sales problem. 
And the WLW radio and television stations have the 
coverage — over 1 10th of America millions of ready- 
to-buy people who see and hear about your products daily. 
What's more, the WLW programs on both radio and TV 
are packed with popular, professional talent to put over 
your sales message. 
So why let sales stumps stand in your way. Get at your prob- 
lems with WLW-Stations and watch your sales grow and your 
problems go. 



os your od dollar is handled, so your sales message goes over 



C OS EY 



broadcasting corporation 



tICtUSIVf SALES Officii: NEW YORK • CINCINNATI • DAYTON • COIUMIUS • CHICAGO ■ ATLANTA • HOUYWOOO 



13 JULY 1953 



179 



graphically is increasing. And with 
consumers doing more shopping than 
ever by automobile, the number of 
those living in market B and shopping 
in market A is increasing. 

Nevertheless, both CBS and NBC 
figures should prove useful to the ad- 
vertiser since they are supplementary 
to each other. CBS gives figures by- 
counties and NBC by markets. 



UIIF 



Q. What is UHF? 

A. Ultra high frequency is the name 
of a portion of the broadcast band. It 
differs from VHF and radio in that 
UHF waves are shorter and, therefore, 
there are more of them transmitted per 
second. In other words, they are more 
frequent. Hence, they are called ultra 
high frequency waves. 

Q. Why is the UHF band being 
used for TV? 

A. Simply because there is not enough 
room in the VHF band for enough TV 
stations to cover the country. The 
VHF band provides for 12 channels. 
The UHF band provides for 70 or a 
possible total of nearly 1,500 stations 
all over the country. 

Q. Is there any important dif- 
ference between a VHF and UHF 
picture? 

A. There is no difference between a 
VHF and a UHF picture on a home 
TV screen. As a matter of fact, UHF 
is less subject to man-made interfer- 
ence than VHF. 



Q. Why, then, all this talk about 
the technical problems of UHF? 

A. As waves become smaller I and 
frequencies become higher) they tend 
to travel more in a straight line since 
the\ will not bend and "'fill" around 
obstruc'ions as easily as waves of lower 
frequency. This is just as true of 
VHF: Channel 13 waves are more af- 
fected by foliage, for example, than 
the lower frequency Channel 2. Be- 
cause the shorter waves are more af- 
fected by obstruction, we say the\ do 
not travel as far as longer waves, 
though radar waxes, which are even 
shorter than UHF TV waves, have 
been able to reach the moon. 

Big obstructions, such as hills and 
large buildings, are more likeh to 



cause "dead spots" in UHF reception 
than in VHF reception. One way of 
minimizing this is by using higher- 
powered transmitters. The FCC per- 
mits UHF stations to use higher-pow- 
ered transmitters than VHF stations 
as well as permits Channels 7-13 to use 
more power than Channels 2-0. 

The extent to which higher power 
will eliminate or minimize dead spots 
is not yet clear. The electronics indus- 
try is still working on developing good 
high-power transmitters. 

Q. Does this mean that UHF cov- 
erage will not be as good as VHF? 

A. Not necessarily. A lot depends on 
the terrain. Hilly country presents 
more of a problem than flat country. 
But a lot depends also on where the 
UHF transmitting antenna is placed. 
If it is placed on a high spot, it is likely 
to reach more homes than if placed on 
low ground. 

Another factor in signal strength 
which affects coverage is ERP, or effec- 
tive radiated power. A TV signal can 
be made stronger by piling antennas 
on top of one another. The more an- 
tennas, the more ERP. Since UHF 
transmitting antennas are smaller than 
VHF antennas, more of them can be 
piled on top of one another before 
weight becomes too much for the tower. 



Q. Is there anything the TV set 
owner can do to better reception? 

A. Since many of the new UHF sta- 
tions are in the smaller markets, the 
problem of coverage is not always seri- 
ous. Where homes are 30 to 50 miles 
away from the UHF transmitting an- 
tenna, installation becomes a more 
critical problem. There are special 
antennas for UHF to begin with as well 
as UHF antennas especially designed 
for picking up weak signals. 

Installation is important also for 
this reason: A change of a few feet in 
antenna placement on a TV set owner s 
roof can make more difference in I HF 
reception than in VHF reception. How- 
ever, in placing the antenna properly 
the service man must keep in mind that 
the line between antenna and set must 
be as short as possible. As you 20 up 
in frequency, there is more signal loss 
in this line. 



Q. Do all TV set owners have to 
convert their sets to UHF? 

A. It depends on what kind of set 



they have or what kind they buy. There 
are more all- wave sets lor VHF-UHF 
sets) coming on the market now and 
buyers of new TV sets can therefore 
buy built-in UHF reception. Where a 
~et owner already has a VHF set, the 
question is what kind of set he has. 
The more recent VHF sets have tuners 
which can easily be converted to re- 
ceive a UHF station by the simple in- 
stallation of a "strip" in the tuner. 
Also being sold are separate convert- 
ers, which can convert a VHF set to 
receive one or two UHF channels, as 
well as "all-wave" converters which 
can receive a large number of both 
VHF and UHF stations. 



Q. How mu'h do converters cost? 

A. The one- and two-channel con- 
verters cost about $10 to $15 and the 
"all-wave" converters go up to about 
$50. Installation charges are addition- 
al. Total conversion costs, including 
antenna, might be anywhere from 850 
to $100 if a service man is used. 

Q. What are the trends in set cir- 
culation and conversion in UHF 
cities? 

A. This is the payoff question, of 
course. It touches not only on the 
technical questions of power, antenna 
placement and so forth but on whether 
set owners in "difficult areas" will 
spend the money to get good UHF 
reception. 

In its article on UHF five months 
ago (see "What timebuyers want to 
know about UHF." 23 February 1053. 
page 32) sponsor felt, on the basis of 
what little knowledge was available, 
that I HF set saturation would depend 
on (1 I whether a UHF station had any 
VHF competition and (2i what kind 
of VHF signal could be received. It 
was assumed that where a UHF station 
bad no competition, set growth could 
be projected without taking into ac- 
count the problems of UHF transmis- 
sion or reception. That is. being a new 
TV market, it would grow fast, faster 
than TV markets in earlier years. But 
where outside VHF signals were plenti- 
ful and easy to receive, set conversion 
would be slower. And where outside 
VHF signals were weak. UHF set sales 
and conversions would be rapid. 

These predictions have been borne 
out 1>\ a recent \HB study of UHF 
markets. \HB concluded that UHF set 
circulation depended on four factors: 
1 11 how far the UHF set was from the 



180 



SPONSOR 



nearest station, (2J how man] good 
\ III- signals can I"- received, < 3 i the 
length "I time the I HF station baa 
been on the air, an I I 1 1 progi anting 
( >ii the I III- station. \BB Direi toi 
James \\ , Seilei feels he can predii I 
the growth of I HF saturation at an] 
given time bj giving propei weight t" 
these factors. 

Tin \l!i; stud) was made l>\ tele- 
phone inten iews. I he figures are 
baaed upon 1,000 calls within 10 days 
inside the < it\ limits. \t the time of 
the intei \ iews I \|>i il I none ol the 
I III- stations covered had been on the 
air more than four-and-a-half months. 
The study covered 11 "problem" I 111 
markets: area* which received VH1 
signals, too. 

While the city names are confiden- 
tial, here are some examples of what 
was found: 

• One UHF station competed with 
a VI IF -tat ion 75 miles awa\ and 
others 120 mile- away. After the I UK 
station was on the air three month-. 

ol the sets could pi< k up its signal. 

• Another I HF station faced com- 
petition from three YHF stations com- 
ing from a ( it\ (>0 miles away. After 
more than the four months on the air. 
the I HF signal was received bj only 
119? of the sets. 

• A third case involves a city ^vith 
a OIF and a YHF station, both post- 
freeze, with no nearby competition. 
The I HF station was on the air first 
but has no major network affiliation. 
\tter four months on the air. 55^5 of 
the sets could receive its signal. An- 
other case involved two station- and 
was similar except that the YHF sta- 
tion was on the air first and is affiliated 
with two major networks. The I HF 
Bignal, after two months, could he re- 
ceived h\ \(>' , of the TV sets. 

• In a case where rugged terrain 
is involved, a I HF station faced com- 
petition from a YHF station 60 miles 
away. \ller being on the air fmir 
month-, the I HF station was reaching 
85' < of the TV home-. 

• In a case similar to the first one 
mentioned, a I HF station received 
competition from four \ HF stations, 
one 30 miles away, three 50 mile* 
away. Although the area was 7.V ,' 
saturated, onh 7.7' i of the sets had 
converted to I HF after two month-. 

• One I HF station, which had to 
compete against four YHFs about 75 
miles away I the YHF pictures were 
fairly good) reached 63% of the T\ 
sets in the citv after four months. The 



Mil station i an ied I BS and NBI 
l>i " i i- w<ll a- lo< al 1 1 %. • - spot t- 

pickups. 

v ">i e resean hers question w hethei 
the \l!l! studj gives i i omplete pi< • 
lure "i the I III situation. It i- point- 
ed "iii that the real problems ol I III 
hi eption m.i\ develop in outl 
areas where obstructions, Btation pow- 
er, and home installation make • 
of a different i 

\ ideodex made a Btudj last month 
• ■I I III- in areas within 100 miles "f 
I III- I \ transmitters. I his matei ial, 



' I lllll It I- 111 

ih.it (In \ idi elop dif- 

■ii. lusioi 
point up 

■hull in outl lln-l 

stud) ol H problem I III 

-. hi'dlih-d fm nil .!-• |>\ \ I.' 1 I 



Q. Are there any figures on the 
actual number of UHF scts-in-usc? 
A. I here ari 

urea a\ ailable. ' tne ■ ■ the < 

(•hi ated natui versions 

as well as sales ol I III -equipped 



There's a spot for you 



in the 
Greater Sioux City Market 



—where 47,208 TV sets in 32 Iowa South Dakota 

and Nebraska counties can 

be reached on the Cowles station 

— where annual retail sales of S655.999.000 and 
effective buying income of S807. 380.000 
brighten eyes and bank accounts 

— where the low basic rate still applies 
1 $200 per hour i. 

See your Katz man 



• • 




Sioux City, Iowa 
CBS, NBC. ABC Cr 
DuMont 



13 JULY 1953 



181 




■: : .::::jf|NMTU 

UrTJ /ju'tr 

; .' ; ' WfMERIOH 
^ :': : ' PORT ORCHARD 

Coverage, ^rea/ 

/A<& HARBOR 
SHELIOH- 7 / 



FT . LEWIS 

m * mm 



eattle 

RENTON 

f ■ 

Tacoma 

_0 SUMNER 
^ WUIUP 



M1HUE 

^CUTULU 
\ CHEHiLIS 



^BUCOOJ % M[ |,E» M ' 



UTOHVILLE 



KING COUNTY (SEATTLE) 

ACCOUNTS FOR SLIGHTLY 

MORE THAN HALF THE 

PUGET SOUND MARKET 

The population of Seattle-King County 
represents but 57% of the prosperous 
area so capably served by KTNT-TV. 
The Seattle-King County population is 
important to advertisers, but just as 
important are the other 550,300 able- 
to-buy folks in the fabulous Puget 
Sound area. Over 60% of the families 
own TV sets, and they are tuning to 
KTNT-TV. And set sales continue to 
boom I Going beyond the area's pres- 
ent 266,900 sets. 
Send for the complete KTNT-TV story. 

KTNT-TV Coverage Area 
Families 418,100 

Population 1,318,700 

Retail sales $1,316,645,000 

Net Effective Buying 

Income per family $5,285 

TV sets in Area (June 1) 266,900 

Population of the KTNT-TV Area 
King County (Seattle) 768,400 

Pierce County (Tacoma) 293,700 

Other Counties 256,600 

TOTAL 1,318,700 



1 25,000 
WATTS 
SOON 



KTNT-TV 



CHANNEL 11 

Affiliated with CBS and DuMont 
Television Networks 



Transmitter strategically located 
at Tacoma in Middle Puget Sound. 
Sales Representatives: 

Weed Television, Nationally 

Art Moore & Son, Pacific Northwest 




Some stations have made studies of 
their own in attempting to find out 
facts ahout the conversion problem. 
WSBT-TV, South Bend, for example, 
found out that during its early days 
I it went on the air 22 December 1952) 
conversions outnumbered the purchase 
of UHF-equipped sets. Beginning this 
mouth RIM A will show, in its month- 
1\ production reports, the number of 
sets equipped with UHF tuners. How- 
ever, these reports will not have any 
information on the production of strips 
and converters. 



Q. What will UHF's future be in 
the over-all TV picture? 

A. While this may sound like a en s- 
lal-ball type of question, it has been 
a subject of deep discussion at many 
agencies, indicating it has a real, direct 
bearing on long-range national adver- 
tising problems. 

One agency study, made early this 
spring (by McCann-Erickson) , pointed 
up the fact that, with TJHF allocations 
outnumbering VHF, by the end of this 
year the number of UHF stations 
scheduled to be on the air will be 114, 
compared with 174 VHF. Including 
allocations, the UHF station figure 
came to 188, compared with 196 VHF. 
It is obvious, therefore, that by next 
year there may well be more UHF sta- 
tions than \ HF stations in the U. S. 

Of course, in terms of TV set cover- 
age the proportion of VHF coverage 
is much greater, and it is doubtful if 
there will ever come a time when UHF 
will dominate the telecasting picture. 
Even before the freeze, most of the 
country's population was covered by 
the VHF umbrella. 

A Sherman & Marquette study indi- 
cates that even in the post-freeze TV 
markets, most of them will eventualh 
be predominantly VHF. S&M"s media 
director, John B. Crandall. estimated 
that about 10 TV market areas will be 
predominantly UHF in the future. 

It is generally agreed that, in time, 
the distinction between UHF and VHF 
will disappear. In a speech last month 
before the Advertising Federation of 
America, Hugh Beville Jr., NBC direc- 
tor of research and planning, voiced 
this feeling when he said: "As UHF 
stations increase power and otherwise 
improve their physical coverage, as 
strong local programs are developed to 
supplement network and film features, 
as the public gets UHF converters and 
new [HF-VHF receivers, we can ex- 



pect the distinction of "U" vs. "V" to 
disappear, insofar as viewers are con- 
cerned. And in television as in other 
media advertisers will basically want 
to know how large an audience the sta- 
tion has. Many factors beyond whether 
a station is a UHF channel or a VHF 
channel will determine the answer." 



Costs 



182 



Q. What are TV network cost 
trends? 

A. Total costs are still going up and 
costs-per-1,000 are still going down. 
Gross time costs naturally increase 
with the increase in TV sets. The basic 
reason for the continuing drop in costs- 
per-1,000 is that the larger any medium 
grows, the more efficient it is economi- 
cally. Applying this specifically to TV, 
it means that the larger a TV market 
is, the lower its cost-per- 1,000 in gross 
circulation. 

For example, a study of TV time 
costs by the Media Research Depart- 
ment of Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 
Bayles showed that for one of its half- 
hour nighttime shows, gross time costs 
by size of markets were as follows: (1) 
for market groups of 500.000 popu- 
lation and over, $1.06 per 1,000 TV 
homes; (2) for market groups be- 
tween 250,000 and 500,000, $1.82; 
(3) between 200,000 and 250.000. 
$2.21; (4) under 200.000. $3.07. 

The above figures, based on the 
gross half-hour rate, refer to time cost 
as of 1 February 1953. The over-all 
average as of this date, and excluding 
post-freeze stations, came to $1.51. 
This compares with an average of 
$1.70 the year before. SSC&B points 
out in the report. 

Q. How long can this dropping 
cost-per- 1 ,000 continue to go on? 

A. As TV markets reach saturation 
figures almost comparable to radio, the 
decrease in cost-per- 1,000 tends to level 
off. The SSC&B study, referred to 
above, shows that in the plus-500.000 
markets, where saturation now aver- 
ages 80^, the decrease in cost-per- 
1,000 was less than in the smaller mar- 
kets where set saturation was smaller. 
Another factor which will affect time 
costs is the beginning of the end for 
single-station markets. There is no 
question but that rates in one-station 
markets are influenced by the lack of 

SPONSOR 



competition. Willi the gradual ending 
of this situation, rates should come 
down relative t«> sets. How this will 
affecl total cost-per-1,000 foi an) given 
network -how depends on the audi- 
ence it attracts. \\ ith competition 
among Btations also comes competition 
among programs. tad the advertise! 
who doesn't attracl a fair share of the 
audience will suffer in terms <>f cost- 
per-1,000. 

Q. How will the new TV stations 
affect the cost picture? 

A. Experienced advertisers know that 
while a new station has low rates, it 
cannol produce a cost-per-1,000 com- 
petitive with an old, established TV 
market. Assuming a hall-hour rate .,| 
$120 for 20.000 TV homes, which is 
reasonable, a new station's cost-per- 
1,000 is thus $6. This is almost -i\ 
times the figure given by SSC&B for 
its larjze market-. 

Of course, new stations attract TV 
sets like hone] attracts hees and the 

new station can figure on its audience 
sprouting much quicker than was ever 
the case for the established outlets back 
in the days when TV was an unfavored 
national medium. 



Q. At what point should an ad 
vcrtiscr add a new station to his 
network show? 

A. I he question of dei iding w hal the 
cost-per-1,000 ol a new station should 
be before adding it to a network line- 
up has been keeping ageni lea and ad- 
vertisers bus] .it their slide rules this 
pasl spring. I be v -i &B stud] feels 
that S3 is a reasonable figure and 
point- ..in thai "the relativel] lowei 
price range in the largei markets 
-li.'iil.l permit the use ol a numb 
additional new markets from time to 
time w ithoul increasing the ovei • ill 
. :osl signifii and] ." I he ageni \ added 
eight post-freeze in.ukei- to the lineup 
ol one ol ii- shows ilu- season and 
reai hed 1,000 homes in these markets 
at an average of ^ t.29. I In- made the 

total cost-per-1, nl) 3* highei than 

w ithout the n.-w Btations. 
Some advertisers wail until a market 

ha- a eer'ain numhei ..| -.1- before giv- 
ing timebuyers the ^o-ahead. \i P&G 
agencies, where foi tnulas i ide bigh, the 
magic figure i- reported to I,,- 30,000 
I \ sets. 

Formula- don'l tell the whole -ton. 
W bile the SSC&B Btud) hit upon .. rea- 
sonable figure for buying new stations 
(it came to about double the average 



network 

I 

i 

new stations added to the network 
-how in question rai low 

o| |] 

Q. What will program costs be 

like in the fall ? 

A. I here i- no e\ idem e tl 

• osta will I..- pushed down b) either 
networlu I ,.t the 

o iij,. dm | 
liioi i I in-. - and talent pi 

• i ..m. 1 1 rk whi. h 

ires Dai . K , . . •.. . imple, will 
beavilj foi the privilege, ti- 
the advertiser who u-.-- him 
able to talk the network into < hip] 

in Bubsid] lie 

I be bothersome problem ••( talent 

• osta waa the subjei i of a recent -' 
meni b] NB( in \ Bo a. I < bail 
David Sarnoff. Apparent!) refen 
to Sid I 

Sarnof] said, "IT- .1 sad stati ol ifTairs 
when a couple of talent deals 1 an rep- 
resent the difference in profit in 
work leadership." 

\- an in.li. alion of new -how . i 
the pilot for VBCsnew I l.mnv Thomas 



Height means reach in TV, loo! 

• • • and reach means sales* 




The two-thirds <>t .1 million people 
living within KSL-TV's \.ist [ntermountain 
coverage .irc.i EARN — and SPEND — 
nearlj .1 billion dollars annually! 

T\' circulation is mushrooming, too. 
Over 125,000 sets .ire now in the KSL-TV 

area, which extends into 1 booming 

Western st.lt. s. 

Get details from ( H>- 1 \ Spot \iks. 
or KSL-TV. 



KSL-TV 



/ 




X 



13 JULY 1953 



183 



situation-conx <l\ film came to a higher 
tab than / Love Lucy (it was shot at 
the Desilu studios). However, since 
the pilot was designed to showcase 
ABC's new programing concepts as 
well as sell the show to a sponsor, it 
is dxpecteil that the production nut for 
the next 38 films will come down. Rob- 
ert Weitman, ABC's programing \.p.. 
said the Dannv Thomas pilot film cost 
"under $40,000." 

Q. Can the advertiser find low- 
cost shows on TV ? 

A. Of course. If production costs are 
the prime consideration, an advertiser 
can usually find something within his 
budget. Station clearance is another 
problem, however. 

All networks can come up with one 
or more available budget shows. Du 
Mont has long made a talking point of 
its budget offerings of under $10,000. 
CBS can also point to a number of 
show's in which costs are being con- 
trolled. For example: Stork Club cost 
$] 1.000 for a half hour last year; this 
year the price is $10,400. Jane Fro- 
man ( U. S. Canteen ) went for $29,500 
last June for a half hour. Last month, 




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Behind each Song-Ad is the vast experi- 
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the quarter-hour price was $9,000. 
CBS' new comedian, Larry Storch, will 
go for $22,500. Meet Millie, which 
cost $18,800 last October, is now avail- 
able for $19,000. Quiz Kids will cost 
$5,300, the same as last year. 

Q. How important actually are 
costs to the TV advertiser? 

A. At first glance, this may seem like 
a silly question. If there is one subject 
on every advertiser's lips it is TV net- 
work costs. It is the overriding prob- 
lem; it has driven some advertisers 
away from TV; it has been the prime 
cause of participation and alternate- 
week shows. 

Yet, as one network official told 
sponsor recently : "Sure, TV cost a lot 
of money, but isn't the whole question 
one of how many prospects the adver- 
tiser can reach for his dollar? And 
hasn't this number of prospects-per-$l 
gone up? Besides, what kind of econo- 
my is it if the advertiser can save 
$5,000 a week on his show and lose 
50% of his audience? Most of the big 
TV advertisers would like to save 
money on TV, but if you suggest cut- 
ling something out of the show to do 
it, they'll say nix." 

Q. What has been the cost-per- 
1,000 trend in various kinds of 
network programs? 

A. Here are Nielsen figures on nine 
program categories. In all cases cost- 
per-1,000 homes is down. The periods 
compared are those of high listening, 
the two weeks ending 9 February 1952 
vs. the two weeks ending 7 February 
1953. The figures cover time and tal- 
ent for half-hour evening sponsored 
shows: 

• Quiz and audience participation, 
$8.75 vs. $7.25 in 1953. 

• Situation comedy, $9.51 vs. 
$7.71. 

• Mystery drama, $10.48 vs. $8.09. 

• General drama, $10.13 vs. 
$10.01. 

• Variety music, $15.69 vs. $13.83. 

• Other music, $12.60 vs. $10.74. 

• Interview, $12.61 vs. $12.04. 

• Two other variety categories are 
not directly comparable with 1952, 
when the variety-comedy category was 
$10.25. The 1953 categories are talent- 
variety. $4.84: general variety, $7.62. 

Q. What changes will the adver- 
tiser find in network discounts and 
time classification this fall? 



A. Here are the specific changes by 
network: 

AHC: The rate card is basically the 
same as last fall. Among minor 
changes is the requirement that an al- 
ternate-week advertiser must be on 13 
telecasts to qualify for discounts. Previ- 
ously the minimum had been four tele- 
casts. Every-week advertisers on for 
fewer than 13 weeks must buy at least 
four weeks to qualify for discounts. 
The previous minimum had been two 
weeks. Annual rebates remain the 
same. Saturday from 1:00 to 6:00 
p.m. is changed from Class A to Class 
B among stations "which accept it." 

CBS: The maximum station-hour 
discount has been increased from 10 to 
15%. Actually, what happened was 
that additional discounts were piled on 
top of what had been offered last fall. 
At that time the maximum discount 
was 10% for 35 or more station-hours 
per week. That still holds. But, start- 
ing at 50 station-hours and going up 
to 90 station-hours per week, an addi- 
tional 1% is given for each additional 
10 station hours. In addition, Satur- 
day from 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. was 
changed from Class A to Class B time. 

D77V; No change. Saturday and 
Sunday afternoon rates "on request." 

NBC: Important changes in NBC's 
stru-ture were made effective 1 July. 
Unlike the previous discounts, the new 
ones permit advertisers to earn savings 
based on the combined value of their 
entire schedule, whether daytime, eve- 
ning or any combination. Previously 
NBC had separate discounts for week- 
day strips and for hour, half-hour and 
quarter-hour programs. The effect of 
this is to make the addition of day- 
time programs particularly attractive 
to nighttime advertisers, a factor of 
great importance to NBC in view of its 
new daytime programing efforts. 

Discounts range from 5% for a 
quarter-hour up to 15 f ^ for a schedule 
which adds up to 200% or more of 
the hour rate. (One quarter hour 
equals 40% of the hour rate, a half 
hour equals 60%, an hour equals 
100' J . for example.) 

Thus an advertiser with a half-hour 
evening show can increase his discount 



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184 



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from <) to 1-' ■ b) adding two daj 
time quartet hours. I ndei t ht- old dis- 
count structure, the advertise] got .< 
6' , discount 1 for 39 weeks 1 b>i hi^ 
half-hour show and a separate 89 dis- 
, ounl foi two quarter-houi segments 
per week. Under the new plan the 12' I 
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total billings. 

The new late- appl\ t" ; n 1 \ i • 1 1 1 - < • t - 

using NBC facilities l"i 26 weeks, ei- 
ther consecutive <>r alternate. I ndei 
the old card, an advertiser had to be on 
at least 39 weeks to qualif) for dis- 
i mini rates. 

NBC ma) join the other networks 
in changing weekend time classifica- 
tions. Both Saturday and Sundaj af- 
tei noons from 1 :00 to 5:00 are ex- 
pected to be changed from Class \ to 

l lass B almost am da\ . 



Programs & .mclioneos 

Q. What are the important pro- 
graming trends for the fall? 
A. The big upcoming trend is more 

program competition. Three factors 
are responsible for this: ill ABC's 
new big-name entries, bought with 
United Paramount Theatres' money 
since the merger creating AB-PT, i2i 
NBC's determined program drive dur- 
ing the late morning, and (3) new- 
stations in the erstwhile big one-sta- 
tion markets. 



Q. How will this competition af- 
fect network programing? 
A. It is quite likel) to sharpen con- 
cern about ratings and ma\ intensify 
the play-it-safe philosophy which has 
tended to squelch chance-taking in the 
creative end of programing. While 
ratings are only one of the criteria used 
In advertisers in judging a program's 
value, air clients during the past season 
have been studying them extra careful- 
Ij to find out how their programs stand 
up in markets with three or more sta- 
tions as compared with national rating 
figures, which include the one-station 
markets. In particular, advertisers 
have compared Nielsen "nine-city rat- 
ings" ( in cities where there is station 
competition) with the national NTI 
figures. They have found that, while 
some programs have held up in the 
face of competition, practicallv all of 
them show some kind of a drop in the 
competitive TV markets, i See *'\\ ill 
competition kill your show?" SPONSOR, 



2 I I ebruar) 19 i I 10.) 

The program i onset v atism refi 
to above > direct result "t I \ costs, 
has intensified copy< at prog] an 
I he plaj -it-safe philosophy has 
led advertisers t" buj into exist 
l iipul. ii shows on an altei nate week 
basis. \\ lib time and pi og ram invest- 
ments growing larger, then- is ever) 

likelih I thai a tread-w ithw are trend 

will be< ome men- ob> ious. 

Q. What new programing will be 

on in the fall? 

A. Pari "I \l'>( !'s new morning line- 



up -t.n ill it 1 1 1 1 . 

pre\ lew n| w h.il kind id ; 

munition NBt w ill use !■• battle < IIS 
The new morning shows include Glam- 
oi Girl start 

! hool, NIK - pro 
< In. i foi the moi nin Glamoi C 
an audience parti ipation show aimed 

tl\ at women will feature exam- 
ples id w li.it makeup < an do to enh 
the fen, ale Like Dii D 

School it i- opposite Godfrey, \fter 
that, ■ ome tw " soap opei as, Hau ■ 

. bw iii In-, I from NBl - I ite ifter- 
i.iiuii -< hedule I' 'lb iwi r s drop- 




2nd of a series 



IN THE MIAMI 
TV MARKET 



K 







Now 26th among the 
nation s metropolitan 
retail areas. 

THE SOUTHS FASTEST GROWING MARKET 
INCLUDES 825.000 PERMANENT YEAR ROUND 
RESIDENTS SPENDING $211.100 000. FOR 
FOOD SALES* 

FOR THE ENTIRE AMAZING SOUTH FLORIDA TV SALES 
STORY CALL YOUR FREE * PETERS COLONEL TODAY 

WTVF 



FIRST RESEARCH CORP of Flor.do 



Now Under Construction — 1000 FT 
ANTENNA — 100 000 WATTS 



13 JULY 1953 



185 



n 

i 

L. 



~l 



Top JO available* programs on the TV networhs* 



Top /' availabilities on 


\BC 


TV 














TITLE 




TYPE 


APPEAL 




LENGTH 


NET PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


1. RAY BOLGER SHOW (fllro) 


Eve 


Comedy-Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


T B A. 


Hollywood-produced film starring Ray Bolger 


2. 


COLONEL FLACKt 


Eve. 


Situation comedy 


Adult 


30 


min. 


i wk 


$12,500 


Alan Mowbray Is the Colonel. Based on Satevepost stories 


3. 


EXPOSED (film) 


Eve. 


Mystery 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$17,500 


Barry Sullivan plays Nemo Gray, big-city police official 


4. 


GEORGE JESSEL'S BANQUET 
TABLE 


Eve. 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$15,000 


Famous "Toastmaster General" In familiar storyteller role 


5. 


HOGAN'S DAUGHTERt 


Eve. 


Situation comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$14,000 


Sheilah Bond. Broadway star, is Hogan's dizzy daughter 


6. 


JUSTICE 


Eve. 


Document, drama 


Arlult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$15,500 


Dramatizations of cases from flies of Legal Aid Society 


7. 


THE LAST WORD 


Eve. 


Aud. Partic. 


Family 


30 


min. 


I 'wk 


$6,500 


New giveaway show, starring Peter Donald, Oswald Jacoby 


8. 


MR GLENCANNONt 


Eve. 


Comedy-Drama 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$16,500 


Satevepost's sea-dog. With Robert Newton: $21,000 net 


9. 


PASSPORT TO ADVENTURE 
(Aim) 


Eve. 


Mystery 


Adult 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$19,000 


Cesar Romero tours the world In tales of a U.S. courier 


10. 


WHITE COLLAR GIRL (dim) 


Eve. 


Drama 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$22,500 


Adaptation of best-selling novel, starring Laraine Day 



Top JO availabilities on Du Mont 





TITLE 






TYPE 


APPEAL 




LENGTH 


NET PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


1. 


AUTHOR MEETS THE 


CRITICSt 


Eve. 


Panel 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,807 


Lively panel sessions between authors and literary critics 


2. 


CAPTAIN VIDEOt 




Aft. 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


$2,125 per 
pgm. 


The pioneer show among popular science fiction dramas 


3. 


PAUL DIXON SHOWt 




Eve. 


Variety 


Family 


60 


min. 


5/wk 


$320 per 
segmt. 


TV d.j. show with Paul Dixon. Sold In 10-mln. slots 


4. 


HAPPY'S PARTYt 




Aft. 


Variety 


Juvenile 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$2,300 


Ida Mae Maher Is the voice of "Happy," canine puppet 


5. 


JIMMY HUGHES. ROOKIE COPt 


Eve. 


Detective 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$7,110 


Conrad Janll as Jimmy, a new cop on a big-city force 


6. 


TWENTY QUESTIONSt 




Eve. 


Panel 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$8,662 


The durable TV version of the well-known parlor game 


7. 


TREASURE HUNTt 




Eve. 


Aud. Partie. 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,276 


Slgmund Rothschild appraises art objects In the studio 


8. 


THE BIG lOEAt 




Eve. 


Aud. Partic. 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$4,313 


Inventors bring gadgets to program to find a backer 


9 


THE BIG ISSUE) 




Eve. 


Panel 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$4,500 


Martha Rountree. Lawrence Splvak spark discussion! 


10. 


WHERE WAS l?t 




Eve. 


Panel 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$5,881 


Panelists guess nature of photos submitted by audience 



Top 10 availabilities on IMBC TV 














TITLE 




TYPE 


APPEAL 




LENGTH 


NET PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


1. KATE SMITHt 


Aft 


Variety 


Women 


60 


min. 


5/wk 


$3,250 per 15- 
min. segmt. 


Kate sings, chats with guests, comments on female topics 


2. 


HAWKINS FALLSt 


Morn. 


Serial drama 


Women 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$9,500 


Typical problems, humor of life In a small community 


3. 


BENNETT STORYt 


Morn. 


Serial drama 


Women 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$8,500 


Story of a lawyer and his family in a Midwest town 


4. 


GLAMOR GIRLt 


Morn. 


Aud. Partie. 


Women 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3,000 


Women wishing to be glamorized appear before cameras 


5. 


DING DONG SCHOOLt 


Morn. 


Instructional 


Juvenile 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


$950 per 30- 
tnin. segmt. 


Video nursery school, with noted Dr. Frances Horwlch 


6. 


KUKLA. FRAN & OLLIEt 


Sun aft. 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$10,000 


Burr Tillstrom's show of great charm and gentle humor 


7. 


FORD FOUNDATION SHOW' 


Sun aft. 


Variety 


Juvenile 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$20,000 


An assortment of literate program fare for the children 


8. 


GABBY HAYESt 


Aft 


Western 


Juvenile 


15 


min. 


3/wk 


$1,560 per 15- 
min. segmt. 


Gabby conducts variety show for six-gun-totin' small fry 


9. 


ON YOUR ACCOUNT' 


Aft 


Aud. Partie. 


Family 


30 


min. 


2/wk 


$2,800 per 30- 
min. segmt. 


Win Elliot Interviews contestants in a televised bank 


10. 


WELCOME TRAVELERSt 


Aft 


Aud. Partic. 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,000 


Tommy Bartlett. m.c, interviews visitors to Chicago 



•As selected by the networks at SPONSOR'S request, CBS TV abstaining for policy reasons tMeans -how has been on air. 



ping the show, and The Bennett Story, 
new to network viewers and a creation 
of Chicago program people. 

NBC will fill up the hour with two 
other soapers, which haven't been de- 
cided upon as yet. Possibilities include 
Big Sister, which P&G dropped last 
year from radio, and Three Steps to 
Heaven. From noon to 1 :00 p.m., NBC 
is mulling over something which may 
be called either Home or Living. It is 
the only example of NBC's new day- 
time programing which might be called 



experimental. Described as a female 
version of Today, it will combine the 
elements of a women's magazine: dra- 
ma, non-fiction, and tips for women. 
ABC is just beginning to get up 
steam wilh its stable of new personali- 
ties, but it has already sold the Paul 
Hartman situation comedy, Pride of 
the Family, to Armour and Bristol- 
Myers. The show will be seen at 9:00 
on Friday nights, which may well turn 
out to be ABC's night. The net is all 
sold out from 7:30 to 10:00 on Friday 



nights except for a half hour and that 
half hour may contain Ray Bolger. 
The lineup, by half hours, looks like 
this: Stu Eruin Show; Ozzie and Har- 
riet; a new Pepsi-Cola drama show, 
Pride of the Family; Bolger. 

ABC has also sold the Danny Thom- 
as situation-comedy to American To- 
bacco. It is scheduled for Tuesday 
night. The new show was supposed to 
go into the 9:00-9:30 Thursday night 
slot opposite NBC's Dragnet (one of 
the Nielsen Top 10 i and back-to-back 



186 



SPONSOR 



with George Jewel. \U< - dickering 
with the Catspaw Heel people aboul 
1 . - — «l came t" naught and latest plana 
call for telecasting Jesse] on Sunday 

ni^hl 

Q. What trends arc there in the 
popularity of different categories 
of programs? 

A. Nielsen rating figures "n nine 
types of programs Bhow that in most 
of ilic categories, the percenl <>t view- 
ing is up. Since those categories which 
declined don't completer) offset the in- 
creases, it appears that the average 
amount of network I A listening is u | >. 
Hen- are Nielsen average rating fig- 
ures for the two week- ending 9 Feb- 
ruary 1952 \-. the two weeks ending i" 
February 1953. Comparisons arc foi 
half-hour evening shows. 

• Quiz and audience participation, 
24.5 vs. 25.4 in 1953. 

• Situation comedy, 32.5 vs. 35.3. 

• Mystery drama. 2 .'!.."> \-. 28.6. 

• Genera] drama, 25.9 \-. 26.7. 

• Variet) music, 21.1 \-. 22.2. 

• Other music 25.7 vs. \'K'l 

• Interview, 22.3 vs. 20.7. 

• Two other \arict\ categories are 
not directly comparable to 1952. when 
the variety-corned) average rating was 
V2A. The 1953 categories are talent- 
variety, 12."i. and general variety, 36.5. 



Merchandising 

Q. What kind of merchandising 
aid is given network TV clients? 
A. It varies. NBC is the only web 
with a separate merchandising depart- 
ment. This department started its net- 
work T\ work lasl fall and it has been 
estimated that as between NBC radio 
and TV, the latter now iiets about 60' I 
of the merchandising effort. The other 
networks will give special merchandis- 
ing aid. depending on the advertiser's 
problem and purchase. This includes 
such help as mailings to dealers, sta- 
tion coordination, and printing display 
material at cost. 



Q. How does the NBC merchan- 
dising department operate? 
A. NBC divided the countr\ into 12 
merchandising districts, assigns a su- 
pervisor, all men of merchandising ex- 
perience, to each. They contact ke) 
retailers and wholesalers in the inter- 
est- ot NBC clients, help develop sta- 



tion i ooperation, train talesmen in 
present >\ i\ men handising tei Inn ; 
and compile reports nil merchandising 
, esults. 

Q. Since big advertisers have 
their own merchandising depart 
ments, why should a network also 
enter into merchandising? 
A. \\ hile -"me ..I \lli - . ompetitors 
fe< I that men handising is properl) the 
job ol the advertiser, NB( contends 
ih.it it- merchandising efforts supple- 
ment the work "f it- ' lients, that 



\B( to sell the powci "i 

work I \ t.. the • outlets 

\ - \ l',< explaint it in •■ slide film 

put mil b) it- men h 

incut. ' < III! 

bed top management men who 
would not • >r < 1 1 n.i i il\ be ' b) 

the spot 

I IK- ii help in pun 

theii 

\ ild .i 1 1 • 1 important work i 

the development of men hand 
operation on the part ol out al 
stations wn ill\." 



VISAZTV 



HUNTINGTON • CHARLESTON 



channel 



1) mi < an ^l.LL 
m this rich . . . 
growing . . . 
prosperous market 
with onh ONI II 
Station .... The Onlj 
1 1 Station in the 



2 1 eclusii <-h cox ered . . 
Counties of 11 est I irginia, 
1 Ohio. Kentucky, Tennt 
and I iriginia . . ■ 
. . . The Retail Sales: $2^16,47 
Effective Buying Pov 
- ;.-, \0,4O0J000 SM 1951 

3) our products n ill re. 
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oj U S //•/' at your ^ 

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HUNTINGTON. WEST VIRGINIA 
r«pr*Mfitad by THE KATZ AGENCY. 



13 JULY 1953 



187 



This stress on getting stations to 
back up a client's product and pro- 
gram is not confined to NBC. Other 
nets are also active keeping their sta- 
tions on the ball. A good part of tbis 
spills over into program promotion. 
CBS feels, for example, that its big 
merchandising job is to get the largest 
audience possible for its clients' shows. 
Program kits to affiliates contain rec- 
ommendations for promoting the show, 
both on the air and off. During the 
political conventions all the networks 
either developed or helped develop 



program promotion material that could 
be used for display material in stores. 



Color 



Q. Will color telecasting be a 
factor this coming season? 
A. While RCA and NBC have already 
petitioned the FCC to approve the RCA 
compatible color system, a decision is 
not expected before early next year, 
even if written "hearings" are held in- 



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stead of time-consuming oral hearing*. 
Assuming that a decision is reached bv 
early 1954, the first color tubes will 
not be ready in any quantity until late 
1954, and, even then, it will not be any- 
thing like mass production. However, 
an FCC decision this year is possible 
and that could mean the production of 
color sets as well as network program- 
ing by spring 1954. 



Q. What plans are being made 
for color network telecasting? 

A. All the networks are giving 
thought to the matter, but only NBC 
has announced anything specific. NBC 
has plans to begin network color tele- 
casting as soon as color standards are 
approved by the FCC. The network 
already has two fully equipped color 
studios and has ordered additional col- 
or cameras and color chains to equip 
five more. A preliminary schedule calk 
for two evening half hours weekly, 
with all NBC sponsors getting a chance 
to telecast at least once not onlv their 
shows but their commercials in color. 
There will also be additional davtime 
programing from the color studio in 
the Colonial Theatre, New York, and 
experimentation and occasional color 
broadcasts from the other color studio 
in the RCA Building. New York. 



Unions 

Q. What percentage of network 
TV production costs are attribut- 
able to unionized labor? 

A. An average of 60% of TV pro- 
duction costs are the total wages, sala- 
ries, fees paid to perfonners, techni- 
cians, other personnel involved in pre- 
paring a show for telecasting. 

Here's how the production costs on 
three typical network shows break 
down : 






— o 



a 

~ = 
c o 
UU 

Cast (all talent) 
Music (all costs) 
Script 

Supervision-Direction 
Below-the-line costs* 
TOTAL 



3 B 



O^: 



23.0% 32.75% 



8.5% 

9.0% 

17.7% 

58.2% 



14.00% 
7.75% 
8.80% 

63.30% 



is 



= 7 

23.5% 
4.0% 

10.0% 
4.5% 

21.8% 

63.8% 



•Figures for below -the line costs represent union labor 
only. Below-the-line a>sts are the package price which 
networks charge for rental of their rehearsal halls or 
facilities. This package price includes the network's 
working crew, which is often larger than the minimum 
crews required by union demands. 



SPONSOR 



Q. Which arc the unions that 
control network TV costs? 
A. Three major unions control most 
n| the "direct ' laboi i osts: 

• \niiiiiiiil tssociation of Broad- 
cast Employees and Technicians (NA- 

Bl I i : I hi- union, a CIO affiliate, ha- 

contracta with ABC and NBl cover- 
ing engineers and technicians, as well 
i- cameramen. Will be renegotiating 
for ABC studio cameramen in L953. 

• International Brotherhood oj 
Electrical U orkers I ll'.I.W } : CBS 
cameramen and technicians arc mem- 
bers ol this union, an affiliate oi Ml.. 

• International Alliance of The- 
atrical Stage Employees (IATSE) : 
I In- union Beta the scale for Du Mont 
cameramen, technicians, stage hand-. 
Varidus components oi IATSE um 
\l I. affiliate) will be negotiating Eoi 
new contracts in L953 as follow-: 

1. IBC: Nen York Sound Effei ts 
I nion; New York Wardrobe Mi>- 
tresses and Handlers — September 1953. 

2. CBS: Scenery Expediters I nion 
— includes special effects expediters, 
scenery expediters, catalog photogra- 
phers; New York Wardrobe Mi-tresses 
and Handlers — September L953. 

3. Ihi Mont: Completed negotia- 
tions and signed contracts early in 
1953 with IATSE technicians and stage 
hands. 

4. NBC: New York Wardrobe Mis- 
tressesand Handlers September 1953. 

Other unions involved with "direct" 
labor costs are: 

• Local 230 of tlir Brotherhood of 
Painters and Paperhangers, AFL: In- 
cludes art directors, assistant art di- 
rectors, letterers, art machine printers. 
I his union will be negotiating for a 
new contract with CBS in December. 

• Local \\2 y ) of the United Scenic 
Artists. ALL: Negotiated a new two- 
year contract with the four TV net- 
works to be effective through Ml March 
1955. 1 ht- contract granted the fol- 
lowing weekb salary increases to 
members of the union: $15 to scenic 
designers, $7.50 to costume designers, 
$15 to assistant costume designer-. 
-In. in to scenic artists. These raises 
represent an over-all 10 to 12' rise in 
labor costs involved. 

The "talent" unions are: 

• Screen Actors' Guild i S V, i : Ne- 
gotiated a contract with the New York 
r ilm Producers' \- ■> tation on 2 
March 1953 putting into effect the 
principle of re-use payments to actors 
in film TV commercials, i See sum- 
mary of SAG terms on page 1'' > 



• Imerican Federation of II mi, l 
Radio hints \| i i; \ \. 

a . ontra< t with \i;t \i;< ,• ,i i BS 
to covei ti .in- i iptiona in t<le\ i 
whit li li.nl not bi e red in pre* i 

on- agreements. I lie . ontrai t. effe - 
tive I lnl\ 195 '>. i- based upon a - ale 
• ■I re-use pa) ments foi eta ii i< ,| i 
- i iptiona ovei vai ious ty pea -t I \ 
programing and < ommen iala not 
ered by S \< - jiu isdi< lion. 

• I in, -than Federation of Musicians 
\l M i : \ jurisdictioi aJ dispute be- 
tween \|\| and \l 1 1.' \. localized in 

I lolU w I. arose in Bprii ovei 

-niuinu iiiu-i. iana and musicians who 

ne also in., s. Ian ea I Peb illo, 
president ol \l \l. ordered musi< 

who had pre\ iou-K been < OVered b\ 
\ I I I! \ be. .in-.- ,,| their singing • • r 
m.c. a. ti\ ities, to drop \l I l{ \ mem. 
I er-hip. 

Local 802 ol MM. whi< h deals with 
the networks, will he negotiating i"i 
new contra* t- in January 195 1. I be 
unions ultimate aim i- to establish re- 
use pawnent- a- a protection against 
hi orded substitution. 

• Television U fixers of America 
\\\ \ I : This union won the Mill'. 

authorized election from the Authors' 
League of \me\ ica \ I \ i in -pi ing 
1953, and will probably negotiate foi 
new contracts for it- members soon. 

• Radio and Television Directors 
Guild i K I DG) : \< bieved new • 

1 1 a' i- representing a 1091 salary in- 
■ rease for network staffers in 1952 



Q. What is the union outlook in 
television for the near future? 
A. \- new categories "t l\ employ- 
ees arise in tin- last-growing industry, 
tin' established unions are quick to re- 
cruit member-hip. Jurisd* tional dis- 
putes among the unioi - tin- 
uously . but are like!) to ,u ise w ith less 
frequen< \ a- the telei ision union- . on- 
solidate their power. Everj conl 
expiration date represents inevitable 
demands for higher w different 
working condition-. 

I wo major trend- w ill need to he 
established to keep television produc- 
tion costs iiom rising beyond the ad- 
vertisers' rea h: 1 • the union- in- 
volved will have to key their demands 
to the problems ol thi- industry ami 
realize that - - - 

stretched beyond the point 
elasticity : '2 advertis 
will have to develop a uniform labor 
policy . and | 



Something new 
to view 

In 

PITTSBURGH 

All Eyes Arc On 

CHANNEL 53 

IN 

1953 

WKJF-TV 

PITTSBURGH 11, PENNA. 



PITTSBURGH'S PIONEER 
UHF TELEVISION STATION 



/ IKING PITTSBl U<.H <>l T ", 
THE SINGLl ST \T10N C ill <.<>!;) 



• ntalion 
WEED TELEVISION 



13 JULY 1953 



189 




26 episodes 
9 brand-new 



Get this exciting, fast-moving TV 
dramatic film series for exclusive 
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released locally in new format... 
with CHESTER MORRIS as host. This profit-proved program 

includes full-scale promotional support in all markets. 



Call, write or wire 




FILM DIVISION 




9 




I" 



NEW YORK, CHICAGO, IOS ANGELES • In Conodo RCA Victor Comoony ltd., Moitreol end Toron»» 



E23 SPECIAL FALL FACTS REPORT 




ON THE HORIZON: NEW STATIONS, NEW PRICES, COLOR 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the pages of this report 

\\ m What's the spot TV availability situation today? »«««' '•'- 

|| a What effect are the new TV stations having on spot plans? !>«?/«• '•*'- 

(J a If wit* tn «»i advertiser evaluate the new TV outlets? i»««<* 1WZ 

\^ m How van spot hudgets he revised (o rare r neiv TV stations? /""/«• IM 

i^. Should arfrerti.ver film spol commercial* in color now? ;>«<»«' ' '"> 

IJ. Who* effect is the SAG contract having on spot TV? P«ff<* 200 

|| a IVfiat ii.ve arc afft-erfi.ver.v making of 10-seeond l.lt.'s? pag** 200 

||. Ire there any notable trends in syndicated TV films? !»«««' 201 

l|. To irlior extent are clients spot placing custom-made film shows? page 20'.i 

13 JULY 1953 191 



Availabilities 

Q. What will timebuyers find 
true of the spot TV availability sit- 
uation this fall? 

A. Timebuyers on the prowl for 
choice availabilities in both new and 
mature TV markets face the following 
general outlook for fall: 

1. Morning slots: TV spot availa- 
bilities, unlike spot radio, are plenti- 
ful in the morning hours. One rep 
salesman stated to sponsor: 

"With the exception of a few high- 
rated chainbreak slots, the earlier you 
go in seeking TV availabililies, the 
more there are. TV has made some 
real gains in the morning, but it has 
a long way to go before it catches up 
with radio's hold on the breakfast audi- 
ence listeners." 

And just as some ad agencies are 
slow to look for nighttime radio avail- 
abilities, so agencies like Young & Ru- 
bicam, J. Walter Thompson, Sullivan. 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, N. W. Ayer, 
and Benton & Bowles are cautious 
about advising clients to enter morn- 
ing TV — unless a really well-rated buy 
comes along. 

"Outside of a spot next to NBC TV's 
Today or CBS TV's Arthur Godfrey," 
one lady timebuyer said, "what's worth 



buying in the morning at TV prices?" 

2. Afternoon slots: There's a defi- 
nite tightening of availabilities after 
the noon hour and before the evening 
TV kid shows. Particularly hard to 
find are chainbreak or announcement 
slots adjacent to well-rated network 
daytimers like the CBS TV soap opera 
block, Garry Moore and Double or 
Nothing, and NBC TV's Welcome Trav- 
elers and Kate Smith. 

Also on the hard-to-get list are good 
availabilities in women's-appeal partici- 
pation shows, particularly locally pro- 
duced TV shows that deal with cook- 
ing and homemaking tips. (See "What 
advertisers should know about TV 
homemaker programs," 4 May 1953 
sponsor, page 36.) 

3. Evening slots: Here's where the 
hottest buying competition lies, in both 
old and new TV markets. Most time- 
buyers ask first for "Class A nighttime 
chainbreaks" when doing their fall buy- 
ing. Result: Good nighttime slots are 
very scarce and are snapped up as fast 
as they become available. 

Said a rep firm sales executive: 
"Few spot TV advertisers who are 
holding down good nighttime slots are 
taking a summer hiatus this year, as 
compared to 1952. They don't want 
to run the risk of losing their fran- 
chises in the tall — even when their con- 



KEY SPOT TV TRENDS 



FRANCHISES 



Having learned that good TV time is quickly 
sold, top TV spot clients like Bulova and P&G 
are losing no time buying many of new stations 



Advertisers are generally planning larger TV 

uUUbtlo spot budgets for fail, to cover rate increases 

on old stations, buy campaigns on the new ones 



Smaller casts are used in commercials, due to 

UUIVIiyibnulALo re-use payment scales of SAG contracts. Some 

advertisers are now filming for TV in color 



More use is being made of 10-second l.D. an- 

IiUi S nouncements in spot TV. Many large stations 

are completely sold out in nighttime I.D.'s 



FILM PROGRAMS 



TV clients hare plenty of choice these days. 
About four times as many film programs are 
being produced this year as were made in '52 



tract- might allow them a summer va- 
cation. Thus there are fewer availa- 
bilities at night in the large, well-estab- 
lished TV markets than ever." 



New TV stations 

Q. What effect are the new post- 
freeze TV stations having on spot 
TV? 

A. The newest crop of TV stations 
are making three major changes in 
client plans for fall spot video: 

1. Expanded national coverage: Last 
summer, there were 108 TV stations 
serving 63 U.S. video markets. As this 
issue of SPONSOR went to pre-s, there 
were about 185 operating TV stations 
(VHF and UHF) in very nearly twice 
as many markets. Nearly 80', c of the 
nation's homes now lie within range of 
TV, and nearly 53% of U.S. homes are 
TV-equipped (CBS TV figures I . In 
simple advertising terms, the addition 
of new TV outlets means that TV spot 
advertisers can now achieve near-na- 
tional coverage (as far as the U.S. 
population is concerned) from TV and 
no longer must look at it as an effec- 
tive-but-circumscribed medium. 

2. New time buying opportunities: 
With the new crop of stations have 
come a new batch of spot availabilities. 
They fall rapidly into the general pat- 
terns of day and night availabilities as 
outlined above. But they are doing a 
lot to ease the squeeze for choice time 
slots, particularly where new stations 
go on the air in an existing one-station 
market like Pittsburgh or Kansas City. 

3. Bigger ad budgets: With more 
TV stations constantly appearing on 
the U.S. map, spot TV budgets these 
days are in a state of real flux. "Every 
time we prepare an estimate of TV spot 
costs for a national campaign," a 
BBDO timebuyer told sponsor, "we 
find we have to revise the figures up- 
wards every couple of weeks." 

Q. How can advertisers evaluate 
TV stations from the standpoint of 
spot TV? 

A. The value of a new outlet in a spot 
TV advertiser's campaign varies wide- 
ly. It depends mostly on who the client 
is and what he's trying to accomplish 
with his air advertising. 

Some advertisers — like Bulova. Ben- 
rus. Gruen. the leading tobacco firms, 
and national and local beer companies 
— are quick to buy spot TV schedules 



192 



SPONSOR 



iUMMARY OF SAG RATE SCALE FOR FILM COMMERCIAL TALENT „,,,/ /„ 



_ COMPENSATION FOR THE WORK SESSION 
(Rotes shown or* for commercioll mode lor one dosignoted sponsor) 

LASSIFICATION 



iN-CAMERA ACTORS AND SINGERS 

iFF-CAMERA ACTORS 

IFF-CAMERA ACTORS employed for spots 
intended only for Closs C us* 

i. iFF-CAMERA SOLO SINGERS 

. IFF-CAMERA SOLO SINGERS employed for com- 
merciols to be used only in Class C 

IFF-CAMERA GROUP SINGERS - 2 - 4 

IFF-CAMERA GROUP SINGERS - 5 ond over 



************** 

I _ COMPENSATION PER UNIT RESULTING FROM THE WORK SESSION 



AMOUNT 




HOUR WORK 
SESSION 


$70.00 




8 


$45.00 




2 


$35.00 




2 


$45.00 




4 


$35.00 




4 


$30.00 per 


person 


4 


$25.00 per 


person 


4 



:lassificatiqn 

dn-camera actors and singers 
)ff-camera actors and solo singers 
3ff-camera actors and solo singers, if 

commercial is used in Class C only 
3FF-CAMERA GROUP SINGERS - 2 - 4 
3FF-CAMERA GROUP SINGERS - 5 and over 



AMOUNT 
$70.00 
$45.00 



III - COMPENSATION FOR USf AMD HI 1$) II 

Ai ACTORS AND SOLO SINGERS - ON Cam! k» | 

I A 



Actor's ond Solo S> 
Actors and Solo S 
A tors ond Solo Sinj.>i 

B ACTORS AND SOLO SINCf H 



Actors and Solo Singers 
Actors and Solo Singers 
Actors and Solo Singers 



C GROUP SINGERS - OFF CAMERA » 

CLASS EACH CYCLE 



CLASS 


CYCLE 




c 


$ 70.00 


.00 


'1 


$105.00 


$105.00 


A 


$140.00 


00 


RS - Of 
CLASS 


F CAMER 

FIRST 
CYCLE 

$35.00 


a r 

1 A 

SUBSEQUENT 
CYCLE 


c 


$35.00 


B 


$52. SO 


$52.50 


A 


$70.00 


$70.00 



• S OF USE 



$35.00 

$30.00 per person 

$25.00 per person 

**************** 
,V - COMPENSATION FOR USE AND REUSE - PROGRAM COMMERCIALS AND SIGNAT 

(Rates are for unlimited use in eoch 13-week cycle except where otherwise noted) 



2 to 4 voices 


c 


$30.00 per 


person 


26 


Over 4 


c 


$25.00 " 


■" 


26 


2 to 4 


B 


$30.00 •' 


" 


13 


Over 4 '■ 


B 


$25.00 " 


■• 


13 


2 to 4 


A 


$40.00 " 


" 


13 


Over 4 


A 


$32.50 " 


' ' 


13 



(For Group Singers ON CAMERA See Schedule A) 

• *•*••••••*•••* * 

URES CLASS C AND B GN CAMERA AND OFF CAMERA 

CLASS C CLASS B 



ON 
CAMERA 



OFF 

.: Ml • .-• 



ON 
CAMERA 



OFF 



Actors ond Solo Singers $105.00 $80.00 $140.00 $90.00 

Actors ond Solo Singers (if 26 consecutive weeks ore guaranteed) $185.00 $140.00 -- 

Group Singers — 2 to 4 voices — per person See Note $ 30.00 See Note $40.00 

Group Singers —Over 4 voices — per person See Note $ 25.00 See Note $32.50 

Signature Singers - Solo See Note $ 80.00 See Note $90.00 

Signature Singers — 2 to 4 voices — per person See Note $ 32.50 See Note $45.00 

Signature Singers — Over 4 voices — per person See Note $ 27.50 See Note $37.50 

(NOTE: Rote for Group Singers and Signature Singers ON CAMERA are same as those for Actors and Solo Singers ON CAMERA in each respective class) 



• •*••••••••••••••••••••••••*•** 
V - COMPENSATION FOR USE AND REUSE - - PROGRAM COMMERCIALS AND OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS - - CLASS A 
(Guaranteed Uses must take place during one 1 3- week cycle) ON CAMERA 



1st 
USE 


EACH 
SINGLE 
REUSE 


3 

USE 

GUARANTEE 


8 

USE 

GUARANTEE 


13 

USE 
GUARANTEE 


UNLIMITED 
USE FOR EACH 
13-WK. CYCLE 


UNLIMITED 

USE FOR EACH 

26 CONSECUTIVE 

WEEK CYCLE 


13 USES IN 

26 CONSECUTIVE 

WEEKS 


$70 
$70 


$50 
$50 


$150 

$150 


$350 
$350 


$500 
$400 


$650 


$1150 


$570 



Actors & Solo Singers 

Openings & Closings 
(including lead-ins 
and leod-outs) 

******************************* 

VI - COMPENSATION FOR USE AND REUSE - PROGRAM COMMERCIALS. OPENING «. CLOSINGS. SIGNATURES - - C.A5S A 



OFF CAMERA 



Guaranteed Utes must take place during one 13-week cycle) 



8 
USE 



EACH 3 
1st SINGLE USE 
USE REUSE GUARANTEE GUARANTEE GUARANTEE; 13-WK. CYCLE 



13 
USE 



UNLIMITED UNLIMITED 

UNLIMITED USE FOR EACH 13 USES IN USE FOR 52 

USE FOR EACH 26 CONSECUTIVE 26 CONSECUTIVE CONSECUTIVE 

WEEK CYCLE WEEKS : <S 



$45 


S35 


$105 


1 $255 


$350 


1 1 

$485 


$865 


- 




$45 


$35 


$105 


$255 


$280 


- 


- 


$415 


■ 


$30' 


$20* 


$ 55* 


$1 TO" 


$150* 


$210* 


$390* 


- 


- 


$25* 


$17.50- 


$ 45* 


$ 90* 


$125* 


S165* 


$300* 


- 


- 




_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


$135 


- 


- 


Si' - 








_ 


- 


$ 67.50* 


- 


- 


$230* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$ 60* 


- 


- 


$200* 



Actors & Solo Singers 

Openings & Closings 
(including lead-ins 
and lead-outs) 

Group Singers 2-4 voices 
Group Singers —over 4 " 
Signoture " _ Soloist 

"2-4 voices 
Signature " over 4 " 
NOTE: Rotes for Group Singers and Signoture Singers ON CAMERA ore the some as those listed m Table V for Actor, and Solo Singers 

NOTE: Ttieo* nre n.-y Items, net full rate list, tl'nllmlted use In 13-weck cycle. U'nlimited use for periods Indicated. •Put person 



on new TV stations, both VHF and 
UHF. These advertisers are looking 
for franchises and will often buy at a 
high cost-per- 1,000 — knowing that t In- 
set penetration of the market will ulti- 
mately improve. 

TV set manufacturers— like Crosley, 
Westinghouse. I'hilco, and GE — also 
hop on the newest TV bandwagons 
since they want to establish their TV 
set brand names while a new TV mar- 
ket is undergoing its initial rapid view- 
er expansion. 

But other advertisers — like the bijj 
soap firms, the food companies, and 
several of the manufacturers of prod- 
ucts bought by women (cosmetics for 
example) — will often wait on the side- 
lines. These advertisers watch for 
costs-vs. -set-penetration to reach a par- 
ticular level since most of them are 
not interested in establishing franchises 
at a high price. 



Q What yardsticks are used in 
buying new TV stations by adver- 
tisers who do not want to estab- 
lish franchises on all new outlets? 



A. As mentioned above, there's no 
master formula that works equally well 
for all advertisers. "It's a question of 
applying judgment against the facts of 
the new station's growth and your cli- 
ent's sales problems," a Biow research- 
er said. 

There are, however, some important 
criteria which have a general bearing 
on when a new TV station is "ready." 
Here are five principal questions agen- 
cies ask before buying as compiled by 
sponsor from interviews with a num- 
ber of leading agency timebuyers and 
researchers: 

1. What's the degree of set penetra- 
tion? — Obviously penetration is going 
to be high in a mature VHF one-sta- 
tion market into which a new VHF sta- 
tion comes. Just as obviously, it's go- 
ing to be low (although it grows 
quickly) in a brand new TV area. 
Since most new stations go on the air 
with a roughly similar base rate (of 
somewhere around $100 to $250 an 
hour), the resulting cost-per-1,000 of 
rough circulation (station cost vs. sets- 
in-market ) varies widely. Clients, 
however, must set their own "break- 



even" point here — P&G, for instance, 
prefers not to buy until there are some 
30,000 sets in a market — since it de- 
pends entirely on how important the 
new market or existing market is to a 
company's sales picture. 

2. What's the degree of UHF con- 
version? — Of the new TV stations com- 
ing into the top 28 existing one-station 
markets in the U.S. (see section on 
Network TV, page 173 I , as many as 20 
— or over 70' \ — will be UHF stations. 
A standard VHF set must be converted 
to receive the signal, through the use 
of a new antenna and a conversion unit 
or tuning strip. Counting the existing 
VHF sets in an established market as 
the "circulation" of a new UHF sta- 
tion is highly misleading. What really 
matters is how many have been con- 
verted to receive UHF. NBC figures 
there will be "as many UHF stations 
as there are VHF by the end of the 
xear." 

3. What are the degrees of overlap 
with other TV?— Although the FCC 
has tried to avoid overlaps, several of 
the newest TV markets also receive 
signals from VHF stations in large 



Hollywood-type hoopla is now a standard item in TV films. Producers 
like Ziv and film syndication services of NBC and CBS video webs offer 
advertisers a wide choice of movie promotional aids designed to 



increase impact of TV film shows. Others, like Guild Films, United TV 
Programs, March of Time, and MCA-TV, have equally-extensive mer- 
chandising and promotional aids for buyers of spot-placed TV films 




194 



SPONSOR 



oearb) < ities. \ \ &H research execu 

iim- point- out: "If the overlap ia 
lici\ \. there "ill a lol of VHF I V -< - t- 
alread) in the mat Icel but the rate "i 
conversion i<> I III', because of the 
overlap, ia likelj to be much slower. 
Advertisers who buj .1 new I III -fa 
tiou maj wail .1 long t inn- before theii 
. osl pei -1,000 drops appreciabl) it the 
market alread) receives several \HI - 
stations." 

1. \\ hill's the potential oj the 111 I'll 

foi II sets? This is a concept so 
simple thai man) advertisers overlook 
it. Let's assume there are two new 
stations in t\so new markets. In both 
markets, there are 50,000 TV seta. Bui 
the total number of homes in the firs! 
market i> 300,000 and in the second 
there ar.' onlj 75,000 all told. The 
lirst l\ market "ill still have plent) 
of room to grow; it's onlj 16.5' i >atu- 
rated. The second market is alread) 
slowing down; it'- (><>.<'!'<' saturated. 
While this shouldn't stop an advertise] 
from buying both station-, researchers 
[eel, it certainl) indicates which station 
i- going to have the largest audiences 
in the long run. 

5. Does the market need 7 / spot 
coverage now? — Apart from the de- 
sire to establish spot TV franchises on 
,in\ new T\ stations in both old and 
new TV areas, sponsors should always 
consider carefully whether or not an 
expenditure for T\ spot in an area is 
likely to produce a worthwhile sales 
return. An improved distribution -'-t- 
up in an area may have to precede a 
TV spot campaign. 

Q. What is the formula used by 
most new TV stations in setting up 
their rate structure? 
A. Usually, a new TV station's basic 
one-hour rate is a compromise between 
what the traffic will bear and the min- 
imum profit margin for the station. 
In terms of dollars, the one-hour rate 
usually starts at around -S100 (for 
('lass A one-time shot) for either a 
new station in an) new market or a 
new IHF station in an existing VHF 
market. Depending on the size of the 
market and its growth potential, the 
starting rate can go up to about $200. 

The rate increases are geared to set 
growth, using a serif- of "escalator" 
level-. 

Here's a typical example of this 
"escalator" pricing: 

In Houston — an established VHF 
market — KNLZ-TV is due to take to 

13 JULY 1953 



tin- .in in mid- August. KM /■ I \ will 
Ik ;i I I If station. It- basi< one houi 

rate w ill I"- v l I" and it- 1 1 1 • - rate 

$22. I hi- h.i- been calculated against 
an expo t.in. j ol some 10,000 "< on- 
\ 11 ted" i" I III 1 sets in the market. 
\- sets equipped to rei eive the I 1 1 1 
outlet in« rease in the I louston .1" 1 
this rate w ill go up I I 11 pei houi and 
|2 pei minute [oi ea< h .nliliiion.il 1 ,000 
Beta. W hen the numbei of I III' -rei ei\ ■ 
ing sets in I Ion-ton hits a level "I 
000 the hourl) rate will be set .11 - 
.mil the minute rate at $70. \\ I1.1t hap- 



|k 11- .iiit i thai 1- an) bod !>ut 

there will probabl) b<- othei period it 
iii' lot . - .1- I III p. 1 1. 1 1 ition 

Networks, iix identally, al-<> pla) ■ 
role in detei mining the rate sti m lure 
oi new I \ stations. I hrough tl" 
lion Relations departments ;it the 
I'.i l\ webs, network executives often 
offei i'K ii >• based on rat.- foi mulas 
m In- h h.n e proved successful i"i 
0&0 stations and afhliati 

Q. To what extent arc advertis- 
ers placing spot TV campaigns on 



Coverage Area of 
KMO-TV Channel 13, 
As filed with the FCC, 
January 1953. 

Effective Radiated 
Power— 95,500 watts! 
Antenna height above 
sea level— 951 ieet!! _ 

HEIGHT means might 
in this Puget Sound 
Area, and KMO-TV 
with the tallest TV 
Tower in the area has 
the HEIGHT for a 
mighty good signal in- 
to the 263,000 TV sets 
in this 10-county Pu- 
get Sound region! 




Cover 

Seattle _ 

with low TaCOma rates! 



4 



<& 



«c4# 



Represented Nationally by 
The Branham Company 



MOW 

Toton 
Wosh 



195 



the newest crop of video outlets? 

A. The whole picture of TV spot buy- 
ing on new outlets is changing so rap- 
idly that it's difficult to trace clear 
patterns. However, here are some new 
trends: 

New stations in old mar Lets — Be- 
cause there is already a sizable set sat- 
uration in an existing market, a new 
Nation in a mature TV area usually 
does all right for itself. WENS, a new 
UHF outlet in the Pittsburgh area, is 
a good example. The station's rep 
firm (Petry) told sponsor that as of 
mid-June WENS was already 80^? sold 
out, both in spot and network TV time. 

Among WENS "charter" spot adver- 
tisers: Coca-Cola, Benrus, Bulova, 
Nash, Pontiac, Sealtest, Sunoco, Rival 
Dog Food, Alliance Manufacturing. 
Lever Bros., Welch's Wine, ami Fort 
Pitt Beer. WENS, of course, is 
helped enormously by the fact that 
Pittsburgh has hitherto been a one-sta- 
tion market and the rate of UHF con- 
version is high. Also a help is the fact 
that WENS is affiliated with both CBS 
and ABC video webs and thus has plen- 
ty of high-rated adjacencies to offer 
spot buyers. 

New stations in new markets — This 
is something else again. Most of the 
small-town TV stations now going on 
the air are having to hustle hard for 
new national spot TV business. Rea- 
son: Buyer resistance. A veteran 
timebuyer told SPONSOR: "I'll be 
darned if I want to buy into a new 
TV market at a cost of $10- or $15- 
per-1,000 homes where the total pop- 
ulation of the market is less than 100,- 
000. Costs like that are only justified 
in the larger new TV markets where 
there is plenty of growth potential." 
As a result of this typical attitude, 
many of the new crop of video out- 
lets in the smaller markets are sailing 
fairly close to the wind, subsisting on 
a diet of local advertising, low-pay net- 
work revenue, and some national spot 
advertising clients. 

Q. What sort of advance budget 
provision can an advertiser estab- 
lish to cover the anticipated costs 
of new spot TV rate increases? 

A. The simplest way, of course, is 
just to add more dollars to an ad bud- 
get as rate increases occur. 

Many advertisers, however, prefer to 
make up their ad budgets well in ad- 
vance, and this policy creates a sizable 
headache. No one can predict with any 



a< curac) just when and where TV spot 
rate hikes will occur, and how big they 
w ill be. 

The New York headquarters of one 
of the biggest radio and TV agencies 
gave SPONSOR its own private formula 
for covering rate increases: 

"We're suggesting to our clients in 
spot TV that they set aside at least 
5% of their spot video budget as a re- 
serve for the latter half of 1953," one 
of the agency's media experts said. 
"We figure that this will cover rate 
hikes in both new and old markets. 
From there on, a reserve of about 
2V2% for 1954 should cover almost 
any rate increases." 

Some other agencies, like Biow and 
Y&R, are meeting the problem by mak- 
ing forecasts of set penetration in new 
markets and then predicting rate in- 
creases based on the penetration fore- 
casts. This is a sort of calculated gam- 
ble, using as the "form chart" a study 
of how rate increases came about in 
the older pre-freeze markets. Then, 
well in advance of an anticipated price 
hike, clients are told to get ready for 
one and to increase budgets periodical- 
ly (every 13 weeks or so) as needed. 

Neither method is perfect, but each 
serves a useful purpose in keeping cli- 
ents on their toes and on the lookout 
for rate increases. 



Spot TV rates 



Q. What changes, if any, are ex- 
pected in spot TV rates this fall? 

A. Spot TV rates are expected to be 
reasonably steady this fall among old- 
er, pre-freeze TV outlets in mature 
markets. Some changes however are 
expected, and those primarily during 
the class A evening hours. 

Thee changes won't occur among 
more than 10 or 15 r v of the total num- 
ber of older TV stations. And even 
then, they won't amount to more than 
about a 5 f (-or-less price hike, most 
reps predict. 

Rate increases will be more sizable 
among the post-freeze group of new TV 
outlets in new TV markets. At these 
stations, as they have been in the past, 
I \ rates will be tied more or less to 
set growth in the TV markets. But 
there's no accurate formula for antici- 
pating these spot TV increases. 

This rule of thumb however may be 
useful: According to a number of sta- 
tion reps queried by SPONSOR, when- 



ever a major TV network feels it's 
time to hike the network rates on its 
newest TV affiliates (due to growth of 
the number of TV sets in a market) a 
corresponding and relatively similar 
rate hike is likely to be made in spot 
TV prices. 

Rate increases on new VHF TV sta- 
tions in old TV markets are expected 
to follow a pattern roughly similar to 
that of the pre-freeze stations. That is, 
if the station is an additional VHF 
station coming on in an existing VHF 
market, it usually starts out at a rate 
about the same as its older compe;ition. 
This rate will hold for some time. How- 
ever, if the arrival of a second station 
sets off a new round of set buving, 
both stations may eventually boost 
their rates. 

As far as rate hikes among new UHF 
stations in old markets are concerned, 
this depends entirely on the rate of con- 
version among VHF owners to UHF. 
Pricing adjustments will resemble those 
of any new TV station in a brand new 
TV market. 



Color TV 



Q. Will color TV be a factor this 
fall in spot TV air advertising? 

A. As far as the spot TV advertising 
plans of those agencies and clients con- 
tacted by sponsor were concerned, col- 
or TV was "being discussed" — but did 
not feature as a major item for fall 
campaigns. 

Q. Can an advertiser shoot TV 
spot film commercials in color 
right now in order to make a sim- 
ple change-over if color TV comes 
anytime soon? 

A. Indeed he can. Most of the lead- 
ing TV commercial film producers will 
tackle a color assignment if a client 
wants his films that way. Meanwhile, 
standard color movie film (Technicol- 
or, Kodachrome, and so on) televises 
nicelv into a rich black and white on 
standard TV equipment. \^ hether the 
color film in use now will prove suit- 
able for televising in color is some- 
what in doubt however until it's known 
just what the final color system will be. 

Q. Are any leading TV advertis- 
ers currently making color films? 

A. A few. But so far it's mainly 
experimental, although some film pro- 



196 



SPONSOR 



^/the most powerful 

TELEVISION STATION 'fe 



ron beu/is or super- coverage 

CALL YOt/A. M-K MAN 



• KANE 




j 

/ •WlLLIAMSPORT 



e 

Pittsburgh.— -, — ^LTOONA 

Johnstown*-' 

f 




CUMBERLAND. MO. 





ABC 'NBC DUMONT 

316.000 «FB. CHANNEL 
™ J^T y 10 

Altoona, Pa. 

JACK SNYDER. Managing Dirclv H-R Television, Inc. 

13 JULY 1953 197 



KDYL 

MERCHANDISING 

Hit* the "Bullseye" 
In Safes Results 




What KDYL s Merchandising 
Organization Offers You: 

• Startling Point-of- 
Purchase Displays. 

• Letters, Brochures and 
Mailers to Grocery and 
Drug Retail Outlets. 

• Close Alliance with 
Brokers and Distributors. 

• Follow-Up Sales Surveys 

Coordinated calls by KDYL's 
merchandising team to brokers 
and retailers, plus strategic 
placing of these eye-catching 
"bullseye" display pieces — with 
your product attached — means 
powerful merchandising sup- 
port in the fast-growing Inter- 
mountain West. 

Write for details, or 

see your Blair man 

TODAY 




Salt Lake City, Utah 



National Representative: John Blair • Co. 



ducers like Ziv have long been shooting 
in color. Here are a few last-minute 
color air advertising developments: 

Camels — R. J. Reynolds plans to 
do a series of color film commercials 
at Transfilm, New York. Primarily 
they are trial runs for Reynolds and 
the Esty agency to get the feel of work- 
ing with color problems. Chesterfield 
is reported "thinking" about a color 
film schedule. 

P&G — Giant bellwether of the radio 
and TV industry, Procter & Gamble 
recently announced that the Compton 
Agency would supervise the filming ol 
its Fireside Theatre in color, although 
most of the first-run (on NBC TV 
network) showings of these color films 
will come before advent of color TV, 
in regular black and white. Both P&G 
and producer Frank Wisbar, however, 
feel that color will add to the show's 
value on syndicated spot TV reruns. 

Colgate — No spot commercial shoot- 
ing schedules have been set yet, but 
Colgate has completed some experi- 
mental color footage of its various 
products just to see how the firm's 
drug-and-toiletry lines look on tinted 
film. With this as a base, some trial 
commercials mav be made this fall. 



Q. Are there any new develop- 
ments in the field of color film 
commercials? 

A. Yes. Probably the biggest: East- 
man Kodak recently announced an as- 
yet-untitled color film stock (Color 
Negative Type 5248 ) available in 35 
mm. size, which is almost as fast as 
slow, fine-grain black-and-white stock. 
This means that commercial film pro- 
ducers can shoot color TV movies for 
advertisers with almost the same studio 
lighting facilities now involved in the 
making of black-and-white commer- 
cials today. 

"Anyone familiar with color photog- 
raph) will recognize what a significant 
step forward a faster-emulsion color 
film will be in the future developments 
of spot color video," the production 
chief of a leading commercial film 
company told sponsor. 

Q. How much more does it cost 
to film commercials in color? 

A. Not as much as you'd think. Ac- 
cording to film experts the extra costs 
of color film are chiefly for the raw 
film stock (which costs about 12.50 
per foot as compared with 4.5tf per 
foot for black and white^ and the 



handling (color film must be processed 
and cut with more care and expense 
than b&w film). 

In terms of dollars, the extra ex- 
penses involved in filming the aver- 
age one-minute announcement (a me- 
dium-budget, live-action commercial 
for a single product) in color come 
to about 20 to 25'v' additional. 



Q. Is it necessary to get into the 
color film commercial act right 
now? 

A. This is a matter for each adver- 
tiser to decide for himself. 

If an advertiser starts shooting spot 
TV film commercials in color within 
the next several weeks, he must realize 
that he is taking a calculated risk, most 
film industry sources feel. 

As pointed out above, a TV client 
can order his next batch of film com- 
mercials done in color today — but it 
will cost him more money. And al- 
though he'll be able to show them to- 
day in black and white, there's no TV 
outlet — network or spot, as SPONSOR 
went to press — where he can air them 
in color on a regular commercial basis 
and no guarantee for the future that 
present color film standards will match 
future TV color standards. 

Besides, by the time color TV does 
arrive officially, his copy approach or 
basic commercial ideas may have 
changed radically and his backlog of 
color films will be out of step with his 
advertising in non-TV media. 



Commercials costs 

Q. Will talent costs of spot TV 
film commercials be higher this 
fall? 

A. They will. Since last March, agen- 
cies and advertisers have been shooting 
their TV commercials in accordance 
with the provisions of the new Screen 
Actors Guild contract. 

In earlier reports (see SPONSOR 23 
March 1953 and 29 June 1953), it's 
been pointed out that pre-SAG-type 
commercials can still be done — if the 
advertiser and agencj understand ful- 
ly the ins and outs of the SAG scales. 
Generally speaking, however, most 
agencies will find that talent costs of 
commercial films will be running them 
from 10 to 50'T more this fall as com- 
pared with last. Thats the opinion as 
of now. I For summary of talent scale 
in new contract, see page 193. i 



198 



SPONSOR 



S mul I'm TV Stations 



. . . Cover Northwestern California Southern Oregon. Let Blair-T) tell 
you how one hilling reaches two growing markets $322,125,000 Retail Sales . 



KIEM-TV 



Channel 3, 14,600 watts ERP 
Eureka, California 
3069 feet above sea level 
1673 feet above average terrain 
3026 feet above Eureka. 



KBES-TV 



Chinnel 5, 29,000 watts ERP 
Mcdford, Oregon 
2169 feet above sea level 
429 feet above average terrain 
840 feet above Mcdford. 



MARKET AND SALES DATA Ire a within W DBl oi 100 I I \l (based on FCi Engine, Standards) 



COUNTY 



POPULATION 



PERSONS PER FAMILY 



FAMILIES 



RETAIL SALES 



Curry 

Jackson 

Josephine 

Klamath I _' 3 count J | 

Douglas i / 6 county I 
'•Del Norte 

"Humboldt 

"Trinity 

"Mendocino (1/8 count \ i 
>m Siskiyou [8/15 count \ I 



2.89 
3.05 
3.06 
3.72 
3.45 



6,400 * 

65,200 * 

29,200 * 

27,700 * 

70,600 * 

73,290 3. 

82,750 3.73 

3,004 2.75 

5,420 3.43 

76,984 3.06 



2,274 


S 6,020,000 


27,377 


83,633,000 


9,543 


39,547,000 


8,872 


39,640,000 


3,057 


72,087,000 


4,430 


72,287,000 


26,437 


700,623,000 


7,092 


7,934,000 


7,600 


5,688,000 



5,536 20,678,000 



Total 

Vanaonnenl Survey, May, 1953 



260..T lit 

**196$ California State Uostrr 



94.194 



9322.125,000 



■ 



HOW YOU CAN USE YOUR SALES AND ADVERTISING DOLLAR 
TO SELL YOUR PRODUCT IN THE "SMULLIN TV STATIONS" AREA 



• ONE HALF PACE. ONE TIME ONLY, IN THE 22 WEEKLY 

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED WITHIN THE "SMULLIN TV STATIONS AREA 



$928.20 



• ONE HALF PACE. ONE TIME ONLY, IN THE 6 DAILY 

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED WITHIN THE "SMULLIN TV STATIONS" AREA. 



1 180. 10 



* ONE CLASS B HALF HOUR PROGRAM ON THE 13 RADIO 

STATIONS OPERATING WITHIN THE "SMULLIN TV STATIONS AREA . . S2(i8.:i0 

ONE CLASS B HALF HOUR PROGRAM ON "SMULLIN TV STATIONS" S130.00 



Write, Wire or Phone 



Smullin TV Stations 



Box 1021, Eureka, California 
Phone Hillside 3-1621 TWX 16 



General Manager: Wm. E. Smullin 

National Representative: Blair TV. Inc.. New York 17. Chrysler Bldq.. ISO E 43rd St.. Murray Hill 2-5644 

Chicago 11 — Y20 Y. Michigan Ave., Su 7-.5580 • Los Angeles 28 — IS33J Holywood Blvd.. Granite 6101 • San Francisco — ',010 /?;;<s Bldg., 

Yukon 2-70<iS • Detroit 26 — 1 1 15 Book Bldg.. Woodward 5-3230 • St. Louis 1 — 134 Paul Brown Bide.. Chestnut 56 • Dallas Rio 

Grande National Bide.. Riverside ■ 

If filiated with CBS Television 



Q. How can an advertiser plan 
effective TV film commercials 
within the revised scales of the 
SAC contract so as to keep costs 
down as much as possible? 
A. Here's how Walter Lowendahl. 
executive v. p. of Transfilm, one of the 
three largest producers of commercial 
\ ideo films, summarized the situation 
for SPONSOR, adding some important 
advice [or < o-t-< onscious advertisers: 

"To make sure the SAG contract 
. 1. .<-ii't spell headaches this fall, it's 
wise to remember two basic points: 

"1. Plan scripts and storyboards to 
take full advantage of those portions 
of the SAG agreement which allow the 
sponsor the maximum talent for the 
minimum expense. 

"2. Secure signed contracts from 
each actor and extra who is employed 
to appear in TV commercials before 
lie is photographed." 




Q. How do such precepts work 
out in actual commercial practice? 

A. Lowendahl explained further: 
'"On the creative end, cut costs by us- 
ing as few people as possible in com- 
mercials and making as much use of 
'ofT-camera' techniques as possible. By 
that, I mean voices with no visual ap- 
pearance of the speaker. 

"Where possible, use extras whose 
initial payments are less than those of 
regular actors and for whom there are 
no re-use payments. Extras, of course, 
may only be used within certain well- 
defined limits which therefore call up- 
on the creativeness of the film an- 
nouncement planners. Complete knowl- 
edge of the SAG contract in this re- 
spect is a must. 

"Keep production simple. Anima- 
tion, demonstrations and testimonials, 
well-planned, can be more effective 
than lavish casting — and can save 
money on the heavy SAG re-use pay- 
ments to actors. 

"When it comes to contractual pro- 
cedure, make sure that your contracts 
cover every possible contingency that 
might arise in a spot film production. 

"For example: Contract for a per- 
former's service first as an extra. Then, 
if change in production requires that 
he must be contractually classified as 
an actor, you can always add to the 
contract. You'll be better off this way 
than if you've contracted for an actor 
and then decide that he's going to be 
an extra because you can't backtrack 
on spot film contracts — no matter what 
the player's work turns out to be. 

"It's always been a good idea to 
know exactly what a spot film commer- 
cial calls for and to arrange contracts 
so that a change of plans is possible 
without running into heavy extra pay- 
ments. This is more important todav 
than ever before. 

"For instance, don't budget a com- 
mercial for 'X' dollars based on the 
services of one actor and then add 
three off-camera voices at the last min- 
ute. SAG re-use payments make this 
prohibitive now." 



Q. How much can an advertiser 
actually save by judicious planning 
based on the new SAC contract? 

See "How to cut TV commercial 
costs," sponsor, 29 June 1953. Arti- 
cle contains picture quiz to test knowl- 
edge of how you can best plan com- 
mercials in view of new contract. 



10-sceond I.D.'s 

Q. Have TV's 10-second "sta- 
tion identification" commercials 
emerged as a major item in TV 
spot campaign plans? 

A. Yes, as compared with their posi- 
tion last year at this time. The stand- 
ards proposed for these quickie live- 
or-film slots by the Station Representa- 
tives Association have been approved 
by virtually every TV station in the 
United States. 

From a client's point of view, the 
standardizing of requirements (exam- 
ples: length of copy, where the sta- 
tion I.D. goes) has greatly increased 
the value of I.D. announcements. From 
the point of view of TV station reps, 
the standardization has enhanced the 
salability of I.D.'s. 

A typical summary of the situation 
was made to SPONSOR by an executive 
of the Petry rep firm. He said : 

"A year ago, when we first stand- 
ardized our TV I.D.'s and started our 
first big sales push, the average TV 
outlet on our list had 50' < or more 
of its I.D. slots still unsold. 

"Today, thanks to the fact that an 
advertiser can now plan his I.D.'s on a 
national basis with a minimum of local 



FACTS about TV 
in EL PASO, Texas 



More people watch KROD-TV and 
it is El Paso's Best TV Buy because: 

I. Mountain-top transmitter location — 
1783 feet above city 

Channel 4 — 56,300 watts 

More viewers because better regional 
coverage, better "home town" cover- 
age, better programming 

Top network shows 

More "top rated" film shows 

More local and live shows; and large, 
experienced TV staff 

Unrivalled studio facilities 

Newspaper affiliation 

Real "merchandising" program 

CBS • DUMONT • ABC 



KRODTV 



CHANNEL 4- • EL PASO, TEXAS 



ODERICK BROADCASTING CORF 

Dorrance D. Roderick, Chm. of the Board 



Val Lawrence, 
Pres. & Cen. Mgr. 



Dick Watts, 
TV Sales Manager 



Call your nearest 
L. TAYLOR COMPANY office for full details 



200 



SPONSOR 



variations in requirements, -t of oui 

I \ stations havt I) 1 5 to 20' I ol 

their LD.'a still unsold. Oui I \ sta- 
lions in the largest I \ markets are 

-old OUt." 



Q. What kind of problems still 
exist in planning a campaign which 
includes TV I.D. announcements? 
A. Despite the standardization <>f 
I.I), requirements in the industry, 
man) problems for the I \ advei I isei 
-till remain. Here are several of them: 

1. \<>i ever) station mil take I J), 
announcements. \i last report, a few 
hold-outs still haired their scheduling. 
These stations include \\ BEN-T\ . Buf- 
falo, W I M.I TV, Milwaukee, and KSD- 
I \ . St Louis. It might be noted thai 
all three ol these Nations have not. 
until recentl) . faced the threat ol I \ 
competition and have been virtual!) 
-old out in all time segments around 
tin- clock. \\ lien one-station markets 

heroine tWO-Station and three-station 
areas, mosl timebuyers feel, station 
rulings against the acceptance of I.D. 
announcements ma) quietl) evaporate. 

2. Several stations have local I.I). 
"quirks." Here and there. T\ outlets 
have developed special artwork designs 
(such as type styles, logo slugs, and 
positioning oi call letter- 1 which either 
\ar\ from Station Representatives As- 
sociation standard- or at least compli- 
cate mallei-. KTI. \. Los blgeles, and 

\\ \U',\\. Schenectady, insist that call let- 
in- be kept off I.D. announcements 
since both stations prefer to cut the 
I.D. at the eight-second mark and flash 
on a full-screen set of call letters for 
the last two seconds. KHJ-TV. Los 
Ingeles, will accept I.D. films in which 
the <all letter- are in the usual upper- 
right-hand quadrant but prefers them 
strung across the top in the upper 
quarter slice. \ml so on. Onl) a com- 
plete knowledge of all station require- 
ment- solves all problems. 

3. Difficulty in obtaining correct 
station art. It's not as easy as you 
might think to round up the correct 
call-letter designs for all the U.S. TV 
stations. Hep- seldom have complete 
sets. New stations — many of which do 
not have any finalized designs — are 
constant!) appearing on the TV map. 
And call letter artwork suhniitted by a 
TV station is often designed with full- 
-i reen showing in mind and looks 
mudd) or blurry when reduced to 
standard quarter size. 



Q. How can advertisers make 
sure of correct call letter designs 
in I.D. films? 

A. I \ > lients will eithei have i" keep 
< onstanl i he< k on all U.S. I \ sta* 
lion- foi - .iri.-. t oi iginal designs "i 
new < hanges oi else i onta< t an inde- 
pendent film produce] who specializes 
in putt ing i all letters into ID. Alms. 

So fai . the onl) In m m iili sin Ii a 
specialty i- the John Lewis I ilm Serv- 
i< e ol 619 W.'-t 54th St., Mew ^ ork 
I it) . I eu i- has laboi iouslj i ollei ted 
a < omplete Bel of I . v . I \ i all letters, 
often i "i i' ■ iihl' them for I.D. him use 
ami even designing new ones < a< i ept- 
able to the Btation > where net essai j . 

For al .mi - In mi $50 pei in. ni 
tive, I.ewi- will print (via an optical 
pi ocess i the correct i all lettei - on the 

hnal duplicate negative. Lew i- « an han- 
dle about I 11 negatives a <\.i\. expects 
soon to -ten this up to 200 a da) . 



S> ndieated films 

Q. What type of syndicated TV 
film shows are available to the ad- 
vertiser? 

A. Almost ever) type of l\ program- 
ing i- < oming out on a -\ ndieated 
basis. This year's new product runs the 
gamut from adventure -how-, such as 
1 nited l\ Program's Rock) laics. 
Space Ranger, through documentaries, 
like NBC T\ film Sales' Victor) <n 
Sea. to variety -how-, such a- CBS I V 
Film Sales' Art Linklettet an,! the 
Kii/s. \|-,, putting in a strong hid for 
the sponsor'- l\ dollars are reruns of 
film series which have achieved high 

audience popularity in the past on the 
networks. Some of the repackaged, 
n tilled film- < in rentl) at ailable are 
The Doctoi (former!) The Visitor), 

I he Cop < a sel« I'd poi li"ii of the 

Dragnet series), and Strange idven- 
tare ia group of films from the Fire- 
side I heatre -ei ie- i . 



Q. Is syndicated film business 
good? 

A. The syndicated IA film industr) 
this \ear i- bigger than evei before in 
it- four-year history. It ha- grown in 
a< ti\it\. in sponsorship, in programing. 
1. Ictii it\ : I953's I \ film output 
will amount to about four time- that oi 
last year, much of it tor syndication. 
One reason: The increasing number of 
stations is helping syndicators -pread 
• •-t-. increase profits, thus making 




THIS IS THE TV SHOW 

which produced more 
than $7,000,000.00 worth 
of new business for one 
sponsor in 13 weeks. 

THIS IS THE TV SHOW 

which produced over 
$1,035,000.00 worth of 
new business for an- 
other sponsor in 7 
weeks. 

THIS IS THE TV SHOW 

which produced over 
$15,000.00 worth of new 
business for still another 
sponsor in 1 day. 

THIS IS THE TV SHOW 

which has made TV his- 
tory. The show that has 
a proven record of deliv- 
ering direct, tangible 
results in an unprece- 
dented volume! 

Send for complete details 



510 MADISON AVE. 
NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 
MUrroy Hill 8-5365 



13 JULY 1953 



201 



syndication more attractive to produc- 
ers than il was previously. The indus- 
try is turning out an average of 100 
hours of completed TV films a month, 
hoth syndicated shows and shows made 
initially for individual advertisers. 
During this season, the older estab- 
lished syndication firms frequently 
doubled their grosses, or came close 
to it, and the newer organizations 
showed signs of prosperity through 
their acquisition of new properties and 
increased staffs. Network participation 
in the film distribution end of the 
business also increased. Last year CBS 
and NBC were less active in the dis- 
tribution field, although CBS had a 
separate film sales unit. This year 
NBC TV created a separate division 
for its TV film syndication operations, 
and ABC will soon follow in its foot- 
steps by forming its own film unit. 

2. Sponsorship: TV stations were 
the biggest buyers of film packages 
this year, in turn reselling them to lo- 
cal sponsors. More advertisers than 
ever before jumped on the syndicated 
TV film bandwagon. Main reason for 
the ever-increasing interest in TV film 
programing: Films offer top entertain- 
ment at the local level, often bring the 



sponsor the prestige of big names at 
comparatively low cost. Advertisers 
now using TV films on a syndicated 
basis represent all fields. A recent 
Consolidated TV Sales survey showed 
beverage companies bought more of 
its packages than any other type of 
advertiser (36%) ; food manufacturers 
look second place ( 26% ) . Other spon- 
sor categories for Consolidated's films 
included appliance dealers, dry goods 
stores, and banks and utilities. 

3. Programing: The non-integrated 
dramatic show (including adventure 
and mystery programs ) forms the back- 
bone of this year's syndicated TV avail- 
abilities. Westerns are in the decline. 
As in the past, this year producers and 
syndicators took their cue from the net- 
works, came up with a number of sit- 
uation-comedies which kept in mind 
the top-rated / Love Lucy. 

Q. What is the outlook for TV 
film programing? 

A. Continued prosperity is in the 
cards for the TV film syndication busi- 
ness as new stations come on the air. 
With about 185 stations now on the 
air, and some 50 with fall target dates, 



TV Comes to the 5th Market of the Great Pacific Northwest! 

On July 12, KIDO-TV took to the air to bring the first full-scale 
television programming to Southwestern Idaho and Southeastern 
Oregon — the fifth market in size of the great and booming market 
of the Pacific Northwest. 

Power: 53Kw Video, 26.5Kw Audio. NBC, CBS and DuMont Networks 
Represented Nationally by Blair TV Inc. 



Owned and 
operated by 



KIDO 



INC. 



Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 
Boise, Idaho 




one syndicate! predicted 70-80% of lo- 
cal TV time will be film by October. 
One strong industry trend: the increas- 
ing use of reruns. Backed by rating 
figures proving second and third runs 
can get as high — or higher — audiences 
as the initial runs, syndicators are re- 
packaging 13 or 26 films of popular 
series on TV — and selling them suc- 
cessfully. Example: Consolidated TV 
Film Sales has figures to show that the 
second and third runs of its Hollywood 
Half Hour show are getting consider- 
able viewer interest. (The series has 
been shown before with the titles Foot- 
lights Theatre, and Bigelow Theatre.) 
The figures: 





Average 


Average 


Average 




TelePuIse 


1 elePulse 


Telel'ulse 




First Run 


Second Run 


Third Run 


Boston 


11.2 


9.7 


21.3 


Chicago 


11.8 


11.6 


13.0 


Dayton 


15.9 


16.4 


18.2 


New York 


5.8 


14.1 


16.8 


Philadelphia 


9.9 


10.4 


14.1 



Q. What new buying patterns are 
emerging for syndicated TV films? 

A. One new buying pattern for TV 
film that looks like a sure trend is the 
formation of central film buying offices 
for groups of station clients. The most 
important buying office development is 
Station Films, Inc., a non-profit or- 
ganization formed by the Katz Agency 
to act as a central office for 15 to 25 
of its station clients. The new organi- 
zation will begin operations 1 August. 
will be headed by Robert H. Salk, for- 
mer TV program manager at the Katz 
Agency. The cooperative arrangement 
is designed to save money for stations 
and distributors: stations benefit from 
their "collective bargaining strength," 
says Salk: syndicators save salesmen's 
travel money. 

Station Films, Inc. is being set up on 
a sendee, not a commission basis. Sta- 
tions subscribing to it will pay an an- 
nual nominal fee, based on their hour 
rates. Video film salesmen will s:ill be 
free to visit the participating stations 
to sell direct. 

The new 7 Katz; operation marks the 
first time a station rep has entered the 
film-buying field. Among other cen- 
tral film buying groups for stations is 
Amalgamated Buying Service. 

Another emerging pattern is film 
syndication by stations themselves. The 
new Vitapix Corp.. a cooperative group 
of some 40-odd stations, is not onlv 
syndicating films but is planning the 
sale of time to national and regional 
sponsors interested in film shows. Also 
being considered is film production. 



202 



SPONSOR 



Nic Vitapix Corp. in past fen months 
baa thread) lined up it- own pack i 
for syndication. 



S|>oI-i»I:ic*cmI films 

Q. Why arc advertisers using 
multi-market film program cam- 
paigns on spot TV? 
A. There are tw<> basic reasons foi 

placing film shows on a spot basis 

regional!) and aationall) : to gel flexi- 
ble market choke, ami to supplement 

a T\ network. 

1. Mm Let choice: Wan) of the im- 
portantly markets toda) are still one- 
station market- (though this >v i 11 be 
less of a problem bj mid-winter). Be- 
cause of tliis factor, the advertiser 
wishing to place his film program on a 

network basis is often faeed with the 

problem of clearing Btations. Many 

sponsors feel that the mOSl intelligent 

ua\ to solve this problem is to bu) on a 
national spol basis, therein getting a 
tailor-made network in the desired mar- 
kef- Especiall) if the sponsor is in- 
terested only in a specific region or 
number of regions, spot TV is the per- 
fect solution to his program problems. 

2. Supplementing network: Even if 
the advertiser has already placed his 
film show via a network, there are 
often some markets in which his prod- 
uct is distributed which have not been 
i leared for the net lineup. Because of 
this situation, there is a growing trend 
today towards the combined operation: 
network placement, supplemented by 
spot. Some of the network advertisers 
planning to place their shows on a spot 
basis to supplement the network lineup, 
include the Chesebrough Manufactur- 
ing Co., which sponsors the Fights of 
the Century film on NBC. TV, 22 sta- 
tions, will add 37 more markets on a 
spot basis, and the E. I. du Pont Co., 
which will place its half-hour network 
TV show. Cavalcade of Imerica, in 25 
markets in addition to it- SBC TV 
weekly half-hour time. 

A big ad\antage of spot-placing a 
film show is that you gain more pro- 
motion cooperation from stations. 

Q. What are some of the prob- 
lems of spot film clients? 

A. Because of the variety of times, 
dates, and places where the film pro- 
gram is shown, spot TV demands a far 
szreater central coordination of aetiv- 



it\ mi tin- pari oi tin- advertise! and the 
syndi< ator than doe- the network -how . 

I In- pnx i--- of men handising tin- -bow 
becomes more complicated, since the 
newspaper ad- and special displays 
must be revised to reflect the different 

time- and days. 

\iiolli, i problem inherent in the 

multiple-markel -pot 1\ operation is 
that oJ actuall) delivering the film to 
different stations. In the earl) da) - of 
-pot I \ . I • > i example, man) advertisers 

I I ied to (ui costs b) bicy< ling the 
print- from one market to another. 
I hi- practice ha- since declined, be- 



cause oi tin- element of ri-k involved 

Q. Who are spot film clients? 

A. I li< -' .in- anion:' IDOt I In-nt- 

I'.h iln ( oast Borax 1 1>< mh ' "I 
ley Days), Hamilton [Yout leweler*s 
Showcase), Taystee Head {Cowboy 
G-Men), Ethyl [Tin /■ Playh 
\K\M Candies [Johnny Jupitei Kel 
< 11 ih 1 V>ill llnl.nl.. Superman), 
t I., .i ( ..I i | Kit ( hi ton . Phillips !'• 
troleum [Douglas Fairbanks Presents), 
< ,ui ida Hi- > Ten \ and the Pirat* 
I!. ill. inline Beet / oreign Intrigw 



v -;*■*-*■*<■«•«•<-«•*-*-*-*-#■«•••**■*•* •*-*«■*•*•*•*-*-*-! 



SPONSOR'S 



NEW 



ADDRESS 



49th & MADISON 

(40 East 49th St., New York 17, N. Y.) 
telephone remains MUrray Hill 8-2772 



.V^*****^***»'****»'^** k ^^* k *^**'*'*'***»******'*'*''*'***'*'*^^»**'^ 



13 JULY 1953 



203 



your customer's frame of mind. . . 



is. the biggest factor in making a sale. That's why these 
success-proven Advertising Showcases on film — all created 
expressly for television — are making sales easier for aggressive 
LOCAL and RKGIONAL advertisers all over America. 




Every MCA-TV Advertising Showcase is 

expertly designed to create the right frame 

of mind . . . week after week . . . that compels TV 

viewers to buy! For outstanding television 

shows on film THAT SELL — contact 

any MCA-TV office: 



another advertising SHOWCASE ON FILM from 




NEW YORK: 598 Madison Avenue - PLaza 9 7500 
CHICAGO: 430 North Michigan Ave. - DEIaware 7-1100 
BEVERLY HILLS: 9370 Santa Monica Blvd. - CRestview 6-2001 
SAN FRANCISCO: 105 Montgomery Street - EXbrook 2-8922 
CLEVELANO: Union Commerce Bldg. - CHerry 1-6010 
DALLAS: 2102 North Akard Street - PROspect 7536 
DETROIT: 1612 Book Tower - WOodward 2-2604 
BOSTON: 45 Newbury Street - COpley 7-5830 
MINNEAPOLIS: Northwestern Bank Bldg. - LINcoln 7863 






■■c. ■«'.•*« 




10-PAGE SECTION 



STATUS OF TV STATIONS IN 225 
METROPOLITAN COUNTY MARKETS 

A TOOL DESIGNED FOR DAILY USE BY BUYERS AND FOR ADVANCE PLANNING 



- 






".-'. 



■m^i-Vn*'''" 



'***£■' 






th" 



»v* — ht 






g « .nil End the status reporl <>u television which appears 
on the following pages an invaluable tool over the coming 
months. It was compiled l>\ the Media Research Depart- 
ment of Sullivan. Stauffer. Cohvell & Basics. Inc., and is 
published for the first time in the pages of SPONSOR. 

Data on the stations currently on the air were com- 
piled as of mid-June L953; this cut-off date was necessarj 

in order to provide time for preparation of the chart- for 
tin- issue. The chart can be kept up to date simpl) by 
moving the channel numbers of station- subsequent!) au- 
thorized to the appropriate column of the table. (Data on 
C.P.'s i-sued appears in each issue of SPONSOR in tin- New 
and I pcoming T\ Stations department; see page II. 

Description and explanation of the data appears >>n the 
next page, written l>\ Richard Dunne Director of Media 
Research of SSC&B. Data compiled l>\ re-ear li assistant 
Jack Canning. 

Timebu\ers particularly will find this compilation handy 
a- a desk-top reference, lien- are some specific examples 
of ways in which buyers can use it. 

\etwork lineup decisions: Suppose a new l\ station 
manager makes a pitch to a buyer to add hi- station to an 
existing network lineup. The timebuyer can consult the 
data on these pages to quickb determine the rank oi the 
market: the number of households; the status of other T\ 
stations in the market. Tins, along with other considera- 



tions, will help to establish whethei or not the- station is an 
important one to be added immediate!) t<> establish a fran- 
chise. Othei determining factors, of course, will include 
the- . lient's distribution and sales picture in the an 

Spot campaigns: When the timebuyer i- assigned the 
job c.f choosing market- for a -pot l\ campaign, he- • 
take- thi- li-t .1- a starting point. It will -how him when 
l\ stations are now in operation '>r are soon t<> be on the 
air. (Where a C.P. ha- been issued, it . .m be assumed in 
most cases that the station will be on the air within -i\ 
month- oi sooner. • 

I he timebuyer can then pick market- on the basis oi 
their size and or important e t" the • bent. 

One caution: The buyer can't estimate from thi- b-t 
what hi- lull potential audience will be- on .«. given l'\ sta- 
tion. The number of households a- listed here are for the 
"metropolitan counties." I urther outlying counties which 
are covered b) stations in the metropolitan counties add. 
of , oiir-e. to audienc e size. 

Vnothei u e l"i these data 1- in making long-range and 
short-range evaluations of the- growth of television. "> 
could calculate roughl) how soon major one-station mar- 
ket- will have new stations, for example. Method: Check 
the t .P.'s issued for present one-station mark* ing 

thai those with C.P.'s now should be on the air h\ 1 



13 JULY 1953 



205 



Past, present, and proposed status of television 

stations in 225 Metropolitan County Markets 

by Richard Dunne 
Director of Media Research, SSC&B 



a m bout 15 months ago, on 14 April 
L952, the FCC "lifted the freeze" and 
provided for 1.809 commercial chan- 
nels or 1.701 more than the 108 in 
operation as of that date. 

The purpose of this study is to show 
such developments as have occurred in 
the Metropolitan County Market9 since 
that date. 

The 22i markets as compiled by 
Sales Management have been used as a 
basis for this study. These include 
the Standard Metropolitan County 
Areas as defined by the Census Bureau, 
plus a number of additional markets 
which are regarded as potentially im- 
portant to advertisers. 

In general, these markets have a cen- 
tral city with a population over 35.000, 
serving an area of at least 60,000 per- 
sons, with an annual retail sales total 
of about $75 million. 

Sales Management has estimated 
that as of 1 January 1953 these mar- 
kets contained 28,509,000 households 
or 63% of the U. S. total. They cov- 
ered 338 counties or about ll c /c of all 
the counties in the United States. 

Metropolitan County Market data 
serves as a basis for budgeting and 
planning; that is, the amount available 
for any media will have some rela- 
tionship to the size and the sales im- 
portance of the counties comprising 
these markets. 

It is anticipated that this study will 
serve a number of useful purposes. In 
particular these markets can be re- 
garded as the primary population 
plateaus upon which one or more tele- 
vision broadcasting antennas are to be 
located eventually. In this respect this 
group should be adequate for the pur- 
poses of visualizing the imminence of 
the ideal network of 100-150 stations. 
Inasmuch as this study lists all new 
stations which are actually on the air 
as of 15 June plus all the stations for 
which construction permits (C.P.'s) 
have been issued as of the end of May, 
it will cover 95% of all the stations 
which will probably be on the air b\ 
the year end. 

As of 15 June there were 174 sta- 
tions in these 225 markets actually on 
the air. There have been 180 new 



stations authorized I including three 
shared channels I . 

Therefore, if all of these new sta- 
tions should go on the air by the year 
end, there would be over 350 stations 
to choose from in these markets. How- 
ever, this is only about half the num- 
ber of stations which may be author- 
ized eventually for these markets. In- 
cluded in this group are a large num- 
ber of highly desirable channels which 
have been held up because of com- 
petitive hearings before the FCC. 

This is of significance in indicating 
the acute competitive situation which 
is bound to develop between TV sta- 
tions in these markets. An intelligent 
screening or evaluating process will be 
necessary. 

There were six stations on the air in 
non-metropolitan counties as of mid- 
June 1952. Thus, as of 15 June there 
were exactly 180 stations on the air all 
told. 

Matamores. Mexico, has been in- 
cluded in this compilation because of 
its availability network-wise. 

In order to complete the record a 
supplementary table has been prepared 
by the SSC&B Media Research Dept. 
lis'.ing all the cities in non-metropoli- 
tan counties in which new stations 
have been authorized. ( A portion of 
that non-metropolitan counties list 
covering markets with TV as of 15 
June appears in this issue, page 216.) 

There were 83 such cities and the 
total number of households in the 
counties in which they are located is 
1.363,100 or 3.0% of U.S. total. 



\ature and significance of 
information shown in tables 
starting on page at right 

Rank shown is based on the number of 
households in these counties. 

Markets are identified by the principal 
city (or cities) in the counties listed fur 
each market. 

Cities refer only to those which are located 
in any of the counties listed. 

While the F.C.C. Priority numbers are des- 
ignated on the basis ol the corporate size of a 
community, applications for channels are 
not restricted to such limits. It generally 




SSC&B's Dick Dunne is veteran agencyman 



applies to an area within 15 miles of such 
communities. This means that a C.P. can 
be issued under the priority number of one 
of the cities listed in this study and still be 
outside the counties comprising its market. 
St. Louis is a case in point, where a C.P. has 
been issued for Clayton, Mo., under the St. 
Louis priority number, even though it is 14 
or 15 miles from that city. These would 
be the only exception to the listing of cities 
in this table outside the counties shown. 

F.C.C. Priority No. shows the order estab- 
lished for processing applications. Numbers 
preceded by the letter B apply to cities or 
communities which had local TV service or 
received service from a source not more than 
40 miles distant. There were 212 such 
cities, including all the older TV markets. 

Numbers preceded by the letter A apply to 
cities with no local TV service or which were 
more than 40 miles distant from a source of 
such service. 1,013 such places were desig- 
nated by the F.C.C. 

The numerical sequence is related to the 
nature of prior service and to the size of 
the city. 

Number of Stations Assigned applies only 
to the cities listed, and does not include all 
the stations which have been assigned to all 
the communities in these counties. 

Stations are designated by Channel Num- 
bers rather than by call letters, as the 
channel number is significant in indicating 
the general range of coverage. All the older 
TV stations are on Very High Frequency 
channels ranging from 2 to 13; the area of 
effectiveness of such channels is resiarded as 
about 60 miles. All the l'ltra High Fre- 
quency Channels ranging from 14 to 82 are 
regarded as having a range of effectiveness 
of about 40 miles. Area-wise the coverage 
of Wry High channels i- about twice that 
of the l'ltra f I i till channels. ■*■ + * 



Summary oi Saets eharted 


Total no. of counties 


338 


Total no. oi households 


28.908.000 


% of U.S. 


63<~ ( 


Total channels assigned 


654 


New stations since freeze 


68 


Total stations on air 


174 


Stations yet to go on air 


354 



NOTE: There »« sll additions] statirms on 8ir in 
non-motropolitan c untiefi .is ot dare ■nrluded in thi.« 
chart (MID-JUNE 1953'. 



206 



SPONSOR 



STATUS OF TV STATIONS IN 225 METROPOLITAN COUNTY MARKETS 

Shows stations <>>i tin air as o\ mid Jutu L953, and n< w ttat\ ;l Hay 19 

Prepared for bfonsor by Media Research D< pi . Sullivat Colwell d Baylt I 



u s 

HANK 



MARKETS 



NO OF HOUSE. 
HOLDS (OOO'i) 



CITIES with 

STATIONS 
AND OR CP'3> 



ECC PRIOR- 
ITY NO .1 



T"TAl NO 
STATIONS 

ASSH.NI t> 
TO CITY» 



chann' 

AIR (l 1 l 1 1 H I 

LIT TINl. HI 

IHI I / 1 



CH A N I 

»IM 

III TINl. 
Of FRI I /I 



I M A | • 

f nR WHII m 

CP'lM'VI 

prcN 



f M • «• • 

-MUM 

r p Hi 

HI 1 N ISSUE D 



1 NEW YORK ft NO. N. J. 4,0 < ;2.1 V« 
Ve» ) "'' flit) (5 rounfiej). Vauau, Rock- 
land, Su*olk, It ,-r. h.strr. V. >.. Bergen, Newark 
Essex, Hudson, Middlesex, Morris, Passaic, Veil Brunswick 
Somerset, I nion, Y. J. 

2 CHICAGO 1,720.4 CAiraga 
Coo*, DuPage, Kane, Lake Will, III.: Lake, 

Ind. 



3 LOS A"<--FL C S 

/ OS tngeleS, Oram;,-, (nl. 



4 PHiLAD r L°HIA 1,081.3 
Burks, Chester Delaware, Montgomery, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, 
V. /. 

5 DETROIT 904.1 
Macomb, Oakland, Wayne, Mich, 

6 BOSTON 835.7 
/ -M't, Middlesex, Sorjolk, Suffolk, l/«>*. 

7 SAN PRAN'IISCO-OAKLAND 802.6 
Alameda, Contra Costa. Solano, San Mateo, 
San Francisco, Marin. Cat. 

8 P^TT^BURCH 633.9 
Allegheny, Beaver, Washington, Westmoreland, 
Pa, 

9 ST. LOUIS 539.6 

St, i - '""•''■ s ty. Louis. Mo.; Madison, 

St. Clair,; III. 



1,633.0 Los Ingeles 
Philadelphia 



B2 169 



Bl 138 



B2 167 



B2 170 



B2 160 



Detroit 



Boston 
Cambridge 



B2 161 



BS 208 / 

B5 208 ■ 



San Irani isco B5 212 



Pittsburgh . B4 180 



S'. Louis 

Clinton 
Belleville, III. 



10 CLEVELAND 

Cuyahoga Lake, Ohio 



11 WASHINGTON 448.2 

lrlin<!ton. Fairfax, \a.: Montgomery, Prince 
George Mil. 



449.7 Clei eland 

Washington 



12 BALTIMORE 

Baltimore. Anne Arundel, Md. 



400.3 Baltimore 



13 MINNEA°OLIS-ST. PAUL 346.4 Minveanotis 

■tnol.a. Hennepin. Dakota. Ramsey, Minn. St. Paul 



14 BUFFALO 

Erie, Niagara, N. Y. 



328.6 Buffalo 



15 CINCINNATI 291.6 

Hamilton, Ohio: Campbell. Kenton. K\ . 

16 KANSAS C TY 282.9 

Clay, .1 art. son, .Mo.; Johnson. Wyandotte. Kan*. 



17 HOUSTON 
Harris. Tex, 

18 MILWAUKEE 

Milwaukee, Wise. 

19 SEATTLE 

Kins. Wash. 



270.1 
264.1 
256.7 

20 PORTLAND 249.8 
Clackamas, Multnomah. Washington, Ore.; 

Clark. Wash. 

21 SAN DIEGO 221.6 

San Die so. Cat. 

22 NEW ORLEANS 211.3 

Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard, La. 



( int mnati 
Kansas City 
Houston 
Milwaukee 

Seattle 
Portland 



San Diego 
/Veil Orleans . 



B4 179 / 
P4 179 J 
Bl 23 

B2 163 
B2 168 

B2 162 



B5 207 | 
B5 207 | 

B4 181 



B2 164 
B4 186 
B4 183 
B4 182 
B4 185 
A2 2 

84 190 

B4 184 



2.4,5,7,9,1 1 
13 

4,5,7,9 



2 4 S 7,9, 
11,13 



3,6,10 

2,4,7 

4,7 

4,5,7 



4,5,9 
4,5,7,9 

2,11,13 

4 
5 

4 

4,7,12 

4 

2 

3 



27 



47 



20,26 



22 



29 



50 



28,32 



16,47,53 



3« 42 

30 
54 



60 



31 

32,38,44 

34 

17,23 

50,62 
5,44' 
2,20,38.44 

11 

4,11 * 



19,65 

20 
18 



Ml ), 17 9,23 



17,59 


2,7 


54 


74 


25 


5,9,65 


23,39 


13,29 


25 


12,19,31 




4,7,20,26 




6,8,12,21 


10 


21,27,33,39 



20,26,32,61 2,4,51 



'Cities llste.l are ill iln the metropolitan counties shown for market which had one 

or more the. air or authorized to go on the air as of mi.l-June U*~3- 2For explana- 

tion of FCC priority system see test Total no channels allocated to this priority n 
•on* cas : will be assigned to commutu 'That is bt- 

ThroiiKli 8 15 53, "As t These are in position to go on air within six months 



Is 2 through 13 i 13 are UHF. Too ran ;;•:'. potential for 

growth of market by studying b* granted 

annel may be n- . ioe of the two or moTf s are* 
with same FCC priority no. See priority column at left tt S- ■ 

channel, gu C.P. wa- hit channel but - up by recipient. 



us. 

RANK 



MARKETS 



NO. OF HOUSE- 
HOLDS (OOO'S) 



CITIES WITH 

STATIONS 
AND OR CP'S' 



FCC PRIOR- 
ITY NO.- 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITY3 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE' 



CHANNELS 

ON AIR 

SINCE 

LIFTING 

OF FREEZE- 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P.'sHAVE 

BEEN 

ISSUED'! 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P. HAS NOT 

BEEN ISSUED' 



23 DALLAS 

Dallas, Tex. 



24 PROVIDENCE 

Bristol, Kent. Providence, R. I. 

25 ATLANTA 

Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, Ga. 

26 DENVER 



209.0 Dallas 
205.9 



199.9 



196.6 



Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Jefferson, Colo. 

182.7 



27 MIAMI 

Dade, Fla. 

28 INDIANAPOLIS 

Marion. I ml. 



29 LOUISV LLE 

Jefferson, Ky.; Floyd, Clark, Ind. 

30 ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-TROY 
Albany, Schenectady, Rensselaer, N. Y. 

31 NEW HAVEN-WATERBURY 
Vew Haven, Conn. 



32 BIRMINGHAM 

Jefferson. Ala. 

33 HARTFORD-NEW BRITAIN 

Hartford, Conn. 



34 WORCESTER 

Worcester, Mass. 



35 COLUMBUS 
Franklin, Ohio 

36 ROCHESTER 

Monroe, N. Y. 



37 BRIDGEPORT-STAMFORD NOR- 
WALK _ 

Fairfield, Conn. 

38 YOUNGSTOWN 

Mahoning, Trumbull, Ohio; Mercer, Pa. 



39 TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 

Hillsborough, Pinellas, Fla. 

40 MEMPHIS 
Shelby, Term. 

41 DAYTON 

Green. Montgomery, Ohio 



42 SAN ANTONIO 
Bexar, Tex. 



43 NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH 



182.3 
177.9 
164.6 
163.1 
162.9 
161.4 
160.1 
156.4 
153.6 

153.0 
152.2 
147.4 
144.3 
142.4 
137.2 
134.0 



Providence . 

Atlanta 

Denier 

Miami 

Indianapolis 
Liuisville 



Schenectady 
Albany 

New Haven . 
If aterbury . 



Birmingham 

Hartford 

New Britain 

Worcester .... 
Columbus 
Rochester . 



Norfolk, Princess Anne, Va. (See also 130) 



Bridgeport . 
Stamford 

Youngstown 

Warren 



St. Petersburg 

Memphis 

Dayton 

San Antonio _ 
Norfolk 



43 SPRINGFIELD-HOLYOKE 

Hampden. Hampshire. Mass. 



134.0 



45 ALLENTOWN-BETHLEHEM-EAS- 

TON 127.7 

Lehigh, Northampton, Pa.; Warren, N. /. 



46 AKRON 

Summit, Ohio 



Springfield 
Holyoke 

Allentown . 
Bethlehem . 
Fusion 



B2 155 5 

B5 206 3 

B2 166 4 

A2 1 6 

B4 193 5 

B4 187 5 

B2 156 5 



B2 141 / 4 
B2 141 , 

B2 143 2 

B1 7 1 

B2 157 4 



B3 172 2 

B1 9 1 

Bl 110 2 

B2 165 4 

B4 191 4 

Bl 1 2 

Bl 137 1 

A2 5 3 

A2 80 1 

A2 3 3 

B4 188 5 

B2 158 3 

B5 209 5 



B4 189 5 

(includes 
# 130) 

A2 4 / 2 

A2 4 J 



Bl 6 
Bl 80 
A2 129 



47 FORT WORTH 

Tarrant. Tex. 

48 TOLEDO 

Lucas, Ohio 



49 FALL RIVER-NEW BEDFORD 
Bristol, Mass. 

50 OMAHA 
Douglas, Sarpy, Veb.; Pottawattamie, la 



51 OKLAHOMA CITY 
Oklahoma, Okla. 



4,8 
10 
2,5,8 

4 

6 

5,11 

4 

6 

6,13 



3,6,10 
6 



4 

2,13 
4,5 
4 



127.0 


Akron 


Rl 


109 


2 




122.8 


Fort Worth 


B5 


205 


3 


5 


122.7 


Toledo 


B4 


192 


2 


13 


116.4 


Fall River 
\ etc Bedford 


Bl 
Bl 


3 
5 


2 

2 




114.3 


Omaha 


B5 


210 


5 


3,6 


111.8 


Oklahoma City 


B4 


194 


4 


4 



23,29 
16 

2,9 20,26 



26,67 
21,41 

41 

53 

42,48 

30 



46 
28 



19,25 



73 

12 

36 

4,7 

7,10,27,33 

8,13 

51 

23,35* 



59 




3,18 


14,20 



11 

68 
34 

7,22,28 
9 



— - 


— 


40 




(10), 27 15 


43 


49 
27 






27,73 


21 
67 






38 


— 


8,13 


— - 


13 


3,42,48 


.... 


22 





— 


35 


12,41 
10,27* 


61 
65 


.... 






51 


57 


39,67 







49 


61 




20 


10 



U 8 

ANK 



MARKETS 



no or HOUSF 
HOLDS (OOO'D 



( I I II S WITH 

MA IIIINS 
ANO OH CPSl 



FCC PRIOR. 

I TV NO 



TOTAl NO 
MA I KINS 

ASMI.NI II 
I .1 I III 



(MANS 
AIR HI FORI 

III! ■ 

run 



r .< * •. 

■, AIH 

I H 

I I /I 



I .1* •. 

■ » . I 
Ith 



52 PHOENIX 
Maricopa, irix. 

53 WILKES-BARRE-HAZELTON 
Luxerne, Pa. 

54 SYRACUSE 
Onondaga, V, i . 

55 SAN BERNARDINO 
San Bernardino, ( <>l . 

56 SAN JOSE 

Stuttu ( hint. I id . 

56 WHEELING-STEUBENVILLE 

Brooke, Hancock, Marshall, Ohio, 
Belmont, Jefferson, Ohio 

58 SACRAMENTO 

5 ramento, ( ol. 

59 RICHMOND 
Chesterfield, Henrico, I a. 

60 knoxv;lle 

tnderson, Blount, Knox, Tmn. 

61 JACKSONVILLE 

Duiitl. hln. 

62 NASHVILLE 
Davidson, Trnn. 

63 FRESNO 
Fresno, Col 

64 GRAND RAPIDS 
Kent, Mich. 

65 TACOMA 
Pierce, IT ash. 

66 WICHITA 
Sedgu ich, Kans. 

67 HARRISBURG 
Cumberland, Dauphin. Pa. 

68 CHARLESTON 

Fayette, Kanau ha, W . I a. 

69 CANTON 

- trk, Ohio 

70 UTICA-ROME 
Herkimer, Oneida, V Y. 

71 TULSA 
Tulsa, Okla. 

72 SALT LAKE CITY 
Salt Lake, I'tah 

73 FLINT 
Genessee, Mich. 

74 POUGHKEEPSIE-NEWBURGH- 
BEACON 

Dutchess, Orange, V. Y. 

75 WILMINGTON 

Veie Castle, Del; Salem, V. /. 

76 PEORIA 

Peoria, Tazewell. III. 

77 DULUTH-SUPERIOR 

St. Louis. Minn.: Douglas. W 

78 JOHNSTOWN 

( ambria, Somerset, Pa. 

79 BAKERSFIELD 

kern. Cal. 

80 BROWNSVILLE-HARLiNGEN- 
McALLEN 

Carmen, Hidalgo. Tex. 



110 6 Phoenix 


B4 


200 


3 


Mesa 


B3 


178 


1 


106.1 Wilkes-Bant 


A2 


46 


2 


II '!.■ Illill 


A2 


129 


1 



104.1 Syracuse 



101.4 v ■ /;, rnadino A2 64 



99.8 Son Jose B3 174 



99.8 Wheeling A2 31 

V . Va. : 



97.2 Sacramento A2 11 

97.0 Richmond B4 195 

95.2 Knoxville A2 21 

94.7 /.;. /. torn illr 

94.0 SashviUe 
92.7 Fn 

91.9 Grand Rapids 

88.6 Tnroma 

88.5 Wichita 

88.1 Harrisburg 
86.1 Charleston 



86.0 Canl 

^fastillon 



85.3 / '//--a B2 144 



B4 


196 


B4 


198 


A2 


35 


B2 


142 


B3 


173 


A2 


6 


Bl 


8 


A2 


48 


Bl 


2 


Bl 


27 



85.1 


Tulsa 


B4 


197 


84.2 


Salt Lake City 


B5 


21 1 


83 7 


Flint 


A2 

A2 


7 


83.1 


Poughkeepi 


105 


81.4 


Wilmington 


B2 


146 


79 9 


Peoria 


A2 
A2 


24 


78.9 


Duluth 


10 


77.1 


Johnstown 


B2 


151 


75.8 


Bakersfield 


A2 


132 


75.6 


Harlingen 

Mr Allen 


A2 
A2 
A2 


36 
36 
36 



5.8 



13 



4,5 



12 



12 
28 



24 



11 



55 



43 



38 



10 



34 
63 



18 



7,51 



26 



47 



« MICH 
C f H* 



3 







30 

11,48.60 

9 

3.10,40,46 

12,29 

6.10 

12.30.36 

8.30,36 

12.53 





23 


13 


62 


16 


3.10 


71 


27 


49 


8 


23 


29 






19 


23 


2.17 


2 


20,26 


16.28 


12 


21 








83 


19 


3 




3,6,32 


56 





29 


10 


4 
20 


5.36- 



U.S. 
RANK 



NO. OF HOUSE- 
HOLDS (000's) 



CITIES WITH 

STATIONS 
AND OR CP'Si 



FCC PRIOR- 
ITY NO.* 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITY3 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE* 



CHANNELS 

ON AIR 

SINCE 

LIFTING 

OF FREEZES 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P.'sHAVE 

BEEN 

ISSUED' 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P HAS NOT 

BEEN ISSUED" 



81 READING 

Berks, Pa. 


75.5 


82 SPOKANE 

Spokane, Wash. 


74.8 


83 DES MOINES _ 

Polk, la. 


74.3 


84 DAVENPORT-ROCK ISLAND 

Mai inc. Scott, la.; Rock Island, III. 


73.7 


85 CHATTANOOGA 

Hamilton, Tenn.; Walker, Ga. 


71.7 


86 SCRANTON 

Lackawanna^ Pa, 


71.5 


87 HUNTINGTON-ASHLAND 69.8 

Cabell, Wayne, W. Va.; Boyd, Ky.; Lawrence, 
Ohio 


88 MOBILE . .. 

Mobile, Ala. 


69.0 


89 LANCASTER 

Lancaster, Pa. 


67.7 


90 STOCKTON 

San Joaquin, Cal. 


66.6 


91 TRENTON 

Mercer, N. J. 


65.5 


91 ERIE 


65.5 


Erie, Pa. 




93 SOUTH BEND 

St. Joseph, Ind. 


64.9 


94 RIVERSIDE 

Riverside, Cal. 


62.8 


95 YORK 

York, Pa. 


61.7 


96 BEAUMONT-PT. ARTHUR 

Jefferson. Tex. 


61.5 


97 LITTLE ROCK-NO. LITTLE ROCK.. 

Pulaski, Ark. 


60.2 


98 BROCKTON 

Plymouth, Mass. 


59.6 


99 FT. WAYNE 

Allen, Ind. 


59.4 


100 AUGUSTA . 

Richmond, Ga.; Aiken, S. C. 


58.5 


101 BINGHAMTON 

Broome, A. Y. 


56.6 


102 CHARLOTTE 

Mecklenburg, N. C. 


55.9 


103 LANSING 

lnsham, Mich. 


54.3 


104 EL PASO 


53.8 


FA Paso, Tex. 




105 EVANSVILLE 


52.9 


Vanderburgh, Ind. 




106 SHREVEPORT 

Caddo, La. 


52.8 


107 GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT 


52.4 


Guilford, N. C. 




108 BATON ROUGE 

E. Baton Rouge, La. 


50.5 


109 CORPUS CHRISTI 


50.3 


Nueces, Tex. 




110 ROCKFORD _. 


50.1 



Reading Bl 4 2 

Spokane A2 8 3 

Des Moines __ B3 171 4 

Davenport B2 159) 4 
Rock Island _ B2 159 \ 

Chattanooga A2 14 4 

Scranton A2 20 3 

Huntington B4 202 2 

Ashland _ ^ Bl 25 1 

Mobile A2 1 6 3 

Lancaster B2 150 2 

Stockton A2 53 2 

Trenton Bl 111 1 

Erie B2 145 3 

South Bend __ A2 23 2 

Riverside A2 87 2 

York Bl 11 2 

Beaumont .. A2 9 3 

Little Rock ... A2 27 4 

Brockton Bl 113 1 

Ft. Wayne _ A2 1 2 2 

Augusta A2 51 2 

Binghamton B2 148 2 

Charlotte B4 199 3 

Lansing B2 147 2 

E. Lansing Bl 41 1 

El Paso A2 15 5 

Evansville A2 17) 3 

Henderson, Ky.. A2 17 J 

Shreveport A2 18 2 

Greensboro B2 149 2 

High Point Bl 18 1 

Baton Rouge .... . A2 19 4 

Corpus Christi . A2 25 3 

Rockiord A2 32 2 



12 



12 

3 

6 



33,61 
4,6 



22 



10,48 



34 



43 



17 



4,9 



28 



39 



17 


8,13,23 


36 


42* 


43,49 


3,12 


16,73 





59 


13 




.... 


5 


21 





36 


13 


— 


37 


— 


35.66 


.... 


46 


— 


40,46 


49 





31 


4,6 


23 


4,11 


— - 


62 


33 


69 


— 


6,12 


— 


40 


36 


9 


54 
60 






13 


20,26 


50 


7,62* 




3,12 


57 



15 


40 


2,34 


.... 


6,10,22 


13 






// uinebago, III. 



u s 

HANK 



M A It K I IN 



NO or HOUSE 
HOL08 (OOO't) 



( I I II s WITH 

STATIONS 
AND 1)11 I r s 



rcc PRIOR 
ITY NCI 



TOTAL NO 
STAT IONS 

ASSII.NI II 

Til 1 I T T ■ 



f. MANN I 1 s ON 
All! I: 
LIT TIN', ol 
I H I I / I 



< H A N N 1 IS 


1 H A N N 1 l S 


ON AIR 




SIN' 1 


MAVI 


111 T INI. 




iii i iii i n 


Iks 



r. r H * 



I 






111 MADISON 
Dims, Wise, 

112 TUCSON 
I'unu, Ariz. 

113 PORTLAND 
Cumberland, Me 

114 MANCHESTER 
Hillsborough, \ // 

115 GREENVILLE 
Greenville, s ( 

116 COLUMBUS 

Chattahoochee, Muscogee, Russell, Ga. 

117 AUSTIN 
Trniis, Tex. 

117 SAGINAW 

Saginaw, Mich. 

117 ALBUQUERQUE 
Bernalillo V M. 

120 SAVANNAH 

( hiitluim. Co- 
lli CHARLESTON 

Charleston, S. C. 

122 LORAIN 
Lorain, Ohio 

123 JAMESTOWN 
Chautauqua, N. Y. 

124 HAMILTON-MIDDLETON 

Hut! <t, Ohio 

124 YAKIMA 

) akima. Wash. 

126 ATLANTIC CITY 
Allan tir City, iV. /. 

127 SPRINGFIELD 

gamon, III. 

128 EUGENE 

l.nnr. Ore. 

129 NEW LONDON-NORWICH 

New London, Conn. 

130 HAMPTON-NEWPORT NEWS- 
WARWICK 

i Independent Cities {See also Vo. l>> 

131 JACKSON 
Hinds, Miss. 

132 MACON 
Bibb, Go. 

133 WINSTON-SALEM 
Forsythe, V. C. 

133 ORLANDO 

Orange, Fla. 

135 WEST PALM BEACH 
Palm Beach, Fla. 

136 COLUMBIA 
Richland. S. C. 

137 ALTOONA 
Rlair. Pa. 

138 KALAMAZOO 

Kalamazoo. Mich. 

139 BOISE 

Ada. ('anion. Ida. 



49.5 Madison 



49.1 1 



49.0 I'orlland 



A2 30 



A2 91 



A2 45 



47.5 Manchester A2 40 



47.3 Greenville A2 68 



46.5 Columbus 



46.2 tiislin 



A2 42 



A2 13 



46.2 Saginaw A2 33 2 

46.2 Ubuquerque B4 201 3 

46.1 Savannah A2 22 2 
45.9 ( harleston A2 55 2 

45.0 Lorain Bl 114 1 

44.2 Jamestown A2 97 1 
43.8 Hamilton Bl 133 1 

43.8 Yakima A2 1 1 3 2 

43.2 Atlantii Citj A2 66 2 

43.1 Springfield A2 41 2 
42.8 Eugene A2 124 3 
42.7 New London A2 159 2 



Hampton .. B4 189 ' (Included 

42.1 Vewport Sews B4 189 \ in 43 

Norfolk) 



41.4 lack son 



A2 29 



41.2 Macon A2 54 1 

Warner Robbins A2 623 A 1 

40.9 Winston-Salem B3 175 2 



40.9 Orlando 



A2 76 



40.7 IT . Palm Beach A2 98 



40.4 Columbia 



40.3 Altoona 



40.2 Kalamazoo 



40.1 Boise 

Meridian 

\ r-.pa 



A2 37 
B3 176 
B2 152 



A2 135 
A2 506 
A2 336 



13 



57 



46 



25 



27,33 



4,9 



53 



6,13 



9,48 



23 


4 


28 


4 


H8.24 







51 


13 


7 




3,11 


5 


2 




31 


58 







65 


23,29 





52 





20 


2 


13,20 


26 


26 


81 


15 
33 






3,12,47 





47 
13 








26 


12 
6,9,18 




21 


5,12 


25 


10,67 





10 




19,25 




36 





— 


7,9 

2 
6 




12 



U.S. 
RANK 



NO. OF HOUSE- 
HOLDS (OOO's) 



CITIES WITH 

STATIONS 
AND OR CP'St 



FCC PRIOR- 
ITY NO.- 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITYa 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE' 



CHANNELS 

ON AIR 

SINCE 

LIFTING 

OF FREEZE'' 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P.'s HAVE 

BEEN 

ISSUED- 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P. HAS NOT 

BEEN ISSUED 



140 WACO 

I/. Lennan Tex, 



40.0 // a. o 



A2 38 



34 



11 



141 PITTSFIELD 
Berkshire, Mass. 

142 MONTGOMERY 

Montgomery, lla. 

143 SPARTANBURG 
Spartanburg, S. C, 

144 LINCOLN 

I. mi' aster, \ eh. 

145 MUSKEGON 

Muskegon, Mich. 

146 ANN ARBOR 

// ashtenaw, Mich. 

147 EVERETT 
Snohomish, If ash. 

148 ROANOKE 

Roanoke. I a. 

148 BATTLE CREEK 

Calhoun, Mich. 



ISO JOPLIN 

Jasper, \ewton, Mo. 



151 GALVESTON 
Galveston, Tex. 

151 SPRINGFIELD 

Greene, Mo. 

153 TOPEKA 
Shawnee, Kans. 

154 TERRE HAUTE 

J igo. hid. 



155 RALEIGH 
Wake, N. C. 



156 SPRINGFIELD 
Clark, Ohio 

157 ANDERSON 

Vadium, hid. 

157 SANTA BARBARA 
Santa Barbara. Cal. 



159 CEDAR RAPIDS 
Linn, la. 



160 LUBBOCK 

I. ii I, bock. Tex. 

161 SIOUX CITY 
II oodbury, la. 

161 PENSACOLA 
Escambia, Fla. 

163 ASHEVILLE 

Hun, owl,,. V. C. 

164 RACINE 

Ha, me. II isc. 

165 DECATUR 
Macon, III. 

165 FT. LAUDERDALE 
Broward, Fla. 

167 JACKSON 

Jackson, Mich. 

168 WATERLOO 

Black I lank, la. 



39.9 


I'll Is held 
Mo. Adams 


A2 
A2 


71 
240 


39.5 


Montgomery 


A2 


26 


39.4 


Spartanburg 


A2 


120 


39.2 


Lincoln 


A2 


28 


38.5 


Muskegon 


A2 


83 


38.4 


Ann Arbor 


B1 


115 



38.0 Everett 



Bl 21 



37.8 


Roanoke 


A2 
B2 


34 
15 


3 


37.8 


Battle Creek 


2 


36.6 


Joplin 


A2 


110 


2 


36.3 


Galveston . . 


A2 


58 


3 


36.3 


Springfield 


A2 


57 


3 


35.8 


Topeka 


A2 


43 


2 


35.1 


Terre Haute 


A2 


62 


2 


34.8 


Raleigh 


A2 


60 


2 


34.7 


Springfield 


Bl 


79 


2 


34.2 


Anderson 


Bl 


16 


1 


34.2 


Santa Barbara 


A2 


94 


3 


34.1 


Cedar Rapids 


A2 


49 


3 


34.0 


Lubbock 


A2 


50 


4 


33.9 


Sioux City 


A2 


39 


3 


33.9 


Pensacola 


A2 


96 


3 


33.8 


Asheville 


A2 


72 


2 


33.6 


Racine 


Bl 


10 


2 


33.0 


Decatur 


A2 


59 


2 


33.0 


Ft. Lauderdale 


Bl 


20 


2 


32.9 


Jackson 


Bl 


13 


1 


31.7 


If aterloo 


A2 


61 


2 



20 


74 


64 


12,32 






7,17 


10,12 




24 




J5 


29 


20 











22,28 


10,27 




7 


64 


56 







.... 


12,30 


11 


41 


35 


10 


3 


32 






13,42 






10,63 




28 


5 


— - 




46,52 


— 




61 




3 


20,26 




2 


9,20 


11,13 


5 


26 


9 


36 


4 




15 


3,46 




62 


13 


.... 




49,55 




17 


23 


23 


17 







48 









7,16 



KOPO 



COOUO&t 



You go nowhere but up when you go KOPO-TV! In the 
midst of the rich, ever-growing southern Arizona market, 
Tucson's first television station has developed o 10,000 set 
audience since February 1st, '53. 

Get product leadership NOW! Get your brand before the 
buyers in this cxponding market where new buying habits arc 
easily developed. 

YOUR MARKET 





Includes Puna County. Its heart — Tucson — with .1 qu 

of 1G3 — the city that outstripped all others in I 
comparative growth and development (Rand-McNall 
Trend, June, 19 

CoolidRe in rich Pinal Counl South 

■-. in Santa Cruz County, on thi 

100 Strong! ** 10 Horn. 



YOUR AUDIENCE 




KOPO-land co\ ipulation larger th 

cutt; Michigan; or Rockford, Illin 




SPENDABLE 


INCOME * 




Pima County 




5221,776,000 


Santa Cruz County 




11,034,000 


Coolidgc, Pinol County 




8,325,000 


Total Spendable Income in KOPO-land 


S241.135.000 


S POTENTIAL 






Pima Count v Retail Sales (1952) 




S175.539.000 


Santa Cruz Retail Sales 




14.904,000 


Coolidgo. Pinal County, Retail Sales 






KOPO-land Total Retail Sales 




$199,525,000 


Incomes Per Household * 






Pima County- 




S5.I33 


Santa Cruz Coun - 




4.344 


Coolidgc. Pinal County 




7.433 


• SKDS — Consumer Income D 






••SRDS — Consumer M 








OLD PUEBLO BROADCASTING CO. 

KOPO^lV Channel 13 

A GENE AUTRY ENTERPRISE 
TUCSON, ARIZONA 

Authorized Power 
316 K. W. VISUM, 
156 K. W. AURAL 

National Representatives Forjoe-TV Inc. 
29 West 57 St New York 19, N. Y. 




13 JULY 1953 



213 



us 

RANK 



NO OF HOUSE- 
HOLDS (000'S) 



CI TIES WITH 

STATIONS 
AND OR CP'Si 



FCC PRIOR- 
ITY NO.- 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITY- 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE' 



CHANNELS 

ON AIR 

SINCE 

LIFTING 

OF FREEZE' 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P.sHAVE 

BEEN 

ISSUED- 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P. HAS NOl 

BEEN ISSUED 



169 SALEM 

Munon. Ore. 

170 WiLLIAMSPORT 

I '.i i oming, Pa. 

171 NEW CASTLE 
Lawrem e, Pa. 

172 ST. JOSEPH 

lUn Iiiuiuii. Mo. 



173 CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 
Champaign, III. 

174 AMARILLO 

Potter, Randall, Tex. 



175 TEXARKANA 

Bonn. 7 ex.. Miller. Ark. 

175 MUNCIE 

Delaware, Ind. 



177 LEXINGTON 
Fay ette, 8 | . 

178 PORT HURON 
St. ( Inn. Mich. 

179 LAKE CHARLES 
Calcasieu, La. 

180 WICHITA FALLS 
If ichita, Tex. 

181 BANGOR 

Penobscot Me. 



181 MANSFIELD 

Richland, Ohio 

183 PUEBLO 
Pueblo, Colo. 

184 GREEN BAY 

Broun. U isc. 

184 ELMIRA 

Chemung. V. Y. 

186 ELKHART 
Elkhart, Ind. 

186 OSHKOSH 

Winnebago, Wise. 

188 LIMA 

Allen, Ohio 

188 BiLOXI-GULFPORT 

Harrison. Miss. 



188 DANVILLE 

I ermillion, III. 



191 DURHAM 

Durham. \. C. 

192 COLORADO SPRINGS 

El Paso. Co/o. 



193 GADSDEN 
Etowah, Ala. 

194 CUMBERLAND 

Allegany. Md. 

195 BAY CITY 

Bay (.it\. Mich. 

196 ALEXANDRIA 

Rapides. La. 

196 WATERTOWN 

Jefferson, N. ) . 

198 OGDEN 

Weber, Utah 

199 DANVILLE 
Pittsylvania, ' a. 

200 PORTSMOUTH 
Scioto, Ohio 



31.6 


Salem 


A2 
A2 


99 
92 


? 


30.8 


If illiamsporl 


1 


30.4 


New Castle 


B1 


14 


1 


30.2 


Si. Joseph 


A2 


44 


2 


30.0 


Champaign- 

( rlana 


A2 
A2 


65 / 
65 


4 


29.8 


tmarillo 


A2 


47 


3 


29.6 


Texarkana 


A2 


208 


2 


29.6 


Mun< ie 


A2 
A2 


67 
70 


? 


29.1 


Lexington __ 


2 


28.7 


Port Huron 


A2 


125 


1 


28.6 


Lakes Charles 


A2 


103 


2 


28.3 


Wichita Falls 


A2 


56 


3 


28.2 


Bangor 


A2 


153 


2 


28.2 


Mansfield 


A2 


95 


1 


28.0 


Pueblo 


A2 


63 


4 


27.8 


Green Bay 


A2 


73 


2 


27.8 


Elm ira 


A2 
A2 


81 
126 


? 


27.7 


Elkhart . 


1 


27.7 


Oshkosh 


A2 


104 


1 


27.5 


Lima ._ 


A2 


79 


2 


27.5 


Biloxi .. 

Gulf port 


A2 
A2 


117 
226 


2 
1 


27.5 


Dun i ille 


A2 


115 


1 


27.4 


Durham 


A2 


52 


2 


27.0 


Colorado Springs 


A2 


90 


3 


26.9 


Gadsden 


A2 


69 


2 


26.7 


Cumberland 


A2 


116 


1 


26.5 


Bin City 


A2 


75 


2 


26.3 


Alexandria .. 


A2 


131 


2 


26.3 


Watertown 


A2 


136 


1 


26.1 


Ogden .-- 


B5 


203 


2 


25.2 


Ihim Ule 


A2 
Bl 


130 

19 


1 


25.0 


Portsmouth 


1 



45 



4,10 



49 



3,6 

5 

3 
2 
24 



73 



11 



24 
36 



25 
22 



18 

48 
35 

56 
24 

46 

13 

(21 su ) 



62 
48 

24 



3 





30 

21,27,33' 

7 

24 

55 

27,64 

34 

7 



2 

36 

28,34 

6 



52 





13,50 




11 

23 

15 

17 

5,83 

5 



9,24 



30 



TARGET: HARRISBURG, PA 




The Harrisburg Market is not covered by any outside 
television station. To sell Harrisburg buy WTPA. 

WTPA provides the best in live, film and NBC programs to the rich Central 
Pennsylvania Market centered on Harrisburg. 16 hours of top-flight programming 
a day, backed by an intensive promotion campaign insures a receptive audience 
for your sales message. 




Represented by HEADLEY-REED 

New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, Son Francisco, Hollywood, New Orleans, ond Philadelphia 



U.S. 
RANK 



NO. OF HOUSE- 
HOLDS (OOO's) 



201 
202 
203 
203 
205 
206 
207 
208 
208 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 



SHEBOYGAN 
Sheboygan, IT isc. 

BLOOMINGTON 
McLean, III. 

LEWISTON-AUBURN 
Androscoggin, Me. 

HAGERSTOWN 
Washington, Md. 



KENOSHA 
Kenosha, IT isc 



APPLETON 
Outagamie, IT isc. 

FAYETTEVILLE 

Cumberland, N. C. 

MONROE-W. MONROE 

(hui' lata. La. 

ZANESVILLE 
1/ ush ingum, Ohio 

SIOUX FALLS 

Minnehaha, S. D. . 

LAFAYETTE 

Tippecanoe, lnd. 

TYLER 

Smith, Tex. 

BELLINGHAM 
// hatcom, IT ash. 

RICHMOND 

IT ayne, lnd. 



AUBURN 

Cayuga, ,V. Y. 

LYNCHBURG 
Campbell, Va. 

ABILENE 

Taylor, Tex. 

LaCROSSE 
LaCrosse, IT isc. 

FORT SMITH 

Sebastian, Ark. 

DUBUQUE 

Dubuque, la. 

RENO 

IT ashoe, \ ev. 

SAN ANGELO 

Tom Green, Tex. 



WILMINGTON 
Veui Hanover, N. C. 

FARGO 
Cass, Y. ( . 



LAREDO 

Webb, Te 



CITIES WITH 

STATIONS 
AND OR CPSi 



FCC PRIOR- 
ITY NO.- 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITY' 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE' 



24.7 


Sheboygan 


A2 


100 


1 


23.9 


Bloomington 


A2 


137 


1 


23.8 


Lewiston 


A2 


106 


2 




Auburn 


A2 


217 


1 


23.8 


Hagerstou n 


A2 


121 


1 


23.6 


Kenosha 


Bl 


12 


1 


23.5 


Neenah 


A2 


139 


1 


23.0 


I'm etteville . . 


A2 


134 


1 


22.8 


Monroe 


A2 


112 


2 


22.8 


Zanesville 


A2 


107 


1 


22.4 


Sioux Falls 


A2 


74 


3 


22.3 


Lafayette 


A2 


128 


1 


22.2 


Tyler 


A2 


109 


2 


21.9 


Bellingham 


A2 


138 


3 


21.6 


Richmond _. 


Bl 


81 


1 


21.1 


Auburn 


Bl 


82 


1 


20.7 


Lynchburg 


A2 


85 


2 


20.2 


Abilene 


A2 


89 


2 


20.1 


LaCrosse 


A2 


86 


2 


19.7 


Fort Smith 


A2 


84 


2 


19.5 


Dubuque 


A2 


82 


2 


19.1 


Reno .. 


A2 


148 


2 


19.0 


San Angelo 


A2 


77 


3 


18.9 


Wilmington 


A2 


93 


2 


16.1 


Fargo 


A2 


114 


3 


13.3 


Laredo 


A2 


78 


2 



CHANNELS 

ON AIR 

SINCE 

LIFTING 

OF FREEZES 



50 

11 



13 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P.'sHAVE 

BEEN 

ISSUED^ 



15 



42 



8,43 



59 
19 
12 



16 
9 

22 



8, (3 =") 



CHANNELS 

FOR WHICH 

C.P. HAS NOT 

BEEN ISSUED' 



59 



8,17 
23 

52 

61 



18 





13,38 



7 

18,24 

32 

37 



33 

8,38 

5 

56,62 

22 

17 

6,29 

13,40 

8,13 



Supplement — Citias among non-metropolitan county markets with TV stations on air 



CITY— COUNTY 



NO. OF 
HOUSEHOLDS 

(OOO's) 



FCC. 

PRIORITY 

NO. 



TOTAL NO. 

STATIONS 

ASSIGNED 

TO CITY 



CHANNELS ON 

AIR BEFORE 

LIFTING OF 

FREEZE 



CHANNELS 
ON AIR 
SINCE 

LIFTING OF 
FREEZE 



DISTANCE TO NEAR- 
EST METROPOLITAN 
MARKET (miles) 



METRO 

MARKET 

RANK 



California San Luis Obispo — San Luis Obispo Co. 

Indiana Bloomington — Monroe Co. 

Iowa Ames — Story Co. 

N. Dakota Minot — Ward Co. 

Oklahoma Lawton — Comanche Co. 

Mexico Matamores 



19.0 


A2 377 


1 


14.0 


B2 153 


2 


6.1 


B2 154 


2 


9.9 


A2 232 


2 


16.9 


A2 133 


2 



TOTAL NON-METRO 
TOTAL METRO 
GRAND TOTAL 



10 

4 



_7 

3 

106 

109 



13 

7 

~3 

68 
71 



82 — Santa Barbara 157 

48 — Indianapolis 28 

29— Dps Moines 83 

240— Fargo 224 

51— Wichita Falls 180 

2— Brownsville 80 



180 





NEXT 
STOP... 

tkje nuo*yn\ 

Like a trip to the moon . . . tint's the zooming, boom- 
ing DALLAS-Forf Worth market! Texas' richest market 
is getting richer for TV time buyers. Last year the folks 

covered by the WFAA-TV pattern had their annual buy- 
ing income boosted by 13 per cent (which totals higher 

than the national average). Retail sales in this market 
flamed up 12 per cent! See any IVtrv man about a ticket 

on the WFAA-TV Special! 

WFAA-TV 9-COUNTY MARKET 

Population 1,339,300 

Families 402,400 

Net Effective Buying Income .... $2,261,758,000 
Retail Sale? 1,753,293,000 

PER FAMILY AVERAGES 

WFAA-TV U. S GAIN 

Net Effective Buying Income . $5,620 $5,086 10.5°e 

Retail Sales 4,357 3,584 21.5°o 

General Merchandise . . . 857 409 I 109.5°o 

Furniture, Household, TV . . 217 197 10.1°o 

Automotive Sales .... 808 614 - 31.4°o 

Drug Sales 139 103 - 34.9°o 

(Salts Management: May 10, 1953 

Television Homes: 277,000 — 56.5' gain over 12 mos. 
'Dallas Morning News Research Dept |unc 1. 1953 > 



WFAA-TV 

CHANNEL 8 • NBC-ABC-DUMONT 

EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, National Represenlativtt 



RALPH NIMMONS, Station Manager • TELEVISION SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NIWS 



13 JULY 1953 



217 




WGAL-TV 

NBC • CBS • ABC • DuMont 
Lancaster, Pa. 



In its fifth year... 

serving people 
selling products 

An enviable record of public service, an enthusiastic, buying 

audience — that's the WGAL-TV story as another anniversary 
rolls around. In the years to come WGAL-TV will continue to give its 

advertisers profit for their sales message . . . continue to serve its 
ever-growing loyal viewing audience with the best in stimulating 

local-interest and public service programs, top shows from four 
networks. The Channel 8 large, rich Pennsylvania market area — 

including Harrisburg. York, Reading, Lebanon, Lancaster — offers 
advertisers a great profit potential. Increase your sales, profitably, 
economically — buy WGAL-TV, Channel 8. 






Represented by MEEKER 

New York Chicago Los Angeles San Francisco 



WGAL 

AM TV FVI 

Steinmon Station 
Cloir McCollough, President 



218 



SPONSOR 



evision 




EVERY OTHER U.S. HOME IS NOW A TELEVISION HOME 

Here are some of the important questions you will find answered in the 10 pages of this report 

U, What'M the sice our! scope of TV io the U.S.? w«f/<* ' 

U. If oh* ore TV ftooi<>.s distrihuteil geographically? P«f/<* - 

U. \\ tun ore socio-economic diffe r e n ce* between radio oiid TV homes? ;>"</<' 3 

|| a II oir does TV audience composition vary with the lime of day? po</e .» 

y. Is TV affected by seasonal variations in eietoina? ■n o c •> 

U. II oh* does TV's "remembrance impact" compare irifh other medio? /»«?/«' • 

|| a W hoi's *he cost-per-1 .000 of spot ond iielicorh- TV? |»«f/«' 7 

l|. Hoic much money hos recently e/one into neticorlc, spo* TV? P««*' '0 

13 JULY 1953 219 



fusions of T\V*s a\ 
1. What is the size and scope of TV, market-by-market? 



SOURCE: Edward Petry Co. TV Research Dept. and NBC TV Research Dept., I April 1953 



MARKET 



TIME ZONE 



NO STATIONS 



NO. FAMILIES 



NO OF SETS 



° PENETRATION 



17 1. 000. 



ILBUQl ERQUE >f I . ... 19.800 

(1/ IRILLO C 

IMES C I . . . . 211.700. 

ill I \ TA E 3 431,600. 

ATLANTH ' IT) E 

1/ STIN C 

ll [LTIMORE E 

B t \ COR E 

BINGHAMTOh E 1 210.20©. 

BIRMINGHAM C 2 . . . . . 265.200. 

BLOOMINGTON (See 

BOSTON E 2. . . . I. 121. 100. 

BROWNS) II. I. K 

i Matamoros, Mex. > J 77 



1 . . 

J * . 

I . . 

3 . 

J . . 

I . . 

3 . . 

i . . 

j . . 

. 2 . 
Indianapolis ) 
9 



. 10.200. 
. i 0,000. 

118.000. 
.130.000 . 
. . 8.000 x 
. 26.800. 

ffO.OOO. 
. I J. 000. 

. 95.50©. 

1.70.000. 



38.6 



6.9.9 
76.5 



8fi. I 



13.6 
60.0 



f. 013.000 93.0 



357 
381 
1.75© 
. 126 
. 897 
. 343 
. 409 
. 203 
. 28« 
. 264 
. 917 



BUFFALO E 

CHARLOTTE E 

CHICAGO C 

( INCINNATI E 

< i.i: i /./. /v/; E 

COLUMBUS E 

DALLAS-FT. WORTH C 

D ll ENPORT, ROCK IS C 

DAYTON E 

1)1: WER iW 

DETROIT E 

EL PASO M. 

ERIE E 

GRAND RAPIDS I E 

KALAMAZOO \ E 

GREENSBORO E I 291, 

HOUSTON C I 338, 

/// \ TINGTON E I 207, 

INDIANAPOLIS ) C J 535, 

BLOOMINGTON \ C I 

JACKSON C I 

JACKSONVILLE E J 121 

JOHNSTOWN ) E I 

ALTOONA \ E I* 

KALAMAZOO (See Grand Rapids) 



I 
I 
I 
,3. 
3, 
3, 
3 
•j 
•j 
•j 

.3 

2 
I 
I 
/ 



500. 

600. 
800 
000 
100. 
,000. 
,600. 
,500. 
,000 
,800 
,900. 
,600. 



155, 

:i8ii 



800. 
600 



. . J 1. 100* 
. 3.»3.000 B 
. 267 ? 9©0. 
1. 5 1 0.000. 
. 379.000. 
. 75 J. 000. 
. 261.000. 
. 272,000. 
. 203.000. 
. 224,000. 
. 119,000. 
. « 18.000' 
. . 22,200. 
. 105,000. 
. 214.000° 



14.3 

95. ^-< z > 

69.9 

86.3 

89.0 

83.7 

76.0 

66.4 

95. -< z > 

79.8 

14.9 

09.5 



67.4 
55.8 



300 
200 
300 
100 



120.000. 
221,000. 
173,000. 
400.000 E 



41.2 
65.4 
83.5 
74.7 



J 00 



. 14, 400 x 
112,000. 
2 10.000 F 



92.2 



a i\.sv/.s c/ry c i 

LANCASTER E 1 

LANSING E 1 

L05 . / NGELES P " 

LOJ /M //J./v C 2 

1/A 1//7//.S C 1 

,l//.-f U/ E 1 

Mil. If 11 KEE C 1 



MIW.ST. PAUL C 

MOBILE C 

\ IN/// //.LE C 

.\A'« HAVEN E 

A/./f ORLEANS C 



162, 
211, 
218, 
.695, 
251 
272, 
202, 
411, 
460, 



700. 

900 

900 

900 

400. 

500. 

200 

500. 

100 



255 
512, 
286 



NEW YORK E 7 1,239 

NORFOLK E I 231 

OKI. IHOM I < IT) C 1 241, 

OM [HA C 2 224 

PEORIA C 1 

/•////. IDELPHIA E 3 1.386 

PHOENIX M I " 7 

PITTSBURGH E 1 776 



500 
900 
500 
900 
700 
400 
400 



900 
400 
500 



. 288. 
. 1811. 
. 145. 
1.434. 

195. 
. 202, 

148. 
. 427, 

363. 
22, 
. 111. 
. 360. 
. 162. 
3. 150. 
. 167. 
. 160. 
. 180. 
. . 26 
1.233. 
. . 58 
. 640. 



000. 

000. 

000 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

500. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

000. 

400 x 

000. 

500. 

000. 



62.2 

86.4 

66.2 

84.6 

77.6 

74.1 

73.2 

95. - 

78.9 



(Z) 



43.4 
70.2 
56.5 
81.4 
72.1 
66.3 
80.2 



88.9 
50.0 
82.4 



tNumhcr home unlit 



Mtlmated bv NBC TV to be within !0-millivolt TV contour line. Figure omitted by NBC TV when no .lata were available. 



TV BASICS p*9* i 



MARKET 



TIME ZONE 



NO STATIONS 



NO FAMILIES 



NO Of SITS 






PORTL l\l> r I Ml,tM 

PROl IDl VCi E / f 00. OOO 

RJl HMOND E I 180,500 

ROAN OKI f: 2 

R0( HESTER K I 205,000 

S 1/ r / tKl (ID II 2 17 1,704 

SAN ANTONIO ... . < . 2 17 1,100 

S i.\ DIEGO l» I 107,000 

SAN FRANCISCO P . . .-{ 866,866 

S( Hi Mil ti» E I 532,000 

SEATTLE P I IS 1,100 

SIOl X cm C I 

v>/ /// BEND <' I 

SPOK \NE I» 2 

SPRlNGFll LD,MAS& E I . . . 

ST. LOUIS < I 580,000 

SK/MCtfSf E 2 2I«. 100 

/v>// />o E I :ti7. too 

77 LS I C I 182,866 

II/i I E I 117. 100 

/f ISH1NGT0H E I . . . 100,888 

» HKi S /.' tRRl E I 

W //. UINGTOh E I I 15,288 

) 01 SGSTOU \ E 2 

OTIII K \l tRKETS 



82, 

I r, 7 

88, 

I7.V. 

•> I 

12 I 

/ 18, 

838, 

200, 

25 I 

10, 

II, 

2H 
15. 
.-.02 
186, 
228, 
100 

86, 
151, 



866" 

886 
ti oo 

866 
866 
..(»♦. 

866 

000 

ooo 
ooo 

000 

866 



■>■> 

/2« 

36, 

02 



000' 
IOO 
686' 
000 
866 

000 

666 

700 
000 
000 
000 

866 

200 



3 J 


7 


73 


4 


.'*.-, 




HI 


3 


.-» 1 


; 


11 


•* 


7 


.» 


63 


n 


86 


1 


58 


.» 



« 1.2 
85.2 

7 1.2 

r, 1.7 

7. •<..«* 
81.8 



»«. 



TOTAL NUMBER U. S, TV HOMES 1 APRIL 1953 23,256,000 



HONOLULl 
\tONTRl II 
TORONTO 



10.000 

52,266 

/ 16, 000 



A H>f uriuT ■ I Mexll .in Rl B 

nut Include leti in Canadian :i ea retched by Buffa C Doe* nut Lncludi ■ 

mittsi i In I'tM.lUn area Detrol D '.rami Haptil; 

s*p»r«trly is Kalamaxoo leparatelj 180, I E [ndlanapolli 

341 > Bl ■ I 



x / 

icing held ai li'i'r b^aii" In ihe num 

Hi,- uiuratl 
NB( T\ 



2. How is TV distributed in the U.S. by key geographical areas? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nie'sen Co., April 1953 (Copr. I9 ; -n e r A. C. Nielsen data ir 

NORTHEAST EAST CENTRAL WEST CENTRAL 



TV homes 
(000) 



SOUTH 



8,280 




9,354 



pacific 
6,221 



41.1% 



9,535 



5,116 



3,395 



28.3% 



2,651 



2,558 



IV BASICS 



3. How do TV and radio families compare on a socio-economic basis? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., April 1953 



INCOME 



COUNTY 
SIZE 



TERRITORY 



AGE OF OLDEST 
CHILD 



IHHMI- 

Middle / "B" ,^^ \| 

33 -^ ■/ 26 -° 22 /-'B-fi 30 

40 ^^ ^* ^^ 25 _ j— | 

"Br S--bC 1 1- 



TV 



RADIO 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 



FAMILY SIZE 



HIGHEST 
EDUCATION 



OCCUPATION 

(head of house) 



AGE OF 
HOUSEWIFE 



B i_ 



B| Gramm, 



46 



41 



3-4 



57 



51 



High 
School 

ha 



1 1*1 rnMl- 



TV 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 




17 



18 



None 



i 1" 



40 



34 



35-54 



RADIO 



TV 



RADIO 



Differences between TV ansl radio-only homes highlight need for shrewd air buying 



The chart above is an important research tool, since it makes a direct 
comparison — on several yardsticks — of the TV-radio and radio-only 
homes in the U.S. These two basic advertising targets are compared 
on the basis of income levels, county size in which family lives (metro- 
politan, medium population, rural areas), geographical location in 
the U.S., age of oldest child, family size, educational level, occupa- 
tion of head of household, and the age of housewife. 

Broadcast clients would do well to keep some of these basic differ- 
ences between radio-TV homes and radio-only homes in mind when 
shopping for program or spot buys in the air media: 

INCOME LEVEL — Radio-only homes are almost evenly distributed 
through the U.S. income levels, but 8 1 % of the TV homes are from 
the upper and middle-income levels. TV is still not strong in reaching 
low-income family groups, does better in reaching families with larger 
purses. Radio has greater impact on low income groups. 

COUNTY SIZE— Although some 80% of U.S. families are now 



within reach of a TV station (CBS TV estimate), most TV families are 
urban (57%) dwellers. TV is not an air medium to reach large num- 
bers of farmers, although many farms are TV-equipped. 

FAMILY SIZE — TV families, on the other hand, are more likely to be 
larger families than are those in radio-only homes. Nearly three- 
quarters (73%) of TV homes have families of three or more. In radio- 
only homes, about half (52%) of the family units consist of three or 
more people TV homes generally have more kids under 16. 

EDUCATIONAL LEVEL— Perhaps because of the relationship be- 
tween educational level and income, TV homes have slightly more col- 
lege grads than do radio-only homes (28% vs. 27%), somewhat more 
high school grads also (57% vs. 51%). Number of those in TV 
homes whose highest educational level is grammar school is increasing 
however. Picture of radio-TV may ultimately balance. 

OCCUPATION— A fairly close match, although TV has the edge in 
the number of household heads who are white collar workers. 



TV BASICS 

IT U <\ I u ■■> 



page 3 



MM Television riewviny habits 

1. How does TV viewing vary according to time of day? 



SOURCE: A. C. NioUon C( 



Total I . S. homes usiiii; TV by hours of tlttu 



1953 




Homes reached (000) 



6A.M. 8 9 10 11 12 1P.M. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 









2. How does amount of time TV homes spend with radio and TV compare? 



SOURCE: A. C Nielsen Co., 1952 and 1953 (April 1952-March 1953) 



Time TV homes spend with TV and radio 



TV HOURS 

PER DAY, 

APR. 52 

TO MAR. 53 



5.02 



4.32 



3.96 



3.88 



3.74 



4.31 




RADIO 

HOURS PER 

DAY, APR 

'52 TO 

MAR. 53 



,w rriri i* «• m "> T«r i ,7 ' rrsi •" I "" 1 ' " 



APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT. 

1952 
NOTE i i whole hou 



OCT NOV. DEC. 



JAN. 
1953 



FEB. MAR 



TV BASICS 



■ 



3. How does TV audience composition vary with the time of day? 

SOURCE: American Research Bureau, June 1953 

.ltffffi<*tt<*<* composition, viewer superset: use them together 



MONDAY-FRIDAY 



MEN 



WOMEN 



KIDS IUNDER 16) VIEWERS-PER-SET 



6-9 AM 33% 52% 15% 



1.9 



9-N00N 


10% ••■ 


....63%... 


...27%.... 


16 








K00N-3 PM 


13% ... 


....56%... 


...31%... 


19 








3 PM-6 PM 


14%... 


...36%... 


...50%... 


21 









6 PM-MID. SUN. THRU 
SAT. (ENTIRE WEEK) 



36% 44% 20% 



2.S 



Chart above, prepared especially for SPONSOR by American Re- 
search Bureau, is based on a socio-economic cross-section of U.S. 
viewers, not just a random sample. It reflects viewing in urban and 
rural areas in every U.S. county within 150 miles of a TV outlet, thus 
has great significance for TV-minded agencies and advertisers. ARB's 



James W. Seiler, director, gives this warning however: "It's impor- 
tant to realize that audience composition must be used in conjunction 
with viewers per set. There is a higher percentage of women in the 
daytime audience, for instance, but with a higher viewers-per-set at 
night that means more women per- 1 ,000-viewing-homes at night." 



IliHIUIIIIIIIilM^ 






4. What is the seasonal variation in television viewii 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. (Nielsen Television Index 1951-1953) 

Daytime (9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) Wim^m Nighttime (6 p.m. to midnight 



% homes using TV 

60- 



50 
40 

30 



■S; y £ 

*%^^ — 



*■- 




TV BASICS pages 



5. How does the "remembrance impact" of TV compare with other ad media? 






SOURCE: Advertost iU 'vey based on 762 inti 



CATEGORY 


SAW OR 

HEARD AD 


NEWSPAPER 


MAGAZINE 


RADIO 


TV 


CIGARETTES 


80.8 'o 


39.2°o 


;6.9°o 


24 


06. 1 % 


SOAP 


65.0°o 


?8.6'o 


18.0°o 


1S.9° 


15.3% 


AUTO 


66.5°o 


28.3°o 


20.2° o 


/0.5°o 


38.7% 


DRUG 


56.7°o 


27.7 r o 


10.4° o 


M.4°o 


10.3% 


AVERAGE 


67.3°o 


28.5° 


16.4° a 


;5.5°o 


17.3% 



c 



^ 



> 



I 



II here «/ i «f i/«»h •*?€ *»»■ 

lu'iir if uilrrrllst'tr.' 

TV viewer panel in Now York-New 
Jersey ar»» were asked last fell 
• or they had seen or hoard ad 
for various product categories the 
day before. Chart at loft, by Ad 
t Research, shows result of 
quijjing. TV was best-remombered 
medium, out-pulling all other me- 
dia by margins as high as two and 
three-to-one. This impact of TV 
helps justify many high TV costs. 



' TO! ,:! ..,, ' 

6. How many homes are reached by the "Top 10" TV shows? 

SOURCE: A. C Nielsen NTI. Aoril 1953 TV *•»«% "l"<U" •* 

now 59% «/n'«»J o| .12 

Programs Two weeks ending 25 April Homes Reached 

In April. "I Love Lucy continued 

I Love Lucy 15,751,000 to reach broadcastings biggest U.S. 

Godfrey & Friends (Toni) 12,390,000 audience for Philip Mor-is. Show j 

Codfrey & Friends (Liggett & Myers) 12,303,000 incredible drawing power rum ring* 

Colgate Comedy Hour 11,808,000 sround most other TV ihow,. ''Ucy.*' 

_ _ _. ,, ,__ _-_ incidentally, was top show m simi- 

Texaco Star Theatre 11,178,000 10 „ . . . 

lar period ir 1952 but has since 

YOU Bet Your Life 10,648,000 managed to increase its homes- 

Dragnet 10,598,000 reached figure by nearly 50%. Its 

All Star Revue 9,960,000 st;l1 climbing. Figure for 26 Ap'.l 

Cj t-\/ di l a to/i nnn 1952 was 10,753.000 homes reached 
oodyear TV Playhouse 9,724,000 

_. .. _. ■*. . « f-^#» /n/%« , « s compared with this years 15,- 

Ph.lco TV Playhouse 9,520,000 ^ y< s _ v;de3 homei reached _ 









IS. radio-TV homes (January 1951-April 1953)? 



h[9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) ■■■■■■■» 



(9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) ■»»■■■■» Nighttime (6 p.m. to midnight) ■■■•■» °/ homes using TV 








^++ 


m • ■ 


t# # g 


'•-*! 


■ ■■ 


»•«, 


DU 




v 


^ 












50 

40 


.,*•« 


f 
















30 




















- 20 

- 10 








































TV /io'ci.v niMlit'iicc «.\ 
Iioiiic hasr iiicrrnsi's 

Like radio. TV viewing as measured 
by Nielsen, takes a summertime dip 
during daytime and evening. But TV 
has bounced back each fall to al- 
most same high levels (50'4-plus of 
homes using TV) as previous. Mean- 
while, number of video-equipped 
homes in the nation has increased 
greatly in '5l-'52. 'light percent- 
age losses mean little in view of 
fact that percentage point now 
equals nearly double numb- 
homes today as it did in '52. 



IUL. AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. 
1953 






TV 8 A S i 









HB in Kansas City 
Swings to 

I 

Sharing Time with KMBC 

on CHANNEL 9 



VV7TTH a jointly-owned transmitter .... using maximum allowable power, 
** 316 kw visual, 158 kw aural .... with a thousand-foot tower to transmit 
from a height above average terrain of 1079 feet .... with the full schedule of 
Columbia Network TV programming .... plus WHB's and KMBC's outstanding 
AM Radio personalities, in bright, new, smartly-produced local TV shows — 

Channel 9 in Kansas City is really something to see and hear! It is a "must 
on every 7 elevision advertiser's national spot schedule! 

Interim operation beginning in August is from a transmitter and mast atop 
Missouri's tallest office building, reaching most of the 298,633 television homes* 
in the Kansas City market — including the metropolitan trading area of Johnson, 
Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties in Kansas; and Jackson, Clay and Platte 
counties in Missouri. 

In Kansas City, plan to use Channel 9 for your future TV schedules! 
WHB-TV NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY BLAIR-TV, INC. 

May, 1953 Statistics o) the Kansas City Electric Association 




s4*tcl a& aicvayd 



WHB Radio — the AM station with Kansas City's 
tinues to reach "the most listeners per dollar" via 



's oldest call letters — con- 
Radio in the Kansas City 
WHB/£ Market — through the 1,362,929 sets* in the area. 



WHB 



Kansas City's Mutual Network outlet since 1936 — 17 
years. 

Exclusive play-by-play broadcasts, at home and away, by 
Larry Ray, of the Kansas City Blues baseball games 
(New York Yankee's No. 1 farm team), since 1950 — 

.irs. 



WHB • KANSAS CITY'S 
OLDEST CALL LETTERS 



*k "Night Club of the Air" since 1951 — 3 years. 

* Club 7 10" (mid-afternoon d.j. show featuring the "Top 
Twenty" records) since 1952 — 2 years. 

if Sandra Lea (women's program) since 194.3 — 10 years. 

if WHB Newsbureau and Associated Press newscasts since 
1936 (John Cameron Swayze was our first newscaster) 
— 17 years. 

•k "WHB Musical Clock" since 1931—22 years. 

it WHB Neighborin' Time" (formerly 
the "Farmers' Hour") since "'.'2 — 
31 > . 

if Represented nationally for Spot Radio 
by John Blair & Company sincv 
—6 years. 




FREE! 

To advertisers and 
agency executives 



&*F 



" 



1922-1953 




10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 

n 



DON DAVI 

MfSIOCNr ^t 

JOHN T. SCHIL1ING 

CfNfUl MANACt* 



MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGHT 






DO YOU READ IT 

Suing, the 100-page 
pocket-size magazine 
published by WHB 
times a year. Articles on 
marketing, advertising 
and research . . . ex- 
cerpts from John Cros- 
by's Radio and Ti 
sion Column . . . pic- 
tures, jokes, quizzes and 
cartoons. Sent free to 
time buyers, advertisers, 
agencies, advertising and 
sales executives. Ask for a 
copy on your letterhead. 




13 JULY 1953 



227 




ost of television udvertisin 




1. How does TV's gross cost-per-1,000 compare with other leading media? 

SOURCE: CBS TV Research Department. Dollar figures are cosr-per- 1 ,000 gross circulation (homes, cci 

TV's eost'VS.-cireulation drops as other media rise" 



$9.00 



$5.00 




Jan. '50 



Jan. '51 



Jan. '52 



Jan. '53 



'Videos cost-per-1,000 of gross circulation is based on time AND 
talent costs for a typical full-network evening half-hour show. Maga- 
zine costs are based on a black-and-white page in eight leading 



magazines with comparable circulations, but do NOT include produc- 
tion costs. Newspaper costs are similarly based on a full black-and- 
white page in leading paper in each major TV area as of I Jan. '53. 



Ililllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 







2. What is the relationship between spot TV costs and TV set circulation? 



SOURCE: The Ka+z Agency June 1953 





$1.00 


Q 
ui 


.90 


_i 




_i 




< 


.80 


1- 




«/> 




Z 


.70 


«/t 




1- 




LU 


.60 


t/i 




> 




K- 


.50 


O 




O 




o 


.40 


p- 




Ul 


.30 


a. 






.20 


O 




u 


.10 







































































































































































|llll« 



















































































































I Sept I Dec. I Mar. I July I Oct. I Feb. I May I July I Dec. I Mar. I June I Sept I Feb. I Aug 

49. '49 50 '50 '50 '5| 51 '51 '51 '52 '52 52 '53 '53 (Est. 



Chart above is based on the relationship between the combined "open 
rate" (for one-minute Class-A film availabilities) and the number of 
operating TV sets in all U.S. markets. Rates are figured using the 



highest-cost station in each market. The comparison line has thus 
dropped from a I Sept. 1949 level of about 95C to a present level of 
less than 47. 5C. Recent rise is due to influx of new TV stations. 



TV BASICS page? 



A significant new name 
in broadcasting 




The name MEREDITH and the word SERVICE are synonyms 
in the magazine world. Because the Meredith Publishing Company 

publishes Better Homes & Gardens and Successful Farming — two 
of the nation's leading magazines, both built on the sound philosophy 

of serving the American family's ambitions for better homes and a 
better way of life. 

You'll find Meredith stations following that 50-year-old Meredith 
tradition of service, too! A tradition which extends to serving Meredith 

advertisers, genuinely trying to help them get maximum value 
from their advertising dollars. 




When you see these call letters: Tr's "A Meredith Station." 



WHENTV^„,¥0W-W0¥TV 



Omalia, .\cbr. 



KPH(L KPHOTY ,.. 



hoenix, Ariz 



WHEN-TV. KPHO & KPHO-TV represented by The Katz Agency- • WOW represented by John Blair & O 

WOW-TV represented bv Blair TV. Inc. 



13 JULY 1953 



229 



3. What's the cost-per-l T 000 homes of network TV programs by types? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co. 

Evening once-a-week halt-hour show comparisons (two weeks ending 7 February 1953) 

HALF HOUR I'KOI.HAMN 

TALENT VARIETY ■ I $4.84 (42.5 RATING) 



QUIZ & AUD. PART. 



GENERAL VARIETY 



SITUATION COMEDY 



MYSTERY DRAMA 



$7.25 (25.4 RATING) 
$7.62 (36.5 RATING) 
$7.71 (35.3 RATING) 
$8.09 (25.6 RATING) 



GENERAL DRAMA 



$10.01 (26.7 RATING) 



OTHER MUSIC 



$10.74 (19.9 RATING) 



INTERVIEW 



$12.04 (20.7 RATING) 



VARIETY MUSIC 



$13.83 (22.2 RATING) 



QUARTER-HR. SHOWS 



$7.48 (16.9 RATING) 



ONE-HOUR SHOWS 



$9.38 (43.6 RATING) 



ll!llllllllll!!lllllll!!llllllllllllllllll(lllll!!llllllllllllllll!lllllllll!lll!lllllllliy 

4. What's the prediction for future network TV cost-per-1,000 homes circulation? 

SOURCE: CBS TV Research Department 

CBS, inc. President Frank Stanton recently stated to the \\ \ 



"In the 100 largest television markets in 1955 
— markets which will account tor 81% of the 
total U.S. families and 82% of the total re- 
tail sales of the U.S. — the higher circulation 



cost of the new television markets will be 
offset by the further circulation expansion in 
the older, low-cost pre-freeie 68 markets." 
(Hot Springs, Va. meeting March 1953) 



1952: Cross circulation cost-per-1,000 homes — $1.59 



21,000,000 TV HOMES IN 68 MARKETS AT 
GROSS COST-PER-1,000 OF $1.59 



1955: Cross circulation cost-per-1,000 homes — still $1.59 



21,000,000 TV HOMES IN 68 MARKETS AT 
GROSS COST-PER-1,000 OF $1.59 



5,000,000 NEW TV HOMES IN 
ORIGINAL 68 @ 79'/ 2 tf 



5,000,000 TV SETS IN 32 POST-1952 | 
MARKETS @ $2.38'/ 2 



TV BASICS voge 8 




According to FCC curies, WAVE-TV 
now effectively reaches 85.5% more 
square miles than previously . . . 
54*6% more people . . . 5/.s f ' f 
.more Effective Buying Income — , 
gives you jar greater coveragi than 
any other TV station in this area.' 




u 



HEIGHT 

COUNTS MOST! 



WAVE-TV's Far Higher Tower 

Increases Area Coverage 

By 85.5%! 

SeecHy *)& ^eUevinyf " 

WAVE-TV is now operating from a new 
600-foot tower, located on top a 985-foot hill, 
giving an over-all height of 1585 feet above 
sea level. 

Tower height is of course jar more Important 
than any other factor, in "reaching out" to 
fringe TV areas. Next most important — 
WAVE -TV is now telecasting on Channel 3 
(instead of Channel 5). and with 100,000 watts 
of radiated power, instead of 24,000. 

100,000 watts at our new tower 
height and lower channel is equiva- 
lent to 600,000 watts from our old 
downtown tower, on Channel 5! 

Check these engineering facts against actuaJ 
viewing results. Ask your distributors, dealers 
or salesmen about WAVE-TV coverage, and 
about the great WAVE-TV television market. 
It's actually far greater than the Louisville 
Trading Area itself! 

LOUISVILLE'S 

WAVE-TV 

FIRST IN KENTUCKY 

Affiliated with NBC, ABC, DUMONT 

Free & Peters, Inc.. Exdasrre National Represent.!' 




13 JULY 1953 



231 



5. What are some typical talent-production costs for network TV shows? 

SOURCE: Network TV Comparagraph which appears in alternate issues of SPONSOR 



UYSTERY-CRIME-DRAMA 



THE WEB 511,000 

ROCKY KING $6,500 

PLAINCLOTHESMAN $6,500 

CRIME SYNDICATED $16,230 

EYE WITNESS $9,500 

SUSPENSE $13,500 

DANGER $10,000 

MAN AGAINST CRIME (film) $28,000 

RACKET SQUAD $10,000 

T-MEN IN ACTION $14,000 

DRAGNET (film) $21,000 

DOORWAY TO DANGER $8,500 

SITl'ATiOJV COMEDY 



I LOVE LUCY (film) $27,500 

MR, PEEPERS $18,000 

BURNS & ALLEN (film) $30,000 

BEULAH(film) $17,000 

I MARRIED JOAN (film) $29,000 

MY LITTLE MARGIE (film) $27,000 

MAMA $20,000 

MY FRIEND IRMA $24,000 

OUR MISS BROOKS (film) $30,000 

THE GOLDBERGS $18,500 

GENERAL DRAMA 



GOODYEAR PLAYHOUSE) t9R nnn 

PHILC0 PLAYHOUSE ) * zo ' uuu 

ROBERT MONTGOMERY $30,000 

FIRESIDE THEATRE (film) $20,000 

KRAFT THEATRE $20,000 

FORD THEATRE $20,000 

TALES OF TOMORROW $12,500 

SCHLITZ PLAYHOUSE (film) $23,500 

YOU ARE THERE $20,300 

fAlI flKures refer to weekly costs even when show is on more than onre a week. 



1IPIEVCE PARTIC. & PADiEL 

WHAT'S MY LINE? $8,500 

WHAT'S YOUR BID? $3,500 

MEET THE PRESS $3,500 

WHO SAID THAT? $3,000 

BUND DATE $11,000 

BREAK THE BANK $12,500 

TWO FOR THE MONEY $10,000 

STRIKE IT RICH $8,500 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME $6,500 

QUICK AS A FLASH $8,000 

TWENTY QUESTIONS $7,000 

YARIETY -COMEDY 



SAT. NIGHT REVUE (per 30 min.) $11,765 

TOAST OF THE TOWN $30,000 

GODFREY'S FRIENDS $45,000 

JACKIE GLEAS0N (fotal hour) $65,000 

GEORGE JESSEL'S BANQUET TABLE $1 5,000 

DANNY THOMAS (film) (total) $40,000 

SERIAL DRAMA 

LOVE OF LIFE $6,000 

SEARCH FOR TOMORROW $6,500 

GUIDING LIGHT $10,000 

HAWKINS FALLS $9,500 

BENNETT STORY $8,500 

JLVE-VILE SHOWS 



DING DONG SCHOOL (per 30 min.) $985 

HOWDY DOODY (per 15 min.) $1,550 

SPACE PATROL $4,500 

SKY KING (film) $22,000 

WOTE: Prices for many film shous ('"''Fireside 
Theatre," "Lucy," ""Brooks." etc.) are not 
actual cost of production, but are gross client 
costs. Difference is made up by producer in re- 
run revenue. Price shown here may be only 
50-70% of real total. Rest is amortized. 



REPRES'TS OF TV RASICS ari» available on request. .Special price for quantity orders 



TV BASICS page 9 



Your product is as popular 
as the television station you use! 



In Los Angeles one station |ust won the 
TELEVIEWS POPULARITY AWARD 
for the SIXTH STRAIGHT YEAR . . . 

and its programs and personalities won 8 
popularity awards against 13 for all 6 other 
network and independent television stations 



IT SELLS TO BE POPULAR 



Year after year 

ifs KTLA 



<****, 




13 JULY 1953 



KTLA Studios • 5451 Marathon St., Los Angeles 38 • HOIIywood 9-6363 
Eastern Offices • 1501 Broadway, New York 18 • BRyant 9-8700 
PAUl H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




233 



1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net TV f49-'53)? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



NETWORK 


1948 


1949 


1 950 


1951 


1952 


I953 
First 5 Months 


^^ P.I.B. 
^ i. Report 


$1,391,991 


$6,628,662 


$18,585,911 


$18,353,003 


$8,268,952 


$3,446,893 


$13,011,831 


$42,470,844 


$69,058,548 


$36,806,449 


$955,525 


(No report) 


$7,761,506 


$10,140,656 


$4,584,218 


% 




$6,500,104 


$21,185,692 


$59,171,452 


$83,242,573 


$37,871,123 



YEARLY TOTALS 




WW/ $12,294,513 
WO] $40,826,185 





Wjj $127,989,713 
195?] $180,794,780 




.■■,..'. a .,....':: .. Ililllilllliiliiii liillilllllillllillllllllllllllllliiliiillilllllllllii 



2. How m uch money have advertisers spent for spot TV time (49-53)? 

SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates 

125 



100 
75 
50 
25 



<^-V ^ 





1949—57,775,013 



1950— $25,034,000 1951— $59,733,000 1952— $96, 750,000" 1953— $125,000,000" 



Dollar figures show national spot revenues of stations AFTER trade discounts of fre- "SPONSOK estimate based on preliminary data of FCC for 19H2 released 

queues and dollar volume; BEFORE commissions to reps, agencies, brokers bSPONSOB estimate based on television industry and rep forecasts. 



125 

100 

75 

50 

25 

sprinc 1953. 



TV BASICS 



page 10 



Here's how 

the coverage areas of 

Atlanta TV stations 

compare 

+ In population + In Effective Buying Income 

Based on the first Nielsen Coverage Service Report 



Advertisers on WSB-TV gel a crack at 

l'l'' , more people than can be reached on Atlanta's 

second station. You cover !:;■, more with WSB-TV 

than with the third station The ten extra, 

or "bonus", counties WSB-TV delivers have an 

Effective Buying Income comparable to 

thai of cities like Providence, Rhode Island, 

and Des Moines, Iowa. Ask a Petry man 

tn tell you more aboul this first Nielsen 

Coverage report— it's dynamite. 




WSB-TV 

2,129,000 people 
$2,198,377,000 




Station A 

1,741,500 people 

$1,826,733,000 




Station B 

1 ,489,200 people 

$1,646,705,000 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution 



W$ 



l-tv 



. atts nn 
lou channel 2 from 
a 1062ft ton ■ I 



13 JULY 1953 



235 




$1 million for SPONSOR? 

V 1 1 account executive told us the 

other day that his agency won a mil- 
lion-dollar account he* ause of one issue 
of SPONSOR. 

This seventh annual Fall Facts issue 
is designed to help you get a million 
dollars' worth of hetter air advertising 
this fall and winter. 

If it doesn't, then the whole SPONSOR 
editorial staff has been wasting its time 
for the past month or two. For here's 
what this issue does for you: 

1. Gives you a quick, yet thorough 
summary of trends from the six sec- 
tions into which this year's Fall Facts 
issue is divided. I See "What are the 
hot radio and TV trends this fall?"' 
page 31.) 

2. Analyzes the fall netuork radio 
outlook. You'll learn the latest on net- 
work audiences, out-of-home listening, 
multi-set listening, "tandem" plans, 
merchandising, and flexibility in "Net- 
work radio report" starting page 67. 

3. Tells you all about spot radio 



from avails! ilities, rate outlook, Negro 
radio. FM, Storecasting, Transit Ra- 
dio, transcriptions, and library services 
to foreign-language broadcasting. See 
"Spot radio report"' starting page 101. 

4. Illustrates the latest in radio re- 
search in "Radio Basics starting page 
L57. 

."). Gives \ ou a detailed network Tl 
report starting page 173. This covers 
one-station markets, network lineups, 
UHF, costs, programs, and audiences, 
merchandising, color, and what unions 
are doing. 

6. Tells \ou where you'll find spot 
Tl openings and covers new TV sta- 
tions, spot TV rates, commercial costs, 
and 10-second I.D.'s in "Spot TV re- 
port" starting page 191. 

7. Charts the newesl Tl research 
data as to TV's size, growth, costs, and 
many other factors in "TV Basics,'' 
starting page 219. 

8. Lists 8 pages of data on TV sta- 
tions in 225 metropolitan county mar- 
kets, prepared for SPONSOR by Sulli- 
\an. Stauffer. Colwell & Bayles. Tables 
give the number of households, total 
channels before and after the freeze, 
number of CP's issued, and other vital 
information. Starts page 203. 

One unstated conclusion emerges 
from this tremendous collection of im- 
portant data on the air media that 
should be evident to every sponsor and 
agency man long before he's fini?hed 
reading this year's Fall Facts issue. 
And that is: 

There will be more activity in radio 
and TV this fall than in all the other 
media put together. 

The reason is obvious. 

So use the Fall Facts issue in plan- 
ning vour fall and winter air cam- 



paign.-. It was researched and written 
to save you money. 

* * * 

Sequel to LIFE 

The rac) debate between two top 
agenc) men in this issue will bring you 
up to date on Life's provocatiye \ 
Stud) of Four Media'" I see page 36). 

We've been criticized by some peo- 
ple on two points for our Life stor\ 
in the 29 June issue: 

1. We didn't ask any advertisers 
for their opinion but instead yvent to 
24 researchers, 10 of whom were air 
media people. Our answer: We are 
polling a number of representative ad- 
vertisers and will publish the results as 
soon as possible. We went to all the 
network research directors in New 
York in order to be fair. After all, it 
ivas network radio and T\ which were 
pinned to the wall by Life. 

2. We ve also been criticized for 
not giving Life and researcher Alfred 
Politz a chance to make a rebuttal. 
Our answer: We have done so. Life 
Publisher Andrew Heiskells statement 
appears on page 38. There may be a 
point-by-point rebuttal later when Life 
Research Director Ed Miller gets over 
his illness which hospitalized him. Re- 
searcher Politz does not want to make 
a statement now. 

We have two comments to make on 
the study's repercussions to date: (1) 
Whv are the air media always expected 
to sit back and take these beatings 
without a protest? i2i The Life study 
should be validated by some media 
evaluation board. If it is. SPONSOR 
wants to go on record in advance with 
a cautionary note: Don t load the 
board with print media men! 



Applause 



"It's time for everybody" 

When a network spends a goodly- 
number of thousands of dollars on a 
film that promotes the medium first 
and the network second, that's news. 

CBS Radio has done this. The film: 
"It's Time for Everybody," a 16-min- 
ute color job that came out of the 
Sales Promotion and Advertising Dept. 
headed by George Bristol with Louis 
Dorfsman as art director. 

Here are some of the interesting 



facts sponsors are culling from the film 
now being shown in various parts of 
the country : 

• The U.S. has become a virtual 
one-class — a middle-class — country. 
Everybody buys. And "everybody" 
consists of some 159 million people 
with $300.2 billion income. 

• Radio reaches these people in 105 
million places I actually it's 110 mil- 
lion, figures just out show). Some of 
these places include the folloyving: 



ill 20 million bedrooms. 

(2) 14 million kitchens. 

I 3 l 25 million cars. 

(4) 10 million public places. 

I 5 I 3 1 2 million dining rooms. 

(6) 27 million living rooms. 

• Yet only 16 1 -> r ; of all ad money 
spent on the four major media goes 
for radio. 

Rightlv. the film concludes: "Radio 
takes vour advertising to everyone — 
to all your potential customers . . . 
It's time for everybody!" 



236 



SPONSOR 







The parade of KMBC-KFRM 
personalities moving into the 
top ten most popular daytime 
shows in Kansas City gets longer 
with each new Pulse Survey. 

The first Kansas City Pulse, 
(November-December 1 952) re- 
vealed that KMBC News Director 
John Farmer, Farm Director 
Phil Evans and the Dinner Bell 
Roundup Gang rated in the 
"top ten." January-February 
Pulse added Marketcaster Bob 
Riley, and according to the 
March-April Pulse, KMBC's Sigma 
Delta Chi award-winning 
newsman, Bill Griffith, joined 
the parade. 

But, there's another parade to 
The KMBC-KFRM Team. It's the 
parade of wise advertisers who 
know the complete story of 
KMBC-KFRM superiority in the 
vast Kansas City Primary Trade 
Area. Write, wire or phone your 
nearest Free & Peters colonel or 
The KMBC-KFRM Team, Kansas 
City, today. Join the parade 
of advertisers who are selling 
their products to the people who 
hear about them on the radio 
station they listen to most . . 



CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 




IN OUT-OF-HOME AUDIENCE! | 




24.4% 



13.7% 



Latest Pulse survey shows WWDC by far the leading Washington Station in 
out-of-home audience. WWDC had 24.4% of this big audience — 6 A.M. to 

12 midnight for the entire week. The second place station had only 13.7%. 

This survey was made during the month of February, 1953, when there 
were no baseball or other continuous special broadcasts on the air. It covered 
the people who listen to radio in their automobiles, offices, business 
establishments, and recreation spots. 

And this audience is BIG! Latest U. S. Government figures show 
that there are 244,067 automobiles in the Washington 
area equipped with radios. 

And this audience is a FREE BONUS for advertisers! 
Get this big PLUS from WWDC in the 

always-rich Washington market! 






14.7% 



WWDC 




4.0% 




1.7% 



1.4% 



■9% 

K 



MISC. 




IN WASHINGTON, D.C., IT'S 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



Ma 

magazine lot RatliJand TV advertisers 



DON'T STOP 

SHORT 

OF YOUR 

GOAL 



s>e 10-50 I 2479 

WM S HEDGE S 

NBC 

33 ROCKEFELLER P L A Z A 

N[« YORK 2 N Y 




K 1 f 



GET OVER THE TOP IN ERIE/ PA., 

the profitable sales aad test market 










W&*- 



by using 



WICUtv 



CHANNEL 12 



JP 




In Retoil Solei per fom>ly Ene is 
29rh in the notion 



EDWARD LAMS ENTERPRISES 

ERIE. PA — WICU-TV 

HeodltOeed Co 

ERIE. PA— WIKK AM 

H-l Co 

ERIE. PA. -THE ERIE DISPATCH 
Reynold*. Fif^gco/d. I c 

MASSIUON. OHIO-WMAC-TV 
Now under Construction 

TOLEDO. OHIO-WTOD AM 
Heod/v Reed Co 

CRLANDO. FLA -vVHOO AM-FM 
Avery-Knodel. 'nc 



w m m es, sir, if sales start to lag in Pennsyl- 
^^vania's Third City, just try WICU-TV 
and watch how fast you reach your goal. It's 
heen done time and time again. There are sales 
success stories galore. 4 Networks, 4 Years of 
Telecasting, and 4 great Expansion Programs — 
and that means more sales 4 you, too, on 
this great VHF station. 



THE ERIE DISPATCH 
RADIO STATION WIKK 
TELEVISION STATION WICU-TV 



NEWSPAPEP 




^ 



miA^ 



27 JULY 1953 



Oc per copy • $8 per year 



R 



RATE CUTTING: 
HOW PREVALEN 

page 33 



Bache gets more leads 
for every ad dollar 
through radio 

page 36 





pHtJSd inc. 



report on radio 
and TV in Canada 



d 






WHB in Kansas City 
Swings to 

I 
I 

Sharing Time with KMBC 

on CHANNEL 9 



VVT1TH a jointly-owned transmit) . using maximum allowable 

^* 316 kw visual, 158 kw atu with .1 thousand- toot !■ ismit 

from a height above averag< < t . . . . with the lull scl 

Columbia Network TV programming .... plus WHB's and KM iding 

AM Radio personalities, in bright, ni produced local I \ shows — 

Channel 9 in k.. 'hing to see anil 

on every Television adt > iiaiion.il hedule! 

Interim operation beginnin: from a transmitter and m 

[issouri's tallest office bui I of the 

in the Kansas City market — including tl politan trad 

Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties in k.msas; and ) Platte 
counties in Missouri. 

In Kansas City, plan u> use < hannel >ur future TV schedu 

WHB-TV NATIONALLY REl' I ED BY BLAIR I I . / 



* 

aivsas( < 



eld <Z4 cUtlACUfA, 



WHB 






if Kansas City's Mutual Network outlet 

years. 

if Exclusive play-by-play broadcasts, at hoi 
Larry Ray, of the Kansa 
(New York Yankee's No. 1 farm i 
4 years. 

if "Night Club of the Air" since 1951— 

if "Club 7r0" ( mid-afternoon d.j. show featurn 
Twenty" records ) since 1952 — 2 yea 

if Sandra Lea (women's program) sin 

* NX'HB Newsbureau and Associated Pre^ 
1936 (John Cameron Swayze was our fii 

— 17 years. 

if "WHB Musical Clock" since 1931 — 22 years. 

if "WHB Neighborin lime" (form, 
the "Farmers' Hour I since 1922 — 
31 years. 

if Represented nationally for Spot Radio 
by John Blair & Compam since 1948 
—6 years. 



MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCTCLES • 3,000 WATTS 




Willi Radio — the AM n with K 

h "the n 

\\ III 



WHB • KANSAS CITY'S 
OLDEST CALL LETTERS 




10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 



DON DAVIS 
JOHN T. SCHIIUNO _ 












rlcvi 










NBC execs NBC executives are being trained to operate TV cameras and controls 
wield cameras as well as radio equipment. Three-hour course gives execs chance to 
wield cameras on closed circuit, is designed as over-all orientation. 
Aside from aiding understanding of how operation fits together, move 
is probably emergency mea sure in case of strikes, other work inter- 
ruption. 

-SR- 

Rarc-curring B argain-basement era in spot radio may be drawing to end. SPONSOR 
is on decline survey of timebuyers, rep firm executives, other admen left impres- 
sion fewer clients were getting, or seeking , off-rate-card deals. 
Reasons: Rate cards have been getting strenuous going over and what 
used to be informal has been put down in print ; resistance to deals 
has stiffened at urging of industry associations, reps, station 
operators. (See story, page 33.) 

-SR- 

Cen. Mills Most in news this spring when requests for special rates came fastest 
rate policy was General Mills. L. H. Crites, director of radio-TV for company, 
told SPONSOR asking station to create special rate wasn't rate goug- 
ing. n I certainly don't approve of the practice of offering several 
different prices to several different clients or agencies," he said. 
Rebuttal to Crites was particularly sharp from several reps who con- 
tended General Mills had dangled more money than it actually spent to 
stations as inducement to lower rates. 

-SR- 

Potentially big air spenders are low-calorie soft drink firms. 
Kirsch's Beverages, Brooklyn bottler, introduced No-Cal line last 
year, is using heavy radio and TV announcement and participation 
schedule in New York, New Jersey, and Washington, D. C. in effort to 
hit 2, 000, 000-case mark this year. Cott Beverage Co. of New Haven is 
devoting 40" of budget to air media in New York, New Jersey, and Con- 
necticut for no-sugar line. Grey is Kirsch agency; John Dowd, Cott. 

-SR- 

Vitapix still Look for announcement soon about acquisition of new film properties 
on upswing by Vitapix Corp. Station-owned syndicator now has Western movie pack- 
age in 43 markets, is near signing for additional product. With 32 
station stockholders, Vitapix is approaching its target of 45 (no 
more than one member to a market) ; is financed at roughly 51 million. 



Sugarless drinks 
open air barrage 



SPO\SOR in lieu- offices 

Remember to change directories: SPONSOR editorial, advertising, and circula- 
tion headquarters are now located at Madison & 49 St. (40 E. 49 St.), New 
York 17, in heart of advertising district. Rapid expansion of SPONSOR per- 
sonnel and services made move to larger quarters necessary. Phone number re- 
mains MUrray Hill 8-2772. Other offices: Chicago, Los Angeles. 



SPONSOR Voluii : \ Published biwvekb SPONSOR P El v i Ba 

latinn Ofnies 10 K 19th St.. N i - IJ %$ a year in D. 5 $9 elsewhere. Bntei i elan milter 29 January 19)9 at Baltimore. Md. poslorflre un.1^ \ 



Ill roil I TO NI'OVSOHS lor 27 Julv 1953 



CMAC new spot 
radio sponsor 



Affiliates urged 
NBC split 



No color rev- 
olution: CE 



Study spurs 
UHF formulae 



For the first time General Motors Acceptance Corp., car-financing 
subsidiary of automotive firm, is sponsoring spot radio campaign to 
sell pay-as-you-go financing. Drive began week before Memorial Day 
weekend, consists of announcements Friday through Monday morning 
over WNEW, New York, WIP, Philadelphia. Announcements range in length 
from 2 to 5 minutes, include reports on traffic conditions, places 
to go, safety hints. Schedule calls for about 60 per week on WNEW, 
50 on WI P for 10-week run. GMAC plans repeat performance next spring. 

-SR- 

"Maybe now the affiliates will quit needling us so we can get back to 

work," is how one NBC executive greeted news of split between radio 

and TV. Affiliates rode network hard, arguing it took separate sales 

and programing teams to give radio fair share of attention. Reaction 

from them is expected to be enthusiastic especially since team of 

William H. Fineshriber and Ted Cott enjoys high repute with station 

operators. Fineshriber heads up radio network with Cott as operating 

chief. 

-SR- 

General Electric booklet to its distributors, dealers predicts color 
TV will be factor in merchandising of sets by fall 1954. But at same 
time GE says color won't bulk big for some years. Here are points GE 
made to allay fears black-and-white sales will be hurt, same advice 
being applicable to clients pondering effects of color TV: (1) Color 
TV will come as evolution, not revolution; (2) Color will prove to be 
a supplementary service and will not quickly or perhaps ever com- 
pletely replace black-and-white; (3) Black-and-white receiver will 
continue to be backbone of TV sales for at least 5 years. 

-SR- 

Now that American Research Bureau has released second study on UHF 
saturation, agency and network subscribers have been busy working 
out formulae for projecting growth of UHF sets. Basic method is to 
analyze stations on basis of 4 factors: (1) amount of VHF competition; 
(2) distance of VHF stations; (3) length of time stations have been 
on air; (4)local programing picture. 



Veir national spot ratlin and TV business 



SFONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Anahist Co.. 
Yonkers NY 

Arthur Guinness Son 
Co.. Lone. Is- 
land City. NY 

Robert Hall Clothes 
NY 



Hotpoint. Chi 



Standard Brands, 

NY 
Standard Brands. 

NY 
Sweet Candy Co., 

Salt Lake City 



Wheatena Corp. 
Rahw.n N| 



Super-Anahist 



Burke's Superior 
Ale 

New salesrooms 



Appliances 



Dlue Bonnet 
margarine 
Royal Desserts 



Candy 



Wheatena cereal 



Ted Bates. NY 
Compton. NY 



Frank B. Sawdon. 
NY 



Maxon NY 



Ted Bates. NY 

Ted Bates NY 

Gillham Adv Salt 
Lake City 



Brisacher- Wheeler. 
NY 



130 radio rrkt; 'sup- 
plementing TV 
coverage' 

Northeast: Maine. Rhode 
Island. Conn 

Seven cities: York. Lan- 
caster. Harrisburg. all 
Pa.; Kansas City. Mo.: 
Kansas City. Kan; 
Baltimore: Brockton 
Mass 

Six TV stations: WTM|. 
Milw: WKY-TV. Okla 
City; WSPD-TV, Tole- 
do; KSD-TV, St Louis: 
WBEN, Buffalo; WHAS- 
TV, Louisville 

50 mkts. mon-'Howdy 
Doodv ' 

65 mkts. non- "Howdy 
Doody" ' 

39 radio stations. Intc- 
mountain Net: 9 Mid- 
west & mountain 
states 

Approx 100 mkts. 
scattered 



Radio' 1-min daytime anncts: start Sep: 
26 wks 

Radio Cr TV annct campaign: start Aug 



Radio & TV: 1-min. 20-sec. 30-sec anncts: 
start in fall: continuing campaigns to pro- 
mote new outlets 



TV: ' 2 hr film show, Hollywood Half Hour;' 
start various dates in July: run 5 alt wks 
each city, thru Sep 



Radio: 1-min daytime anncts: start Sep. 

15 wks 
Radio: 1-min daytime anncts; start Sep: 

15 wks 
Radio: total of 6.074 e.t. anncts: start early 

Sep 



Radio: 5-. 10-, 15-min newscasts, mostly 
morning; start Sep; 26 wks 



: 



SPONSOR 



More advertisers than ever 
before are buying morning 
radio time. For them, we'd 
ike to add a couple more 
"mores!' 




•San Francisco Pulse, 

May-June 1953 

In© Koffee Klub has tin- 

highest average rating of an\ 
San Francisco-Oakland independent 
in the Ifondaj through Friday, 

6:(K) to <):<)<> a. m. period. 







George Ruge's "Koffee Klub;' 
6:00 to 9:00 a.m., Monday 
through Friday, has more 

steners than any morning 
program on any Bay Area 

ndependent station.* 

George Ruge's "Koffee Klub" 
has more San Francisco spon- 
sors than any San Francisco 
station. Sustained sales re- 
sponse is the reason. 

It follows, therefore, that in 
San Francisco these "more" 
advertisers get more listen- 
ers per advertising dollar and 
more sales per advertising 
message on KYA's George 
Ruge "Koffee Klub:' 

If you're interested please 
hurry... the "Koffee Klub" 
is a very, very popular place. 




tJu. 



^>r yrasci&c:o 







27 JULY 1953 



the magazine Radio and TV 



advertisers use 



ARTICLES 



is era of spot radio rate dettls coming to an end? 

Under-the-counter deals are on the downgrade, most buyers and sellers 'feel. 
Realistic rate cards and recognition of the evils of chiseling have helped broad- 
casting industry clean its own house 



Bache gets more leads-perS on radio 

Brokerage house puts hefty share of ad budget into radio, finds that careful 
selection of programs enables it to get sales prospects at less cost than news- 
paper ads which tend to get buried among competing ads 



Betatre of these medio research pitfalls! 

Part 7 of SPONSOR'S All-Media Study. It's awful easy to read into a research 
study what you want to find there. Ten tips on what to consider when evaluating 
a study, gathered from interviews with 158 media experts around the country 



Moving Bay on Matlison Avenue 

Keeping a directory up-to-date these days is a tough operation. Agencies, 
reps, and others in the industry have been bursting their seams, moving to larger, 
more modern quarters. SPONSOR pinpoints a few examples 



IV fit/ IfiM'riooii }1 a chine uses TV 

Use of prestige programing aims to make AMF trademark as well known and 
respected as GE, USS, and Westinghouse. But "Omnibus'' program has also dem- 
onstrated its ability to sell consumer items such as home woodworking equipment 



lVftcif \BC brand-switching study reveals 

How you can use NBC TV's brand-switching study. New NBC study finds corre- 
lation between viewing TV programs and purchase of sponsor's product. This 
article analyzes use agencies, clients can make of study. It also contains ques- 
tions from admen on research approach with answers from NBC 



COMING 



33 



36 



3« 



n 



42 



44 



Volume 7 Nurr 
27 July 1953 



1 



t 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

49TH & MADISON 

MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

MR. SPONSOR, Milton Fox-Martin 

NEW AND RENEW 

P. S. 

NEW TV STATIONS 

FILM TOP 20 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

RADIO RESULTS 

SPONSOR ASKS 

AGENCY PROFILE, Eric Eisner 

ROUND-UP 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS IN ADVERTISING 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper G 
Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred 
Department Editor: Lila Lederman 
Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, 
Konrad, Joan Baker 
Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry. E 
Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. 
(Western Manaqer), Maxine Cooper 
Manager), Wallace Engelhardt ( 
Representative), John A. Kovchok 
tion Manager), Cynthia Soley, Ed 
Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernar fl 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Sati S 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shear • 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



I 

P : 
( * 



Caimdian radio and TV section 

SPONSOR'S annual round-up of data on air media and their uses in Canada. -. . - 
Will contain market data, coverage figures, tips on selling, info on current users -***"• 



\ightt ime radio analysis 

SPONSOR is gathering research facts on nighttime. Al! the pros and cons on 
buying nighttime radio will be summarized to aid buying decisions. 



1 1 Aug. 



Published blweckl} bj SPONSOR PUBLICATIO 
combined »iili TV. Executive, Editorial, ilnu 
Advertising Offices: I9lh & Madison 
\,u Y.ik 17. X. V Telephone: MUrray Uil 
Office: 16] E Grand Ave Phonal 

Wesl Coasl Ofl ^7 Sunset B.Hile 

Tell phi ii. Hollywood 1 8089. Trintii 
:.' in Elm Am . Baltimi re 11, Md Subs 
States (8 Canada and toreign $9. Sim 

Printed In I S. A. Address all «>rre 
in in E. 19th St , N.-u V.iik 17. X V MlrraOj 
2772 Copyright 1933 SPONSOR PUBLICATIC I 



'1 



KWKH delivers over 
hree times as many homes 
as Shreveport's 
second station! 



J's easy to pick the Shreveport radio winner it's 
KVkH, by more than three-to-one! 

\s, KWKH delivers 302.9' '< as many Average Daily 
tsteners as Shreveport's second station — yet costs 
cly 60.0' i more money! 

"hese audience figures are from the new Standard 
Nation Audience Report — the more conservative of the 
to recent audience surveys made in this area. 

it your Branham man tell you all about KWKH's 

erwhelming superiority, here in the important 
/r Kansas- Louisiana-Texas area. 




"B" KWKH 

AVERAGE DAILY LISTENERS 

KWKH 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



A Shreveport Times Station 

Texas 



"> 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham C o.. ArkaflSa* 

Keprcscntativ i * 

Henrv Clav, Gfncnl \Uinaser 
Fred Watkin*, Commercial Manager 



?**WOW! 




10,000 WATTS 

at740 



K8IG 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 




GIANT 

ECONOMY 

PACKAGE OF 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

RADIO 



John Poole Broadcasting Co. 
KBIC • KBIF • KPIK 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28. Calif. 

HOIIywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker Associates, Inc. 




The Blue Ribbon already 
—and just a year old! 

"Tke Best News Reporting of any non- 
network radio station." 

That's the inscription on the trophy 
just awarded KBIC, the Catalina sta- 
tion, by The Radio and Television 
News Club of Southern California. 

With men who know news best . . . the 
writer at the teletype, the newscaster 
at the mike . . . these expertly handled 
hourly 5 minute-news gems of KBIG's 
Alan Lisser rank tops! 

A long list of KBIC news sponsors 
verify this judgment with pen on 
contract. 

You can join them with your own 
newscast every day of the month for 
only $25 a day . . . twice daily for $36. 







t harh's C'fimpfx'ff. Mm Manus, John & Adams. 
Detroit, says, "Radio has done a real job for 
Cadillac." So sold on the power of radio are he 
and his client, that Charles recently placed 
the {5-minute Cadillac Choral Symphony not only 
in 7 J CBS network markets, but arranged tor tran- 
scriptions of it in 193 spot markets as well. "The 
spot stations still bring in the maximum listening 
audience," he explains. "And the lle.xibility of 
a spot schedule continues to offset the savings ac- 
i/uired on a network buy with its dazzling discounts." 



>lutU'lv\nv t/fisoii. Herschel /.. Deutsch X- < ».. 
Veto York, has become an ex/jert in \egro radio 
through her work on the Landers Co.'s Dixie Peach 
hair pomade and Palmers' SI. in Sin (ess. a soap and 
ointment. "We're on Negro radio on a ^2-week 
basis with anywhere from fire to 15 60-second 
announcements a week for each of these clients.' 
she sins. Because of their variety store distribution, 
hiatus for both products comes between 15 Novem- 
ber and the end ot the year: "That's whtn they're 
crowded of! the counters b\ giil items." she adds. 



Joy >faIfirocit. Warwick & Legler, Los Angeles, 
buys announcements to reach as large a cross-section 
of male and female adult audience as possible for 
her Eastside Beer account. "We place announcements 
both on radio and Tl except in Lot Angeles nhere 
Eastside Beer sponsors two Tl programs Foreign 
Intrigue ami City Detective, <>n K Mill." Joy explains. 
Announcements are tailor-made to local areas, and 
Joy analyzes each market before deciding upon the 
number ot commercials to be aired. Among her 
other accounts is Ben Hur Products. 



!>«»«• Ki>(itf<*!/. Roy (inrii Advertising, \cw York, 

saw radio has done too good a job for one of her 
accounts, Peter Peterson. Long Island building 
contractor. "We ran two 60-second announcements 
,linl\ lor this firm on WHLI," she explains, "titer 
a couple ot weeks on the air. Peterson was SO 
swamped with business, that we had to reduce the 
schedule to tkree-a-week." Dee's agencj specializes in 
advertising with "emotional appeal," using the per- 
sonalized approach tor Dee's an mints including 
Whitehall Kitchens, Lynbrook led. Sav. X- Loan Assn. 



SPONSOR 



Pid you 




hear POOLe this* rwrnmg 

That is a question you hear around Greensboro and throughout the WBIG 
broadcasting area any day It's proof that we reach listeners — they tune to 
hear Bob Poole every day. 

Who can say why Bob, or any other successful radio personality, clicks with the 
public 5 It's tough to pick a man for a spot like his early morning show, 
"Poole's Paradise " Comments need the proper balance of good humor and sincerity if 
the audience is to be held. Bob has scored with listeners in this area. He 
quips, gives the time and weather reports, and plays recordings — and some 

amazing sound effects will be heard Occasionally there will be an announcement 
obout a missing dog, or about an earring Mom lost shopping It's a terrific day for 
golf, so Pop gets panned for working. Do listeners love it 5 Judging 

from the added sales for sponsors of Poole shows, they do. 
There is also that daily inquiry 



// 



GEEENSBORQKC. 







In Zi r A Year of Broadcasting 



CBS AFFILIATE 5000 WATTS 



"Did you hear Poole this morning 3 " 



This is a /'• si '/ S( eg. Watch (<>,■ 

other ads featuring Dob P 
"Poole's Paradisi ." Add /'• i fit Id, Sports 
Director ,v V Dick Mi 

Farm Director. 



Represented nationally by Hollingbery 



21 JULY 1953 



Want to see 
your sales 

SKY HIGH? 




oul <>l 3 French radio 
homes in Quebec. 

'2. Hundreds of 

i housands of 

i. in litul listeners day 

and night as 

reported by B B \1 

.'$. Selling power 
second to none 
7.500.000 box tops 
ast year. 



CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 



MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives 

Adam J, Young Jr. New York, Chicago 
Omer Renaud & Co. Toronto 





HSSff* 



00 



00 



''%»»»''«' 



MEDIA STUDY 

That was quite a job SPONSOR did on 
Life's new 4-media stud) ( "'What spon- 
sors should know about Life's nev\ 1- 
media study," 29 June L953, page 27). 
I think, all of us in broadcasting owe 
you a vote of thanks for taking up the 
cudgels so tellingly and so effectively. 
It is this kind of awareness which we 
need so much in these days of strong 
competition. 

My congratulations to Ray Lapica 
who did a thorough and comprehen- 
sive job. And by the way. his media 
evaluation series has been tops. 

William H. Fineshriber Jr. 

I .P. & Gen. Mgr. 

Radio and TV Networks 

NBC 



Your media study is wonderful! 
Please put our name on the reserva- 
tion list to receive this study in book 
form when it is reprinted. 

Somehow we have misplaced the 
May 4 issue of sponsor which includ- 
ed the second article, '"Media Basics I." 
Would you be good enough to send us 
this one issue? 1 am enclosing 51V. 
Jo Anne Rebstock 
The Armand S. Weill Co. 
Buffalo 



Would it be possible to receive the 
survey regarding the evaluation of ad 
media, in full, now? 

J. F. Pleskach 
Pleskach & Smith Adv. 
Omaha 

• The scries i- not available in full now. A!« 
though most of the research on the -.eric-. is done, 
the articles are written is-ne !►> is-ue. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Congratulations on your recent arti- 
cle entitled "Is your PR man air- 
minded?" il June 1953. page 38). 
\\ hile radio has become an accepted 
"tool" of public relations, too few 
people in our particular ty pe of busi- 
ness fulh realize the potential of the 
radio medium. 



Personally, though. I differ from Al- 
fred Jaffe's excellent commentary that 
PR through radio — or TV for that mat- 
ter — means far more than a mere utili- 
zation of paid programs. Nor do I 
fully agree with the concept of capital- 
izing on the sustaining time through 
the pseudo "radio kit>-. . . . 

Between the two there is a point 
ol balance quite similar to the PR 
approach to newspapers and periodi- 
cals, whereby the advertising, news and 
editorial columns are used according 
to the "demands of the moment. 

In radio, there is a definite line of 
demarcation between the paid series of 
spots or shows and the sustaining news 
or feature programs. yet all phases of 
a station s programing must be recog- 
nized and integrated into the public re- 
lations program. 

As in newspaper and periodica! 
work, we must have a thorough under- 
standing of radio or T\ before we can 
take advantage of the facilities they 
have to offer. By the same token, we 
have to know our public relations be- 
fore we can apply the principles of a 
specific project to the air media. 

It's about time someone started com- 
menting on public relations and radio- 
TV. Kudos to Mr. Jaffe! 
Stanley \. Conder 

Public & Industrial Relations. Ltd. 
Toronto. Canada 



RADIO BASICS 

If possible, please send me three 
more copies of Radio Basics, which we 
agree is ■"something special." 

If there is am charge, plea-e send 
me a bill. 

Ed La Grave Jr. 
Account Executive 
Lessing Adv. Co.. Des Moines 

• The 1933 editions of Radio and TV Ba-ic- 
now i*. ill .1.1. Price Is 25c each. 



15% COMMISSIONS 

I'd like to add a few words to your 
article. "Do agencies earn their IV < 
on air accounts?"' 1 29 June 1953, 
page .S2 I . 

The advertiser who says that all an 
agencv does for its radio and television 
shows is w rite a Few commercials either 
has his eyes closed to the facts — or he 
needs a new agency. There are. obvi- 
ously, \ar\ing degrees ol service which 
an agency can give an account, depend- 
ing on the relationship of the client 
(Please turn to page 17 t 



SPONSOR 





AIR TRAILS' THREE SUPER 

COMMUNITY STATIONS DELIVER 

$3 BILLION OHIO MARKET 

Twin attraction for advertiser in ATN: 
advantages of network cost, flexibility of spot 



M his is tin- stor) <>i the $3-billion I entral Ohio market and 
and how the Vir frails Network can service it economical!) 
for imiional ami regional advertisers. 

Tlii- is also the ston, ol the Dayton, Columbus ami Spring- 
field markets individually and what \\I\<-. WCOL and 
W l/l. mean to these markets in terms "I programing, prestige 
and sen ice t<> the advertiser. 

Here an- some ol the highlights "I these interlocked stories: 

The area covered by iIk- lit I rails trio is comprised <>l 
1,840,000 people with one of the highest net effective buying 
incomes in tin' country. This income averages $5,330 pei 
family. (For Dayton the average comes to $6,405 //"■ sixth 
highest for tmerican lilies | 

1 lie Air Trails area combines tremendously productive ami 
fast growing industrial cities with consistently prosperous 
agricultural country. These farm lands in L952 prodwi-d 

close to Ml>7 million in gross cash income, a per acre \itl'l 
that ranks pretty much in a class In itself. 

Each of the tir Trails stations is richly staffed in local 
personalities personalities who rule the popularity roosi in 
their community. The interlined management makes the lu^h- 
ralinc personalities available to lir Trails advertisers. 

The Air Trails stations are preferred 1>\ local men hunts — 
a point quite cogent in vieu of this: more than ever in the 
history of radio national advertisers are going to local re- 
tailers lor their opinions on what media or broadcast outlets 
arc producing the best results for them. 

Each station is extra-alert about promoting audiences and 
the advertiser's product. 



This presentation was researched on the scene and prepared in its entirety 
by stos'Sor Presentations, Inc., for the Air Trails Network and its stations. 



I* t- 1* M otes Sit /#>.v 

1/f Trails Network 



'""»'<"%/»; v ^"<mw^~'^"WiM%^'''>m 



markets 



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AIR 

TRAILS 

NETWORK 



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S 

. Irontoni M 

t 1 ^ 'i P 



•Ill III 



WCOL 



COLUMBUS 



■ I 



WIZE 



SPRINGFIELD 



markets 



FHE ATN MARKET: RICHER THAN METROPOLITAN CLEVELAND 



I hi- .11 r.i • n\ ered l>\ the \ m r rails 
Network, as pictured on the left, repre- 
sents a in. ii ki-t m iili ovei v '■ billion in 
net effei ii\ e bu) ing in< ome .1 bu) ing 
pqwei w lii' Ii i- greatei than that a< • 
1 red i ted \<< Metropolitan ( lleveland. 
I I he \l'i 1 1 ipolitan ( \e\ eland figure is 
J2,987,037,000. 1 

I'll i — ( lent 1.1I < Mim in. 11 ki-t. u lin Ii 
comprises \\ ING in Dayton, WCOL in 
Columbus and WIZE in Springfield, 
Ji-ln ers i" the ad\ ei tisei these things: 

\n expanding industrial activit) 
which has in recent years appreciablj 
increased both population and income 



in .ill thro • ii i'-. 

I ai ming areas w hich rank among 
the mosl prosperous and steadil) bo 

in the 1 ounl ry. I he \ I \ area in 
1952 produced a total ol 1406,820,000 
in -in-- . ash fai in up ome. I Sales 
Management's "Survej "I Bu) ing 
Power.") 

\n i-lli-i live buj ing in< ome i"-i fam- 

il\ "I S5,3 II I a most extraordinai j 

average in light oi the fa< 1 thai .1 

dlj pep mi ol the area's population 

1,8 10,000 ' live in what are dominant- 

l\ agricultural disl ri< ts. 



Urn's 11 Iml the Hi I lulls 
\llll i>r I. '■■ I Hg in flu- 

ill 11 boi 1 WING, 

II 1 Ol and II l/l -is a 
pat kage you - ■ dist ounl 

on the three-station pat 
Ii Mm buy tiro of tht 
stations the dist oun I 
/ d ad\ ertx 

1 1, ni enient us well us < < onomit al 
means o) doin 
three rich, complententi 
markets at a 



Basic market data on Air Trails Network Area 



ObNTIES OHIO 



POPULATION 



FAMILIES 



RETAIL SALES 



FOOD 



DRUG 



HOME FURN 



CEN MDSE 



NET EFFECTIVE 
BUYINC INCOME 





■tflaize 


31.600 


9,600 


$38,379,000 


$8,688,000 


$570,000 


$1 726.000 


$2,385,000 


$41,333 000 


linmpnigii 


37.200 


8.300 


26,875,000 


6,080,000 


692,000 


1,517,000 


1.069,000 


32,187.000 


«;irk 


115,600 


34,700 


123,885,000 


32.0:9.000 


23,821,000 


7,244,000 


13798.000 


195,595.000 


• 'II Kill 


26,400 


28.900 


33.497,000 


7,086.000 


450,000 


1,184,000 


1,407,000 


28,116,000 


l;irk«» 


42,600 


13,000 


50,527.000 


10,030,000 


82 3, C00 


1,936. COO 


2.300.000 


52.292000 


- -l.-i \\ arc 


30,900 


8.700 


29,586.000 


6,365.000 


414,000 


1 186.000 


1,148.000 


34,273 000 


lirfield 


53,000 


16,000 


43,974,000 


1 1,603.000 


1,424.000 


2 444,000 


3.765.000 


77.658.000 


li>rll«- 


23,000 


7.100 


24.831,000 


5.290.000 


433X00 


I.050.C0C 


2.772.003 


26.574.000 


k-ankliii 


532.800 


156,400 


598.260.000 


132,811 000 


18,782.000 


31.740.000 


91.062.000 


990.475000 


%-IM'IU- 


64.100 


18.300 


53 853.000 


12,473,000 


1,744,000 


2.279.000 


3 255.000 


96,740.000 




■eking 


19.300 


5.600 


15.201.000 


4,381,000 


363,000 


620.000 


1.223.000 


18 851.000 


1 


IMl\ 


36,100 


10.900 


40.040.000 


9544, 000 


824.000 


1 462.000 


3.817,000 


45 396.000 


1 


<-l\iim 


73.000 


22,600 


75061.000 


19.554, COO 


1.672,000 


3.159,000 


5.031,000 


106,361 000 


lust 11 


31.500 


10,000 


41,159 COO 


9,270.000 


708,000 


1.594,000 


2801.000 


34.939.000 


'ndisoii 

Vrccr 


22.700 


6,000 


30.592,000 


5,579.000 


611.000 


1 217.000 


1 018.000 


28862.000 


28,900 


8,200 


36,762,000 


6.132,000 


442 000 


1.253.000 


1 344,000 


39 762,000 


iami 


63.600 


19 700 


66,187.000 


16,876.000 


1,728.000 


3.031.000 


5,630.000 


105,449.000 


v oiit$>oim»r> 


423.000 


124,100 


516.333 000 


127,288,000 


18,415,000 


25 337.000 


75.004.000 


815 276.000 


1 


nrriifl 


17.600 


5.100 


1 1 ,838.000 


2 726000 


162,000 


217000 


239,000 


18 231.000 


\ 


i»rr> 


28,900 


8,400 


19.789.000 


6.666.000 


391.000 


704, COO 


I.I 19.000 


29.937.000 


\ 


irkiiw ji> 


29 700 


7,600 


27.380.000 


6.125,000 


476.000 


956,000 


1.237.000 


33.388,000 


: 


r«»lil«» 


28,300 


8,300 


20.760.000 


4,998,000 


401.000 


809,000 


765.000 


36.413,000 


' 


iHb> 


29.100 


8.400 


29.300.000 


8 195.000 


63 1 000 


1.374,000 


2 460 000 


37,03 1,000 




nion 


20.900 


6,200 


17.047.000 


3,404,000 


353.000 


507.000 


539 000 


22.886,000 




arrea 


41,000 


1 1,600 


34,528.000 


8,680.000 


750.000 


1.477,000 


1.071.000 


56 410.000 




TOTAL 


1,840 800 


563,700 


52,010,644,000 


$471,853,000 


S54,080,000 


$96,023,000 


S226,259,000 


S3. 004, 535, 000 



SOURCE - Mjnaci-inrnt Survey « 



markets 




JTVOCV.TT 



wa 



■in. ; *'■■ '■ 

»__AU.EN 



■I. ' IH. 



* W^rc r AUGLA IZE 




Miyicir 



New Bremen 






61 



Kenton 

£ 
HARDIN- 



MARION £**V 

«Mtu elarion Sun 

' J £ 



M .)Sowl fe: - ' 



^ JJ 



HMHUU| I" 

L BejJwH« 



,KNC)X Buil 




. •:■ 



Stdfley 






ir~7- l -Mi>«?riofl-**, 



[CHAMPAIGN 

Troy" 

„ TippsawefiHjfrpton 



CHAMPAIGN M «^<' W«i*l|lM fit 






^"^•ffiwi*" ) " ; Springfield 



""•J^ 



■ r ' nt ' rs !i»Srtv 



"sCSIir -?y WAYNE* £ncn- w* PIA.^« ^^J*"*^.,,* S*" 8 * 

L.tf^jL-NioN: / Dayton .x^fctfW^™* 

1 PREBLE p t^izsaagKn 



- 
JeffeiscT, - 

London Colu rnbus J&gi 



( 



t^'NHami 







A A AY 



eLancaste 



• •ton. 



Mtddietown *„„, , at , $^; 

Lebanon .y, fa ,„•-, 



jfcwtpoit 




s-SUea 



!£RLAN 



SAIXATIN 



A YETTE ft iwjr .-.-rjika,, C.rtte»itt#— ^fBStK IS G ^ 




i 



CU.VTON 1 ° , ™ !w * i, 

RUT' i K j y. y' J ROSS ^Wlli 

_ y Ke»Pe!f^!>.-j . . , z" 

v -■- . -:^_ 

J^iincinnatif^Kof) -tyen»w«. P !KE i< 

<*,(»!-;?, £.«*••«.»».. HIGHLAND I *»erij« 

^ u^V*' p TIl.^ >«^^ \___M! A< bS? 



**omJ McArthu? 




Mi 



^ ra%S>ii 







Peebles 



,../ *tati/r * 



; [S 

,TI jGAL. 



. . ol»X«Sr«« 



»«!»r5 



Ik?!- {ghyy y^afe^. 



- 



WCOL 



"> 



RlChKOO 




Marysville # ^ 
cMilfo'dCwi 



'LARK 



Mtchaniaburg 



oCatJwba/ 



GSEg'N'll 



WiiberfOfceo 
Xeniae 



Yellow Springs 





W Jeffet» 



N«* Cariisle 

Springfield / London . 



S. Cha 






FAYETTE 

o 






Was 



Sat»na° 

^gtoa 



,Ctirtswil» 



* Hen Uitbostm 



ifijflsSitfy 
' — ( 



MAP KEY: Daytime coverage: large unshaded area. Nighttime coverage: smaller, outlined area 



MAP KEY: Daytime coverage: l»r: i 



THREE RICH MARKETS-BEST SOLD BY ATN RADIO 



1. THE DAYTON MARKET 

Dayton is the center of the fast-ex- 
panding and thriving Miami Valley. 
with <p\tr $1.5 billion in net effective 
hn\ ing income and over 950.000 in 
population. 

In terms of effective buying income 
per family Dayton with its average of 
$6,405 ranks as sixth in the entire 
U.S.A. 

Dayton's industrial roster includes 
over 600 manufacturing plants produc- 
ing a wide diversity of both durable 
and consumer goods. 

Dayton's payrolls in 1952 were \ncII 
over the $800' ; 000 ; 000-mark. 

Dayton's Wright-Patterson Field is 
the home of the Air Material Command 
ami the hub of aviation research and 
development. 

One of the most important manu- 
facturing < ities in the middle west, 
Da\ton holds world-wide recognition 
as a production centei l"i precision 
tools and machines. This large em- 



ployment of highly skilled artisans is 
closely related to the above high fam- 
ily average of net effective buying in- 
come. 

Some of the country's biggest indus- 
trial names — National Cash Register 
and five General Motors plants — Frig- 
idaire. Delco. Aeroproducts. Inland 
Manufacturing and Moraine Products 
Divisions — are located in Dayton. The 
contribution of these plants to the cit\ - 
high wage level is mirrored by this 
fact: Dayton's average weekly wages in 
manufacturing in 1952 averaged over 
$83.25, higher than an\ other Ohio 
cit) and considerablv higher than the 
national average. 

2. THE COLUMBUS MARKET 

Columbus is one of the fastest-grow- 
ing industrial cities in America. 

The construction of new plants — 
\\ r-tinghouse. General Motors and 
North American Aviation — will in 
1953 alone add an estimated 38,000 



persons to the city's industrial payrolls. 
The industrial payroll in 52 was over 
$250,000,000. 

The net effective buying income per 
Columbus family in 1952 was $6,333. 
Only eight other cities in the I .S.A. 
had higher family Inning incomes. 

Columbus' wholesale establishments 
in 1952 accounted for $572,084.7(10 in 
sales. 

3. THE SPRINGFIELD MARKET 

Springfield is the marketing center 
of one of the richest and most progres- 
sive farming areas in the countr\ . 

The gross cash farm income for this 
area in 1952. according to Sales Man- 
agement's Survey of Buying Power. 
was 188,996,000. 

Springfield is the home of the Crow- 
ell-Collier Publishing Company and 
one of International Harvester's large 
plants. Springfield's net effective buy- 
ing income per family in 52 wa> 
$5,637. 




markets 



v mailer. putlm< d Vdi 







oMilford C 



1 



Pans 



Prv - - 1 S/j 



Urbana 

o 



o 

Troy 



ton 



Tippecanoe 
oCity 



CLARK 



Mechanicsburg 
o 



Catawba; 



MADISON p|ai 



"V 



Vandalia 



EKY 

iyton 3 o 

Oakwood 

W. Carrollton 
o 
urge 

iermantown 



New Carlisle Vl <$ nna 

Springfield , 



GREENE] 



S. Charleston 
o 



Yellow Springs 




W. Jefferso 



Wilberforceo 
Xenia © 



f 

°Sedalia Ste filf 



FAYETTE 



Jeffersonvillo 



MAP KEY: Dtyl large unvhnrtrri area N'ichitlme roreraje. imaller. outlin.d area 



Basic facts about these individual markets' 



1. DAYTON 2. COLUMBUS 3. SPRINGFIELD 



POPULATION 



RADIO FAMILIES 



RETAIL SALES 



NET EFFECTIVE 
BUYING INCOME 



City 
Metropolitan 

Market 



Metropolitan 

Market • • • 



City 

Metropolitan 
Market • • • 



2.> f.HOO 393,600 «I 

IH7. 100 532,000 I I.I 

952,900 887,100 2.72 

75.727 120.1110 23, 

1 IU.07U 155,310 34, 

2«7. lit I 2.">r.f;72 711 



City 0433,298,000 9543,000,000 SI I 1,070. 

Metropolitan si57o.iita.ooo 9590,000,000 0195,595, 

Market si.no.tno.ooo 9008,352,000 $271,200, 



8 180,008,000 

. so 12.0 10.000 

91,571,543,000 



8725,405,000 SI 10,000, 

8990,475,000 8195,595, 

si. I :t2M02. 000 8431.042. 



.'JOO 
000 
100 

915 

Of; f 
«.ir; 

ooo 
ooo 
ooo 

ooo 
ooo 
ooo 



•SOURCE: 1952-53 Sales N 

COUNTIES INCLUDED IN MARKETS Da I !) Champalirn. (3) 

Clark. (4) I Login. <8) JJ Miami. (10) 

Montgomery, ill) Treble. (12) Shelby. (13) Warren. Columbus— (1) Delaware, (2) 



FalrfleM. (3) Faye;te. (4) Franklin, (5> Hocklnc. (6) Knoi. (7) Llcklr .- 

row. (10) Perry. (11) rickaway. (12). Springfield— (1) Clark, 
,: Cbai pales, ,3) FayeUa, (4) Greene. (5) Madljoo. 



prog r aming 




AIR 

TRAILS 

NETWORK 



} 






wi 

DAY I 




Monkey business in the morning: a typical Butl Baldwin stunt 

Bud Baldwin, Dayton s leading disk jockey and showman, built a monkey giveaway 
into memorable audience promotion event. In Dayton radio 14 years. Baldwin 
joined WING in Xov. '52. Evidence he more than brought over audience: Jan.-Feb. 
'53 Hooper (6:30-9 a.m. daily) showed him tops in five out of 10 periods. 



CLICK FORMAT: SAI' 



^nal\ze the program structures of 
\\ [NG, WCOL and WIZE and this be- 
comes readil) evident: the program- 
ing approach is different with each 
market. In other words, each station 
knows what its community favors most 
in radio entertainment and shows and 
personalities are fitted in to that com- 
munity pattern. 

To cite a few cases in point : \\ I NG'a 
Bud Baldwin is considered h\ his 
townsmen to he as characteristic of 
Dayton as the cash register. WCOL's 
Joe Dobbins, who keeps aceounts with 
him anywhere from eight to 12 years, 
has as close a morning identity in Co- 
lumbus as the milk bottle at the hack 
door. The Hooner J. Socker character 
on WIZE is perhaps more quoted than 
any local editorial. (Incidentally, Con- 
Ian for November. 1952 showed \\ IZF. 
No. 1 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. intact Monday 
through Friday. I 

They like to go in for local program 
pioneering at all three stations, and 
here's one of the big reasons: two mem- 
bers of management came up through 
the program creating route. Among 
general manager Adna H. Karns' pre- 
vious assignments was program direc- 
tor of \^ ING, while ^\ IZE manager 
Mrs. Virginia Bennett used to be a pro- 
graming executive at W SAI, Cincinnati. 

WING has long been a breeding 
ground for programing ideas and tal- 
ent. For instance. Lonesome Gal orig- 
inated here. WING also prides itself 
on the diversity of its personalities and 
long-time Daytonians. For instance. 
Jack Wymer has been with WING 24 
vears: Jack Zeigen. newscaster. 14 
vears. and Charles Reeder. close to 
19 years. 

Just to give you an idea of how 
WING goes about diversifying its pro- 
graming so that all levels of listener 
interest are covered, let s call the roll 
of its disk jockeys: 
Bud Baldwin — pop tunes of the Hit 
Parade type, interspersed with a brand 
of monologue that's a popular source 
of quotation around town. I The 1953 
Jan.-Feb. Hooper shows him top at- 
traction locally between 6:30 and 7:45 
a.m. I Baldwin's added asset: his skill 



<TillTi 



WCOL 1 



COLUMBUS 




WIZE 



SPRINGFIELD 



programing 



I TOP TALENT 









u iili a i ommer* ial. 

Tommy >»///«>/» specializes in liil 



,i 



Dili) music, ranking among the coun- 
try's tops as a commentator in thai 
field. \l>" one ol Dayton radio s i rack 
"pity liini'ii. 

Dave llbritton leans to the sweetei 
• ide «'l populai music, with .1 In m li<>U 
i>n the Negro market in Dayton, 
Gene Hurry ace authorit) on race 
music among his turntable brethren in 
Ohio, and a producei "I -.ii<-^ results, 

I success storu: it's topical 

of these three stations 

ITiis is .1 memo oul ol the Wi 01 fill - 
which pretty w «-l I typifies the man] success 
stories thai have come to WING, WCOl ind 
WIZE during ihe pasi year. 11m memo i- 
fr an salesman Don ( . Brandes to lii- boss: 
Then I presented the renewal foi Central 
Ohm federal Savings & Loan Isspciation 
in its executive secretary, Don I.. Tobin, he 
related an incident that had had a bearing 
on his dri ision in renew. 

"It seems one afternoon when the board 

nl directors a as to meet. Mr. Tnlnri armed 

in advance of the scheduled time, ami he 
overheard a conversation regarding on: II ai 
ter Furniss, it ho does the newscasts for 
his bank 

tleman had 1 omt into the 
haul, and asked one of the tellers it this was 
If alter Furniss' bank' The teller replied, 
'No, but if ult, r Fumiss has been doing a 
newscast hi us evenings for years.' 

"'Well.' the 1 alter Mini, 'it's alright as 
this is the bank that If alter Furniss talked 
about, ind he then proceeded to open a 

suable ai 1 ount." 

In. identally, 1 entraJ Ohio has been 
\\ i Ol - longesl and mosl consistent user. 



Tey're HfZE's tap personalities 



tliee liahmnii. director of it omen's 

ams, has i'i her Id years on 

II l/t. become 1 <>/ on'y /<>/> local 

radio star but a civit pen 




Jnhn McEnaney doubles from pro- 
gram manager to the high rating a.m. 
5, Ri-c and Shine, where he's 
better known as "Hooner k. ^ 




W i\ii stcinus lots ai tceiultt in personalities 



Tommj Sutton, l> re mosl hilllnll 

1951 Billboard poll rate, I him \o 9 among 

country's most populai hilllnll ■. ■ 1 

er. htS hits in' hidi I II li I Had a \ 



Hi its Inn Hontman, as director • ■' women's ac 
miles, conducts a variety o) ill\(. program 
hei \" I assignment is Foi Horn Only, a 

highly popular mixture oi musii and women's neus 



Dme ilhr iiimi. famous college and Olympit track 
stai carries a lot oj tales power with 

mini. et, and • Began his dl 

'49 and quick!) mushroomed Irom weekly to muhlh 



Jin k II ymer, hen sinct 1929 • dire, tor oj publit 
oj modern musit with a racey stile ut comment 
audience participation slum and commercial an- 
nouncer on the I niversity of Dayton's toot ball names 



t.rnr lint rs combines an encyclopedia* knot 
oj modern musii with n racey style oj comment 
and salesmanship, lie alternates his torrid nightly 
stint in 15-minu/e segments with Dave I 









WCOL'* personalities set the pace lor t'ttlunibus 



II nltrr I nrnisy. .' , makes 

him dean oj Colun :■■ •- 20 '"Its 

his sponsors will tell you he ;• 

eat deal oi influence nith his local listei 



Joe Dobbins, creator oj the "Perky," "A; and 

i' car" comedy ro \e himself a ho 

hold favorite in the central Ohio , nine 

he's also known Uir his m 



Evelyn Briers d charm 

tlaih afternoon halt-hour tor women: included in 

her background 

N 1 it ) ork and < lei eland 



Mr lei Foland, 1' ' "/ - new inquiring reporter and 
lernoon shou . hat a knack 
. things uf> uith showmanship. He's been 
and spinning 







Aim tra,ls 

¥%, If NETWORK 



} 



I WING 



DAT TON 




4111I11 



WCOL 



% COLUMBUS 




management & staff 




John Pattison (Pat) Williams, executive vice-president of the Air Trails 
Network, WING, WCOL and WIZE; 13 years in radio, with ATN 



Adna H. Karns, vice-president and general manager of the Air Trail: 
Network, WING, WCOL and WIZE; 10 years in radio, with ATN 



MANAGEMENT'S PRSME OBJECTIVE: SELLING FOR ADVERTISERS 



W^hat WING, WCOL and \\ l/l. 
are today is the fruit of long-range 
planning and imagination. Here is a 
management that in the late '40s fore- 
saw the need for revamping its local 
programing structure in order to meet 
the competition from a second air me- 
dium. It proceeded methodically to 
strengthen its retinue of local person- 
alities and put greater emphasis on au- 
dience promotion. 



Although affiliated with ABC. WING, 
WCOL and WIZE are community sta- 
tions in every sense of the word : WING 
has for years received more awards for 
community service than any other sta- 
tion in Dayton. \^ IZE has lived up to 
its slogan. "'WIZE Promotes Spring- 
field" by maintaining a high quota of 
public service programs, while \\ COL 
has truly distinguished itself as the rep- 
resentative station in the Capital <it\ . 



To give \ou an idea of how \\ IZE 
rates in prestige: Springfield wanted to 
show Alice Bahman, one of \^ IZE's 
personalities, how much it appreciated 
the public service she contributed 
through the vears and so the mayor 
proclaimed an '"Alice Bahman Da\ ." 

Service to the advertiser has always 
been a cardinal policy with the man- 
agement. It is alert and thorough with 
merchandising help when requested. 



1 WINfi' ''' '"' Oearge Leaning. Wf)f)| ■ [left) ISeal A. Smith, manager: in radio 16 years; sales 

" »"" u ' account exec, whose 10 Ll nwUl executive foi WLW and WLW-T between leaving WCOL 

years in radio have made him an authority in 1944 and his return early last year: doubled W'COUs billings the 

on how to help the advertiser best build past year, (center) Jack Doty has been with WCOL 15 years as local 

sales in the Dayton market. 1 right) sales representative and more recenth in charge of national sales. 

Charles Reeder, program director; with Tight) Bill Belaney, program director; served in various capacities 

lll\(, 17 years; also a ranking pianist in his six years with station: has popular earl) morning newscast 





1 3, WIZE: "-'"- 

gimc Ben- 
nett, the manager: was 
lour years account exec- 
utive at WING; prioi to 

If I \ G was assistant pro- 
gram mgr. with WSAI 




NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES 



NEW YORK 



C H I C A C 



H-R REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



LOS ANGELES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



49TH b MADISON 
(Continued from page !!i 

and the agen< j . But, w ithoul getting 
into the cliche "t "big ln>^ in a little 
pond" or the "little frog in the big 
pond," radio and television require 
sound, • artful sei \ i< ing in an) event. 

\\ i- Feel thai an advertise] deserves 
full measure "I return f< >i ever) dollar 
he - j m-ih I-. ;iml we've learned thai 
means staying on t<>|> "I ever) radio 
and television purchase, whether net- 
work, Bpot program, oi spol announce- 
ment. I he result is mounting man 
hours hi the cosl "I doing business, 
.in .i|>|>i^ iable nick in an already-small 
margin <>f |>r« >h t . 

We've heard ii said that we have an 
eas) t.i-k when we buy an outside n<i- 
work television package, Foi example. 
We've learned from experience thai 
-in Ii i- iu>t tlif case. First of all, we 
general!) select the program because 
our television specialists are program- 
ing experts. Secondly, we've found 
that we put almost as many man hours 
in the program, exclusive ol commer- 
cials, as the packagei does. 

Responsibility for the success or 
failure of the program will ultimatel) 
come to u-. especially the responsibility 
for a failure therefore we have addi- 
tional incentive to give it the attention 
required to make it a success. . . . 

We've analyzed our telephone and 
traveling expenses solely in connection 
with obtaining station clearances for 
our television programs. I ln-\ re ab- 
normally high. Abnormally bigh? 
["hey re fantastic, and they will be un- 
til the market situation in T\ is sta- 
bilized with the advent of new station- 
in one- and two-station markets. 

We've had our choice less service 
and Fewer man hours, or the necessary 
service and a "by the -kin ot our 
teeth, we hope to get by" attitude on 
the i o-t to us. We haven't succumbed 
to the temptation to give less service, 
bul we are about ready to succumb to 
the temptation to ask For a service fee 
on certain types of radio and television 
Bi ti\ it\ . 

Secretary-Treasi reb 

Midwest Agency 

I \<ime withheld on request) 



\ practical and e< onoi d method 

ot In inging a •! a-- i oota appi oa< Ii to 
\eu ^ m k tune lm\ ing i- in' n ased ( o- 
operation between the la i u-< 
and -in. dl agem ies in ii ies and tow ns 
throughout Vmei i< a. W( re< entlj had 

i-ion ti. aid the Bu< hen Co. in a 

leli-v ision i ampaign in Milwaukee. \\ e 
have also recentl) furnished a black- 
and-w lute and i oloi newspapei i am- 
paign in i oopei ation w itli Hem i, Hurst 
& \|i I tonald. Se> eral times we ba> e 
had occasion to assist Lennen S Newell 
m a |uil>li< relations capa< it\ . 

I l.i I n-\ e that the small agen< ies are 
in a |io-itiun [,, proA ide a real sei \ i< e 
to New ^ oik timebuyers in many ways 
where specific local information would 
add value to theii efforts in sei i< ing 
national accounts. We have found tri- 
form ol cooperation to be mutuall) 
benefit ial and expecl to find oui efforts 
in thi- direction expanded consider- 
al>lv during future years. 

II. I I I i- > V\ l<>\ 

The Saxton tgency 
Milwaukee 



CRASS-ROOTS APPROACH 

\ suggestion to help you accom- 
plish Item L5 in \our editorial. "This 
we fight for" (9 Fehruarv L953). 



SPONSOR REPRINTS 

I am an instructor in I \ produi - 
lion and writing and considei youi 
publication a "must foi i lass reading 

in all uiv courses. I would like to 

secure repi ints ol any artii Ies thai are 
available, so I will not have to damage 
mv library of SPONSOR. Having seen 
and acquired many reprint- at the 
\ \l\ll! convention, I know the value 
ol them in class instruction. 

I would also like to know where I 
may secure back copies of sponsor, 
Januarv 12. February 23, March 23, 
and \lav I!'., all 1953 issues, and their 
cost. . . 

Elder F. I'm iss 
tmerican Telecasting Corp. 
Ilolh ii ood 



. .... i.. 

.1 bark 



TV STATION MAP 

Would it l>e possible for you to -end 
me one copy ol the- latest l\ station 
map which vmi published along with 
j our fine magazine? 

Fr\nk Kmi.ii i 
Radio-! I Dim tot 
Richard t. h oh v Adv. 
Philadelphia 

• SPONSOR'j latest r\ .utinn nap appeared 

il. ih, 1 I JuK 1«.-.J j-.ur. 



► It... k 


t*snea. »«h<'i» 


... ...i.a.i 


PONSOH 


ImimI.t- 


Incl 


ii.lin^ 




"■Mir-, en. 


l -Ml. 









WJAR-TV 

.jfowi»vG 

* ABOUT ITS NEW 

SINGING SENSATION 




WW 



Fresh from New York and 
fabulous success at the 
famed Copacabana, the 
Paramount, Gogi's La Rue! 
A sought-after singer on 
the "Ken Murray Show" 
. . ."Kate Smith Show" 
"Celebrity Time" . . . the 
"Faye Emerson Show"! 

NOW STARRING ON THE 

Hty INC/AW 
TAUNT* C£1)B 

Monday through Friday 
5 to 5:15 pm 

Sponsored Mondays and 
Wednesdays by THREE 
MUSKETEERS and SNICKERS 
on Tuesdays by SIMMONDS 
UPHOLSTERY. A breezy 
quarter hour of tuneful 
talent, with established 
guest stars and enthusias- 
tic would-be celebrities! 

Available now over 
New England's Most 
Powerful TV Station 
where you sell More 
People Per Penny 
than in any other 
area in the U. S. A. 




AT THE SIGN Of THE ROOSTER 

PROVIDENCE 

Represented by WHO TIllVISION 



27 JULY 1953 



17 



^.ifcyt-f* 




C. RICHARD EVANS 

VICE-PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER I 
KGMB-TV 




MNi'.v"^:. 




" . . .our confidence ' 
UHF television, and 
'RCA All The Way,' il 
not misplaced. " 



NEAL B. WELCH 

GENERAL MANAGER. WSBTTV" 1 



WARREN P. WILLIAMSON, JR 

PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER. 






What Telecasters se 



. j w \Bl-TV 




MURRAY CARPENTER 

MANAGER. WABI-TV 







"Our 1-KW UHF Trans- 
mitter has proved to be 
all that could be desired 
...Since our first day 
of operation we have 
consistently maintained 
1003 power " 



PETER B. 
KENNEY 



JULIAN GROSS 




WJTV 



Cluuutel ^5 



"RCA can feel justi- 
fiably proud of their 
1-KW UHF Transmitter, 
UHF Pylon Antenna, studio, and 
remote equipment installation 
. . Our RCA transmitter is giving 

us a signal far in excess 
of what our engineers 
originally 
calculated. " 



JOHN ROSSITER 

GENERAL MANAGER. WJTV 






KFDnA Beaumont, Texas 
KFDX Wichita Falls. Texas 



"For 20 year; 
have operated ou 
Radio Stations on l 
policy that our eqi • 
ment must be nothing 
less than the best. N; • 
rally we chose an 
RCA 10-kw trans- 
mitter and asso 
ciated RCA TV 
equipment for 
KFDX -TV." 



i 



'i 



DARROLD A. CANNAN 

PRESIDENT. KFDM KFDX-TV 



MSH 




The RCA 12-section 
:«nna is performinK 
isplendid fashion. As 
iter of fact, its 
>rmance exceeds the 
;e made by your 
Representa- 





KARL 0. WYLER 4^ 

PRESIDENT. KTSM TV ^^ 




FRED WEBER 

PRISIOINT. WIPO TV 



bout RCA Equipment 



JLor a professional opinion on the finest TV equip- 
ment you can buy, ask the management man who operates a 
modern television station. 

For a professional analysis of your TV station requirements, 
ask the experienced equipment man who knows his TV station 
planning . . . Your RCA Broadcast Sales Representative! 




RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT. 



D jss. 



CAMDEN. M.J. 



"KROD-TV is com- 
letely RCA equipped. 
;ir RCA 500 -watt trans - 
itter (temporarily in- 
stiled) has done a very 
;a sfactory job. . . Cover- 
uj (because of our 
in mountain-top 
~i location) has r^ 

| been phenom- 
> fij enal . " ? ""- 




WCE DORRANCE D. RODERICK 

: ^ '*«» cm*(«»« or n* Kits 




JOSEPH HEROLD 

STATION MANAGER. KBTV 






THE FACTS 

speak for them' 
selves about 

"HOMETOWN, 
AMERICA" 

on WFBR 
in Baltimore! 



IN THE FIRST 4 WEEKS 



28,338 

Labels Were Bid In Radio 
Telephone Auctions 

511 

Calls Were Made By Our 
Sales Servicemen 

278 

New Retail Grocery Outlets 
Were Opened For Sponsors 

410 

Store Positions Were 
Improved For Sponsors 

469 

Stores Are Now Cooperating 

And Displaying "Hometown, 

America" Display Material 

401 

Individual Displays Were 
Built For Sponsors 



THIS IS ONLY 
THE BEGINNING! 








by 

Robert J. Landry 



Salesmanship and radio 

In the 7 April 1 ( ).~>2 issue of this journal, affectionate tribute was 
paid the memory of an admirable opera-singer-turned-salesman. 
Otto Freitag was the gent's name, and he was a friend of \our 
correspondent. We recalled seeing him in a small distributors shop 
in a provincial Mexican town on a summer afternoon "down on his 
stomach explaining to a Mexican business man. who was down be- 
>ide him. the wherefores and modus operandi of a Servel kerosene- 
fueled refrigerator." We went on to comment: "He could ha\e relied 
upon brochures and conversation." But be was <lov\n on the floor 
making the demonstration "because he was. b\ instinct, a naturally 
creative salesman." 

* *.i f: 

We thought of Otto Freitag again the other night at tin- New ^ ork 
University Summer Workshop when we heard Robert S. Keller, this 
time a theatre-organist-turncd-salcsman. make some verv wise and 
amusing comments on the whole theme of salesmanship. Keller, of 
course, sells small town radio, and in the present television-obsessed 
period, some people would consider that occupation to be prettj 
courageous, if not downright naive. 



"How do you sell time'.''" Keller put the question rhetorically, then 
answered it: "About the same way you sell anvthing. First, you 
locate your prospect; second, vou focus hi sattention on or whet his 
appetite for the commodity you are selling: and. third. \ou take his 
order. . . . There are as manv wa\s to make a sale as there are sales- 
men. There is high pressure, and low pressure, being in the right 
place at the right time, being in the wrong place at the right time. 
perseverance, diffidence, knocking your competitor, praising your 
competitor, pounding pavements, sitting in the office making tele- 
phone calls ad infinitum. There are no pat formulae, no magic 
words, no boiler plate that will guarantee result-. 



Ibis, we submit, is good firm sense and we found it arresting when 
Keller went on to observe to the universitv students: "Radio has 
nothing to fear but its own lack of confidence. The temporal - ) scare 
was good for radio: it took a closer look at its circulation, it- audi- 
ence, its low cost-per-1.000 and discovered how realK big it is. \nd 
now. finally, radio is doing a proper job of sales promotion to focus 
the attention of the advertiser on these facts." 



How true, how true. The "comeback" of radio is now a mattei 
of general notice, and of a new salesmanship hammered out on the 
anvil of a bad freight. The most enthusiastic zealots of the cause of 
television cannot make the overpowering radio statistics turn blue. 

{Please turn to paste 71 I 



20 



SPONSOR 



To Better Serve Alabama 

©te Birmingham Hem* 



/ 



JOINS WITH 



Application Vending for 50 KW 






<inn>, t n A., t I C VWf ^* 



Soon to be ) 16 KW 



Henry P. Johnston, executive vice- 
president of THE BIRMINGHAM 
NEWS CO., who has managed The 
NEWS' radio properties for the past 
17 years. He now is president and 
managing director of the three sta- 
tions. 



ami the Columbia Broadcasting System 



Advertisers will profit, too! They will receive the benefit of 
vastly increased promotional facilities, stepped-up merchandis- 
ing and valuable research activities. 



Represented by 

CBS Radio and TV 
Spot Sales 



WHBS and WHBS-FM, HunKyille, Ala., under some management 



MEET ROBB 

(Two B's, If You Please) 

THOMAS 

He might offer you another 
explanation, but to his spon- 
sors those two "B's" mean 
Big Business. 




Popular music, personality interviews, 
frequent news and sports reports and 
pleasant chatter about Milwaukee events 
— that's the "R.T." formula on Robb's 
mid-morning "Record Shop" and late- 
afternoon "1340 Club." Milwaukee loves 
it. loves WEMP's round-the-cloek dise- 
jockey personalities. 



And so do these national ad vertisei-s: 
Oxydol, Prell, Swan's Down, 
Carnation, Omar Baking, 
Mautz Paint, Robert Hall, 
Wonder Bread, Standard Oil, 
R. G. Dunn Cigars, Household 
Finance, Campbell's Foods 
and others. 

Join them and find out how WEMP 
delivers up to twice the Milwaukee 
audience per dollar of Milwaukee net- 
work stations*. Call Headley-Reed ! 



*Based on loicti mailable Hooper 
Comprehensive and SR & DS rales. 



WEMPWEMP-FM 

MILWAUKEE 

HUGH BO ICE, JR., Gen. Mqr. 
HEADLEY-REED. Natl. Rep. 

HOURS OF MUSIC. NEWS, SPORTS 




feniisf 



Tfiffon Fox-Jftartin 

Manager, Central Mutual Funds Dept. 
Kidder, Peabody & Co., New York 

It would be a rare contestant on a quiz show who could tell \ou 
that the president of the N. Y. Stock Exchange is G. Keith Funston. 
The chances are far greater that the contestant could identify Milton 
Fox-Martin as the mutual funds department manager of Kidder, 
Peabody & Co. The reason is simple: Fox-Martin has been something 
of a radio personality for the past two \ears. 

Shortly after he joined the brokerage house in 1951. Fox-Martin 
became intrigued with the idea of a radio program which would ex- 
plain the workings of mutual funds to a mass audience. Working 
with Edwin Rooney, radio and TV director of Doremus & Co., a 
format was developed in which Fox-Martin would conduct a 15- 
minute interview every week over WOR. New York, with the re- 
search heads of the country's leading mutual funds. 

The program proved so popular that it was taped and rebroad< ast 
over WBZ, Boston, and WGN, Chicago, in which cities Kidder. Pea- 
body has branch offices. In addition to its popularity, the program 
proved successful as a new business getter through its booklet offers. 

Explaining his personal appearance on the program. Fox-Martin 
told sponsor: "One of the important things in getting new customers 
for an investment business is building confidence. And I feel that 
people like the fact that they are getting their information from 
someone who is actually in the investment business rather than a 
professional actor. It gives the program that personalized approach 
which is so important in the securities business." 

To improve his delivery Fox-Martin took diction lessons from 
coach Marion Rich. And to steer clear of possible trouble he became 
a member of American Federation of Radio and Television Artists. 

One other reason that he likes radio as a sales tool is: "You've 
got a certain amount of freedom from competition. ^ our ad isn't 
buried in with manv other advertisers of the same category." 

This accolade for radio has added weight when vou consider the 
fact that Fox-Martin worked in the financial advertising department 
of the \eu } ork Herald Tribune before joining Kidder. Peabody. 
He has had a diversified selling and advertising career between the 
time he left Yale in 1935 and his present assignment. 

Fox-Martin makes home in Pound Ridge. N. V.. with his wife and 
»i\ children. He's active in church work and a member of the 
school board. * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 







WSPP 



Slorer Broadcasting Company 
TOM HAR*;- 



, AM TV 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

Represented Nationally 
by K A T Z 






27 JULY 1953 



23 




Something ^ew has been added 



MEET 

Connie 

limk! 



THE NEW HOME SERVICE DIRECTOR OF 

OMAHA'S RADIO WOW AND WOW-TV 

... A FRESH NEW PERSONALITY WHO 

CAN SELL FOOD AND HOUSEHOLD 

PRODUCTS! 



SHE CAN GET MORE SALES FOR YOU . . 

BECAUSE . . . she has fine professional training in home eco- 
nomics . . and every other facet of modern 
living. 

BECAUSE . . . her experience includes applying her skills to 
a family of her own . . and teaching home 
management to thousands of women. 

BECAUSE . . . she sells naturally and instinctively . . (You ve 
got to see and hear her to really appreciate 
this*) 

(*Air-check or film 
available on request) 



• Ask your John Blair or Blair-TV representa- 
tive how Connie Cook can give your sales a 
lift in the great Midwest market served by 
Radio WOW and WOW-TV. 




♦CONNIE'S CUPBOARD 

11:15 — 1 1:30 a.m. 
Monday through Friday 

Radio WOW 
♦CONNIE'S KITCHEN 

3:00 — 3:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday 

WOW-TV 



NBC— 590 KC 
5000 watts 



Meredith Stations 

OMAHA 



NBC — Dumont 
100,000 watts 



Radio WOW • WOW - TV 



24 



SPONSOR 



J\ew and renew 




1 



on l(«fiif< \clti 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


SJA 


TIONS 


Chevrolet and Chevrolet 


Campbell Ew.ild Detr 


A8C 


364 


D- .ill rs. Dctr 
Emerson Drug. Bait 
Int'l Ccllucotton. Chi 
Xaiser-Frazcr. Willow Run. 


Lcnncn & Newell. NY 
FC&B Chi 

Wm H Weintr.mb NY 


MBS 
CBS 
CBS 


S60 
202 
166 


Mich 
Radio Bible Clast. Crand 

Rapids Mich 
Tom Co, Chi 


|ohn M C.i<np. Whejton. 

Ill 
Weiss & Ccller. Chi 


ABC 

ABC 


42 
313 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Five mm newscattt: 24 each weekend scattered 

throughout tched ; 27 |uni 13 wks 
Titu> Moody T Th 7 45 50 pm ; 21 |uly; 52 wks 
Arthur Godfrey. M c 10 10 15 .im 7 |uly; 52 wk 
Lowell Thom.it M F 6 45-7 pm ; 29 June; 52 wks 

Radio Bible Class. Sun 8-8 30 am; 5 Jul: 52 wkt 

Turn to a Friend; T, Th II 55 am 12 25 pm ; 23 
|unc: 26 wkt 



2 



». .«*»<# A 



SPONSOR 



it Radio \rt 



Liggett & Myers. NY 

• Chettorticldt i 
Liggett & Myers. NY 

Chesterfields 1 
Miles Labs. Elkhart, Ind 

Procter & Camble. NY 

Procter & Camble, NY 

Procter & Camble. NY 
Procter & Gamble, NY 

Procter & Gamble. NY 

Procter & Camble. NY 



AGENCY 

Cunningham Cr Walsh NY 

Cunningham & Walsh. NY 

Ccoffrey Wade. Hywd 

Biow. NY 

Benton 6 Bowles. NY 

Compton, NY 
Benton & Bowles. NY 

Dancer-Fitzgerald Sample. 

NY 
Young t j Rubicam. NY 



STATIONS 

ABC 331 

MBS 560 

MBS 476 

NBC 162 

NBC 175 

NBC 170 
NBC 173 

NBC 164 

NBC 186 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Les Criftith & the Newt M F 7:25-30 pm ; 29 

|unc; 52 wks 
Perry Como M. W. F 7 45 8 pm ; 31 Auk; 17 wkt 

Curt Masscy Time; M-F 12-12:15 pm ; 29 |unc; 

52 wks 
Welcome Travelers; M-F 10-10:30 am; 29 |unc; 52 

wkt 
Lite Can Be Beautiful: M-F 3 3 15 pm; 29 June. 

52 wkt 
Road of Life: M-F 3:15-30 pm; 29 |unc; 52 wkt 
Pepper Young's Family: M-F 330-45 pm; 29 June: 

52 wkt 
Right to Happiness: M-F 3:45-4 pm; 29 |unc; 52 

Backstage Wife. M-F 4-115 pm : 29 June: 52 wkt 



(For N.-u National Spol Radio and TV Business, see "Report I page -' 



3 



National Broadcatt Salr 



NAME 

Louis Arnold 
Leslie C. Arrics Jr 
|oe H. Bak:r 

Richard H. Baldwin 
Frank Barron 
lames W. Beach 
Bob Brahm 
F. E. Busby 
Calvin S Cass 
Robert E. Chaffee 
Douglas R. Clawson 
Alex Coc 
Pat Cooney 
Richard L. Ceismar 
Ansel E. Cridlcy 

Dick Harris 
Bertram |. Hauscr 
A. L. Hollander |r 
E. P. H. lames 
loscph A. Jenkins 
Harrison Kohl 
Jacques Licbcnguth 
Robert Lyons 
Clyde F. Mcades 
lay Mcrklc 
Werner Michel 
John H. Milburn 
Edward A Montanus 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Du Mont. NY. asst to dir prog & prodn 
Du Mont. NY. asst dir prog & prodn 
KMTV. Omaha, prom mgr 

Paragon Pictures. Evan;ton III. sis stf 

WIW Cleve. sis rep 

WBKB. Chi sis dcDt 

! -""n Crms. NY. sis exec 

WKRC Mobile, gen mgr 

Croslev Bdcstg. NY, sis dept 

Life Mag, sr tlsmn 

Zion's Securities. Salt Lake City, attt mgr 

KITE. San Antonio, comml mgr 

Ley 6 Livingston SF mgr Phoenix branch 

Du Mont. NY sis arct mgr 

WFCM. Fitchburg. Mass. pres & gen mgr 

WNAX, Yankton SD. prom mgr 

MBS. NY. m-r co-oo p'og'.iming 

Du Monr NY prodn facils mgr 

NBC NY. prom dir 

WNBK. Cleve mgr 

Des Moines Register & Trib. prom mgr 

A<-me Manifolding NY. sis stf 

WRAP. Norfolk. Va asst mgr 

WCH. Norfolk. Va. icct exec 

Du Mont. NY. sr prodn facils -upvr 

Du Mont NY. prodr 

KTIP Portcrville. Cal romml mgr 

Bryant Machinery & Eng. Chi. adv mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same a>st bus mgr prog dept 

WTTC W,i<h mgr 

May Bdcstg Co KMTV also KMA. Shenandoah. 

Iowa i dir prom & mdsg 
NBC Film Div Chi sis rop 
WXEL Cleve. sis iM 
Same. ;ls mgr 

S-mc eastern sis mgr film synd opcr 
WPFA-TV Pcnsacola Fla gen mgr 
Ad.^m J Young |r. NY. radio sis stf 
KX'C Iowa City tit mgr 
KDYL KD>L TV Silt Lake City tit dir 
S'mc station mgr 
KH|-TV LA acct exec 
Same, but mgr prog 6 prodn 
Same alto Salisbury Bdcttg Corp Worcester vp 

gen m-jr 
Same tit scrv mgr 
Same vp chg co-op prog'amipg 

dig prog opcr 
KVOA Tucson, coord af TV planning & pub rel 
WKIF-TV. Pittsb comml mgr 
KMTV Omaha sis stf 
NBC Film Div NY. sis rep 
Same gen mgr 
Same, comml mgr 
Sarrc prodn facils tc 
Same exec prodr chg prodn 
KSFO SF jeet 
NBC Filn Du Chi. sis rep 




In next iaanei ^>ir and Rcnrirrd on Tclrrision (Network) I MverfistJIg igency Personnel 
Changes; Sponsor Personnel Change*} Station Change* (rep*, network affiliation, pmrrr increase*) 



\umi ■■ 

nru category 

Arthur U S 
F. I B 
R. I < 
John /.. U. 



27 JULY 1953 



25 



2 7 



ULY 19 5 3 



3. 





\ational Broadcast Sales Executives (continued) 



NAME 

Ellis Moore 
John L. Moore 
Charles E. Morin 
John Mowbray 
Paul B. Mowery 

Fred Ncttere 
Carl Nielsen 
Roger O'Connor 
Alvin C. Pack 
Robert D. Peel 
Ed Prcsncll 
Herbert Rice 
Robert Rodgers 
Richard H. Rogers 
William T. Roimine 
Sam Rossant 
Murry Salberg 
Richard T. Sampson 
Dick Schutte 
John Scidlcr 
Frank S. Shaw 
James Strain 
Donald D. Sullivan 
Arthur M. Swift 
J. W. Timberlake Jr 

Bill Waish 

Ceorge I. Weinman Jr 

Earl M. Willhite 

Ken Willson 

Henry T. Wilson 

Mel Winters 

Kelly Wofford 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NY, adv mgr 



NBC, NY, press dept 
Longincs, Wittnauer Watch Co, 
KPOA, Honolulu, comml mgr 
KSFO. SF, acct exec 
WABC-TV, NY, gen mgr 



Wall St Journal, NY, space slsmn 

NBC, TV spot sales mgr 

Avery-Knodel, NY, radio time slsmn 

Own ad agency & recording co, Salt Lake City 

WFRX, Frankfort, III, prog dir 

H. P. Wasson Co, Indianapolis, sis dept 

MBS, NY, creative prodr 

NBC Spot Sales, NY, acct exec 

Rogers Co, NY, film rep (own firm) 

CBS. NY, mgr film library 

MCA NY, sis exec 

CBS Radio, NY, prom dept 

KXO, El Ccntro, Cal, mgr 

KSFO. SF, acct exec 

Du Mont, NY, asst to prodn facils supvr 

NBC, Chi, guest rels stf 

World Bdcslg, Hywd, sis rep 

WNAX, Yankton, SD, cmml mgr 

WOOD, WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids, Mich 

W. L. Stenesgaard & Assoc (point-of-purch adv 

specialists), staff 
Dowd Agency, Boston, media dir 
Tide Mag, NY, sis stf 
Tullis Co, LA, radio & TV acct exec 
Tobacco Net, NC, gen sis mgr 
WOR, WOR-TV, NY, bus news ed 
WINS, NY, prom, mdsg mgr 
KEYS, Corpus Christi, Tex, mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, bus publicity mgr 

BAB, NY, sis exec 

Consol TV Sis. Pacific Coast acct exec 

KXA. Seattle, comml mgr 

WFIL, WFIL-TV, Phila, prog & sis advisor 

& TV 
Katz Agcy, NY, TV sis stf 
KCBS. SF, acct exec 
Katz Agcy, NY, TV sis stf 
KDYL, Salt Lake City, prog dir 
WIND, Chi, prodn mgr 
KSTL, St Louis, sis rep 
Same, vp chg progs 
NBC Film Div, NY, sis rep 
Screen Cems, NY, sis serv 
WSAZ, Huntington, W. Va., admin asst 
ABC, NY, acct exec radio sis 
Same, prog prom mgr 
Bdcstg Corp of Amer, Cal, gen mgr 
KXA. Seattle, acct exec 
Same, asst prodn facils mgr 
NBC Film Div, Chi, sis rep 
NBC Film Div, Hywd. sis rep 
Same, also KVTV, Sioux City, dir adv 
-Same, gen sis mgr 
Jefferson Standard Bdcstg <WBT, WBTVi, 

lotte, asst to gen sis mgr 
Weed & Co, Bost, supvr spot radio sis 
Ceo. P. Hollingbery, NY, sis stf 
KMO-TV, Tacoma, gen sis mgr 
Same, vp, gen mgr 
Same, mgr press info 
KWKW, Pasadena, prom mgr 
KITE, San Antonio, comml mgr 






Seve Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR 



B-B Pen Co, Hywd 

Betty Zane Corn Prods, Marion, Ohio 
Chicago Spring Prods, Chi 
Cole of California, LA 
Country Home Bread, Wolcott, Conn 

Cudahy Packing, Omaha 

Cardcn Guild of Amer, Devon, Pa 
Hosid Products, Syracuse 

Kroll Bros, Chi 

M & R Dietetic Labs, Columbus, Ohio 

Polaroid Corp, Cambridge, Mass 
Serta Assoc, Chi 
Sun Oil Co, Phila 

C. A. Swanson & Sons, Omaha 
Whitehall Pharm, NY 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Pens 

Betty Zane Popcorn and Popcorn Oil 

Spring units 

Cole swim suits 

Country Home Bread, butter rolls, 

English muffins 
Old Dutch Cleanser, Delrich margarine, 

meat prods, other prods 
Horticultural prods 
Clamur Instant Upholstery Cr Rug 

Cleaner 
Juvenile furniture 
Pream, dairy prod for coffee; Ten-B- 

Low ice cream mix; other dairy 

prods 
3-D viewing glasses 
Perfect Sleeper mattress 
Blue Sunoco gas, Sunoco motor oils, 

automotive prods 
Oleomargarine div 
Kriptin, Cuards Cold Tablets, Petro- 

Sytlium 



Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 



I red Nettere 
Roger O'Connor 
John Mowbray 
I). I). Sullivan 
Dick Harris 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



I. I'. II. James (3) 

Uvin (,. Pack 

\turry Salberg (3) 

I. L.Hollandet .// (3) 

Werner Michel (3) 




P Q 




AGENCY 

Hilton & Riggio, NY leff 1 Ai 
Kight Adv, Columbus, Ohio 
Bozell & Jacobs, Chi 
Young & Rubicam, LA 
Edward Craceman & Assoc, H 

ford, Conn 
Young & Rubicam, Chi ieff 3 

Smith, Hagel & Snyder, NY 
Barlow Adv. Syracuse 

Bozell & Jacobs, Chi 
Benton fc Bowles, NY leff 1 



Cunningham & Walsh, NY 
Bozell & Jacobs, Chi 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY 

Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha 
Compton, NY 




26 



SPONSOR 



N NEW HAVEN 



\\L- Qwna/*yi&€# . /rs/*f<// //</// €4; 



Wl€& 



Xv± ^/f^w- izrl<//vmi 



A prosperous, working community 

*>. n buyinfi community. New Haven's 

mmi ilniii ',',,! manufacturing concerns 

mak( it a market that's healthy 

tconomically and wealthy in potential sales 

for you. Includi it in your 

mlr, rtising sch< duh s! 



Most efficient way to reach 

and sell >ln pi "i>li hi New Woven is 

through WNHC — tht "radio center" for 

entertainment and news. Programs 

linn a strong local appeal that h 

dials set at 1340. Let WNHC 
stimulati your • \ ■ II 







WTSttiC 

.£l:m: i^issl t-m 




In drug itorn all over the »orld 
Irsdcmu 

riertmo 
1917 II ■ 

Miffing (rirtn I ll 

rig Into 
111 and tun. 



mm. 



v> 



$Mlf 



NEW HAVEN 

ally by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



27 JULY 1953 



27 



J I T I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I II M I H 

j THE 

: BUY WAY 

: TO GREATER 

: PITTSBURGH 

! CHANNEL 

! 53 

j WKJF-TV 

Telecasting 

Outstanding 

NBC Programs 

Pittsburgh's Pioneer 
UHF TV Station 

now telecasting 
daily sponsored 
programs 

taking Pittsburgh's ~ 

2'/ 4 billion market : 

OUT OF SINGLE ~ 

STATION CATEGORY : 

WKJF-TV 

PITTSBURGH 

Phone, wire or write, 
tor rates and data sheets 

WEED TELEVISION ~ 

National Representatives Z 

ki i i i i i i i i i i 1 i i 1 i i t i i i i ; i i r 





28 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 

"Hon Ruppert wooed the women and 
won" 

20 October 1932. p. .32 

Introducing; a new brand, Knicker- 
bocker. Ruppert used air media ex- 
tensively, scored massive gain* 

Haying wooed the women and won. Ruppert has broadened it- 
appeal via a spot campaign of programs and announcements. To kick 
off the promotion of its dark beer. Ruppiner. the brewer] ran an ex- 
tensive announcement campaign on WHOM, WWKL, WLIB, New 
York, to reach the Spanish, Italian. German, and Jewish markets. 

Recently returned from a trip through New England, Riow account 
executive David Halpern told sponsor: "I checked sales very closer) 
and can safely say that Knickerbocker has outstripped everv brand 
in New England, local or national. We're first in sales in Massachu- 
setts, Connecticut. New Hampshire, and Vermont. And we're using 
plenty of radio and TV to stay No. 1." Firm is airing newscasts 
four times a week on WNAC-TV, Boston, and \\ J \R-TY. Providence. 
It's also running announcement campaigns on radio and TV in New 
Haven. New Britain, Holyoke, Schenectady, and Binghamton. 

To maintain its rate of climb in New York Ruppert has the follow- 
ing lineup: Jane Pickens, WNBC. Thursdav. 10:35-11:00 p.m.; Bill 
Leonard. WCBS. 9:00-9:05 a.m., Monday. Wednesday. Friday: Bill 
Leonard, WCBS-TV. 6:05-6:10 p.m., Monday through Friday: a 
Spanish soap opera on WHOM. 9:45-10:00 p.m.. Monday through 
Friday; Ken Banghart. WNBC. Tuesday. Thursdav. Saturday. 6:00- 
6:15 p.m. 

Starting 29 July Father Knickerbocker. Ruppert s live trade mark, 
will be a Wednesday. Thursday, and Friday feature on the Steve 
Allen Show, WNBT. 11:20 to midnight. Both agency and adver- 
tiser are convinced that a fresh, live show in that time slot can pull 
a major share of the audience awa\ from the usual run of late films. 
A spot radio campaign will be used to promote the new program. 

One of the tricks Ruppert uses is to spot the major portion of its 
announcements and programs on Wednesdays. Thursdays, and Fri- 
days in order to pound its messages home at a time calculated to 
catch the housewife just before she does her weekend shopping. Con- 
vinced that the trend toward bottled beer ilb't bottles to 24' , 
draught I means an increasingly important role for the woman 
shopper. Ruppert works closely with WNBC to get the most out of 
that station's "Chain Lightning'" merchandising plan. The brewery's 
own promotion team supplies special display material in advance. 

The effectiveness of Ruppert "s strategy is put simply b\ Herman 
Katz, v.p. in charge of sales: "Despite our phenomenal sales success 
in 1952 we haven't slackened up a bit. And the result is our sales are 
up 15-20' < over last year and still rising." 



"Foreign-language radio: a 1953 sta- 
tus report" 

26 January 1953. p. 38 

General Mills joins national sponsors 
of Spanish-language programing in 
Southwest 

Recent addition to the impressive roster of national foreign -lan- 
guage radio advertisers is General Mills' Cold Medal Flour. To sup- 
plement its radio advertising in the Southwest, this firm bought a 15- 
minute segment of a homemaker show. Club del Hogar [The Home 
Club\. on KIWW . San Antonio. Tex. This program, on the air start- 
ins 6 July from 10:00-10:15 a.m. across-the-board, is aimed at the 
large segment of the 1.500.000 Latin American* in Texas who" re 
concentrated iti the San Antonio area. Agency: D-F-S. • • * 

SPONSOR 



Time Buyers who Dig for the FACTS 

BUY SAN DIEGO 

( . . . Because it's the Nation's fastest growing large city) 



AND 



buy KSON 



( . . . San Diego's only 24 boar music and news station) 



Because, regardless of what survey they work 
with, they have only to consult SRDS to find- 



KSON IS THE LOWES! colt 



PER THOUSAND 









PULSE 



KSON 44< 



'A". 
•B". 
•C\ 
'D". 
'E" . 



S .80 
$2.27 
Si. 68 
Si. 50 
Si. 50 



April -May daytime Inner Pulse 
10 0% yardstick (Mon.-Fri.) day- 
time 1 5 time one minute rate 



REPRESENTED BY 
THE BOLLING CO. 



NIELSEN 

KSON 06< 

"A" 10<: 

"B" 25< 

"C" 22<: 

"D" 21( 

"E" 1 4< 

Comparatise cost per thousand 
homes based on average dmil) 
circulation daytime 15 time one 

minute rate 




HOOPER 



KSON 76< 



•A" 

•B" 

•C" 

•D". 

•E" 



A pri I - May da 
radio audience 
daytime I 5 time 



. $1.04 

. N6.18 
. S i.o i 
. S 1.63 

. $ 1.12 

v I i m c Hooper 
ndex (Mon -Fri ) 
one minute rate. 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

FRED and 
DOROTHY 



RABELL 



27 JULY 1953 



29 






lka-Seltzer + 
mm-i-Dent + 



nacin 




amel + 
oca-Cola 



+ 



unningham & h 



ayer Aspirin + 

ros.,Lever + 

ristol-Meyers + 




lock Drug + 
.B.D.&0 + 
elding, Foote, Co 



ecil & Presbrey + 
heste?'field + 
arter Products* 




terling Drug + 
.S.C.& B.+ 

. C.Johnson & t\ 



+ all these clients and all these agencies (]1 
many, many more: more, in fact, than i 
summer-fall to date) are now using 



14 




eedham, Louis & Brorby* 
aumkeag ( bttori* 
ewell, Lennen & + 






cites. Ted & (V>. + 
romo-Seltzer + 
urnett, Leo Co. 




onsolidated Cosmetics' 
.U.N.A + 

oe, Donahue £r + 



MBS 





TOWELS-SHEE 
CANNON MILLS COMPA 




LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF 



OLD TEXTILES 



• Kannapolis 

• Charlotte ^ 



CHARLOTTE 



rrfOE? 



YCin^tb? Ob KOn?FHor 




cvmmom wirra cowbVMA 

•LOMEfZ-ZHEEi; 





as near Charlotte as Highland Park to Chicago 

A BIG GUN OF AMERICAN INDUSTRY 



Emplaced on the towel racks of the nation, the friendly 
firing piece of Cannon Mills symbolizes the national 
significance of the Carolina textile industry. Every fifth 
American textile mill is located in the Carolinas and 
Charlotte is the geographical center of the industry. 
It's an industry that's small-town but big-time — and 
a major reason why Charlotte — 73rd U. S. city, ranks 
in the nation's first 25 markets."" 



are 

plumb 

I 

in 

the I 

middle 
of 

a 



22nd in populotion 

(Hearst Advertising Research i 






fabulous 
market 



Jefferson Standard Brdadeasting Company. Charlotte, N. C. 

Represented Nationally by CBS Radio and Television Spot Sales 



J 



27 JULY 1953 




Under-the-counter stations 
arent popular with most buyers 




I. Kaufman aKrin> 



Stations willing to haggle over air prices are finding cold shrewd agency shops for a good buy, timebuyers distrust the 
responses these days from many buyers. Reason: Although a chiselers since they may offer a better deal to competitors 

Is era of spot radio rate 
"deals" coming to an end? 

"Yes." say admen — but sonic air chisel in«" has taken new tonus 






by Charles Sinclair 

M »>u can still find radio stations 
willing to toss rate cards in a drawer 
and talk business like horse traders in 
a Persian market. 

However, alter two years of bargain- 
basement selling, the radio "price 
wars" in which some stations would 
make a special preferential deal for <in\ 
amount of business, large or small, are 
l.'-i disappearing. 

That's the opinion of a Dumber of 
leading agencymen, clients, and reps 
contacted b) SPONSOR while preparing 
this latest report on rate chiseling in 

27 JULY 1953 



broadcast advertising. (For an earlier 
report on the subject, see "Radio's 
gasoline war: Nobod) want- it SPON- 
SOR -' June 1952). 

Does this mean that a completel) 
stable rate situation i- returning to the 
radio industry ? 

Not necessarily. It's true that the 
number of station- who will cheal di- 
rectl) on their rate card- ha- dropped. 
But a new form of indirect rate eva- 
sion is rapidh becoming common pra< - 
lice in air advertising, main indu-tr\ 
members stated to sponsor. 



Here- how one veteran rep. whose 
station li-t includes several of ihe 
country's most powerful clear-channel 
outlet-, puts it : 

"Rate chiseling todaj i- taking the 
form of 'getting-around-the-rate-card 
rather than 'bargain-basement' selling. 
\ growing Dumber "t advertisers and 
ad agencies are approaching rep- and 



status report 



illllllllllllll 



33 




War against radio rate "deals" is being fought on many fronts 



Industry groups, buyer-seller clinics, and active groups of loc 
broadcasters help mold industry opinion against "deals." Fr 



stations with spot radio offers that are 
either so big — or so unusual in some 
way — that they do not fit the standard 
provisions of regular rate cards. 

"In such a case, the advertiser is 
often seeking a special price for these 
special campaigns. And radio and TV 
stations — even some of the best-known 
outlets — often grant it. They rational- 
ize the process bv saying to themselves 
Tm not cheating on my rate card. I'm 
creating a new. additional rate to fit a 
particular, unusual situation'." 



s 



Not everybody, of course, views this 
trend among large advertisers — like 
General Mills, Whitehall Pharmacal. 
B.C. Remedies, Grove Laboratories, 
Robert Hall Clothes, and the top soap 
and cigarette air clients — with alarm. 
Spot radio billings this year i after 
trade discounts but before commis- 
sions) are expected to be around $130,- 
000,000 — an all-time high. Even in the 
top TV markets, many a radio outlet is 
sold out — at card rates. 

What, then, is the real status of ra- 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii niinmiiiiiiumniii mi iiwiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiin iiiniiuuiiiiiiiiiiiii iiuiiiiiinniiiiiijg 

RATE SITUATION AT A GLANCE 

Status of '"'deals'''' : The straight chisel, within structures of 
normal rale cauls, is on the downgrade. But there has been a 
rise in the number of huge, or odd, spot campaigns in which 
advertisers and agencies force stations to create "special" rates 

Trade action: lis difficult, if not impossible, to police the 
air industry. However important industry groups, like 
\ IRTB, SRA, and others are leading active fight on "deals" 

Trade opinion: A station that cheats on its rate card 
must face distrust of buyers, must sacrifice goodwill 

Remedies: Several have been proposed by both buyers and 
sellers, including honest revisions of rales if needed. 
extension oj card rates to include new types of campaigns 

minium iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiuiiiiiiiimmiiumuuiuiimiiiiiiiiiii < % 



dio land TV I rate cards toda\ ? 

This is how the picture shapes up, in 
the opinion of a number of top buyers 
and sellers of spot air advertising: 

1. In mature video markets, nearlv 
half of the radio outlets — according to 
one rep's estimate — have made rate 
card adjustments during the past 12 
months. Many have switched to a sin- 
gle-rate basis, in which nighttime rates 
have come down to the level of davtime 
prices. At the same time, many have 
created new volume discount struc- 
tures and "floating schedule" prices 
which are attractively low — but are 
now offered equally to all advertisers. 

"In the big television markets, radio 
rates have come down to the absolute 
minimum. Clients can get good value 
for their spot dollar. Of course, some 
stations will try to prop up an unreal- 
istic rate card by making special deals 
here and there. But most of them 
realize now that it's a matter of sell- 
ing at the same price to everybody — 
or going out of business, said Reggie 
Schuebel, a veteran radio and TV buy- 
er and a partner in the agency consul- 
tant firm of W yatt & Schuebel. 

2. In the new I \ markets, or in t lie 
one-station video areas now rapidh 
filling up with second and third out- 
lets, the rate situation is also reason- 
ably stable. "Radio stations who are 
now facing new or increased T\ com- 
petition due to post-freeze video ex- 
pansion are not in the same kind of 
panic that was common hack in 1950, 



34 



SPONSOR 




|."-ellows, NARTB; SRA clinic with Shell Oil: Ben 
\VDC who made one of "anti-deal" resolutions 



said tin 1 Bales manager of one <>f New 
^1'ik- leading radio and T\ station 
rep organizations. 

"Management at these radio stations 
has had a chance i<> see what happened 
during the 'price-war' days of L952. 
^ ou II probabl) see some rate re\ isions 
on radio outlets in new TV areas. But 
it will be an orderl) process," tlii- sales 
manager added. 

.'{. Umost all of the TV stations in 
the largest and most competitive tele- 
vision market- are sticking prettv <lo-e 
to their rate cards, liiiielun er- report- 
ed. However, some agencymen told 
sponsor that the "tie-in purchase" is 
being practiced l»\ a few of the outlets 
in one-station market-. 

"It work- like tin-." a Weintrauh 
agenc) Inner stated. "You are look- 
ing around for good nighttime avail- 
abilities. \ I \ station in a one-station 
■ itj will report that the) don't have 
an) nighttime openings. Then you 
hint that you might also he willing to 
bu) some morning or da) time I \ 
slots. In a little while, the station re- 
ports hark that the) just happen to 
have found some nighttime availabili- 
ties whidi the) will sell you if you're 
willing to bu) daytime slots as well 
at raid rate, of course." 

I. Client- who have openl) sought 
under-the-counter deals in recent week- 
are finding a stiffening resistance 
among even the lower echelons of radio 
stations in all major market-. The bie- 
i Please turn to page 88) 



Here's how top 
admen view radio-TV 



"deal" situation 




Harold E. FeUou>$, President VARTB: " / r n< i i tain raU polit 
short-sighted personnel and publit relations, undei tht count et 
deals . . . nil of them n i < strong < i idt nt i - oj moral managt 
meni breakdown which in turn had.*- to ultimatt financial 
disastt i for the station involved." 

Timebuyer at P&(; agency: " Then s< i m& to bt a strong trt nd 
away from offering us straight raU chisels, in both radio 
mi 'I TV. Hal I ft el that mi advertise* who has an extra lat ge 
campaign mi <i shit Km is not unreasonablt it ht inquirt - 
about a special volume discount based on his campaign. 

Irving H augh, CommL Mgr., WSM: "RaU cutting is achit i < d 
through the cooperation oj radio operators themselves foi 
otherwise if would not exist. The curt "ill not i<>>>< 
thebuyerbut from the seller tht operator himself." 

John J. ( tirier, Adam I oung, Inc.: "( < ittnii stations I"' 

to cut i<iti*< rather limn improvt theii product and do a 
better selling job. We feel strongly thai cutting rates is 
n dangerous > cpedient which in tht long run hurts both 
particular station and the entirt industry. Most advt i 
Users don't want off tht card deals." 

Radio-TV director of V V. ml agency: "There's a trt nd today 
among big advertisers toward tht ust oj saturation - 
campaigns in radio and TV. Stations often havt to en 
special rates to til tht situation. Thest stations should 
immediately include the& ht raU cards, and quickly 

advise nil regular ad ht change." 

Executive of the At i i: "Tht ' modi I Wt' dt Vt lopt 'I >' ith 

tht NARTB mah - clt a\ : ■ 4.1'- on •< 

/,, . ill tactics • ■ ■ 

i prohil " prat lit 



27 JULY 1953 



35 



Iliirhp gets more 
Ieads-per-$ 

on radio 



Careful program choices 

pinpoint investment prospects, 

attract customers for Bache & Co. at 

higher rate than print media 




Nignily chore is teletyping financial news script to radio stations in 
Chicago, Cleveland, San Antonio. Checking script, above, are Account 
Executive Howard Liebl and Bache Ad Manager Henry Gellerman 



By Dick Jackson 

M he ad manager was relaxing at 
home after one of those days. He 
was listening to the 7:00 p.m. news- 
cast before checking his own program 
at 7:15. At about 7:03 he heard the 
Hash that the Federal Reserve Board 
had lowered margin requirements for 
stock purchases from 75 to 50 % . This 
announcement was taken impassively 
by the vast majority of listeners. But 
this particular listener was Henn Gel- 



lerman, advertising manager of Bache 
& Co., one of the country's leading 
brokerage houses. 

Hastily scribbling a few lines of text 
he called the newsroom of WOR, New 
York, dictated a change in the copy 
for that evening's Bache commercial, 
and asked to be phoned back imme- 
diately for confirmation. He got his 
confirmation at 7:12. At 7:15 Henr\ 
Gladstone's transcribed program To- 



Brokerage firm uses newscaster in Philadelphia to win audience susceptible to investment pitch 




36 



day's Business went on the air. A few 
minutes later a live announcer cut in: 
"Flash! Word has just been received 
that the Federal Reserve Board has re- 
duced margin requirements for stock 
purchases. For a free copy of the 
Bache booklet explaining the signifi- 
cance of this change, write tonight 
to Henr\ Gladstone, care of WOR. Box 
G, New York." 

Needless to say. Gellerman sat up 
most of the night writing the booklet. 
He knew that his desk would be loaded 
with requests for the booklet in the 
morning. It was. That's why Bache \ 
Co. is spending over $80,000 of its 
$300,000 budget for 1953 on radio. 
\bout S90.000 is used for newspapers 
and magazines, a considerable chunk 
for promotion, booklet printing, public 
relations, and production, i In addi- 
tion, a heftv slice of this year's budget 
has been put aside for T\ when a suit- 
able format can be found. I 

Bache i. Co. likes the Henry Glad- 
stone program so well that it has the 
scripl teletvped daily to WGAR, Cleve- 
land: \\<;\. Chicago: and KABC, San 

SPONSOR 









case history 



Antonio, where l>.n he also sponsors the 
show For branch offices in those i 1 1 1< ■-. 
In these three cities the set i|)i is read 

1»\ local aillioiini il - .llhl le-ull- lull e 

been uniformly good i" date. Bache 
re entl) commenced sponsorship "I an 
earl) evening newscasl on WIT. Phila- 
delphia, i Ml nl Bache radio acth i- 
lies are aired al a time w hen it i- be- 
lieved ilw whole famil) is present, and 
particularly the bead i>l the house. I 

lh" firm started sponsoring / odaj s 
Business ovei \\('l! three times week- 
Is in Ma) 1952, Btepped up i" five-a- 
week in November. 

The formal for the program was de- 
veloped l>\ \\ Ol!. presented to Bache's 
). \ Mln'ii Frank-( luenther Law . 
Inc., b) W Oli'- account executive in 
charge ol business programs, Martin 
Monroe. \i the agency, Bache account 
<\r. utive Hum. ml Liebl and radio and 
T\ director Robert Da) agreed thai it 
was a natural For Bache. \d manager 
Gellerman bought the idea with little 
urging. 

Kui ilii- was not the maiden air ef- 
fort for Bache. The brokerage house 
started on radio with a 13-week sched- 
ule of three announcements a week 
over WO\li. New York, in Januar) 
1950. 

The pitch was simple: "Willi high 
taxes and an increasing cost of living 
it i- necessar) that you gel the highest 
possible income from your surplus 
funds: the way to do that i- to invest 
your surplus mone) in common stork-. 
. . . To gel information and counsel on 
how to invest, go to Baelie \ Co. . . ." 

\ number of booklets were offered 
and the response was encouraging. Of 

course, the main purpose of offering 
the booklet was to get lead- for Ha< lie 

salesmen. 1!\ programing on a good- 
music station the firm felt tliat it w i- 
reaching a higher-income, better-edu- 
cated audience and thai a good pro- 
portion of sales would result from tin- 
leads obtained. This proved to he- true. 
Bache graduall) stepped up the fre- 
quenc) of announcements on \\ 0\R 

with each l'vweek renewal, was Usins 

2."> announcements a week 1«\ Vugusl 
\97>2. \t thai time Bache pulled out of 
\\o\li because compan) executives 
felt the) had saturated that particular 
audience: they contemplate going hark 
soon, possibl) this fall. 

During the last six months of the 



\\n\li buy, Bache also used tin 
\\ QXR network ol I 1 Btations I 12 in 
upstate \iu ^ ork. one in New Haven, 
one in Scranton) which uses relaj s ol 
\\ QXR's ' I.I--H al mii-i programs. 

\ niiinlif i of t) pes ol programs were 
tried during the past three years. \ 
husband-and-wife team was used o 
New York station fo] 26 week- .m,\ 
ilieu ,i lot nl leads. Bui as ..• count 

e\d uti\ e I low .ml I ,ie!>l |uil- il : "\\ e 

can gel inquiries From an) type oi 
show hui in too mam instances these 






leads turn oul in be a w aste ol tiiiu 
foi the sales department. \\ e I 
Found thai using well-known personali 
ties often pulls a l"i "i fan mad from 
loyal listeners who reall) 
prospei i- tin U-. 

I -i 1. 1 several othei pei Bon ilit) -t) pe 
shows in the Midwest substantiated this 
theoi j : Plent) oi mail hut not enough 
hot pi osp< cts, (( in the othei hand, 
K iddei . Peabodj S < o., w hi< h spe< ial 
izes in mutual Fund i ustomers, has n-ed 
i Please turn to pa ■ 66 



Mil It (Mill 







Here's how Bache attracts new 
leads with selective programing 

Business news written by recognized 
authority, classical music programs, 
and straight newscasts at houi when 
head oj family is at home seem to 
attract type oj audit nee u huh is 
< asi( s/ to convi ri h om l< ads to sales. 



t ai i< ty "/ investmt nt bookh ts an 
offered on radio program (> vampU at 
left). Aftei booklets an sent, salesman 
follows up with /" i sonal t all. s, h , tii < 
programing insures least muni,, oj 
wasted calls by Bache contact men. 



Investment firm has tried using popu 
hit local pi i sonalities but found 
tlnif while mail pull was heavy, much 
of it was ni mil hi < oj tun mail sent 
by loyal list* m t s who wen hit n sU d 
in show but not investment prospei 

D'/' In has li m i" d that by -< l< < tivt 
programing it gets leads via radio 
at h 55 cost than by in wspapi r ad- 
r, , Using Also thai UsU h< i - 

vert ini nu rs at i aU i ompara- 

1,1, to best fhtana /><"" advertising. 






27 JULY 1953 



37 



C nil i/oii /»«•/)«• i •«■ 

•i- luil pcoiitV («>f f t/nu? 

"No," says researcher Alfred Politz. 

Example: Foi almost a decade, the 
question "What brand of refrigerator 
will von bin next?" produced more 
tulcs for General Electric than for 
Frigidaire, although Frigidaire went 
on selling more. There is often dis- 
crepancy be/ween actions and words. 



Beware of these mer 

Part 7 of SPONSOR'* All-Media Study quot r 
media research and points out traps to avoid. 



I>\ Rtiy Lapira 

"Trouble with admen in dealing with re- 
search is they know so little about Chi 
Square tests, logarithmic or semi-logarithmic 
graphs, lines of regression, and Pareto 
curves." Agency researcher 

.■Research trouble is common to all 
media. 

Indicative of the confusion that ex- 
is^ are the following three sets of 
figures on magazine circulation pub- 
lished during the past 12 months. 

Look's figures are from the "Nation- 
al Study of Magazine Audiences 1952" 
conducted by Crossley, Inc.; Life's fig- 
ures are from "A Study of Four Me- 
dia" just completed by Alfred Politz 
Research, Inc.; and This Week's, pub- 
Hished a few days after Life's in June, 
.are projections of Starch estimates of 



readers per 100 copies and are primary 

readers only (family members who 

read the copy brought into the home I . 

Here is what these figures show: 

MAGAZINE AUDIENCES or WHO'S FIRST?* 

Look Life This 

Magazine Study Study Week§ 

Life 30.9 26.4 12.7 

This Week* ** 23.0 25.4 

Look 20.6 18.0 8.0 

Satevepost 19.6 14.0 9.0 

Collier's 14.8 7.1 

Ladies Home Jrnl. 10.9 11.5 7.2 

Good Housekeeping 10.6 5.8 

McCall's 10.6 7.0 

Woman's Hm. Compan. 9.5 7.4 

'A newspaper supplement, of course, f Female audience 
only. iFigures in millions. ''Indicates not counted. 
§ Project ion. 

Point: Discrepancies in the above 
figures can be explained partly by the 
fact that different research techniques 



v\ere used. But the question the adver- 
tiser asks is: "How can I choose quick- 
ly between such contradictory sets of 
figures without first learning how to 
use a slide rule or knowing just what 
a Pareto curve is?" 

The answer: Many times he can't. 

ffoit* one agency tests media: An 

example of the opposite kind of re- 
search that is of more use to him is 
the weekly media sales check being 
done by a $5 million New York agen- 
cj for a fairly expensive automobile 
product. 

The agency doesn't care to prove 
one medium superior over another — 
for this product. It wants to know 
which one is superior — a considerable 
difference, \mfll a»ree. 



Ill iillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllll Illllllllllllll!ll!l!lli:illll!lllli!lllllllllll Illllllll Illilllllllllli 



21 years of radio research has 
failed to solve the basic problem 

Each of these studies uncovered fact 
that people who listen to radio buy more 
of radio-advertised goods than those who 
don't listen. Each concludes that this is 
due to listening. But independent re- 
searchers interviewed by SPONSOR say 
this is not proved, that it's just as 
possible some buy first and then listen. 



38 



<ft _^ Professor Elder's study for CBS (published 1932 unc 
lljjl "Does Radio Sell Goods?") matched radio vs. non-racl 
concluded former bought more radio-advertised goods 



TABLE I: TOOTHPASTES 

Consumer Use in Radio Homes vs. Non-Radio Hem 

Shewing % Of gain Or loss toe red.o ■ nd.-i-rtrol ot* r« . roai . MkikH kft 




coiOAtrt 



fOIHAN-S (CIS) 
rODCNT (N*0 
IPANA (NIC) 



lOlTNOS 



uiTttmr. 
rtitco icu) 



PtKOHat (N»C, 



souisrs (lOCAl) 



Uniform InoY 
of USttlfl 

NON.RADIO 
HOMES 

■ ■• 



of us© in 

RADIO 
HOMES 

IN CITIES 






I 



Rataliv* Indti 
of UM in 

RADIO 
HOMES 
in cms 



77 0|iOcil*»| 



17.1(1 cny] 






7i0|i cay) 



SI S('0 c.i «| 



H9.2|8c,t»>! 






1234(2 c'ei: 



til |)0c>.«i) 



I 






S6 0il0cit«w| 



76-2 (10 t 



% OF GAIN 

in 

RADIO 

HOMES 

in cries 
■•*•*• p>oduct 



19 2",. GAIN 



;3 6'oGAIN 



■■ c '-a 



:■ ■■: 10 



;';-. IC 



31 1% IC 



I»»'.IC 



4 31l( | 



SPONSOR 



! 



search pitfalls! 

i'ihIciii rt»st»ar«*lit»ra «»■• various phases «>l 
■ iiioH's agencymen ;imi air experts 






How to choose u stunt 

Man a Pa G 

president hou the) bought radio si 
II. aid " • have them recorded 
brought to Cincinnati. It •■ play them 
La the exei uli 

like a show, we buy it Buy what 
-ill- the soup in toap. That isn't hard 
in inn/ out. U In does everybody 
in make the job to complicate 

II Horgan <■'•• " ' " Vtorgmn ll..~.l 



I 



So ii traces each sales dollar t<> the 
newspaper, radio, or l\ station which 
..inicd the sales message. It then elim- 
inates the weak medium and concen- 
trates on the strong. In some 80 mar- 
kets ovei .in L8-month period, here fs 
whal thi- agenc) has found: 

I . It- clienl make- $9 on each I \ 
dollar spent on an average. 



>I'.W STIOY: One of the most recent 
research efforts (NBCs study o) TVs effect 
on sales i lines) is described in separate 
article on page II. This SBC study in which 
same group o) people is interviewed twice 
insidered by many admen to be impor- 
tant step forward in determining media sales 
effectiveness. It was completed too late lot 
analysis as pun of this article which does 
touch ni'on eariiei network media studies. 






2. lie makes $7 in sales foi each 
radio dollar spent. 

3. Hi* makes v(i foi ea< h newspapei 
dollar spent. 

vdding radio to newspaper advertis- 
ing strengthened tin- returns from the 
newspapers. Vdding l\ strengthened 
both radio and newspapers. In a three- 
medium market (newspapers, radio, 
and I \ I tin- agen< \ found thai ap- 
proximatel) 859! of the customers were 
I ighl in 1>\ advertising, as follows: 

One-third l>\ newspapers, one-third 
1>\ radio, one-third 1>\ I \ ... w itli 
verj little overlap. > The othei I V I 
were passersb) . ' 

The method and results ol tlii- agen- 
cj - media checking are 90 fascinating 
thai this Ul-Media Stud) will devote a 
future article to it. 

Illlllllllll! 



Vetteorfc H'stn: Bui the prinl media 
aren t alone in "\<-i -rea< bing in theii 
resean b. I he ail media have -| >«-nt 
hundreds <>l thousands "I dollars ovei 

the w-.ii- to "|>r<>\ •■ that listening •■! 
m at' bing in. reases sales. 

[Tiej t<-ll the stor] in research i in lea 
..I a network resean bei m Ii" proudly 
presented the results "I a i ostlj projei t 



MAT ISSl'F: These agency and air me- 
dia experts give you their views on media 
research and pitfalls: William If iillwe l/< . 
Cann-Erickson; hi I ergil D. Reed, J. Vol 
ter Thompson; G. Mmuell I /< . / 
Eckhardt; Stanley Canter, VcCann-Erickson; 
Frank White, Mlf . Dr. Herta Eerzog \h 
Cann-Erickson; Hub Kintner, IBl 
Edeah, l>u Want .- Maurice fl. Mitchell, En 
cyclopaedia Britannica Films; Ra\ Morgan, 
Raymond R. Morgan Co., and othi 



Elmo Roper's survey for CBS called "A Study of Consumer Re- 
sponse to 40 CBS Sponsored Programs'' used interview technique, 
decided "more you listen, more you buy," which experts now deny 



1952 




"NBC Study of Radio's Effective Sales Power," its third Hofstra- 
type survey, matched radio vs. TV city, but basic finding 
that listening boosts purchases went unproved, experts declare 



SUMMARY OF CASE HISTORIES 

BUYING OF LISTENER vs NON-LISTENER 



| *W*W NM-UtaMH 



+ 61% 



20% 



30% 



-111% 



-64% 



+ 24% 



.1 ll I 



Dr. Lyons ScMrrz Beer Turns Dial Scop Alka-Seltier Pet Milk 



3 4 TIMES A MONTR LISTENERS 



27 JULY 1953 



39 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



10 MEDIA RESEARCH TRAPS FOR THE UNWARY 

(bused on SPONSOR Interviews with I.»8 media experts) 



1. Belie) that a general index foi the comparative 
rallies nt various media can be established. (Type of 
product or message may make same medium 100', 
successful o) completely mirthless.) 

2. Belief that you ran compare costs of media with- 
out first freeing the figures of cumulation or making 
sine tins hate equal cumulation. 

3. Belief that people tell the truth, even to such sim- 
ple questions as, "Which program do you listen to or 
watch?" or "II hich magazine do you read?" (Tendency 
is to pick the program, magazine, or newspaper that 
people think has the most prestige.) 

4. Belief that research, no matter how scientific, can 
ever take place of sponsor's judgment. {It can only 
reduce the adman's guess margin.) 

5. Belief that any one medium has only one audience 
— each reachable by the advertiser. (Politz lists at 
least four audiences. For radio they would be, in 
diminishing numerical order: (1 I Those listening any 
day to any program during a month or a year; (2) 
those who listen to any program on a specific day; (3) 
those who listen to a specific program on a specific 
day; (4) those who hear a specific commercial mes- 
sage. The variety makes media tests hard.) 



(i. Belief that a good unbiased random sample can be 
chosen haphazardly uith the interviewer allowed to 
pick those he will interview. 

7 . Belief that the number of returns in a mail media 
sin iey is more important than the percentage of re- 
turns, or the assumption that those who don't answer 
fed the same as those who do. 

it. Belli f that rating seniles have no limitations. 
i {dually Audimeters don't count noses, just homes 
listening or viewing; diary and re, „ll techniques in- 
flate audience figures: telephone coincidental can miss 
up to 49% of listeners, gives you popularity of pro- 
gram, not numbers in audience.) 

U. Belief that people tune to hear or see your com- 
mercial instead of the program or that they hear or see 
your commercial even uhen they're in the same room. 
[Independent research organization has preliminary 
figures showing one-third of audience pays enough at- 
tention to one commercial in a half-hour program at 
night to be able to recall sales point within hour: 
two-thirds see one of three commeri Hals, i 

1 0. Confusing correlation with causation. I You as- 
sume the customer bought your product because he 
saw or heard your ad, yet he may have noticed your 
'id because he bought your product, i 






Ulllll [I!ll!i;illl[l!lllll!llllll!!ll!lllllllllll!lllli 



llllllllllllllll 



to P&G to show how much more of its 
product radio homes hought than non- 
radio homes. 

P&G was quite impressed — until it 
discovered that the product was not 
among those being advertised on radio. 

Sequel: P&G still keeps the study 
around (after 13 years I to remind it- 
self of the cardinal rule in media re- 
search: Discount 99% of any media 
test done by a single medium to prove 
its own superiority, for it will prove 
what it set out to prove, and let the 
advertiser dig out the actual facts and 
figures himself. 

No one has yet been found !»\ 
SPONSOR in this study who will deny 
that enormous quantities of goods can 



be sold via radio and television. 

The difficulty is to find a method 
of proving it — especially on a network 
basis. 

The four principal methods used to 
date and their chief weaknesses are: 

1. Matching radio owners vs. non- 
owners. Used by Elder in his 19.32 
study for CBS "Does Radio Sell 
Goods?" Weakness: Can't be used 
now because only T , of population 
doesn't have radio. 

2. Matching test areas vs. control 
areas. Advertisers use this technique 
quite frequently in media tests. Weak- 
ness: Difficultv in finding two cities or 
areas similar enough: usually you need 
more than two i this raises expense i . 



3. Matching listeners vs. non-listen- 
ers. Roper, Hooper, and The Pulse 
have used this technique. CBS for one 
has discarded it. Weakness: \ou can't 
prove listeners vary from non-listeners 
in their buying habits because of their 
listening. 

4. Using a panel. \ ou mea>ure sales 
among the same people before and 
after the campaign. This technique is 
popular with advertisers and agencies. 
\\ eakness of fixed panel : Tends to be- 
come "conditioned " or selective and 
thus atypical. 

The subject of how to run a success- 
ful media sales test and avoid the usual 
pitfalls is so vast that it will be men- 
[Please turn to page 82 i 



SPONSOR'S All-Media Advisory Board 

George J. Abrams ad director, Block Drug Co., Jersey City 

Vincent R. Bliss executive v. p., Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago 

Arlyn E. Cole president, Mac Wilkins, Cole & Weber, Portland, Ore. 
Dr. Ernest Dichter pres., Inst, for Research in Mass Motivations 

Stephens Dietz v. p., Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, New York 
Ben R. Donaldson ad & sales promotion director, Ford, Dearborn 

40 



Marion Harper Jr. president, McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York 

Ralph H. Harrington ad mgr., Gen. Tire & Rubber Co., Akron 



Morris L. Hite 

J. Ward Maurer 

Raymond R. Morgan 
Henry Schachte 



pres. 



president, Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas 

ad director, Wildroot Co., Buffalo 

Raymond R. Morgan Co., Hollywood 
ad director, Borden Co., New York 

SPONSOR 




CUNNINGHAM & WALSH LEARNED SECRET OF EFFICIENT MOVING: BREAK LOADS INTO DEPARTMENT SIZE. MOVE INDIVIDUALLY 

Moving Day on Madison Ave. 

A rundown on tho f|iiartt k rs-shil'tiii$> activity «ilon<> ,i«l\ oil isiu- «IU»v 



%p ne oi the more familiar sights 
along Madison Vvenue and it- em irons 
these weekends is a Bee! of moving 
vans. With new buildings popping up 
in midtown Manhattan it seems that 
the first names that appear on lobb) 
directories are those of advertising 
agencies, station reps, and radio and 
tclr\ ision broadcasters. 



1 he reason is simple: business is 
booming and the old quarters just 
aren't adequate. Because sponsor 
finds itself in pr« isel) that position, 
we decided to check around town, find 
out how others had handled the situa- 
tion. Uso t" tr\ to find a Formula to 
make mir move as smooth as the w <-l I- 
oiled operation carried • > 1 1 1 b) Cun- 



Jiam & Walsh, In", last summer. 
S ne of the elements oi that move 
.in- pii tured on tin- |..i_ 

SPONSOR found that mot ing ofl - 

• an be well nigh a- < omplicated as 
moving a factor] in operation. I nless 

tin- sw it' I: i- well planned it i an 
thorough!) disrupting experience with 
/' • •/<'■ liirn to / "-■ 92 



Cunningham & Walsh packed library and files efficiently, had minimum 
of work sorting at new offices. Reliable moving men eliminate head- 



aches. Jack Cunningham does his own packing, is soon in new quar- 
ters. Conference table shipped in four pieces was assembled on arrival 







"flmnihlic" fnrmat cnlrl AMF nn TV 1 American Machine & Foundry liked quality program content ranging from spirited ballet to blue- 

UllllllUllO lUlllldl oUlU Mlflr UN IV i mood ballad. AMF demonstrates its varied products through educational five-minute documentaries 

Why American Machine uses TV 

1 'hough company .soils few of 50 products direct to consumers, it will spend 
over $1 million on TV this season mainlv to huild trademark 






/->. new (wist was added to commer- 
cial TV in December 1952 when Amer- 
ican Machine \ Foundry Co.. manu- 
facturer of a long line of industrial 
equipment, including pretzel-twisting 
machines, made its T\ debut on CBS 
I \ 's Omni hits. 
AMF's sponsorship of the Ford 



AMF uses TV to aid 
brand identification 

Industrial manufacture) bought 
Omnibus to: ill popularize 
trademark; (2) stimulate inte- 
gration of parent firm, subsidi- 
aries; 'it emphasize its role in 
the national defensi i [) promote 
better intra-industry relations 



Foundation program raised a question 
of wide interest to advertisers of heavy 
industrial products: Can a network 
TV prestige show 7 make the name of a 
heavy machinery company which sells 
few products to consumers a familiar 
one in households throughout the 
countr\ ? 

AMF wanted to become better known 
because it felt this would give the firm 
several advantages: i 1 I The compan) 
has been growing rapidly and in the 
last few years has acquired a number 
of subsidiaries. The parent company 
wanted l<> stimulate integration of the 
subsidiaries under the \MF banner 
through advertising. (2) To further 
entrench itself as a major manufac- 
turer ot defense equipment, W1F want- 
ed to impress on the public the impor- 
tance of industr) and the armed forces 
working together. (3) WIF felt it 



could sell more industrial machinery 
as well as consumer items by promot- 
ing better dealer, distributor, and 
manufacturer relations. That even it- 
industrial products would benefit from 
the magic of a trademark everyone 
knows has long been demonstrated in 
the industrial operations of such giants 

Ad Mgr. Vic Ancona says merchandising pays 




42 



SPONSOR 



■fe 



a* \\ estinghouse and I ! I 

Making the consume] ^MF-con- 
kious I- an advertising policy which 
was originated in 1951 when Wll be- 
Kan i" stress the subsidiaries who pro- 
duce consume] goods. Mm- was im 
minor j < >1 >. Victoi Vncona, Wll ad- 
vertising manager, was faced with the 
problem <>f interesting the public aol 
onl) in the Roadmastei Bicycles, Jun- 
ior Velocipedes, and DeWall Powei 
Saws which Wll in.inui.Miuii'-. but 
also in products as indirectly related to 
evei \ da} consumer use as toba< co 
stemmers, tobacco leaf separators, au- 
tomatic pretzel twisters, radar anten- 
nae, dough mixers, and baking ovens, 
among some 50 othei items which ii 
raanufat tures today . 

\\ hen Morehead Patterson, Wll 's 
chairman of the board ami president, 
first saw Omnibus in November 1952, 
In- decided thai this prestige program 
would be a perfect vehicle for Wll - 
institutional and consumer advertising. 

Three major factors stand oul as 
proof of Wll - success with television 
last season: < 1 I hundreds of unsolicit- 
ed complimentary letters from viewers 



iiiiii 



case history 



and dealers, as well as an unexpectedly 
large number ol responses to a write-in 
booklet offer; (2i satisfied company 
management as home out 1>\ Wll - 
being the first sponsor to sign on for 
the 1953 Omnibus -eric- despite a 
sKKl.tlltO price hike: i '.\ i initiation of 
an additional TV program on three 
Midwestern stations for Wll'"- Pin- 
spotter, starting 27 June 1953. 

Wll- - first concrete proof of the 
pull of Omnibus came following the 
firm's write-in offer for the DeWall 
Power Shop booklet. 

On 22 March, following a five-min- 
ute documentary devoted to various 
art? and crafts, including woodwork- 
ing. VMF's two-minute commercial for 
the DeWalt Power Shop ended with 
this booklet offer. The same commer- 
cial was repeated the following week. 
Viewers were asked to -end in 2"iC in 
coin with their request for the DeWalt 
booklet explaining various uses and 
techniques of this $229 machine. This 
same booklet was offered in full-page 
two-color ads in four consumer mag- 
azines in April I including Better Homes 
& Gardens. American Home, Popular 



s ' l n, e, and Poputai \le< Ilium v ' . la* h 

advertisement carried a detachable 
• oupon al the bottom to make the 
write-in easiei lor the reader. By 30 
\pnl the Omnibus booklet offei bad 
pulled 6,276 requests while the maga- 
zines had brought in l.~>iil . 

I hi- I )r\\ .Hi ' ommert ial was typi< al 
ol Wll i ommen ials ' produt ed by 
Wll - agent j I let. hei D. Richards I 
in it- educational approach: 

innouncei \ "Here - the home powei 
tool that make- prei i-ion woodworking 
easy even foi beg inners ! \\ ith it \ ou 

i an make things OUl of wood 01 make 

repairs to youi home at a fraction of 
the regulai cost! It's the ingenious 
DeWalt Power Shop, manufactured by 
Wll American Machine & Foundry 
Co." 

(During this part of the announce- 
ment, viewers -aw the DeWalt Powei 

Shop demonstrated. I hen the booklet 
appeared on screen, i 

Announcer'. "This ex< iting, new. 28- 
page booklet. ) ours for the Making, 
has ju-t been prepared 1>\ Wll De- 
Walt, in cooperation with the editor- 
of American Home Magazine. Here's 
Mrs. Dorothy Trumm, arts and crafts 
editor of American Home, to tell you 
more about it ! 

Mrs. Trumm: "You'll get so much 
valuable information from this color- 
fully illustrated booklet. It show- In 
authentic early \meri< an furniture de- 
sign-, and 10 juvenile furniture designs 
which you can make in your own home 
al tremendous savings of more than 
80%-. \nd there are pages on profes- 
sional woodworking language . . . 
facts you should know when buying 
wood . . . practical tips on wood fin- 
ishing . . . and a wealth of ideas for 
your home. To get vour booklet, just 
send 'IryC to DeWalt. Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania. Write today!" 

Innouncer: "'Please don't forget to 
include your own name and address 
along with your quarter when writing 
for your booklet I hat address again: 
DeWalt. Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

"See the WIF DeW alt Power Shop 
at your dealer's. You'll be amazed at 
how you can convert, in seconds, from 
a saw to a drill ... to a dado head 
... to a shaper. See tor yourself how 
the AMP DeWalt Power Shop does 
even thing . . . easier, faster, safer, and 
bettei ! 

"" I he DeWalt Power Shop, manufac- 
tured by \merican Machine & Foundry 
Co.. is another example of how Wll 

i Please turn to page 72 i 



m bowling ■ rafn w is f»nii( 

(iroitiiff firm's pin v/iof f <«r\ 

Encouraged by "Omnibus" success. AMF is 
now testing second TV show in Midwuit. "Bowl 
inrj \\ Fun" is audience-participation show tele- 
cast remote from Detroit bowling alley, util- 
izes AMF'i Automatic Pinspotters (see below). 
Program is designed to ;timulate interest in 
the sport, has no regular commercials. Con- 
testants are selected from the audience, are 
given specific bowling problems to solve, get 
cash, other priies. Show may continue in fall 




27 JULY 1953 



43 




AMONG WOMEN WHO BEGAN VIEWING SHOW SPONSORED BY CLEANSER IN FEB. 1952 23% WERE CUSTOMERS BY MAY 



How TV stops brand-switching 

There's incessant stream of customers switching away from and to most 
brands, NBC TV study finds, but TV holds old, attracts new purchasers 



M he pictograph above spells out 
mathematically what most admen know 
instinctively: that exposure to a spon- 
sor's television program makes con- 
-uniers buy his product. 

The graph is part of NBC's new 
study of brand-switching called "Why- 
Sales Come in Curves," which agenc) 
executives and clients in New York, 
Chicago, Detroit, and Cleveland have 
seen unveiled in meetings this month. 
Admen in San Francisco see it 28 
lul\ : it will be shown in Los Angeles 
30 July, in other cities later on. 

' \\ h\ Sales Come in Curves"" is the 
tillli in a series of NBC research re- 
|jort> on sales effectiveness which began 



44 



in 1950 with publication of the first 
Hofstra study. Reaction of most ad- 
men interviewed in New York was 
that this was the most persuasive of 
the series. Reason: For the first time 
researchers went to the same group 
of people twice — once in February 
1952. then three months later in May 
— in order to find out how TV affected 
buying patterns. This was one of the 
few times a study conducted by an ad- 
vertising medium used this "two-wave" 
or "panel"" technique. 

\\ luit NBC was able to spell out in 
numbers as a result of the study was 
no surprise. It found: 

1. When customers beuin viewing 



TV. they begin buying the products 
they see advertised. 

2. If they stop viewing, the) tend to 
stop buying. 

sponsor can report that most admen 
contacted in New \ ork accepted these 
conclusions as a valid contribution to 
understanding of the medium. But 
many of them — especially agency re- 
search directors — had questions to ask 
about the technique used in producing 
the results. On the page at right you'll 
find some of these questions listed to- 
gether with answers from Hugh M. 
Kcville. NBC planning director, and 
Dr. Thomas Coffin. NBC manager of 
I Please turn to jxige (> ( > i 

SPONSOR 



QUESTIONS ADMEN ARE 
ASKING ABOUT NBC STUDY 


ANSWERS PREPARED FOR SPONSOR BY NBC's HUGH 
BEVILLE AND DR. THOMAS COFFIN WHO DIRECTED STUDY 



Ever) brand in youi study is advertised in 
man) media. Isn't it probable that all 
media influenced tjm'sc who bought the 
merchandise, mul.iiiM it impossible to i\<> 
late the prnportionMnt suits due to II 
alone? Or, puttingttanothet way, hou do 

am know it tins Tl which ninth- tin- lieu 
t-is Inn mint- ^otitis than the non viewers? 



< ei lainl) ill mi -Ii i influi n< ed those who 
bought ili' merchandise. That's wh) we 
studied non-viewers as well .1- viewers Oui 

basi npai ison 1- the change in 1 

person's buying in three months. The non- 
viewers' buying changes indicate the effects 
"I thi -• other media 1 as well .1- seasonal 
changes, merchandising efforts, price cuts 



.mil -in li othei 1 .11 1 .t 1 > I • - - 1 \ iewi 
can onlj be interpreted in the lighl •>( what 
happened in the sami period i" non uieu 
11 s. .1 , ontrol group h ho wen expo 
these "ili' 1 influences but nol i" ihi pro 
gram Hius, ever) lime we show .1 tnn<l 
l"i viewers we also show the trend f"i 
non-i iewei s, to 1 '*b iselini 



( nn Mm drau tin 
pud) that in enlt 
Sponsor is liable to 
the tail? That is, 



1 



nclusion from tins 

T\ advertising n 

grabbing 11 bear l>\ 

<• t>m c lets go, It ill 



he Inst- customers rapidly, thus making it 
impossible fur him to drop n show? 



No, entering l'\ isn'l grabbing .1 beat b) 
the tail. Il you drop sponsorship, you lose 

customers but il nes you I"-'- are the 

extra customers added b) TV, These are 
present h hen you are on T\ . and nei es 
-.11 il) ili ill awa) and ai e lost to you w hen 



\..ii ili"|i ..il I \ as 1- "iil> i" I.. • \|.. . ii .I 
So .ili' 1 dropping l\ you art nol "worst 
"if" than where you'd I" it you'd stayed on, 
\111l if you don'l go "ii ii ill, ili' 11 the beat 
ma) grab you \>\ the neck. 



II a know that mum brands <>i a given 
product category nun be in television, lint 
thr\ nil cant go iii>TrMinlr.s unless the mar- 
ket is expanded considerably. So what has 
this stiitU t>t tflrrfkmn's effect nn brand 
switching really proved lor the individual 
client who is contemplating expenditure of 
tome t>i his budget for a television program? 



["here's more lo advertising than increas- 
ing your sales. \ ver) important job, also, 
i- maintaining your sales. Where man) 
competitors are in T\ this 1- probabl) the 
most important job. You have to defend 
yourself againsl the inroads "l this com- 
petitive T\ advertising, which would other- 
wise cut a l>iy slice oul "l youi pie. Youi 



l\ advertising prevents 1 1 • i — and helps you 
hold your own. This, »• submit, 1- a defi 
nitel) positive contribution. If on top oi 
ilii- you can devise ways "f using T\ mon 
'Hi ctivel) and more effii ientl) ili in avi 1 
you 1 .in forge ahead and expand fur salt - 
those "h" use the medium besl will ex 
pand the most. 



fsn't it possible that those who use a alien 
product are more inclined to watch a pro- 
gram which is sjioMiireil In that brand 
'or the ver) reas ffl that the) use the 
product? In other*l9rtls. what you inter- 
pret as the effect oi television viewing ipur- 
thase) mm actually be the cause oj it? 
(Note: This was one 0) most frequent!) 
encountered questions pat l>\ researchers.) 



We made .1 spei ial check t" investigate 1 Ii i — 
point. The answer was "nn." in tlii- Btudy. 
We fmmil thai the users (those »li" bought 
the brand in Februar) 1 iliil not claim i" 
watch more than tin- non-buyers either in 
"beginning to \ir»*' "r in "continuing t" 
view"; we checked both. I would attribute 
tlii- in the fact thai we dealt with every- 
day, frequent-purchase categories, where 



the buyer ha- little ego-involvement 01 
personal attai hmenl tp his branti. If ».- 
studied, -.i\. automobiles I would expect 
i" find a buyer-viewer feedback (that's .%l>\ 
\sf did nol stud) cars this wa) ' 1 . Se< ond- 
ly, I'll expect it if we hail Btudied < ommer- 
'inls instead "f programs; recall "f thr 
advertising, I'm sure, 1- affected b) product 
n-<-: % i>-\s iu^ i- much less likel) i" be. 



) DU ask people whether the) use a t ertain 
group oj products. Hon can you be sure 
ihe\. are capable of giving you turret i an- 
swers 1/^ to brand agues' Isn't it possible 
that the\ ma) lortte^w/ie names of certain 
Wands thc\ at luallWMne bought anil sub- 
stitute other names which while more fa- 
miliar to them are not the products the\ 
actual!) hare purchased ami have i" their 
pantries at home.-' 



I hi- i- a question we were aware of some 
years ago when we started 1 1 1 i — research. 
In each stud) we've incorporated 1 succes 
sion "f methodological tests to che< k and 

nn|ii"\ ir procedures. 

One "f the first was checking questionnaire 
replies againsl pantry-check results; .1 high 
degree "f correspondence was found. In 
subsequent studies we tested such problems 
as the difference between open end ques- 



tions vs. the ii-'- "f lists, the effect of 
■ hanging the order "f questions, etc. \l"-t 
nf these checks have indicated that our 
methods were substantial!) accurate; full 
details have been presented in mir \arimi- 
research reports. However, if an) inac- 
curacies -till remain, I think theii effect 
1- minimized in this stud) 1>\ the fart that 
"in comparisons an- based on the same 
[uestions in Ma) .1- were used in Ki-liruarv. 



) 011 use a roster recall method in asking 

what programs respiimlents view. Can you 

he sure the) aile lw corral answer or 

can it be that the) wmic certain programs 
which the) feel estatnTsh their own prestige 
or status in the eyes of the interviewer? 



\- we indicated in question 5, thi same ques- 
tions were used each month, -•> an) in- 
Rational) or deflationar) tendenc) would 
In- .1 constant. However, it's worth exami- 
ning the consequences of .m\ inflationary 
tendenc) which might be present If mir 
method inflated tin- number "f viewers, the 



onsequence in this stud) i- iliat w« i" 
understating the impact oi [*V. fffte ii"t 
iiMii- i" report the nz< "f the Aidience 
I. ni it- lumne. If some of them didn't 
act u all) view, [ben iheii buying ^a-n't af- 
fected In tin program, so we're watering 
down the impart by including them. 



Wiik can uc tell tha^he market son those 
to stud) is typical org he rest ni the coun- 
try? Maybe the reoMion in major metro- 
politan areas would Wr different lor people 
there nun differ in response to TV. 



We 'l"ii 1 claim our market 1- "typical" 
probabl) no single market 1-. Itni we should 
certainl) think the same kind "f thing 
would be happening in all T\ markets. 
Differing in degree, perhaps (maybe more, 
maybe less) but not in kind. Our findings, 



I would believe, an tapping fundamental 
principles as t" how advertising and es- 
pecial!) T\ advertising wrk-. \- - 
I would expect these principles t" "perate 
wherever such ail advertising is operating. 



27 JULY 1953 



45 







'• *•> 



• • 



•w*v*v •• 

• •• % 






W 



H «l 



F= 



• •»» . •>. .• 



•A 



5*5 



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. ; .•♦•. , 

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•.•••.•. 



•*•:♦: 
ft*:* 



•• ••• 



:*:♦::: 

,». .*.• .•. 

: *; : 

» • • • • • 



S2*:*: 



i • • • - 

i • • • • 

i '• •*• V 



:•> >„•> >» 
• • ••• • • • 

'•*• • •*• 

•••••••••• 



• • •»••.• •, 
**•'• • •.' .• 

.•>.•,•.•.•».♦ 

••••••• • • 






VoV.V.V.V.' 






3 



Most of the Top TV shows 
are on NBC 



Out of the top ten shows— those with the largest audiences — 

six are on NBC-TV. 

Of the top twenty, twelvt are on NBC-TV. 

Even more important, 76 "o of NBC's shows are in the top half 
of all network commercial TV programs. Only 54 % of the No. 2 
network's attractions are in this select group. 

Obviously, then, your program will have definitely the 
best opportunity for the largest audience on NBC. Another 
reason why NBC is America's No. 1 Network. 

Next week . . . further proof. 

NBC's Audience Advantage is to Your Advantage . . . Use It. 



• • • • • • • 



• * • • » 



• •> •». 



•»; > -y •» ».♦.•. ••• ••• •••. •.•.•♦.•.•.« L L If \ M 

• • • >\ » >» •»: •». •» •.».•. .•>».•» I llli i \j i \j 1 1 






• • • • • c • 



/; s< /•'•"•< of Radio ( 'orporatu 



SOURCES: Ni* hi <■ '/'• •'• > 

NOTE: 77'. acc 






NEW AND UPCOMING TV STATIONS 

iiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ' iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii 

I. J%ew construction permits* 






CITY 4 STATE 



LEWISTON, ME. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

POLAND, ME. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



CALL CHANNEL DATE OF 

LETTERS NO. GRANT 



WLAM-TV 


17 


8 July 


WLOW-TV 


27 


8 July 




8! 


8 July 


WSJS-TV 


12 


8 July 



ON-AIR 
TARGET 


POWER 


(KW)" 


STATIONS 


VISUAL 


AURAL 


ON AIR 


Jan. '54 


15.8 


8.51 





Jan. '54 


89.1 


51.3 


1 




105 


52.5 







316 


158 






SETS IN 
MARKET* 

1 000 1 



LICENSEE 4 MANAGER 



KJCA Lewiston-Auburn Bdcstg 

Corp. (WLAMl 

Fra-k S. Hoy 

KJCA Commonwealth Bdcstg. 

Corp. (WLOW) 

Bob Wasdon 

NFA Mt. Washington TV 
NFA Triangle Bdcstg. (WSJS) 



RADIO 
REP' 



Everett- Ml 

K inneyrl 



Forjoer 



Htadley- 
Reed 



ff. \vu stations on air 



CITY & STATE 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO. 



POWER (KW)' 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIP 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

(0001 



LICENSEE 6. MANAGER 



BOISE, IDAHO 

HARRISBURG, PA. 
MADISON, WIS. 
NAMPA, IDAHO 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 
RALEIGH. N. C. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

SAN ANGELO, TEX. 



KIDO-TV 



12 July 



WTPA 


71 


6 July 


WKOW-TV 


27 


8 July 


KFXD-TV 


6 


29 June 


WOSH-TV 


48 


1 July 


WNAO-TV 


28 


12 July 


WTVI 


54 


17 July 


KTXL-TV 


8 


7 July 



51 

17.5 

85 

19.72 

13.1 

17.5 

207 



26 

9.3 

42.5 

9.86 

7 

8.75 



CBS, NBC, 
DuM 

NBC 
CBS 



ABC 
CBS 



103.5 DuM 



27.5 15.5 CBS, DuM, 
NBC 



NFA 

35 UHF 
NFA 
NFA 
NFA 

20 UHF 

125 UHF 
NFA 



KIDO. 
Walter 



Inc. 

E. WagstafT 



Harrisburg Bdcstrs. 
David Bennett 


Hiadley- 
Reed 


Mcnona Bdcstg. Co. 
Michael Henry 


Hiadley. 
Reed 


Frank E. Hurt & Son 
Edward Hurt 


H nil I n g bf ry 


Oshkosh Bdcstg. 
William F. Johns Jr. 


Hiadley. 
Reed 1 


Sir Walter TV & Bdcstg. 

Co. 
Cl-.arles Stone 


Avery- 1 
Knodel 


Signal Hill Telecasting 

Corp. 
Bernard T. Wilson 


Weed TV 


Wtstn TV Co. 
Arm sttad D. Rust 


Taylor 1 



IN. XtUlenda to previous C.P. listinas 



These changes and additions may be tilled in on original chart oj post-ireeze 
C.P.'s appearing in SPONSOR'S 9 February issue and in issues thereafter. 



Bakersfield, Cal., KERO-TV, ch. 10, target 26 Sep. 

'53; to be NBC affil.; est. sets in market, 28,346 

(RTMA-Nielsen) 
Cheyenne, Wyo., KFBC-TV, ch. 5, target 25 Dec. 

'53; gen. mgr., William C. Grove 
Colorado Springs, Colo., KRDO-TV, ch. 13, new 

target I Sep. '53 
El Paso Tex., KROD-TV, ch. 4 (on air), new nat'l 

rep, Branham (formerly Taylor) 
Eugene. Ore., ch. 13, target Oct. '53; gen. mgr. 

S. W. McCready; nat'l rep, Hollingbery 
Fairbanks, Alaska, ch. 2, target I Dec. '53 
Fairmont, W. Va., WJPB-TV, ch. 35, target 31 Dec. 

'53; gen. mgr., R. M. Drummond; nat'l rep, Gill- 

Perna; to be ABC, NBC, DuMont affil.; est. sets 

in market, 2,500 



Harrisonburg, Va , WSVA-TV, ch. 3, 'arget I Sep. 

'53; gen. mgr., Robert B. Harrington nat'l rep, 

Devney; est. sets in market (RTMA), 24,668 
Houston, Tex., KXYZ-TV, ch. 29, gen. mgr., Fred 

Nahas; to be ABC affil.; est. sets in market, 

265,000 VHF 
Idaho Falls, Idaho, ch. R, new call assigned KIFT 

(formerly KlFI-TV) 
Kansas City, Mo., KMBC-TV, and WHB-TV both 

ch. 9, new target I Aug. '53 (shared-time grant) 
Louisville, Ky., WKLO-TV, ch. 21, new target early 

Aug. '53; gen. mgr., Joe Eaton; to be ABC affil. 
Macon, Ga., WETV, ch. 47, gen. mgr., Dixon Harp 
Meridian, Idaho, ch. 2, call assigned KTCO 
Midland, Tex., ch. 2. call assigned KMID-TV 
New Haven, Conn., WELI-TV, ch. 59; taiget 8 



mos. to I year: mgr., Rudy Frank; est. sets i- 

market, 125,000 
Pensacola, Fla., ch. 15, call assigned WPFA-TV 
Pine Bluff-Little Rock, Ark., ch. 7, new call KATV 

target Oct. '53; to be CBS, ABC affil. 
Richmond, Ky., ch. 60, call assigned WBGT 
San Francisco, Cal., KBAY-TV, ch. 20, target No. 

'53 
Springfield, III., WICS, ch. 20, new target 15 Sep 

'53; gen. mgr., Milton D. Friedland; nat'l rep 

Adam Young 
Stockton, Cal., KTVU, ch. 36, new target, 30 Oct 

'53; gen. mgr., Knox LaRue 
Tulsa, Okla., KCEB, ch. 23, test target Oct. '53 

nat'l rep Boiling 
Worcester, Mass., ch. 14, target 15 Dec. '53; ger 

mgr., Ansel E. Gridley; nat'l rep, Raymer 



BOX SCORE 



Total I .S. stations on air, incl. Honolulu (16 Vo. oj post-freeze <l'\ granted 'excluding 18 Percent oj ill I .S. home-, with Tl sets il 

July '53) 196 educational grants; 16 July '53) 388 May '53) .~*2. I%5 

Vo. o) m,!, Las covered 133 Percent o) all homes in Tl coverage areas (1 

So. of grantees on air 88 So. of Tl homes in U.S. 23,930,000§ Ma) '53) 76.6% J 



B C.P tl i i hid red betwi 

Julj and 16 July or oi hat period. Statioi 

Power of C.P that 

in iii ippll i [nformatloi number of si 

in \ r.i k. i i i f ostlmati 

and niusl Data 'BC Kescarel and Plannln Si I 

is hi I April 1933. Where 1'ITF Is nol e VH1 In b 



TV homes figure Is as i i M .i \ Pi '' 

sidered anpii xinuite • !;■ ■ . . 

granted a I i' nisi represeuts thi m ~ pressliim it i 

■ ■ i i Sl'ONSOIt li-'. 

stations in thi* column when a r« ■ n given the n 

.It. .i<l\ i until lll'.'.l III' I'.'H TV -l.i: i.-t:- \ I \ V 

ssl inie ' ii iiuinht'i -i -•:■■' r, ! I' 



48 



SPONSOR 



n*t 



1 




Look at cars. Like Chevrolet, whose local dealers have 
used Channel 2 continuously for over five years.) 

Only on TV, of all media, can you seat your prospect 
up front ...demonstrate performance with an actual ride 
...focus his full attention on individual features 
of engineering, style, and economy. 

And only on WCBS-TV will you find the best average 
rating, day and night all week long, in the nation's biggest 
television market . . . the most quarter-hour wins 
. . . the biggest unduplicated audience. 

Your product looks good— your business is good — 
when you are on the station most New Yorkers watch 
most of the time... 

WCBS-TV New York. CBS ■< CBS ."■ 






V 



The hottest station 



"V-. v" 







yj 








mimm 



SSS5- 



* GINGER 
ROGERS 




SHOW. ..THE 



tat&fi 



p OlVEU 



PRICE... IN HISTORY! 



12 one-minute spots plus 3 chain breaks every hour . . . 
75 per week! National advertisers . . . regional adver- 
tisers . . . local advertisers ... all rarin' to participate. 
We know because we've SOLD them! 

Schedule it daily 5 hours a week or as 4 separate quarter- 
hours a day! Whether you sell spots, participations, quar- 
ter-hour sponsors, half-hour or full-hour sponsorship . . . 



"The Hour of Stars" will bring your station plenty of 
extra profits! 

Never before such an opportunity to offer the glamour 
of big-name stars . . . the response of a big listening 
audience . . . the prestige of a big-time show! Tony Mar- 
tin, Ginger Rogers, Dick Powell and Peggy Lee make a 
dazzling combination that will have the whole town lis- 
tening, applauding and buying! 



at ever hit radio! 




5 FULL HOURS 
EVERY WEEK/ 

Full of one -minute spots and 

chain -breaks that mean dollars 

pouring in for stations! 









9 I Superman, MPTV, R. Maxwell (K) 



72.9 : 

k& a !v 
7 :30pm 



8.2 10. S 

will] ktla 

10pm •' :00pn 



9.6 




wbkb 
3 :OOpm 




72.2 


72.4 


wbkb 
9 30pm 


wnliiv 

in 30pm 


72.0 




wbkb 
: 30pm 




7 7.0 


73.8 


«hkl) 

1 :•• Ill 


ntop-ti 

I in 



Iti.K 



wabc-tv keca-tv 
6:15pm 8:30pm 



wbkb 
7:30pm 



'. UN 



Wlll.k Willi. IV »A 

il:00|>ni \1 ': 







27.3 


27.8 




U 






wkrc-tv 
8 30pm 


n i'w . 
10:00pm 








79.3 


76.8 


76.0 


26.3 


n 




wi. ni ii 

10:30pm 


uiiii 
0:30pm 


VWW. 

10:30pm 


wl.n.-lv 
B :i 




70.5 












W.I. -11 

' Ill 














74.0 


78.3 


72.8 


20.0 


?3 




winat -!v 
10:30pm 


wlw 1 

8 :30pm 


w \fl 

1" .i in 


wlw -I 

8 30pm 




72.3 


73.3 




72.5 


20.0 


71 


iiiiu 
7 7.3 


w mai rv 
6 a 




wnl.k 

S :00pm 


u bns-li 
i; :30pm 




16.3 


78.0 


73.5 


24.3 


70 


w.l. -n 


wl.al lv 
7 00pm 


wi pn-tv 

5:30pm 


wnl.k 
6:00pm 


Wl,||. -11 

1. :00pm 





vish-lv whal-tv 
". :30pm 7 pin 



vkr. tv 
:30pm 



wnbk vi I. us [1 
Mini Ipm 



Shows among top 20 in 4 or more markets (ranking omitted) 



Hollywood Off Beat, United TV Programs (M] 



Dangerous Assignment, NBC Film, Donlevy (A) 



Doug. Fairbanks Presents, NBC Film (D) 



March of Time, March of Time (Doc. 



Hank McCtine, United TV Programs (C) 



lAberave. Guild Films (Mu) 



The Unexpected. Ziv (D) 



China Smith, PSI-TV, Tableau (A) 



Heart of the City, United TV Programs (D) 



I'm *««• fail'. MCA, Cosman [Ml 



24.4 



•>:t.:i 



22.2 



22.1 



21. 



20.7 



18. 



17.7 



17.1 



I 



15.9 



3.9 

urbs-tv 
2:30pm 



72.9 

knlih 
10:311pm 



76.7 

wnbt 

10:30pm 



4.2 

km 

.ni.ii 

2.0 



klac-tv 
7:00pm 



72.2 

klac-tv 
Op, 



4.0 

keca-ti 



2.9 75.7 

wabc-tv keca-ti 

8 in 



4.9 

km 
10:30pm 



9.8 

inn tv 
:30pm 



4.2 

wbkb 
00pm 



8.4 6.4 

ML'II tl Wttg 

9:30pm . 30pm 



79.4 

il Inn lv 

9 30pm 



wall. I klac-tv 
8 in.,,: 



6.2 

wbkb 





2.9 4.5 5.2 9.4 



wttg 



77.3 

Ukir t\ 

8:00pm 







U 






WWl 

111 II 






20 






930 






77.5 






Willi- -11 

m :;i>pin 


76.8 




5. 


Wll.ll lv 

10 :30pm 




HOT 

S:S0| 


72.3 


77.5 




w aga-tv 
10:30pm 


\i en i 

1" i ii 





Show tyi (( . D drama; (D locumentarj K kid show 

[Ml mj terj ; (W) i u ic.F1 

"■ " i ""'"■ ">arl 



77.0 74.8 8. 



wnbk wiins-n 
10:30pm 






70. 
76. • 



vidua] marl r . ;,, n„ 

"' 1 :i I ''■ 7 an I 9 .1 N shows arc lairlv -lalil. 

- nut in mi . h Ii --.! , x' 



52 



A new chart will appear in the 24 August issue 



SPONSOR 



100 41V/U 



:lislws 

iiy mode for TV 



-STATION MARKETS 

BmI Oiytsn Mplv 



'*-' 



24.3 
78.3 



26 5 



77.8 





18.3 



22.8 



27.3 



26 8 24.8 27.8 

■ 
■ 



24.3 

: OOpra 



25.8 

- 



20.0 19.3 

win .i kitp n 

- 



3.3 11.8 17.3 



7.5 11.0 10.5 22.0 

, iv win d 



.3 7 7.3 9.8 7.8 



i Da 

Ma- 



li i« .1 

'in 



(STATION 
la Nr» Or. 



MARKETS 
Si-«ttl« SI liu.i 



50 5 53.3 56 5 



Mil.ll l> 



k..l tl 

■ 



45.5 



29.0 44 5 34.5 



OUpm 



00pm 



26.0 43.5 41.8 28 



»bm i\ 












57.5 



220 

k-.i i> 



45.0 



40.5 



i" "" 



50.0 38.8 



wdsu i> 
5 00pm 






46 5 



46.8 



43.5 



35.5 



24.5 46.5 25.3 30.5 



I 00pm 












45.5 29.0 25.8 29 5 



,1-uti 






0.8 



2.8 



23.8 






75.8 



24.8 

- 



11.3 

wn«rtv 



27.3 



0.0 



26.3 



27.8 






7.5 



55.5 



47.8 



47.0 
ksd-U 

1» .in 



56.5 



46.0 



49.3 



49.5 



47.5 
knl-U 



47.0 
klng-ti 

50.0 



77.0 55.0 



57.0 



mini Mini 
them maik 



»OUNT AIRT 



REIDSVIUE* I 

^ i ri ivfmv-tv I T i 

winsto^aumj mmju T j N m ^J i 

"I «. j — J Greensboro| 1% 

/^■V,^ V^ A THOMA5VIUE 
>i^ LEXINGTON I 

^ % ASHEBORO* 



TROY 



DUPHAM, 



/ 



CARTHAGE * 



this is where 
it PAYS to be in the middle... 

Providing it's the middle of this important mid-South region 
— an advertiser's paradise of progressive communities, all 
served by the broad circle of WFMY-TV's coverage. Packed 
into this zone of sales opportunity is a greater amount of 
buying power than you'll find in such media "musts'' as 
Baltimore, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, or New Orleans. 

Strategically located in the middle of almost a billion and a 
half dollars — money waiting to be spent on what you have to 
sell — is WFMY-TV. Many of America's most successful adver- 
tisers have discovered how well WFMY-TV reaches and per- 
suades the customers of this growing area. Why not share 
their good fortune with them? 



wfmy-tv 



Basic CBS Affiliate - Channel 2 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons. Inc. 

New York— Chicago — San Francisco 



27 JULY 1953 



53 



Radio 



o \_^ o 



■ft ..«..«»«« "-"■ "-S 



6y Z?o6 Foreman 



jr%.imm» the biggest of our dilem- 
ma- in a dilemma-wracked medi- 
um is the endless search for new 
TV commercial announcers. In the 
earliest days of the medium most 
of us attempted to make a simple 
transition from radio by using our 
ladio announcers to sell our prod- 
uct visually. In some instances this 
proved to he wisdom itself for, by 
dint of hidden talent, previous ex- 
perience, or sheer luck some radio 
announcers turned out to be fine 
salesmen-on-camera. From this 
group (radio announcers) came 
the Dick Starks, and the Nelson 
Cases, and the Allyn Edwards. 

However, more often than not, 
we found we had tremendous trou- 
ble ahead when we blithely expect- 
ed a script-reading radio man, first 
—to learn a script by heart, second 
—to become mobile before a cam- 
era, third — to have sufficient con- 
fidence and poise to be visually 



convincing to the viewers. 

There was the gent who got 
every line right except the theme 
at the sign-off in which he accused 
his bulb sponsor of providing "less 
and less light for more and more 
money" and then, realizing he had 
made a Grade A boo-boo, the poor 
chap nervously allowed, "I think 
it's the other way around." 

There was the skilled radio an- 
nouncer, with years of well-deliv- 
ered messages under his belt, who 
also had, unfortunately, too much 
stomach under the same belt, since 
his sponsor was selling a product 
intended to take weight off. 

There were the dozens of com- 
petent, intelligent men and women 
who had to overcome understand- 
able camera-shyness, who had to 
learn to walk (most difficult of all 
video-instructions!), to point, to 
open tin cans, to hold up packages 
— all without that tell-tale shake of 



Skilled radio announcers won't go over on TV if they lack poise, don't know how to walk. 
Allyn Edwards (below) is among radio vets who made good on TV, Foreman says 




the hands or knees which was so 
much with u< in the beginning and 
was so annoying that it took the 
viewer's mind completely off the 
message being delivered. 

Gradually, because we can't af- 
ford to nor do we dare to take 
chances, a few announcers stood 
out and became in such great de- 
mand they appeared on shows and 
spots with bewildering profusion. 
\\ c then realized something else — 
that a man or woman could physi- 
cally handle far fewer TV job- 
than in radio. So the search again 
v\a> underway full speed. 

Actors and actresses were audi- 
tioned by the score. Agencies even 
compared notes. Local announcers 
moved into the big city for their 
auditions and gradually some new 
faces did creep in here and there. 
Some have lasted. 

At this point everybody was out 
to find another Betty Furness or a 
Rex Marshall or a type "just like" 
Dr. Roy K. Marshall. Once again, 
we were hewing to the line, trving 
to find some carbon copies (after, 
of course, attempting to sign up 
the originals and being turned 
down for one reason or another. ) 

And, today, the search is still 
going on. As far as I can see with 
myopic orbs, this will be a never- 
ending quest. A quite necessary 
one, however, and well worth the 
effort since the burden of the effec- 
tively delivered commercial is 
-<|uarely on the shoulders of the 
advertising agencies. It is their job 
to find the fresh faces and new T per- 
sonalities who can move product- 
by making people move. 

Unfortunately, there is no for- 
mula for assuring anvone that the 
right choice has been made before 
the leap has been taken. In fact, 



• Do you always agree with Bob • 
. Foreman when he lauds or . 
, l.i in 1 1. 1 -i- a commercial? Bob 

and the editors of SPONSOR 
would be happy to receive 

and print comments from 

• i • ■ .... • 
readers in rebuttal; in ire; in 

qualified agreement. Address 

• Bob Foreman, c o SPONSOR. 

• 40 East 49 St. 



54 



SPONSOR 




£5t&4&fc 



Does M- 




"It's awful early at 5:45 A.M. 
How do we know anyone's listening? 
asked the man from Kent Feeds. We 
couldn't do a phone survey at that hour. 

"Give away something," someone 
suggested. "Chicks," said someone else. 

WMT carried one "free chicks" 
announcement one morning. Kent 
dealers thought they'd had it. Chap in 
Chelsea, la., opened at 8; found 
200 customers waiting. 
Same thing at other stores mentioned. 

Folks are listening. Kent concluded. 

"Good story," said a time buyer. 
"How much feed did they sell?" 







tell G- 



Kent has 



been on daily since March 20, 1951. 
Their agency says they'll triple WMTs 
budget whenever we can provide 
suitable (and early!) program time. 
We're working on it. 

Moral: The early chick doesn't need norms. 
WMT CEDAR RAPIDS 

600 KC 5000 Watts 
ivepresentcd nationally by the KATZ Agency. 




£0 










more families 
in Washington 
^1 listen to WRC 
than to any | 
other radio 
station in the 
area.' 



fl^a. 




it takes perhaps 13 week? on the 
air to know. Auditions give only 
partial answers because an actor 
in a studio-audition may freeze up 
on the live show or before the roll- 
ing motion picture camera. Film 
may do his lor her) looks unex- 
pected harm, noticeable only after 
this film comes out of the lab. Hut 
there is one guidepost we can take 
direction from as we try to sell a 
new personage to an advertiser — 
familiarity is a good 50% of the 
battle. The more people who see 
whatever spokesman we choose, 
the more welcome he or she will 
be in their homes. Familiarity, 
rather than breeding contempt, 
breathes life into the salesman as 
well as into the message he or she 
delivers for the sponsor. 



commercial reviews 



TELEVISION 

SPONSOR: Pacific Coast Borax Co. 

agency: McCann-Erickson, N. Y. 

PRODUCER: Fire Star Productions 

PROGRAM: One-minute announcement 

As I screened this announcement, I was 
about to deliver a tirade on misuse of 
humor, the insincerity of it, and how inef- 
fective I'd wager such an approach is 
when trying to make the point that Borax 
kills garbage can odors. 

However, the animated lead-in, in which 
the garbage can talks in snooty terms im- 
mediately dissolved to Rosemary DeCamp 
giving a straightforward presentation on 
the subject. Miss DeCamp laughed off 
the animated opening and in a very di- 
rect as well as attractive manner presented 
the subject. 

Another point well made, I believe, was 
the way the audio pointed to the video — 
zooming up from the package such phrases 
as "kills garbage odors" and "chases flies." 
Rather than reading what the words said. 
Miss DeCamp's audio pointed to the visual 
which made it much more emphatic. Far 
too often, audio merely repeats video rath- 
er than emphasizing it. 

This commercial is. I believe, an excel- 
lent example of animation well combined 
with live action providing the best that 
each technique can offer. * * * 






56 



SPONSOR 



*e> 










BETTER Television for Wisconsin 



Fim to provide television foi Milwaukei and W nsin, Hit Milwaukee foumal 

h..s constant!) improved its facilities and kepi pace **>U new developments in the field 
Here is the latest itep in providing improved television servii i It is thi milestone 
al i bannel i Da> ," obs< rvi .1 Saturday, Jul> 1 1 — 



NO 



■ ■ 

urn Your 

If 



Eye to Channel 



Enjoj better retep i this new spot on youi television dial! The shift of 

VVTMJ rVtochannel I is one of II changes in existing television station channels 
approved In ilu- Federal Communications Commission to 
better nation-wide mimic l>\ reducing interference 

MORE Power. . . 100,000 Watts 

The radiated power "l WTMJ-TV on channel I is increased to 100,000 

watts, which is the maximum power authorized by the 

Federal Communications 1 ommission t"i stations on thi^t bannel. 

NEW Tower ... 1,035 Feet 

Hi. combination of more power and greater tower hnuhi will rtearhj 
double WTMJ- tVs basic service area from a radius of 45 to 50 miles to 
approximatel) 90 miles Improved reception is also expected in areas 
"shaded" bj ground hollows, buildings or oihi-r obstructions. 



! 



*r 



National Representatives: HARRINGTON, RIGHTER AND PARSONS, INC. 
27 JULY 1953 




57 



FLOUR 



USED CARS 



si'oNSOK: Cni.no S Markel VGENCY: Direct 

( MM II i W HISTORY: This super market, one of 
the largest Latin-American grocery outlets in San Antonio, 
was Ifiii ily stocked mi a well-known brand oj flour. It de- 
cided to hold a one-week sale, bought announcements on 
KIWW to tell people about it. No other medium was 
used. Mr. Centeno states: "My sales of this brand of 
flour increased from an average of 6,500 lbs. per week 
to 19,000 lbs. during this sale week.'" The sponsor's total 
investment in the 35-announcement campaign, $80. 



klttW. Mn \ntoniu 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



- ' ■ 




results 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



SPONSOR: Rhodes Dept. Store 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For the purpose of attract- 
ing women into their appliance department for a "live" 
show, this de\mrtment store advertised first in a local 
newspaper, then on KMO. The 54-inch newspaper ad, 
which cost about $135, drew five people on the show's 
first day. The announcements on KMO, which cost the 
sponsor a total of $50 brought in 120 persons to the show 
the second day. The newspaper ad cost $27 per patron; 
the announcements cost 42 1 /o0 per patron. Also signifi- 
cant: 80% of the air pitches were aired between 6:00 
p.m. and midnight in this, a TV area. 



KMO. Tacoma 



PROGRAM: Announcement! 



SOAP-FILLED PADS 



'■■■"■ 



M 



>l'O\S0R: American Steel AGENCY: Needham & Grohmann 

Wool Mfg. Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To help sell its Soap-Filled 
Pads, this sponsor bought two one-minute participations 
a week, Tuesday and Thursday, on The McCanns At 
Home (9:30-10:00 a.m.). After three months, sales of 
the item in the New York area had increased 10.4%. 
According to R. O. Dahling, sales manager of the com- 
pany, the campaign on the McCanns'' shoiv was largely 
responsible for obtaining expanded distribution in the 
New York area, which included selling the product to 
more than 300 Associated Food Stores in Brooklyn and 
Queens. The sponsor pins s2<"»0 (/ week. 



\\<)K. New York 



PROGR \M: The McCanns At Home 



SPONSOR: Harding M r- AGENCY: Dir 

CAPSU.K CASE HISTORY: Harding Motors, Mete 

auto dealers for ChUliwack, British Columbia, wanted 
known that they were opening up a new used car I, 
They planned the opening for a Saturday. For use on t 
'Thursday and Friday immediately preceding that Sati 
day. they purchased a total of four announcements , 
CHWK, used no other advertising. On opening do 
they sold nine used cars, grossed $13,000 in busint 
from an advertising investment of $40. 

CHWK. Chilliwack, B. C. PROGRAM: Announcemei 



PREFAB HOMES 



SPO!W)K: Gunnw.n Homes, I . S. 
Steel subsidiary 



AGENCY : \dv. \- 
Louisville, K 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: JJ . S. Steel, on two brot 
casts of Theatre Guild on the Air, offered literature on i 
Gunnison Homes. These are prefabricated houses whit 
sell from $6,500 to $12,000 {excluding the lot). T> 
offer explicitly stated that "a salesman will call" on tht 
people writing in — a move calculated to eliminate tl 
idly curious. Result: 7.500 letters came in from prospec 
who were, in effect, asking to talk to a salesman. The; 
a sales potential of from $49 million to $90 million fro 
an investment of $79,000 for time and talent. 



NBC Radio 



PROGRAM: Theatre Guild on the A 



BRIDGE TABLES 



SPONSOR: Mc & Mc Ltd. 



AGENCY: Dir- 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : In one furniture sale, M 

& Mc Ltd., a branch of a British Columbia hardware or, 
furniture chain, had a special on bridge tables. It u- 
four issues of one local paper and two of another to plv 
the sale, but was not satisfied with the results. It tht 
switched to CKOV uith an order for four 30- 
announcements {at a cost of about $5 each I . After li 
third pitch had been aired on a Monday — usually a slo 
shopping day — the store's furniture department fram 
called CKOV to cancel the last plug. Reason: It u 
swamped with orders for the tables. 



CKOV. Kelowna. B. C. 



PROGRAM: Announcemer, 



SILVERWARE 






SPONSOR: International Silver Co., 
Holmes & Edward- Di\. 



AGENCY: Cunningha 
& Wal- 



( UPSULE CASE HISTORY: To promote the offer oj 
special spoon, the Holmes & Edwards division of Ink 
national Silver particijtated in the Housewives Protects 
League I daily 1:30-2:00 p.m. and 10:30-11:00 p.m. i I 
KNX. Four of the largest department and jewelry stort 
in L. A. were lined up to install windou and "in-stort 
displays of the item. After the first iveek of the offe 
one of the stores reported: "We had ordered an adequai 
supply for many weeks, but were completely sold out l> 
Wednesday. Largest volume of flat silverplate we hat 
sold in a number of years." Cost per week: $357.50. 



k\\. In- \ll-rl,- 



PROGRAM: Housewives Pn 
tective Leagu 




To sell the 

NEW 

PITTSBURGH 
MARKET... 

IIAV „. 

■ m^^f ^ f w '^ ** * offers you 



tv»» w "" MMr JM «"«i kimmh.... n»'- 




How do you sell in the New Pittsburgh/ By cashing in on Pittsburgh's most 
successful new merchandising plan, sponsored by K.QV — now (IBS Radio in 
Pittsburgh — and the 130 A & P stores throughout the Pittsburgh market! 

From K.QV you get top spots and programs, adjacent to high-rating CBS 
network shows. And from A & P you get the unprecedented opportunity to 
merchandise and display your product in 130 A&P markets in the K.QY area. 

This amazingly successful tie-in has already brought eye-popping sales 
results for many national advertisers. General Mills, for example, upped pur- 
chases of Wheaties 8 13% in the Pittsburgh area. Canada Dry reported, "almost 
doubled normal weekly case sales." 

This promotion works. Why not put it to work for ^uu? Call or wire — tight 
now — for full particulars! 



ICQ ltEfci 



National Representatives: WEED & CO. New York • Boston • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • Los Angeles 
27 JULY 1953 



59 




a forum on questions of current Interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



The BBC offered free Coronation films und tapes to 

Ameriean broadeasters provideti no singing 

commewials were used. Bo you think jingles are irritating 




Mr. Davis 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

Although I do 
not believe all 
jingles should be 
classified under 
the one '"irritat- 
ing and undigni- 
fied" heading, I 
am in complete 
accord with the 
BBC stand; for 
the Coronation is 
not only of his- 
torical significance, but also it is basi- 
cally a religious service, rooted in the 
spirits, hearts, and national sentiments 
of the British people. It should com- 
mand respect and dignity and every- 
thing associated with the Coronation 
should be in good taste. 

If all jingles fulfilled the good taste 
requirement, the BBC proviso certainly 
would be a critical slap at American 
culture and advertising. Unfortunately, 
however, far too many jingles are irri- 
tating and undignified, sounding as if 
they were written by the boss' seven- 
year-old daughter or the office boy. 

For some illogical reason, advertis- 
ers too frequently make the mistake 
of thinking that all jingles and musical 
commercials receive equal audience ac- 
ceptance and create the same impact, 
regardless of whether or not they're 
written by a professional or an ama- 
teur composer. 

As a result, the American air seems 
flooded to the average European — par- 
ticularly the Englishman accustomed to 
government controlled broadcasting — 
with irritating and undignified jingles. 
Inasmuch as the BBC can in no \\a\ 
approve, edit, or control am jingles 
that might be used. I approve its stand 
to eliminate cheap or undignified ma- 
il rial !>\ banning the use "I all musi- 



cal commercials with the Coronation 
films, even though the American broad- 
casting companies do have many ex- 
cellent musical spots that could have 
been used in connection with the films, 
without offending any listener — British 
or American — or indicating bad taste 
in any way. 

Phil Davis 

President 

Phil Davis Musical Enterprises, Inc. 

New York 



Yes, I think the 
BBC is entireh 
correct. I think 
"jingles" are ir- 
ritating ... I 
think they are un- 
dignified ... I 
think most of 
them are down- 
right stupid. 

This past March 
I was invited to 
speak at the Association of National 
Advertisers spring meeting, down at 
Hot Springs, Virginia. The title that 
was assigned to me on this occasion 
was "Successful Selling with Radio and 
Television Jingles." 

I prefaced my remarks at that time 
l>\ saying . . . "The first rule a suc- 
cessful jingle ought to follow is that it 
ought never to sound like a jingle . . . 
it ought not to look like a jingle . . . 
act like a jingle . . . or smell like 
a jingle." 

I went on to say that that all of this 
is pretty plain, ordinary common sense. 
because aside from hucksterish rub- 
bish, ever) darn fool and his brother 
knows that people hate "jingles." I 
reminded the members of the AN \ 
gathered there that the\ didn't like 
them in their own homes, their maids 




Nelson 



didn't like them, the people in their 
offices didn't like them . . . and I ad- 
mitted I hated them. Nobody has a 
right to be an s.o.b. in Mrs. Jones' 
living room. Nobod) ever sold nobody 
nothin' nohow by getting 'em mad. 

We are. as you know, the largest 
producers of musical announcements 
for radio and/or television in the his- 
tory of the business. Our work is 
heard on more stations more often than 
that of anyone else. Our clients are the 
very largest, the most respected names 
in American business and industry to- 
day. There's hardly a station in the 
country that doesn't carry our work. 
And yet. this business has been built 
with no salesmen . . . very little solici- 
tation b\ us. 

We. just as \ou. know that the pub- 
lic loves music ... all forms of music. 
That's why they spend millions upon 
millions of dollars a year to buv songs 
on Victor, Columbia. Decca. Mercury, 
and similar labels. So what we produce 
for our clients is simpK the hit parade 
of music ... no shouting, no scream- 
ing, no phony baloney repetitious, irri- 
tating malarky. We just give our cli- 
ents songs . . . songs of all t\pes. all 
styles, all tempos . . . songs fullv as 
good as anything \ou will hear on the 
hit parade of popular music. 

We spend virtually all of our time 
in creating and producing our work . . . 
mt\ little tr\ ing to dispose of it. Nor- 
mally we have onl\ to audition for the 
president or the chairman of the 
hoard of a major corporation and he 
almost invariabl) asks these two ques- 
tions: i 1 I How long has this been go- 
ing on? (2) Win haven't we heard 
about it? 

In my opinion, the BBC i» entireh 
correct . . . "jingles" are irritating . . . 
"jingle- arc undignified. Moreover. 
we don t think "jingles" sell too well. 



60 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Sdnde 



Mans oi the mosl importanl names 
in business and industi j todaj i ould 

tell you thai :■ I music and good 

songs d" sell . ■ , sell like < ra/\ . I hal - 
h hat keeps us in business. 

(.1 0RC1 l>". Nl i SON 

President 

Selson Ideas, Inc. 

Schenectady, V. ) . 



I'm inclined to 
think the BB( 
bas s false pi< - 
hue ol the \imci 
ican broadcast ad- 
mi tising - c e n <■ 
ami i- discrimi- 
nating unfairl) : 
thai is, making 
decisions w ithoul 
full \ understand- 
i ii g advertising 
Americana the jingle. I think mosl 
people End jingles no more irritating 
than other forms of advertising. v ". 
win discrimination? 

From the British point of view, a 
jingle might conceivably be undigni- 
fied. But from the American viewpoint 
— no. In fact, the jingle fit- right into 
our mode ol life, a certain gaiety, a 
competitive message, a sale without 
drive. 

We, who are specialists in the field 
of creating jingles, or as we call them. 
Song-Ads, offer these basic facts: Jin- 
gles appeal to the consumer in an 
entirel) different waj than other forms 
of advertising. Jingles appeal to the 
subconscious mind rather than the con- 
scious mind, as in other media. 

To receive the advertising message 
from a newspaper, magazine or bill- 
board ad, the consumer must con- 
scioush absorb the contents. It is 
therefore ea-\ to turn the page and 
pass it 1>\. Hut in receiving the prod- 
uct message from a jingle the con- 
sumer does not ha\e to concentrate 
in fact he doe- not have to consciousl) 
do anything. In most cases he is not 
aware of even hearing the message — 
hut the natural euphon\ of rh\ me and 
rhythm, plus repetition -oaks in he 
hums the tune, associates it with the 
product, and eventual!) even begins to 
learn the word-. Then Mr. Consumer 
has your message solidly, constantly, 
and pleasantly. 

Hon Swm 
President 
Song-ads Co. 
Holh wood 



**w towers 



over a 
rich market 




There's more sell on 

5000 Watts 
Day and Night 

ABC Affiliate 
Richmond. Va. 



Edward Petry & Co.. Inc., National Representatives 



27 JULY 1953 



61 



EVEN IN VIENNA 



THEY WATCH 



WHEN 





Not for dancing, but for 
year 'round enjoyment 
people in Vienna watch 
WHEN and then shop the 
Syracuse Market. 



Vienna, N. Y., reacts to tele- 
vision as enthusiastically as 
the other communities in the 
rich 26-county market covered 
exclusively by WHEN. This 
enthusiasm is reflected in the 
increased sales volume of 
WHEN advertisers. Over IV* 
million people with a high, 
stable buying income are your 
prospects. It's the heart of the 
Empire State. You get maxi- 
mum effectiveness from your 
advertising dollar and GET 
COMPLETE COVERAGE OF 
THIS IMPORTANT MARKET 
WITH ONE MEDIUM-WHEN. 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 





agency profile 



Erie Eisner 

Radio and TV director 
Maury, Lee & Marshall, New York 



When Eric Eisner left Europe in January 1939, his credentials 
stated that he was leaving to cover the New York World's Fair for 
the largest newspaper in Prague. He had a much better reason: 
Paul Goebbels, German propaganda minister, had put a price of 
25.000 Reichmarks on his head for his anti-Nazi programs on the 
Prague radio station. He left Prague with a plane ticket to Rotter- 
dam. Holland, and $1.50 in his pockets. 

By way of contrast, he will plav a major role this year in the 
spending of about $1,325,000 in radio and TV for Amana Refrigera- 
tion. Inc. His start in the advertising field was modest. He joined 
Weiss & Geller, Inc. in Chicago in 1940 as an idea man. script writer 
for radio musical programs, and fashion shows. 

Three days after Pearl Harbor he joined the army. After CIC 
training, military authorities decided against sending him to Europe 
because of possible reprisals against his family there. 

Separated from the service in 1946, he freelanced as a radio-TV 
writer and producer for five vears producing a number of pilot 
films before joining Maury, Lee & Marshall in 1951. Agencies were 
then eager to get motion picture men for use in J\ production. 

Eric explains his rise in the movie business simpl) : "In Europe 
vou start by carrying sandwiches for the crew. Soon you work 
up to carrying a camera tripod; then vou become assistant director, 
script writer, director, and, finally . a producer." He worked on 36 
feature-length pictures as either writer or director. Then in 1935 he 
went to work for Bata Shoe Co. (which was then producing 2<°>4.000 
pairs of shoes per da\ i to turn out documentaries. 

His views on toda\"< television production can be boiled down 
thuslj : "ill There are too many copycats in this business; they all 
want to make like 'Lucv .' (2) Main tr\ to supplant the lack of an 
idea with a big production. I 3 I Few people know how to use a TV 
camera to its best advantages, i 4 i TV films can be produced equally 
well in New York without the high Hollywood overhead." 

Eric"s wife, \rlene. the mother of his four-year-old son. is 
going to college at night, expects to get her M.l). degree in about 
three years. Eric and his wife debate regularl) over the subject of 
how oid their son Peter should be before he is told that hi* father was 
(he writer of Wcih Lamarr's famous movie Ecstasy. • • • 



62 



SPONSOR 



Greatest Weather Invention Since the Barometer! 




THE WEATHER GIRL-on WPTZ 

A nighttime 5-minute strip now available., 
the right show, the right time, the right price! 






If toi *ki interested in a high-quality show 
at a low-budget price, meet Miss Lynn 
Dollar, television's talented weathercaster- 
model-actress. Her nightly WEATHER 
GIRL programs are enjoyed Monda\ 
through Friday at 7:25 on WPTZ by thou- 
sands and thousands in the vast Philadelphia 
television market. 

True, the curves on the weather map aren't 
the only ones that keep 'em watching. L\nn 
appears nightly in the latest fashion appro- 
priate to the day and season. She reports 
the weather and forecasts the morrow's tem- 
perature in peddle-pushers, evening gowns 
or bathing suits, liberally lacing the show 
with informal fashion news, breezy chatter 
and winning ways. 

THE WEATHER GIRL is part of \\ PTZ's 
nightly news, sports and weather strip, which 
immediately follows the sensationally popu- 
lar FRONTIER PLAYHOUSE program. It 



precedes NBC's strong 7:30 line-up — Eddie 
Fisher, Eddy Arnold, and Dinah Shore. 

It's hard to believe, but you can sponsor 
THE WEATHER GIRL every night. Mon- 
day through Friday, for only $1537.00, full) 
commissionable (only a few dollars mure 
than you'd pay lor a strip of 20-second an- 
nouncements in the same time period). THE 
WEATHER GIRL also may be sponsored 
on a once, twice or thrice-weekly basis. 

For full details on this great television avail- 
ability, give us a call here at WPTZ. or see 
your nearest NBC Spot Sales representative. 
It's a bargain buy your clients will want to 
hear about. 



WPTZ 

PHILADELPHIA 



CHANNEL 



NBC-TV AFFILIATE 




27 |ULY 1953 



WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc 

WBZ • WBZA • KYW • KDKA • WOWO . KEX • WBZ-TV • WPTZ 

63 






I 



■■■■■HP m 




WTOI'-TY tot slum- scores hiyh rating niter one week on ttir 



That there is a big need for enter- 
tainment of pre-school toddlers has 
been indicated b) the success of NBC 
rV's Dins, Dong School. Recently, a 
show of this type on WTOP-TV, after 
onl) <>ne week on the air, zoomed to 
the position of second-most-viewed 
weekday program in Washington, D. C. 
(Arthur Godfrey was first). And this 
completely sans publicity or advertis- 
ing build-up. 

Billy Johnson, a 27-year-old young 
man. sings, tells stories, and shows film 



of bab\ sitter for harassed mothers. 
keeping tots quietl) at the TV set for 

anhoure\er\ morning. He emphasizes 
the wonders ol nature and wildlife, 
gives advice on -alet\ and good living. 
converses with two puppet companions. 
plays his guitar sings, and shows car- 
toons ("Felix the Cat"' and Walt Dis- 
ne\ - "' Mice" serie- i . 

One mother wrote: "If more sta- 
tions would realize that the way to a 
mother's or father's heart is through 
their children. the\ certainlv would 




pla\ing, story-telling d.j. on WHK who 
has been selling for two sponsors — 
Pavelka Meats and Cannon Tailors — 
for over 10 years. When these two 
sponsors launched Dick in a new show 
a while back I daily 1:15 to 2:00 p.m. | 
they wanted something to keep the 
program from being "just another d.j. 
shot." Station planners looking for an 
idea hit on a "Plant of the Week" 
promotion. 

The plan v*a- for Dick to give his 
audience a complete five-day aural tour 
of each plant, including live interviews 
with worker-, management, welfare of- 
ficers: chats about job opportunities, 
working hours, insurance and retire- 
ment funds; new developments and 
future plans of the plant. It would be 
necessary for industry to go to the 
trouble of preparing a great deal of 
written material and provide men for 
live interviews at the height of the 
work da\ . 

\nv uncertainty about how indus- 
trial firms would take to th ; s idea was 
soon dissolved. The Fisher Body Plant 
headed a long list of glad acceptances; 
since then such companies as Cleve- 
land Pneumatic Tool. Glidden Paint. 
Chevrolet. Enamel Products, White 
Sewing Machine and Apex Electric 
have taken part in the program. 

According to the station, the pro- 
gram's Pulse is fine — evidence of ac- 
ceptance by a public previously apa- 
thetic to the idea of learning about in- 
dustry — and the sponsors are happy 
with increasing business. • • • 



Some 2,500 young fans flocked to see Billy at a recent gathering; he spoke to each child Brief It/ 



cartoons to youngsters on his morning 
Cartoon Club program ( Monday 
through Saturday, 9 to 10 a.m.). He 
launched his program on 23 March. 
Just four days later, the American Re- 
search Bureau started its monthly TV 
rating check. ARB officials were 
amazed at the 8.9 rating high I average. 
6.9) pulled by a show they'd never 
heard of before and which had not 
even been on the air a week. 

When TelePulse completed its mea- 
suring survey the week of 6 April, it 
found that the Cartoon Club had an 
11.2 rating. This made the show No. 
5 in the top 10 multi-weekly programs 
in Washington. It garnered more audi- 
ence than such network shows as Cam- 
el Vew s Caravan. Kate Smith. Time for 
Beany, and U.S.A. Canteen. 

Like Ding Dong's Dr. Frances Hor- 
wich, r>ill\ Johnson functions as a sorl 



be the wiser. Mothers buy the product 
that sponsors a show to interest their 
children — all advertisers should realize 
that. Don't ever replace Billy Johnson. 
I think he is wonderful." 

Due to the success of the morning 
stanza. Billy also keeps the tots ab- 
sorbed dailv from 5:30 to 5:55 p.m. 
on the WTOP-TV screen. * * * 

TlffK d.j. slum- promotes 
Cleveland industry 

Big industry plays an important part 
in the business life of Cleveland. To 
make people aware of the city's indus- 
trial picture and bring it alive for them, 
radio station WHK. Cleveland, has a 
program which honors a different in- 
dustrial plant each week. This pro- 
gram, oddly enough, is a d.j. show. 

Dick Heren is a singing, ukelele- 



When home-wrecking wind storms 
swept Wichita. Kan., last month, a 
lumber company reported that among 
hundreds of frantic calls from persons 
seeking information on household re- 
pairs and FHA loan procedure, one 
came from a man who said: "Last 
spring I done bought a car: and I been 
so worried over making payments on 
the car that my house insurance done 
relapsed. But I know my credit is 
good . . . and that I can get one of 
them KFH loans." Radio station KFH 
states that it is happy to be thought 
of in time of trouble though it is not 
in competition with the FHA home loan 

program. 

* « * 

The state of Maine has a new re- 
gional network covering 7V, of it- 
radio homes. Called the "Lobster Net- 
work" it embraces WPOR. Portland: 






64 



SPONSOR 



\\i:oi . Lewiston; \\ I \l . Augusta; 
WRKD, Rockland; \\ I \ I . Waterville; 
and upcoming WKI M. Rumford. \l 
tei the baseball season, several lull net- 
work features will I"- established t" at 
commodate participating and single 
sponsorships. The network covers 
"back yard" Maine as well as more 

heavil) populated ma joi markets. 

• • • 

\\ hen Herb Shriner \ isited bis home 
town, Fort Wayne, I ml., recently, some 
15,000 Hoosiers lined the streets to 
rive liim a vociferous welcome. \\ itli 




Old Gold gets spotliqht on air talent's travels 

Herb, the star of P. Lorillard's Two 
l<>r the Money show on NBC l\ 
(switching i<> CBS T\ as of L5 \u- 
gust), was the Old Gold Dancing Pack 
iii rl t<> remind the folk* of bis air spon- 
sor. Station WOWO. where lie started 
about 20 years ago, honored him with 
a special broadcast When lie arrived 
1>\ plane, he was greeted b) old friends 
i photo. 1. to r. I Crawford Parker. In- 
diana Secretary of State: Carl Vanda- 
urift. WOWO station manager; Cliff 
Milnor. Fort Wayne Journal Gazette 
columnist; Paul Mills, WOWO sales 
manager; Boh Shreve, Galbreadth Pro- 
ductions: Shriner; Norm Widenhofer, 
WGL pro-ram manager; Shirk) 
Wayne, WOWO. Herb's wife, Pixie, is 
at right with back to camera. 
• • • 

To help dispel the "mystery" about 
agenc] organization, procedure and 
philosophy, Henry J. Kaufman & Asso- 
ciates, Washington, I). (".. has pre- 
pared a booklet which trie* to clear up 
an\ questions a serious agency-prospect 
might have on bis mind. Titled '"Mow 
to get the most out of your advertising 
dollar, the brochure develops eight 
principles it deems important to at- 
taining this end. Thej include: keep- 
ing your advertising tuned to changing 
minds and markets: validating your 
sales judgment with current research; 
analyzing areas with greatest potential. 
Booklet also stresses benefits of com- 
plete, up-to-date agencj service. ** + 



t <t i ft i . 




WTHf 

Personality 



Hoy Sh it dt 

MOBILGAS SPORTSCASTER 6:15 P.M. 
"FIFTH AT SARATOGA" 4:30 P.M. 



Ko\ Shudt didn't know whether to saj "yes" or "no" when asked 
several years ago to call the trotting races at Saratoga. The track 
for CBS. He- the star performer at Hollywood Park on the coast 
tator and pla\-h\-pla\ star on WTRY, Ko\ had never described the 
trotters before. 

Fortunately, he finall) said, "Yes." He used hi- fine, clear voice 
and crisp Btyle to develop the most distinctive and successful te.li 
pique in the business. Now he's the country's highest paid trotting 
race caller; a sportscastei with a national reputation foi being tops 
in his specialty. He has broadcast the Hambletonian coast-to-coast 
for CBS. He's the star performei at Hollywood Park on the coast 
He opened the fabulou- Ponce de Leon Racewaj at Jacksonville this 
season. He helps pack 'em in at Rosecroft in Baltimore. 

Naturally, his success abroad has made him a hero at home in 

the Albany, Troy, Schenectad) market His large WTRY audience is 

nothing short of enthusiastic. He's a great boostei for bis home town 
area and will work and live no place else on a permanent basis — no 
matter how attractive the mam offers are. 

Bo\ s 6:15 p.m. sport -how ever) day, Mon. thru Kri.. has the 
biggest audience of sport- fan- in the area and certain!) one of the 

most vigorous and articulate in the country. He's the Mobilgas 
Sportscaster foi Socony-Vacuum <m the 6:15 -how and during the 
racing season he's on the air ever) afternoon with the "Fifth at 
Sai itoga" for Owen Cartwright one of the top Ford dealer- in the 
i ountr) . 

I!..\ Shudt's top-notch performance is ver) much in keeping with 
the qualit) programming W \\V\ maintain- . . . the kind local radio 
people like to call ""network quality". \nd when you're with I BS 
""network quality" mean- aiming higher all the time. 



WTRY 

Albany -Troy -Schenectady 



CBS — 5000W— 980 KC 

Represented by Headley-Reed Co 



27 JULY 1953 



65 



BACHE ON RADIO 
i Continued from page 37 i 

\\()K personalities with greal success. 
This nun Ik- due l<> the fact that mu- 
tual funds appeal to a larger audience 
spreading down to t he lower-income 
brackets.) 

Said Radio ami I \ Director Boh l)a\ 
to SPONSOR: "For a firm offering gen- 
eral investment counsel you need a 
partirulai t\ i>e of audience. \ol ucci-s- 
sarilv people with investment experi- 
ence but people who have surplus funds 
and are therefore interested in in- 
creasing their yield." 

That's why the Henry Gladstone 
package was so attractive to agenc) 
and advertiser. Today's Business is 
like a five-minute radio version of the 
Wall Street Journal. The program 
gives a rundown of closing Wall Street 
prices, analyzes significant trends. 
brieflv reports news from Washington 
which might have a bearing on stocks. 
and interprets worldwide events in the 
light of their possible effect on busi- 
ness trends. 

Gladstone prepares his script be- 
tween the time the New York Stock 
Exchange closes (3:00 p.m.) and 4:15 
p.m. A messenger leaves the station 



with the script at 1:30, arriving at the 
\llicrt Frank-Guenther Law offices be- 
fore 5:00 p.m. A teletype conference 
linkup of New York, Cleveland. Chica- 
go, and San Antonio is arranged in ad- 
vance, and copy is transmitted as soon 
as the lines are cleared. 

This technique of working close to 
airtime has its headaches but the ad- 
vantages outweigh the disadvantages. 
I They've had some close shaves when 
teletype circuits couldn't be cleared un- 
til the last minute. I Ad Manager Gel- 
lerman told SPONSOR: "Timeliness is a 
very important element to us. As with 
the case of the Federal Reserve an- 
nouncement, we can take advantage ol 
news breaks and get the maximum ben- 
efit out of them. And by using radio 
we get not only the selling power of 
the human voice but. in Henry Glad- 
stone, we have a man with a reputa- 
tion for integrity which is very impor- 
tant to a brokerage house. The mu- 
tual respect Bache and Gladstone have 
for each other is manifested in the 
cooperation which results. No 'prima 
donna" antics; Gladstone works closely 
with us and we get maximum results 
from his program."' 

A comparison of results between the 
Gladstone program and The New } ork 



LOOK NO FENCE! 

AROUND KOA'S WESTERN MARKET 






NIELSEN REPORTS GUARANTEE 57% 
OF ALL RADIO HOMES IN 303 
COUNTIES IN 12 STATES LISTEN 
REGULARLY TO KOA. 



A 



BUT . . ."you can't fence KOA in!" These 
figures do not include KOA's . . . 



CAlT AtllONA ■ hiw I fix 

I mixico 



=QS* BONUS 

**• CAR RADIO BONUS 



If you believe 

more people should be buying 

what you're selling . . . 

KOA IS YOUR ANSWER. 



COVERAGE 
/ 

KOA is the best Outdoor Advertising Medium in the 
West! With appeal that's alive wherever you drive! 

• GEOGRAPHICAL BONUS~"\ \ 

<"■* KOA is a favorite with radio families in hundreds of 
additional counties in 34 states not included in 
Nielsen Coverage. ^^/ 

• SUMMER BONUS 

More than 12.5 million tourists spend on average of 
8.8 days, over $600 million in the Mountain States. 



ooe 



50,000 Watts 
850 Kilocycles 




Covers The West S&lC/ 



NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE: EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, NEW YORK, 
CHICAGO, DETROIT, SAN FRANCISCO, LOS ANGELES, ST. LOUIS, DALLAS. 



Times financial section shows that 
Gladstone pulls leads at an average of 
SI. 50 each. The Times costs Bache 
$2.00 per lead. Newspapers get a lot 
ol play from brokerage houses because 
the) publish extensive stock exchange 
listings daily. And it's logical to as- 
sume that a person who reads the finan- 
cial pages of a newspaper is a potential 
customer for an investment firm. 

That's win Gladstone's program as 
well gets such a high number of leads 
and why such a high proportion of 
leads are converted into sales. As many 
as 1,781 leads per week have resulted 
from Today's Business. Cost of the 
program: $120 a night for time 
I \\ OR l : $60 for Gladstone: about $12 
a night for teletype charges. 

The commercials on the program are 
rotated regularly: the agency writes 
two new ones each week. Commercials 
for mutual fund investing are seldom 
used by Bache because so many re- 
strictions must be incorporated in the 
text that it's practically impossible to 
get a compelling script. 

Among the items offered as give- 
aways in Bache commercials have been 
lists of stocks paying up to 9% divi- 
dends, booklets of questions people ask 
about stocks, lists of lower-priced 
stocks, and booklets about various in- 
dustries. Typical of the latter type of 
booklet is one described in a commer- 
cial last month. Here's how part of 
it ran: 

"A Avord from Bache & Company, a 
leading investment firm since 1879 . . . 
One phase of American enterprise 
which appears today to be on the 
threshold of a tremendous future is 
the helicopter industry. The wide- 
spread use of helicopters in Korea has 
greatlv stimulated demand for this type 
of aircraft and present indications are 
that this jrrowth trend will continue. 
| In a new special study, the Research 
j Department of Bache & Company has 
considered the helicopter industry as a 
whole . . . and has also reported on six 
individual companies . . . from the old- 
est and largest to some of the newest. 
. . . For a free copy of this special 
Bache & Company report, write to- 
night to me. Henry Gladstone, care of 
WOK. Box G, New York. . . .'" 

Requests for these booklets are for- 
warded to Bache and. a few days after 
the mailing, a salesman makes a per- 
sonal call on the prospect. Conversion 
rates are prett\ hush-hush, but it is 
known that the cost-per-lead is lower 
than am other medium used and the 



66 



SPONSOR 




gives you the lowest cost 
per thousand radio homes 

in Los Angeles • NETWORK OR LOCAL 



THE MUSIC STATION FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRUDENTIAL SQUARE 



LOS ANGELES 



Represented Nationally by THE BOLLING COMPANY 




-^ latest PULSE 



27 JULY 1953 



67 



conversion-to-sale rate of WOK lead- i> 
comparable to the financial section of 
The New York Times. 

So the trick then is to get a more or 
less pre-conditioned audience. \- How- 
aid Liebl told SPONSOR: ''Today's Busi- 
ness has delivered a selective audience 
but a responsive one, and the mail 
count has been consistent!) high. We 
feel that it fulfills a real need in in- 
forming the public of the progress "I 
finance and business. Many listeners 
of Today's Business are buying securi- 
ties for the first time — through Bache 
& Compam ." 

Other security dealers have not been 
caught napping (see "Stocks on the 
air." sponsor. 28 July 10521. The) 
realize that through an educational 
campaign they can get at a large num- 
ber of people who formerly looked at 
the stock market with suspicion or dis- 
trust. A Brookings Institution stud\ 
showed that at the end of 1951 there 
were 6.490.000 shareholders in the 
U.S. of which 1,220,000 individual 
shareholders were members of family 
groups with annual incomes of less 
than $4,000. So the potential is huge. 

Among other brokers using radio 
have been Ira Haupt & Co. (through 
Albert Frank-Guenther Law), which 



has used WHLI, Hempstead, L. I., lor 
over a year to air a public service type 
of show called News and liens. 

Kidder. Peabody & Co. (agency is 
Doremus & Co. I has used a number of 
programs on WOR (Your Money at 
Work, Barbara Welles) and is current- 
ly using a five-minute taped program 
on Saturday mornings called The Key 
I to prudent investing I. Kidder. Pea- 
body specializes in mutual funds invest- 
ing and plans to use The Key on \\ HI. I 
and probably in all cities in which the 
firm has branch offices. And since the 
program deals exclusively with mutual 
funds, it is planned to sell open-end 
versions of the show to other mutual 
fund dealers throughout the eountr\. 

Doremus & Co.'s radio and TV direc- 
tor, Ed Rooney, trekked up to Roches- 
ter recently to handle a radio and TV 
campaign for Calvin Bullock, a mutual 
funds dealer. Campaign will concen- 
trate on Canadian Funds (a mutual 
fund I and is scheduled to use 20 an- 
nouncements a week on WHEC, I.D.'s 
on WHAM-TV. and newspapers. Slides 
will be supplied to local dealers so 
they can tie in with the Canadian 
Funds' three-week promotion. 

There is a definite undercurrent of 
change in the air. The fact that 00', 



It's So Easy to Listen 

to WBNS 



Central Ohioans set 
their dials at WBNS 
and relax. More Central 
Ohio people listen to 
WBNS than any other 
station. Popular staff 
personalities, plus top 
CBS programs add up 
to the 20 top-rated pro- 
grams and hour after 
hour of listening pleas- 
ure. Sponsors profit 
more when they reach 
this big audience of 
steady listeners. 



CBS for CENTRAL OHIO 





ASK 

JOHN BLAIR 



radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



of Kidder. Peabod\'s sales of mutual 
funds come from women has not gone 
unnoticed. Use of the Barbara Welles 
Show, a da\time women's program, 
pulled about 100 inquiries per com- 
mercial announcement. 

Its a well-known fact that women 
own more than half the common stock 
in the country. How much influence 
the) wield over this stock is subject to 
debate; many people feel that control 
of this stock is exercised by male coun- 
>elors. lawyers, and brokers. But it is 
true that more and more wives are 
participating in family investment de- 
cisions today. 

The more progressive brokers I nota- 
bly Merrill Lynch. Pierce, Fenner & 
Beanel have conducted investment clin- 
ics for women that have drawn packed 
houses. A fashion show worked out by 
Bache & Co. in conjunction with Saks 
Fifth Avenue attracted such a crowd 
(despite a downpour I that it had to 
be repeated twice. Manv brokerage 



"Through the years, radio has pro- 
duced more statistics, and a greater 
variety of ihem, than any other ad\er- 
tising medium — perhaps as much as all 
other media put together. Unfortunate- 
ly, the great mass of radio's research 
has been distinguished only for its 
quanti'v. The true function of media 
research is to make the medium easy 
to understand, and to provide clues to 
its most effective use. Radio's research 
has failed utterly to achieve either of 
these objectives." 

VICTOR A. SHOLIS 

Vice President, dir. radio-TV 

WHAS. Louisville. Ky. 



houses have added a female sales force 
to overcome the false impressions of 
potential customers who harbor the no- 
tion that customers' rooms in a bro- 
ker's office are closelv akin to saloons 
circa 1900. 

But two trends definitely can be 
looked for: ill greater use of women's 
shows: (2 l more TV when a suitable 
format is found. 

One reason Bache has held back on 
TV is that people's response to invest- 
ment advertising is closely tied up with 
market conditions. People new to the 
market seem interested only when the 
market is rising, which is not the case 
at the present time. So when the stock 
market gets "hot" again, watch for a 
host of video tubes to be carrying mes- 
sages urging investors to take their 
money out of cold storage and put it 
into common stocks and mutual funds. 

• * • 



68 



SPONSOR 



NBC STUDY 
( ontinued f) mn page I I < 



research, undei whose direction the 
-iikI\ was conducted. 

I he market used in NBC's stud) was 
the Quad-Cit) area: Davenport, Iowa; 
Moline, Ro< k Island, and I asl Mo- 
line, III. "We selected this area for 
stud) bo ause we wanted a i\ pical, 
medium-sized market, preferablj in the 
Middle West," the NBC stud) states. 

I he first wave of inten iew ing took 
place in February 1952 among the 
same respondents interviewed in the 
market foi NB< 's stud) of radio Bales 

effectiveness (which was released in 

I. ill 1952). The second wave of inter- 
views with the same people took place 

13 weeks later in Max . 

I ime elapsing between conclusion of 
interviews last Bpring ami release of 
the stud) this month was necessan foi 
tabulation which gives you some idea 
of the complexity of the statistical prob- 
lem in this kind of stud) . 

Cost ol last fall's radio effectiveness 
*tiid\ and the present brand-switching 
report was 1150,000, shared about 
equally between them. For all five of 
it> sales effectiveness Btudies (includ- 
ing Hofs'.ra studies I and 2. a summer- 
time T\ study, the radio study, and the 
brand-switching stud) I NBC has -pent 
about 1500,000. 

John K. Herbert. \I>C vice presi- 
dent in charge of l\ networks, told 
sponsor: 'W e feel it's the responsibili- 

t\ of leader-hip to throw light on how 

well television as a medium works. 

Dial's what lies behind our polic) of 

making these facts available to adver- 
tisers, agencies, and the industry." 

Sampling and field work for the 
brand-switching stud) were done b) 
the research firm of W. R. Simmon- & 
Vssociates. The) used a strict proba- 
bility sample, conducted interviews in 

over 300 different sampling area- oi 
clusters. Ibis was to a— ure coverage of 
ever) type of neighborhood. Altogether, 

't.lv.W homo were interviewed in Feb- 
ruary and reinterviewed in May. I Ac- 
tually, Simmons interviewed about 
5,000 home- in February, then succeed- 
ed in reinterviewing <)]', of them or 

1,881. I hi- is considered an outstand- 
ing!) high percentage l>\ researchmen 
and as mam as eight call-backs were 
necessan to achieve it. i 

Says NBC of the interviewing: "The 
fact that dose to 5,000 families were 
interviewed out of a total of some 
70,000 in the area means that almost 

27 JULY 1953 



W-i SUITS 




Now III REALLY 
knock 



em dead!" 



In Kentucky radio you can overdo a good thing. You can cut 
the cloth" so big that your waste and overlapping get absurd — 
because wore than half of Kentucky's sales are made in the 
25-county Louisville Trading Area, alone! 

Here in this one concentrated area occur 553 r ' ( of Kent ink) 'j total retail 
safes, 59.8 c 'c of its drug sales and 51.3' , of its food salts. ' 

5000-watt WAVE is powered, priced and programmed for the 
Louisville Trading Area alone; and WAVE delivers it intact, with 
no waste circulation. To cover the rest of Kentucky, you need 
many of the State's other 50 stations. 

Enough said! Ask your Free cV Peters Colonel for WAVE 
availabilities, soon. 



^r 



WAVE 

LOUISVILLE 

Free & Peters. Inc., Exclusive National Represent atiies 



5000 WATTS 

NBC AFFILIATE • 



69 



KMA'S 




TOPS 66 STATIONS 
on Premium Offer 



KM \ once more was in FIRST 
PLACE in the result sheet dis- 
tributed by Tidy House products 
on their recent premium offer of a 
Plastic Storage Bag for 50c and a 
Shina Dish boxtop. 
The offer was run over 66 radio 
stations between April 6 through 
May 2, a period of only 26 days 
and only 21 broadcasts. KMA 
pulled in 6072 premium orders to 
end up champ again, and at a 
cost-per-order of only 2c. 
If it's results you are looking for, 
place your message on KMA . . . 
the station with the loyal, respon- 
sive audience. 



KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
EDWARD PETRI & CO.. 11SC. 



19 50 Census 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 



( ne out of ever) 14 homes was sam- 
pled. This represents a verj compre- 
hensive and accurate cross-section 
which lends a high degree of statistical 
reliability to the findings." 

Interviewers sought information on 
product use as well as viewing of spe- 
cific sponsored TV programs. (The 
market has two TV stations which car- 
r\ programs of all four networks.) 
There were 42 brands advertised on 
TV, 44 non-TV brands studied. The 
45 TV programs studied included high 
and low-cost shows on all four net- 
works and local programs as well. 
I here were 18 product categories in- 
cluding beer, cigarettes, cleansers, soap, 
dentifrices. Adult men and women 
heads of households were interviewed. 

Basic discovery of the study about 
buying patterns is that brand switch- 
ing is incessant with a constant stream 
of customers turning to and away from 
any given product. Here's the wa\ 
NBC describes it: 

"As one might expect, the over-all 
customer level for most brands did not 
appear to fluctuate greatly between 
February and May. . . . But if we look 
at the actual composition of the cus- 
tomer group, we find that the customer 
flow for the average of all 86 brands 
(TV and non-TV), was practically a 
torrent. Here's the arithmetic of the 
switching, taking the number of Feb- 
ruary customers as 100. 

Fcbruarj customers ... — _. 100 

February customers not buying in May (lost) 49 

February customers Mill buying in Mav (loyal) 51 
May customers who did not buy in Feb. (new) 49 

Customers in May (loyal plus new) 100 

"Within the span of three months, 
the average brand lost almost half its 
customers. What maintained the brand 
was the fact that 49 people who had not 
been buying in February had flowed 
into the customer stream and were bu\ - 
ing it in May. . . ." 

The moral of the NBC study is that 
television can be a primary force in 
shaping the direction of this brand 
switching. 

To make the study's conclusions eas- 
ier to grasp. NBC selected one of the 
brands under study as a "theme 
brand." Figures for this brand are 
representative of results in the entire 
study. Here are some of the highlights 
about this brand, which is described as 
a cleanser advertised on a Sunda) eve- 
ning high-cost variel) show. 

J. Of those women interviewed who 
switched to this brand between Feb- 
ruary and May, 72', bad seen it ad- 



vertised on television programs. 

2. Picking the data up at the other 
end of the stick, of those who began 
viewing the program on which this is 
advertised. 21.5$ began buying the 
product. Of those who did not view 
the program. 15.39? began buying, 
ibis 15.395 is what NBC terms the 
normal "new customer expectancy." 
The difference between 15.3$ and 
21.5' i is the percentage of new cus- 
tomers attributable to television 
(40$ i. 

."$. NBC next describes the opposite 
situation — what happens when the 
viewer stops timing the show. Among 
those in the three-month period who 
stopped viewing the Sunday show, 
2(1.2' I stopped buying. During the 
same period 14.1 S of the non-viewers 
stopped buying the brand. Comparison 
of these two percentages shows that 
there were 43' ^ more lost customers 
among the ex-viewers than among 
those who hadn't been viewers at all. 
\\ arns the stud\ : "So if exposure 
ceases, television 'takes back' the buy- 
ers it had previously poured into the 
brand's customer stream." 

4. NBC's final statistical analysis 
concerns those who continue viewing 
the program. It found the 'continue 
viewing' group contained 39.1$ who 
also continued to buy the cleanser. But 
non-viewers contained only 23.7' < who 
continued bu\ ing. That is, there w ere 
65' I more loval customers among the 
'continue viewing' group. 

The four statistical situations de- 
scribed above are expressed this way 
b) NBC: 

• \\. ben thev switch, the\ switch 
to brands they've seen advertised on 
TV. 

• If thev begin viewing, they begin 
buying. 

• If thev stop viewing, they stop 
buying. 

• If thev continue viewing, they 
continue bu\ ing. 

The preliminary report of the study 
includes figures for many brands in 
addition to the cleanser. But in each 
case results \ ield the same conclusions 
— whether the program involved is 
high or low cost, whether the brand is 
well established or struggling. A com- 
plete report on the stud\ including 
(harts will be made available to the in- 
dustry within a few weeks. The prelim- 
inary report is available now. 

The advertisers whose brands were 
studied h\ NBC will be given reports 
privately oxer the next few weeks as to 



70 



SPONSOR 



how their <>u n |>i odu< i- fared. 

sponsor asked .1 numbci "I agency 
media and research men how the) 
would use the new NBC -tu<l\. Here 
are Borne of the answers : 

1 . "This presentation w ill bei ome 
pari of the ammunition to be used the 
iic\i time we have .1 new client we're 
ii \ ing in sell on 11-inu tele\ ision foi 
the first time." 

2. "'< )ui .i-i-n. \ one nl the i"i> 
three] won't need tlii- in dealing with 
1. in group ni rV-w ise ( lients. Bui the 

ic) u illi clients \\ ho are using I V 
in .1 small waj the 'magazine-inser- 
tion' t\ pe nl 1 lienl w ill be able I" 
-li< >w tin-in the ail\ antages ol im reas- 
ing tlicii schedules. 

>. " [Tie next time one oi oui 1 lients 
complains aboul the liiuli cosl ol tele- 
vision, we'll luiil thi~ stud) 1 1 — < - 1 »i I in 
marshalling evidence on wh) he can'l 
afford in get oui ol television. 

I mil Coffin, M>( '. managei of re- 
search and the man <lin- tlv in charge 
of NBC's series oi sales effectivenes.i 
studies, had these comments on the 
purpose of the stud) : 

"'The stud) demonstrates with Facts 
and figures what people have known 
intuitivel) bul which sometimes the) 
lose faith in or gel cold feel about. 
We've proved something thai advertis- 
ing men seldom have an opportunit) 
to demonstrate in the course of then 
day-to-da) work. It gives us all a re- 
affirmation ol confidence." 

Collin was chairman of the depai 1- 
ment of psychology at Hofstra Col- 
lege, Long Island, before he came to 
NBC in l ( ).i(). He says this about criti- 
cism ot the research technique used in 
NBC media effectiveness studies or an) 

media effectiveness te>t» : 

1 am deepl) interested in pure the- 
oi\ and have ti ied to put it into use,. 
We've tested bias. We've put aside 
mone) for methodological tests alone 
ever) step of the way. Hut you can 

argue method- forever. In the long 

run Mm must do something that's fea- 
sible. Research, to be useful, must 
move forward with the besl tools that 
an available, while striving always to 

improve them." 

On page 15 \ ou'll find Hugh Bet ille's 
and lom Coffin's replies to questions on 

methods used in the latest study, in- 
cluding rebuttal from them of the con- 
tention that it ma) not have been T\ 
alone which influenced purchase. For 
a complete analvsis of media research 
methods, see part 7 of SPONSOR'S Mi- 
Media Stu.lv on page 38. * * * 



MEN, MONEY 

' i i mtinued \< om page 21 ' > 

lodav there are ovei II' 1 million 
i adio -et-. 

Mid we make ,i predii tion lm the 
season ol !953-'54. With television 
program costs punching holes in the 
roofs, h 1 1 1 1 Milton Bet le pa< kaged -it 
$] In. inn) per pei formal* e, Sid < laesai 
on the tali lm 125,000, fmogene I 
for $15,000, and so on, ad inferno, 
the sane pi i< . tags on radio programs 
are going to seem might] business-like 
to some dazed sponsors. 



I hi. - .i i hi . Ic-lisl ol i in n ni radio 

rams i and net pin ■•- i win. h till 

ii. offei in adverti i 



I I I I l LENGTH 

II hen ii Giri 

■ 



l . 
I 

H 

I '. 
/ 

<■ I I 



i il 
VI. I 



'VI lis 



linn 

MUM. 
Illlll 

linn 
Mini 
linn 
nun 

Illlll 
Mini 
Mini 
Mini 

,.h 



I wl 

1 nL 



I'RII I 
* * * 



/figm*, 19 chapters by 19 specialists 
on everything you need to know about 




Teh/ism 

ADVERTISING^ 

PRODUCTION 

HANDBOOK 

Br IRVING SETT EL. NORMAN QLENN AND ASSOCIATES 

With on introduction by Strnard C. Duffy, pr.ild.nl ol 8604O 



Outstanding authorities give you their 
years of "know-how" in this thorough 
and up-to-date new guide to the adver- 
tising and production phases 
of television. 

4SO pages jam-packed with vital facts 

Here are just a few of the essential things 
you will find in this book: how to choose 
the right TV station for your product; how 
a TV show should be written; successful 
mail-order advertising on TV; getting 
publicity for TV stations and shows; how 
to use premiums effectively on television; 
etc. 69 illustrations, charts and graphs 
make every point lucid and easy-to-grasp 
at once. There are, in addition, helpful 
appendices which give you a complete 
dictionary of TV terms, the Television 
Code, an explanation of how television 
works, and many practical visual aids you 
may use in your work. 




Contributor* ara acknowledged laadara 
in thair Held* 

20 experts write on the phases of television 

for which they are noted; Robert J. Wade 
discusses "Staging"; Milo Frank — "Cast- 
ing"; Ann Howard Bailey — "Dramatic 
Writing", Bill Todman — "Selling a TV 
Package ; Walter A. Lowen— "Personnel"; 
Allen H. Kalmus — "Publicity"; Stockton 
Helffrich— "Censorship"; and many others. 

Here is .1 "how-to" book that will be read 
and re-read, that will be kept at hand as 
a necessary reference book for all who 
work in TV or related fields. $6.00 

fh. outhort 
IRVING SETTEL I. S.lr. Promotion Coa- 
• ull.nl. Domont Trlr.i.lnn >rt»ork Film 
Syndic. lion ; AH.rrli.injE M.na*rr of Con- 
cord*. Inr. ; and In.lrurlor In Radio and 
TV at Parr Collritr. 

NORMAN GLENN t. Editor and Publl.hrr of 

the maaaainc SPONSOR. 



MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY ______ _ 

THOMAS Y. CROWELL COMPANY. Dect-S 7 
I (2 Fourth Avenue, New York 16, N. V. 

Please send me copies of TELEVISION 

ADVERTISING AND PRODUCTION HAND- 
BOOK. I enclose check or money order. 

Name 



Address . 
City 



.Zone 



.State 



27 JULY 1953 



71 



Measure 
Watchmanship 
Too 



* 



v..t horologiinl ; we mean the kind 
of attention accorded TV in a new 
market, the kind KVTV merits from 
its viewers in :t'2 Iowa, S. Dak. and 
Nebraska counties. For buymanShip, 
see Kutz. 



KUW- 




Sioux City, Iowa 

CBS, NBC, ABC & DuMont 



THE TELEVISION 

PICTURE IS CLEAR 

IN BALTIMORE 

"More advertisers spend 
more dollars on WBAL- 
TV than any other Balti- 
more station." You ought 
to iind out why! 

WBAL-TV 

NBC IN MARYLAND 

Nationally Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



AMERICAN MACHINE 

I Continued from page 13 I 

products are better . . . bj design!" 

To test the reaction of both its em- 
ployees and of its subsidiaries to the 
Omnibus program, AMF's public rela- 
tions department sent out a postcard 
questionnaire to some 7. (><><) AMF em- 
ployees. The questions were keyed to 
getting employee reaction to Omnibus 
and brought the following result: Over 
two-thirds of the respondents indicated 
that thev thought the program to be 
either "excellent" or "good." 

Growth of AMF's over-all advertis- 
ing budget since 1951 is another indi- 
cation of the firm's determination to 
make its trademark more widely 
known. In 1951 AMF's over-all adver- 
tising budget (including that of its 
subsidiaries) was $900,000; by 1952, 
this figure had grown to $1.4 million; 
and in 1953, the over-all budget rose 
to 82 million. 

Each AMF product line has its own 
advertising program, the appropriation 
being determined by the board of di- 
rectors of the particular AMF subsid- 
iarv. division, or product group gen- 
eral manager. In a number of in- 
stances the parent company has helped 
subsidiaries by underwriting a strong 
advertising campaign in various con- 
sumer and industrial media. For ex- 
ample, in 1953 the parent company set 
aside the sum of $435,000 divided as 
follows: 

For Roadmaster Bicycles, $134,000; 
DeWalt Power Shop, $160,000; Junior 
Vehicles. $66,000; Pinspotter, $75,000. 

This is over and above their regular 
advertising budget and the consider- 
able number of Omnibus commercials 
allotted to AMF consumer products. 

AMF's projected 26 weeks on the 
program will cost a total of $900,000 
for time and talent, or $17,500 for 
production and talent costs per show, 
compared with last year's $500,000 to- 
tal (813.000 for production and talent 
costs per show). In addition AMF 
will spend over $100,000 on film com- 
mercials, which will bring its TV ex- 
penditure this coming year to over 
$1,000,000. AMF and the other three 
sponsors will each get four five-minute 
documentaries plus 20 two-minute com- 
mercials on the show. 

AMF carried out a heav\ merchan- 
dising effort to insure its half-million 
dollar investment in Omnibus. Ever) 
week, during the run of the program. 
WIF placed full-column ads in Time, 



Newsweek, and U.S. News and World 
Report plugging that week's Omnibus 
program. It was the only Omnibus 
sponsor to carry out this heavy pro- 
motion of the features of the program 
on a national basis. This magazine ad- 
wrtising keyed to AMF's sponsorship 
of the program cost the firm 803.000. 

All of AMF's trade press advertising 
during this period mentioned the Om- 
nibus show. Furthermore, the subsid- 
iaries did their own merchandising of 
the particular Omnibus program on 
which they were to be mentioned. This 
subsidiary -merchandising effort ranged 
from telegrams to individual dealers 
inviting them to tune in on a particular 
Sunday, to special mailings to jobbers, 
dealers, di-tributors, and manufacturer 
representatives telling them about Om- 
nibus in general. 

Special stickers mentioning Omni- 
bus as well as an Omnibus postage me- 
ter indicia have become part of AMF's 
daily promotion of its TV program. 
Further plans for promoting AMF's 
1953-1954 season on Omnibus have not 
yet been formulated: however, says 
Victor Ancona. AMF's advertising 
manager: "It's safe to say that we will 
again promote Omnibus through strong 
merchandising of our own. first of all. 
because it paid off last year, secondly, 
because it doesn't make sense to keep 
quiet about sponsoring a $3.5 million 
prestige TV show." 

The 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. Sunday show 
i new time: 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. I started 
as an experiment conducted by the 
Ford Foundation TV -Radio Workshop 
in developing better television pro- 
graming and entertainment. Its for- 
mat, during each 90-minute run. re- 
mained completely flexible, devoting to 
each presentation the playing time that 
it seemed to require. Its presentations 
ranged from five-minute science docu- 
mentaries to full-length 90-minute op- 
era performances, such as Die Heder- 
maus. La Boherne, also special ballet 
or symphony performances inter- 
spersed with dramas by top play- 
wrights. 

The commercials as well as the five- 
minute documentaries apportioned to 
each sponsor were kept on a level with 






WANT A DIFFERENT TV SHOW? 

Popular, well rated, entertaining? 

The Sportsman's Club 

52 great 15 minute hunting, fishing and out- 
door panel shows. Write for audition prints. 
SYNDICATED FILMS 

1022 Forbes Street Phone: Express 1-1355 

Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 



72 



SPONSOR 



the cultural programing "I Omnibus. 
I [ard-sell lei hnique w .t~ i onspii uous 
l>\ ii- absen< e from \ Ml- - commei • 
cials. As Ini id.- five-minute do< u 
mentaries, these were supervised b) 
the Ford I' oundation, « hi< li woi ked 
with the particulai sponsoi whose turn 
ii w.i- id li.iv e .1 five-minute documen- 
tor) "M selecting and presenting the 
subjecl mattei . I In- Ford I oundation 
then fai med tin- do< umentai ies out i" 
1 1 • . I. pendent prodiu ers specificall) . 
I i ansfilm, \\ ilding. and l'i m< eton 
Film Center. 

During the 1953-1954 season, \MI , 
in cooperation with it- agency, Fletch- 
er D. Richards ' I om i oung Jr. i- 
\ I |, will present outlines foi it- fouj 
documentaries to tin- Ford Foundation, 
wlfirli. in turn, has sel up it~ own film 
unit to <aii\ out the production. 

AMF's tentative schedule foi these 
documentaries indicates tin- type "I 
educational effort about American in- 
dustries thai these five-minute films 
represent: Bowling, as a famibj Bport, 
will he tlit- fir-t one to Ik' featured 
indirect]) plugging AMF's Pinspotters 
Division. Next will Ik- a film mi home 
maintenance, with stress on woodwork- 
ing, t<> show the various applications 
and uses lor AMF's Dt-W alt Power 
Shop. Third, probabl) at the end of 
January, there will he a feature about 
the tobacco industry, or some phase of 
it. to tie in with the tobacco processing 
equipment which \MF produces. Last- 
Is. at the end id February, a five-min- 
ute documentary will -how aspects of 
the baking industry, to acquaint the 
public w it li VMF's bakery machinery. 

During the 1952-1953 season, VMF 
shared sponsorship with: Willys-Over- 
land i Fw ell & Thurber) which bought 
the show sighl unseen for it- full _'f" 
week run to further the prestige appeal 
<d its low-priced < ars: Remington Hand 
i Lee ford Advertising Agency) which 
bought in for 23 week- because it con- 
sidered Omnibus a read) -made -how 
with a good following before which the 
firm eould demonstrate its electric 
shaver; Scott Paper Co. ij. Walter 
rhompson) for 20 week-: (Jre\ hound 
Corp. i Beaumont iv Hohman i for 18 
weeks. 

First of the fi\e 1953 sponsors to 
sign on for the second \ear of Omni- 
bus. WW was followed 1>\ Scott Paper 
Co. 'see "Win Scott Paper Co. spends 
million for three T\ programs,' 

sponsor, 1 June 1953, page 30) and 
the Greyhound Corp., which i- renew- 
ing its first plunge into network T\ 



w ii h an iJ. Iii ional budget appropi ia 
tion tin- \ <-.u . 

Although Howard V Reid, AMI 
General Products Group advertising 
ami sales promotion manager, referred 
in Omnibus .i- \\.w ing produi ed an 
"amazingl) high conversion to sales "I 
tin- iii|iiii ies "M the I >'W all booklet," 
It i- difficult I" i mi dow n the su< < ess 
ol the program in tei m- "I \\l I ovei • 
all Bales figures foi two reasons : i I i 
the first six months of 1953 have not 
\ei been I ibul ited ; (2) a lai ge propoi • 
tion ol Wll' -air- in. reases an- dm- t.. 
govei nmenl i onl ra< Is. I he rapid ex- 
pansion ol \ \ll can be seen I rom the 
jump in sales from $52,807,000 in 1951 



to 1100 .'. I » i 19 >2 However, in 

' billings undei the u'"\«-tin' • 
militai \ proi uremenl program in- 
i reased more than two and one-hall 

times, inting i"i 51 ' • <d total 

tales. I hi thei more, dui ing the - 
\.-.ii . the sales "I newlj a< quired • 

p. inn- ,i inted for II ' . ..I total Bah - 

Wll . toda) . has 16 plant- and is i 
tinuing it- proi ess ol diversified ex- 
pansion in t\ pe ol products produced 
Vlanufai turei ol el» tronii aw>\ me- 
. ii.iin. al equipment aim e 1900, AMI 
i- the world- I. ii .i-i manufa< turei ..i 
tobai co mai hinei j . -p«- ializing in bak- 
ing equipment, bu< Ii as ovens, mixi 
i Please turn /" i>nw '*'■- 



3rd of a series 



,^L f: 












• • I 



parct otf i£e fcictune 

' IN MIAMI S TV MARKET 



Now 26th among the nation's 
metropolitan retail areas. 

THE SOUTHS FASTEST-GROWING 
MARKET INCLUDES 825,000 PER- 
MANENT YEAR ROUND RESI- 
DENTS SPENDING $47,600,000. in 
Drug Sales* 



FOR THE ENTIRE AMAZING SOUTH FLORIDA TV SALES 
STORY CALL YOUR FREE l PETERS COLONEL TODAY 



FIRST RESEARCH CORP of Flondo 



• • I 



Now Under Construction — 1000 FT 
ANTENNA— 100.000 WATTS 



27 JULY 1953 



73 



"9 




Our staff has gone all out to cook up the 
best advertising buy in the Denver market — 
KLZ-TV! Look at the ingredients they've used, 
and you'll see why KLZ-TV will dominate tele- 
vision entertainment in the Denver area...wi 
be the preferred station of this important urban 
and rural TV audience. With 32 years season- 
ing in showmanship radio, KLZ-TV will go on 
the air with a top-performance operation, 
staffed with a highly-trained crew. For best 
coverage of the rich Denver market, put KLZ-TV 
on your schedule. 





aladdin radio and television, inc. . See Your KATZ Man 



74 



SPONSOR 



1953 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PR 



MON DAY 



TUESDAY 



hur Godfrey* 
iw Crop. Mxn; 
'1 Cellucotton 
IB al t das 

wns-Corning, 

R 

tr-Kist Tuna, 

D alt das 



i ann-Eric kson 

Isbury Mills: 
lour, mixes 
m-th 
Burnett 



No network 

program ing 

all wk 



I Buy That 
m-f L 



rike It Rich 

Igate: tthpst; 
, super suds, 
lmolive. fab, 
ajax 

rr l 

m.w.f 
y $8000 

Ide & Groom 
i Mis: bisqkt 
rr m.w,f L 
i. KR $15,000 



ove 


of Life 


a 


Home Pr 


V 


m-f L 


w 


$6000 


rch for Tom'w 


P&G: joyt 


T 


m-f I, 


* 


$6500 



Ding Dong 

School 

Cli m-f L 

(sponsored tu, 

th, f) 



Glamour Girl 
Hy m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Arthur Godfrey* 

Snow Crop. Mxn: 

Int'I Cellucotton 

FC&B alt das 

Owens-Corning, 

FSR 

Star-Kist Tuna. 

R&D alt das 

General Mtrs: 

Frigidaire Div 

tu.th 

FC& B 

Pillsbury Mills 

flours, mixes 

m-th 

Leo Burnett 




No network 

programing 

all uk 



Ding Dong 
School 

Minnesota 

ining & Mfg: 

scotch tape 

Ch tu onl I, 

BBDO Uhr $985 







Glamour Girl 
Hy m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Hawkins Falls 
ICh m-f Ll 



The Bennetts 
Ch m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



I'll Buy That 
jNY m-f L 



Strike It Rich 

m-f 

sus tu.th 

NY L 



Hawkins Falls 
Ch m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 



Idinq Light 

3: Ivory, duzt 

rr m-f l 

ipt $10,000 



io network 

irograming 

m-f 



arry Moore 
m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



!4ht $2038 



Double or 
Nothing 

mpbell Soup 

rr L 

m-w-f 



rd 
eelock 



$8000 



t Linkletter 

>ver: surf 
ly m,w,f L 
T (see bel) 
sbury Mills: 
lour, mixes 
fy ex-th L 
',lir $4000 

Big Payoff 

olgate: fah. 
orophyll tth- 
;, cashmr bqt 
IT m.w.f L 
(sus tu.th) 

y $12,000 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Paul Dixon 

Show 

m-f 3-4 

(Participating 
segs available: 
see cost below) 



Vitamin Corp: 
Action In rybutol, juvenal 

ie Afternoon lOCinc L 

estern drama m 3:13-55 seg 
la m-f L 



15min: $1350 

'-Mr: $3200 KFCC 



mmer School 
L 



lOmin : 
$376.76 



Break the Bank 

co-op 

m-f 3-3:30 

NY I. 

(lmin anncts. 
] /4hrs available) 

Welcome Trav'lrs 

Kkm Prods: 
kitchenware 

filCh alt m 49L 

DFS (see be!) 
P&G: prellt 

61Ch 51L 

m-f 3:45 4 

Biow "4hr $1200 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



On Your Account 
<Y m-f Ll 

sus m. th 



No network 

Programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Ladies Choice 
Hy m-f L 



No network 

Programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Atom Squad 
Phila m-f L 

Gabby Hayes 
Quaker Oats 
32NY m.f 30L 
Per prog : 

S&M $3500 

Howdy Doody 
Standard Brands: 
royal puddings, 

gelatli 
53NY 48L. 

m.th 5:46-« 
Bate* Vthr $1590 



No network 

programing 

m-f 




Love of Life 
Amer Home Pr 
ra-f (see mon) 
Biow 



Search 


for Tom 


w 


P&G: joyt 




[m-f 


see mon 




Biow 







No network 

programing 

all wk 




Guiding Light 
P&O : ivory, duzt 
; m-f (see mon) 
Compton 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Garry Moore 

Pillsbury Mills: 
hallard biscuits 
4XNY I, 

tu 1:45-2 seg ' 

O-M %hr $2038 

Freedom Rings 

Westinghouse: 
appliances, TV, 
radio sets, tur- 
bojet plane mtrs 
35NY tu.th L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



FSR 



$6000 



Art Linkletter 
-Kellogg: all pr 
■2SHy 1. 

B-B tu 2:3 0-45 

Pillsbury Mills 

exeth 2:45-3 
LB >4hr $4000 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Big Payoff 
m-f 
NY sus tu.th 



Action In 

the Afternoon 

m-f 

Phila L 

(see mon) 



Paul Dixon 

Show 
m-f 3-4 
ilOCinc L 

(Participating 
segments avail- 
able) 



For 10m in: 
$376.76 



Break the Bank 

co-op 

NY m-f 3-3:30 L 

(lmin anncts. 

'Ahrs available) 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Welcome Trav'lrs 
P&G: prell. 
ivory snowt 

m-th 3:15-4 seg 
(see mon) 



DFS 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



On Your Account 

P&G: tide 

&2NY L 

tu.w.f 



Benton & Bowles 



Ladies Choice 
Hy m-f L 



WEDN ESDAY 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Arthur Godfrey* 
Snow Crop. Mxn: 
lnt'1 Cellucotton 
FC& B al t das 

Owens-Corning, 
FSR 
Star-Kist Tuna, 

R&D alt das 

Lever Bros: 
pepsodent 




Ding Dong 

School 

Ch m-f L 

(sponsored tu, 
th.f) 



No network 

programing 

all wk 



Pillsbury Mills 
flour,, mixes 
m-th 
Leo Burnett 



Glamour Girl 
Hy m-f L 



programing 



I'll Buy That 
NY m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 
m.w.f 

(see mon) 



Esty 



■ I 



Bride & Groom 

General Mills 

m.w.f (see moKi 

DFS. K-R 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Love of Life 
Amer Home Pr 

m-f (see mon) 

Blow I 

Search for Tom'w 
P&G: joyt 

m-f (see mon) 
Blow 

Guiding Light 
P&G: ivory, duzt 

m-f (see mon) 

Cnmptrin 



No network 

programing 

all wk 






No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Garry Moore 

Purex Corp: 

bleaches, clnrs 

54NY 1, 

w 1:30-45 pm 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Hawkins Falls 
Ch m-f L 



The Bennetts 
Ch m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



FC&B 



$2038 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Double or Noth'g 

Campbell Soup 
m.w.f (see mon) 



Ward Wheelock 
Art Linkletter 

Lever: surf 
m.w.th 2:30-45 
Ayer 

Pillsbury Mills 
exc th 2:45-3 
(see mon) 
Leo Burnett 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 

m.w.f 

(see mon) 



Esty 



Paul Dixon 
m-f 3-4 

(Participating 
segments avail- 
able) 
lOCinc L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Action in 

the Afternoon 

Phila m-f L 

(see mon) 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Atom Squad 
Phila m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Gabby Hayes 
NY m-f L 

SUB tU 

Howdy Doody 

Kellogg Co: 

rice krisplest 

48NY 44L 

LB (see bel) 

tu. th 5:80- 45 

Colgate: tthpst 

51VY 6:46-6 48L 

Bate* tthr $1550 



10-min seg: 

$376.76 DFS 



Break the Bank 

co-op 

m-f 3-3:30 

NY L 

(1-min anncts. 
Vi hrs available) 



Welcome Trav'lrs 
P&G: prell. 
ivory snowt 
m-f 3:45-4 
(see mon) 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



On Your Account 
P&G: tide 

tu. w. f 
(see tu) 



Benton & Bowles 



Ladles Choice 
Hy m-f Lr 



Atom Squad 
Phila m-f I« 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Gabby Hayes 
NY co-op w I* 



Hswdy Doody 

Continental Pkg: 

wonder brt-a«l, 

hostess cak. s 

35NY 291, 



No n( 
progr; 



No n< 
progri 



No m 

progr; 




No n 
progr 



No r 
progi 



#s i 






htizm to Fi/ui. . . 




KTYLTV 



. . .in 
Population 
Growth 



b 



Ankim! 



KM-IVuFw. 



IIBC and DuMont 
f filiate for 
hoenix and 
entral Arizona 



. . IN ANTENNA HEIGHT: KTYL-TV's towering mountain-top antenna is four 
times higher than any other Arizona station ! 

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. . IN PROGRAMMING: KTYL-TV programming is a blend of the best in 
network, live and film programs . . . and the fan mail is terrific ' 

. . IN MERCHANDISING: KTYL-TV Merchandising Department suggests 

contact your Avery-Knodel man for proof of its performance 
for national advertisers. 

. . IN FACILITIES: KTYL-TV Studios are considered the most advanced 
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•• your Avery-Knodel man ... or Phone or Wire Collect to KTYL-TV, 2730 N. Central Avenue, (AMhent 6-4485) Phoenix, Arizona 







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REPRESENTED 

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AMERICAN MACHINE 
(Continued from page 7.S I 

high-speed breadw rappers, roll ma- 
i bines, and automatic pretzel-forming 

machines among other capital goods. 

Most outstanding outgrowth of 
VMF's participation in Omnibus is a 
new TV program which the firm has 
built around its Automatic Pinspotters. 
This Saturday 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. show. 
Bowling Is Fun. is being tested during 
bowling's off-season from 27 June 
through 19 September in three Mid- 
western markets: the show is done re- 
mote from a Detroit howling establish- 
ment and is carried simultaneousK bj 
WBKB. Chicago. WXEL. Cleveland, 
and WXYZ-TV, Detroit. 

The AMF parent company has al- 
lotted $75,000 to this program. \- 
Frank P. Dow ne\ . v. p. and general 
manager of AMF's Pinspotters Divi- 
sion, says: "The main reason for AMF 
sponsoring the show is to promote the 
game of bowling during the sport s 
normally slow months — the summer 
period — and stimulate interest in their 
becoming keglers among those who've 
never tried it before."' * * * 



MEDIA STUDY 

f Continued from page 40 I 

tioned only briefly in this article and 
will be treated at length later in the 
series. 

How have the networks fared in their 
efforts to prove air advertising sells? 

Answer: Not so well, according to 
the numerous experts SPONSOR inter- 
viewed. I One cynical advertiser put it 
this way: "It's hard enough to find out 
whether anv advertising sells, so when 
you try to pinpoint it to a single me- 
dium, you're only compounding a fel- 
ony and making vour research job 
doubly impossible." i 

Example 1: Back in 1931 CBS com- 
missioned Professor Robert F. Elder, 
then of Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, to measure sales results of ra- 
dio. He sent out 100.000 question- 
naires by mail asking people whether 
thev listened to radio and to note what 
products thev bought. He tabulated the 
14.061 usable returns and concluded in 
his report "Does Radio Sell Goods? 
I published 1932 I that the answer was 
"yes" — 29.3', more in radio homes 
than in non-radio homes. 

Example 2: In 1040 CBS spent a 
small fortune ha\ ins Elmo Roper 



"Count the Customers." Roper inter- 
viewed 10.000 people from coast to 
coast to find out whether people who 
listen to CBS programs bu\ more of 
the goods the shows advertised than 
those who don't listen. (IBS' conclu- 
sion then: "In ever) single case — with- 
out exception — the number of product- 
users was higher among listeners than 
among non-listeners to each CBS pro- 
gram . . . higher, on the average. It v 
53%." 

Example 3: In 1950 NBC sponsored 
its first Hofstra T\ stud\ : 3.270 people 
in 93 communities in New York City 
and Long Island were interviewed: the\ 
were matched according to six varia- 
bles: 15 T\ -advertised and 13 non- 
advertised brands were similarly 
matched. NBC's conclusion : TV set- 
owners bought 30.1 'r more of the 
average TV-advertised brand in the 
preceding month than non-T\ set own- 
ers bought. 

Example 4: NBC's second Hofstra 
study in 1951 interviewed 5.067 adult 
family heads 1 1.419 of them in non- 
TV homes I in the New York market. 
Eight variables were matched: 11 TV 
programs were measured and 187 TV 
brands checked. Conclusion: "Average 



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82 



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^ain for all packaged products adver- 
tised Dii television in television homes 

is 2(..;;' , ." 

Example 5: NBC's third Hofstra- 
type stud) entitled "NBC Stud) of Ra- 
dio- Effective Sales Power" in 1952 
tabulated «':.027 interviews 5,349 of 
them in Davenport, Iowa, which had 
radio and TV. and 2.67J! in Fort 
Wayne, Ind., which had radio only. 
Fifteen variables were matched, a math- 
ematical feat previously unduplicated 
in advertising research, which required 
an IBM No. 10] Electronic Statistical 
Machine to complete. NBC's conclu- 
sion: For each of these examples i li-l- 
ed I — daytime or evening — the pro- 
main has shown a positive sales effect, 
ranging from 20' v to over 100'/ in 
buying differences between listeners 
and matched non-listener-. 

The verdict of the experts inter- 
viewed by sponsor: All the above stud- 
ies proved there were differences in 
Inning habits between listeners or 
viewers and non-listeners or non-view- 
ers. But they did not and could not 
prove that these differences were due 
to exposure to advertising. Reason: 
If thousands of variables influence 
sales, how can \ ou match onl) 15 (in 
itself a mathematical miracle, b) the 
way l and say these were the important 
ones? The experts answer: You can't. 

One network research director put 
it this wav : "All of these studies were 
useful. The) uncovered a lot of valu- 
able information on radio or TV. Each 
also represented a big advance in tech- 
nique over the preceding one. But un- 
til we find a more scientific way of 
measuring sales effectiveness, we aren t 
going to run such tests." 

(After this article was completed 
NBC released its new TV study of 
brand-switching entitled " \\ In Sales 
Come in Curves."' A total of 9.762 in- 
terviews were made in Davenport. 
Iowa, and Moline. Rock Island, and 
Fast Moline. 111. The same person was 
interviewed twice three months apart 
to determine his buy ing-habit and TV- 
v iew ing habit changes — in itself an im- 
provement over the previous Hofstia- 
type studies. For a complete report on 
this new studv. see separate article, 
page 44. 1 

Among the 158 media experts inter- 
viewed in eight months bv SPONSOR for 
its media evaluation series were two 
groups eminentl) suited for discussing 
media research trap-: agenc) research- 
ers and independent researchers. One 
of them said: "We know all about the 



traps; we ve been in so man) of them!" 

Their remarks will be summarized in 
this article. 

lo help vou. the advertiser, keep out 
ol traps, the Advertising Research 
Foundation has just come out with its 
eight-poinl "Criteria for Marketing and 
Advertising Research." It was pre- 
pared b) the AAA Committee on Re- 
search composed of Edward Battej 
(Compton), Peter Langhoff (Y&R), 
David F. Robinson l Price. Robinson \ 
frank i. reviewed and revised by the 
ARF Technical Committee, and offi- 
ciallv approved bv the ARF Board of 
Directors. 

It applies primarily to quantitative 
consumer studies based on samples ot 
prescribed populations, but the eight 
points can guide vou in media research 
as well. The eight points are: i 1 i I n- 
der what conditions was the studv 
made'.'' i2i Has the questionnaire been 
well designed? l3l Has the interview- 
ing been adequately and reliably done? 
i 4 1 Has the best sampling plan been 
followed? (5) Has the sampling plan 
been fullv executed? (6) Is the sam- 
ple large enough? (7) Was there sys- 
tematic control of editing, coding, and 
tabulating? (8) Is the interpretation 
forthright and logical? (For complete 
text, see part 2 of this article next 
issue, i 

Incidental!) the Advertising Re- 
search Foundation has -pent approxi- 
matel) $1,750,000 in supervising over 
190 studies since 1936 in an effort to 
improve advertising, according to Man- 
aging Director A. W. Lehman. The 
ARF now has these five important proj- 
ects under way. among others: (1) \ 
:-tud\ <>f printed advertising rating 
methods: (2i radio and TV rating 
methods: (3) an analvsis of reader- 
ship data already collected through the 
ARF continuing studies; i 4 i develop- 
ment of economic and marketing data: 
(5) an analvsis of motivation studies. 

What do the researchers watch for in 
media research and what is their ad- 
vice on avoiding pitfalls? 

Tips from i ml*' pontic it t research' 
ers: For a detailed, scientific explana- 
tion, vou should go to am of the nu- 
merous books and pamphlets listed in 
the Advertising Research Foundation's 
new 28-page A Short Annotated Bib- 
liography of Marketing and Advertis- 
ing Research. This material is grouped 
under nine classifications: Sampling, 
Questionnaire. Construction. interview- 
ing. Editinu. Codinjj and Tabulating. 






84 



SPONSOR 



I'ii pai .ii ion "I Repoi i. i ienei .il and 
Bibliographies. I he firsl six i < ■ n 1 1 > c isc 
a nil e summary i'l the majoi pitfalls 
in advertising reeean h. 

i u the 2ii books I i~i •-• I in the general 
category sponsor found these most 
helpful: Dr. Lyndon 0. Brown's Mar- 
keting and Distribution Research (he's 
dire* toi "I media, marketing, and re- 
search .ii Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample); 
Advertising Psychology mill Research 
by I 'i . Dai rell B. Lucas, i hairman "I 
the marketing department, V i .1 .. and 
technical director ol 1 1 1 « - Advertising 
Research Foundation, and Steuarl II. 
Hi in. v.p. and research director, Need- 
ham, Louis & Brorby, I hicago. 

Bui the aim of this article is to give 
\on a few pointers from each "I the 
experts interviewed I * - 1 them extracl 
from their lifetime "I experience t In- 
one or two factors which 9eem mosl 
important i<> them in research and me- 
dia e\ aluation. 

Politz: First i- Mlri-il Polite, presidi nl 
iii his national research organization, 
Mfred Polite Research, Inc. The great- 
est portion of lii- activity is market 
and advertising research for a clientele 
<>f top advertisers and their agencies. 
His research work for media includes 
new-paper- and transportation adver- 
tising. I'olit/ was the first man to mea- 
sure audiences to radio commercials; 
he is the central figure in Life's contro- 
versial " \ Stud] "I lour Media." 
which lie -pent 30 month- making. 
\nd his motivation stud) for seven 
radio stations represented 1>\ the Hen- 
ry I. Christal organization, will soon 
be published. So he's an expert in ill 
media, especially print and air. 

I'olit/ told SPONSOR there were three 
chief dangers in media research: 

a. I he use ol in\ alid method-. 

b. The use of scientific lingo t" con- 
vey the impression of validity. 

c. Employing a "scientific" method 
lor a part ol the -linK and using it as 
glorification of the conclusions which 
cannot l>e supported 1>\ the pari-. 

Hen- are some I'olit/ example- ol 
invalid research: 

1. ■ on survey preferences for three 
product-; and find these results: 

Product \ i- preferred by 10 1 ! . 

Product l> i- preferred 1>\ 2l\' < . 

Product C is preferred 1>\ 32' i . 

^ on conclude \ i< preferred h\ more 
people than B and C. This can be false, 
as follows: If A i- a portrait and !» and 
(. are landscapes, then more people 
may prefer landscapes than portraits. 



Km the naivi 
inn- do you 

I. Old-' ape ln\ il 



quest ion, "Which pic- 
ike best ' t"i' '•- the 
tn -phi then voti - 



between B and < , V' tually the same 
. an hold ii ue it all three prodw ts are 
members ol the same class; the in- 
ii nsity ..I feeling i an \ ai ) Buffi< ientl) 
in lead iii the same misleading result. 

2. ^ mi ' i in I n- riation with 

i ausation. 

in the ad seers, -'ii', bought. 

"( H the non-seers, ■"-' - bought. 

" I IhicI seeing the ad increased 

pun basing l>\ 1 1' • . 

I In-. -a\ - I'nlil/. i- u iniiu lie au-e 



ii - a i.ii relation and nol a i ausal rela 
linn. It's w rong !•••' ause those h ho 
read the ad might be those m ho I 
loin e money . are more alerl "i are 
different kind- ..l people entirely . I hey 
mighl also have seen the ad I" • ause 
they had pn-\ iously bought the prod- 
uct. 'I he same reasonin • ipplies i" 
■ ommen i lis. 

( Hliei examples "I -\ is resean h 

a- • ii--, | by Polite: 

\\. i mi believe thai one medium is 
superioi generally undei mosl circum- 
-lam e- i" anothei . Politz - answei : 
"I \ ei \ medium exists I & au-e ii f n I - 





t) A N D 

AKIMA 



The famous Rose Festival tells the world 
about the "City of Roses." But it doesn't 
take a festival to sell the seasoned time 
buyer on Portland, Oregon. To him it's 
an important Western market and one 
of the nation's top sixty metropolitan 
areas. 

Choice secondary markets, like Yakima. 
Washington, are less familiar. 

Every year, more national advertisers 
select this 200 million dollar Yakima 
package as a first choice secondary mar- 
ket. They recognize it as the key city of 
the Northwest's power industry and one 
of the nation's wealthiest agricultural 
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GEORGE W. CLARK 



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WEED AND COMPAQ' 



21 JULY 1953 



85 



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WHBF;: 

TEICO BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




Represented by: 
NATIONAL TIME SALES 



fills a need; each supplements the oth- 
er. It it were objectivel) true that me- 
dium A is better than medium B. then 
\ would destro) B. Everybod) agrees 
that everybod) violates this rule in dis- 
cussing media. Thus it heroine- ob- 
vious that we can measure the -uit- 
abilitj of \ over B under certain cir- 
cumstances and \ might win, but B 
might win over \ under a different sel 
of circumstances. 

Says Politz: "Media can be com- 
pared on the factors thev have in com- 
mon. One should not. ot course, treat 
these factors as representing the whole, 
if thev ((institute onlj a part of the 
causes that contribute to the medium's 
effectiveness. 

"Media thus can stav in business 
only because in general no one is superi- 
or to any other. But in certain circum- 
stances one can be superior: for ex- 
ample, color and selectabilitv in maga- 
zines, motion and therefore unique 
demonstrabilit) of products on TV. in 
such circumstances it should he worth- 
while for the medium to concede an- 
other's superiority. For if the adver- 
tiser is misled and tries the medium 
under circumstances in which he can- 
not succeed and he fails, then all ad 
media lose out. Conversely, if we keep 
an advertiser alive, all media benefit."' 

4. You believe that the medium alone 
influences the sale of a product and 
therefore the medium's effectiveness 
can easily be measured. Politz savs 
this is false for this reason: The me- 
diums obligation is to reach people, 
but it can t take on the obligation of 
assuring that the message will be heard, 
seen, or read. That depends on two 
factors with which the medium has 
nothing to do: lai tvpe of product. If 
men want to hear about a new car and 
not about a new table napkin and there- 
fore pay more attention to the commer- 
cial for the car than for the table nap- 
kin, that can't be held against the me- 
dium (in this case, radio), (b) Effect 
of copy . This depends on the advertis- 
er, not on the medium. For example. 
about the onl) way a medium can influ- 
ence copy is h\ censoring it if it's un- 
ethical. Copj influences belief or con- 
viction, and neither belongs to the me- 
dium but to the viewer, reader, or 
listener. So the medium contributes 
only a part of the factors that lead a 
consumer to make a purchase: It gets 
you an audience, but it has nothing to 
do with the product or copy. Can we 
then compare media b\ purchase.' "\\ e 
definite!) can if we keep in mind the 



fact that we must relate the medium to 
one specific product with a specific 
copy," says Politz. (These two diffi- 
culties have prevented any successful 
tests of sales effectiveness of networks 
vs. magazines or stations v«. newspa- 
pers to date, except in the latter case 
v hen single products are involved. For 
example, the 240-some ABBI tests 
SPONSOR. I 

5. ^ ou can determine wh\ people 
hu\ things. Politz's answer: "Multiple 
causation usuall) does not make it pos- 
sible to discover more than one part of 
the motivation and. all the more, onl) 
a part of the causes. To stud) the role 
of advertising from the impression- lelt 
b\ it in the consumers conscious or 
unconscious mind is useful but incom- 
plete. Except for certain types of mail 
order business, the greatest portion of 
the advertising effect depends on a sort 
of chain reaction. Person A receives 
the advertising message and buys the 
refrigerator. Person B sees the re- 
frigerator in A's home and hears com- 
plimentary remarks about it and there- 
fore buvs the refrigerator. W ilhout 
the advertising neither A nor B would 
have bought. And. vet. there need not 
be an\ conscious or unconscious im- 
pression of advertising in the mind of 
B. The advertising mechanism resem- 
bles bowling. All 10 pins are knocked 
down but the ball actually hits only 
four. If one interviews the other six 
pins thev will answer truthfully that 
the\ have been knocked down bv ad- 
jacent pins and not bv the ball. And 
\et the ball has to be credited with the 
effect of a 10-strike." 

What's the chief scientific rule to 
keep in mind then in testing media via 
sales? Politz says you must measure 
sales before the campaign as well as 
after. As in science, you must deter- 
mine sales carefully beforehand, intro- 
duce vour variable — advertising — mea- 
sure then again. 

And Politz adds this last cautionar) 
note: Don't survey those customers 
who have dropped your brand or prod- 
uct and then conclude from the results 
that if vou redesign vour product to 
overcome their dissatisfaction, vou will 
increase vour sales. Ever) propert) of 
a product attracts some people and 
repels some others. Any propertv that 
does not renel some people usuallv is a 
propertv that also does not attract an). 
The problem is to get that propertv 
which attracts more than it repels. 
Therefore, one cannot design a product 
bv research that is confined either to 



86 



SPONSOR 



the ones h>-t 01 i<> i li>- preai nl i ustom- 
ei b. < 'in- can design a producl onl) il 
tin- resean h includes .ill three groups 
those who used in use ii. those who il" 
use ii. .Hid those who do not yel use it. 

Coutmntt sponsor has alread) called 
attention to the facl thai Frank l>. I ou 
i. mi. president "I I' i< i Findei - Asso- 
ciates, New York, listed 150 variables 
thai affet i -.ill- ,i- far back a- I' 1 '>_'. 
(See hi- "Suggestions foi Conducting 
.i 1 1 i.il Sales real "I Advertising 
i "|>\ ," reporl submitted to Amei ican 
Marketing Society, New York section, 
( )< tobei 1932, page I. il \ ou can End 
ii. sponsor couldn't. I Some "i tin 
variables, which make media testing 
prett) much a matter of i han< e rather 
ih. in ,i science: differences in weather, 
newspaper circulation, activities of 
competitors in local market-, dealer ac- 
tivity, composition of the population of 
different eities, and variations in buy- 
ing power. You'll undoubtedl) be sur- 
prised to learn that left handedness i an 
also influence -ale-. Toda) experts 
• there are thousands of \ai iables, 
not just 150. 

■famviltej Richard Manville heads his 
own national research organization. 

Here is his list of pitfall.- to beware of 
in evaluating media and using media 
research: 

1. Determine cost-per-1,000 custom- 
ers, not reader-, listeners, or viewers. 

2. Don't believe that all ad rating- 
are comparable even if the\*re done b) 
the same method. Readership and or 
ratings varj considerably l>\ producl 
more so than b) magazines or pro- 
grams. 

3. Don t accept glib generalizations. 
Make the researcher define ever] word. 

4. find your customer, then learn , 
from him what medium he sees, reads, 
or listen- to. Don't go to a medium 
to find out whom it reaches. Mam of 
them like to pretend the) are •"all 
things to all people.'" 

5. Beware of the biased point of 
\ ieu. 

6. Beware of a predisposition to de- 
• ide on how a job i- to be done. 

.. Spend adequate mone\ for the 
job and give your firm enough time to 
do it right. 

In brief. Manville says that in usin<_' 
research advertiser- should beware of 
i 1 i an inadequate job. i2i an inaccur- 
ate job. (3) a biased job. and | fi too 
hurried a job. 

Manville made this chanre: "Mam 



exei uii\ es in Bgem ies are afraid "i 
outside media e\ alual ion tests I hej 

I want to 'rock the boat on a li-t 

thej ve alwa) - had O.K.'d. Vdverti 

in man) was - i- -till in the dai k b 

Il a man showed up on an island ol 

savages with an anti-biotic thai kill- 
all germs, he d he pill to death b) the 

medicine man foi upsetting the Btatus 
quo. So do il,, advertising 1 1 atei nit) 
tieat anyone who challenges theii pel 
theories. Ih- listed them a- follow-: 
I . Ratings are a \ alid test ol -ale-. 
la i : "I here i- no necessai \ coi rela- 
tion between i al ings and -ale-, eithei in 



pi inted ad- oi in < omnien iaU on the 
,ii 

-. It i- important to know the du 
pli< ation ol i in ula ion ol mag uines 
and stations in Belling a specifi* mar- 
ket. (Fact: "Two programs oi two 
izinea • an have a duplii ation ol 
\ percent <im<>nu the numerical audi- 
ence; however, when you arid./'- du- 
pli* ation itinou^ tin- prospet i • 
given produ< t. it varies widely from 
the so-called numerical duplication, de- 
pending entirel) on the producl and 
\ ai \ in- 1 1 oin one prodm t to anothei . 
Duplication among prospects even va- 




WDAYZ^y 

(FARGO, N. D.) '*/ 

IS ONE OF THE NATION'S 
MOST POPULAR STATIONS! 



Last year, WDAY was swamped with 145,659 letters and 
postcards from its listeners! This is the equivalent of a 
letter or card from over 70% of the 211.550 families who 
listen regularly to WDAY — an average of slightly over 
399 letters per day, including Sundays and holidays! 

NBC • 5000 WATTS • 970 KILOCYCLES 

FREE & PETERS. INC., Exclusive National Representatives 




27 JULY 1953 



87 



CBS 



IN THE LAND 



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is tor the r w 



"Careful Buyer" 



The buyer who must make every ad- 
vertising dollar do double duty — the 
local advertiser who knows the Port- 
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that this powerful independent brings 
more sales per dollar spent because 
KWJJ brings local people the kind of 
local programming they want to hear. 

One spot schedule will .*"+ 

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Studio and Offices 

1011 S.W. 6th Ave., Portland 4, Oregon 

WEED &. COMPANY 



in- for two magazines or two pro- 
grams, between 'hea\ y' vs. 'light' users! 
Example: Duplication between two 
magazines or two programs might be 
20' i. Vmong the users of margarine 
who read both magazines <>r watched 
<>i heard both programs, it might l>«- as 
high as 7(i' i or as low as 7%. Yet for 
an automobile, the reverse ma) be the 
case. ' 

3. Measuring costs-per-1,000 is val- 
id when based on circulation and rates 
instead of on customers readied. It 
tells you nothing of cost-per-Sl.OOO po- 
ll ntial goods sold. 

4. It isn't terriblj important to de- 
termine who your customers are. "Our 
customers are everybody." (Fact: 
"This is an illusion: no product has 
]()()' f acceptance.") 

How do you find who your customers 
are? Go out and make a survey. Then 
find out how best to reach them. That 
helps deride what medium or combina- 
tion of media \oull use: then you'll 
know duplication among your pros- 
pects, how to increase or decrease your 
duplication. I Comments of additional 
researchers to be continued in next 
issue.) * * * 



RATE-CUTTING 

I Continued from page 35 I 

gest stations, particularly those who 
have made an overhaul in their rates, 
are not afraid these days to tell a cli- 
ent or agency to go to blazes if it wants 
a deal which would make the rate card 
blush. 

There are of course exceptions to 
this — even among the largest stations 
in the top markets. If an advertiser 
dangles a big enough budget, he can 
sometimes get a flat rate all the way 
from 10 to 40' } off the card rate for a 
sizable package of announcements. 

"Generally speaking. Id say that 
standardized volume discounts have 
largely replaced the "special rate" deals 
common last year. We checked almost 
all of the reps and larger stations in 
recent weeks and found that you could 
gel a good price for an extra-large 
schedule. Howe\er. am advertiser 
could have gotten the same price." a 
.1. Walter Thompson buyer stated. 

W hats caused this partial about- 
face in rate deals? 

For one thing, industry opinion has 
made main a station manager think 
twice before offerinu a cut-rate deal to 



an agency or client. "Because of all 
the publicity that has been afforded to 
this topic in the trade press, in agency- 
rep clinics, in 4-A meetings and the 
like a station is taking a big chance 
today if it makes private deals on 
rates, the sales manager of a large 
New York rep firm told SPONSOR. 

Meanwhile industry groups like the 
National Association of Radio and 
Television Broadcasters have been 
waging an active war against rate 
chiseling within their own ranks. 

Sample barrage from Harold E. 
Fellows, president. .NARTB: 

"There is some rate-cutting going on 
in broadcasting today, and it is de- 
plorable — not for the punishment it 
ma) visit upon those who practice it 
I for they desene the punishment t but 
for the unfair position in which it 
places the industry as a whole. 

"Anyone who consistently cuts rates 
should cut his own salary, for he is not 
worth what he is being paid to sell his 
product. Or he should quit the broad- 
casting business and become an auc- 
tioneer. 

"If it is your honest conviction that 
vour rates are not justified in the light 
of j our service, get out from under the 
table and change them — for everyone 
to see. No off-the-card deal is ever off- 
the-record. The word can soon get 
around that you are running a bargain 
counter instead of a broadcasting sta- 
tion." i From a speech before the 
Ltah Broadcasters Association in Salt 
Lake City. 30 June 1953.) 

Officially, the industry groups asso- 
ciated with radio and T\ can not 
take am drastic action against the few 
stations who still maintain a name- 
vour-own-price policy. 

The NARTB and the Station Repre- 
sentatives Association, who do not ap- 
prove in am way of special rate deals, 
can't force the issue because of anti- 
trust angles. 

On the buyer's side of the fence, the 
American Association of Advertising 
Agencies group feels that it is caught 
between media and buyer in dealing 
with questions of rate chiseling. And 
the Association of National Advertis- 
ers indicated to sponsor that it didn't 
like to interfere in media problems, 
feeling that efforts to end rate deals 
would have to come from broadcast- 
ers themselves, not clients. 

However, all of these industry as- 
sociations — and many local and re- 
gional broadcasters groups — are on 



88 



SPONSOR 



record, one way oi another, .1- • > 1 ■ 1 >> >~- 
in^ t In- practice "f rate 1 hiseling. Sim e 
they are influential in forming indue- 
try opinion they are thus doing a lol 
in . in 1. 11I |u ic c » .11 selling in radio 
and TV. 

\- a result, most stations today are 
-tii kin^ to ili«' clauses in the generally- 
,K cepted \ \K I B I \ - model spot con- 
tract, originally drawn up in 1946. 
These model contract clauses state: 

"1 a 1 . It is agreed thai the time rate 
named in this contract is 1 he lowest 
rate made b) the station for like broad- 
1 tats and that it at any tim<' during 
the life of this contract the station 
make- .1 lowei rate foi like broadcasts, 
tin- 1 ontracl shall be completed at 
>u<li lower rate from that date. 

"1 1> 1 . \ll time rates shall be pub- 
lished l>\ the station. There -hall l>e 
no secret rates, rebates "i agreements 
affecting rates. Ml rates shall be fur- 
nished advertiser if requested in writ- 
ing so to tin. 

\ 111 > 1 1 1 »- 1 unofficial restraint which 
keeps stations in line when it comes t'> 
rate chiseling is time buying opinion. 
\ cross-section "I well-known time- 
buyers told sponsor, without exception, 
that they didn't like to do business 
with stations that arc known t'> cheat 
on their rates. 

""II I catch a station "tit of bounds 
from the rate provisions of it- -|><it 
contracts, I would think twice before 
ever buying that station again," a 
Ruthrauff & Ryan buyer said. "If a 
station offers me a fancy deal under 
the counter, how do I know they won't 
make a better deal at an agency that's 
buying an even larger schedule than 
the one I'm planning on buying?" 

Individually, or unofficially, some 
station executives are taking serious 
steps toward rebuilding prestige for 
station rate cards prestige which has 
occasionally become a little tarnished 
in the past couple of seasons, 

I odd Stor/. general manager of in- 
dependent station KOWH, Omaha, re- 
cently initiated a movement among 

broadcasters to have a "No-Trick-Deal 

Hate (lard policy. \- Storz sees it. 
broadcasters would -iun a pledge not 
to make preferential rate deals and 
would then be allowed to place a seal 
on their rate cards something like 
the \ \RTB code seal Bhown by l\ 
station-. 

Advertisers and agencies would then 
know, if they saw the seal on a rate 
<aid. that the station won't sell on an 



under-the-countei basis. It the station ing up with similai proposals. In 
steps "in "I line, the privilege "I dis- Washington, I*. ' ., the Mai land I' 
playing the seal would I"- yanked. \t tricl "I • olumbia Radio l\ Broad 
last report, Storz's plan was gaining .< casters Vsso iation unanimously adopt- 
lot "I momentum among broadcasters ed 1 resolution on 19 lune toward the 

in .in ml .d sort "l way, Hie maintenan •• ■ •! fail and equal rates 

\ARTB, "I which Storz 1- > member, which stated in part: 

- a n't hark Store's plan openly but did "Be it resolved that [the group 

indicate to sponsor through an official gests t" each membei station that it 

spokesman that the plan "is a - I realistically examine its rate card to 

idea.'" Certainly, the NARTB isn't dis- determine whethei changes "i revi- 

couraging the idea ol a "quality 1 ite sions upward <u downward are in "i 

1 ard group. der, and. 

Locally, othei broadcasters are com- "Having determined that it- rate 



SELL MORE IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 State! 






■X- Winston-Salem 

is the home ol 

R. J. Reynolds 

Tobacco Co. 




27 JULY 1953 



89 



WANT TO SELL 
CANADA? 

One radio station 

covers 40% of 

Canada's retail 

sales 




TORONTO 

50,000 WATTS, IOIO K.C. 

CFRB covers over 1/5 the homes in 
Canada, covers the market area that 
accounts for 40% of the retail sales. 
That makes CFRB your No. 1 buy in 
Canada's No. 1 market. 



REPRESENTATIVES 
United Stales: Adam J. Young Jr., Incorporated 
Canada: All-Canada Radio Facilities, Limited 




Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent audience rating 
leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y./// 
3,000 WATTS \ 

Rtprt$*ntativt ... L 

EVERETT-McKINNlY, Inc., N.w Tart. Chicog 
LEE F. O'CONNELl CO . Lo. An 9 .l... Son Francisco 



card is correct, each station maintain 
that card and avoid practices which 
tend to discriminate between adver- 
tisers and agencies." 

In discussing this resolution of the 
broadcasters in the nation's capital 
city, Ben Strouse, vice president of 
WW DC. stated to sponsor: 

"Once the station has a reputation 
for rate cutting, there is no bottom. 
\<> buyer can be sure that he is get- 
ting the right price and therefore he 
tries to chisel even more. The station 
that cuts rates is slowly but surely dig- 
ging a grave for itself. 

"Price cutting is stupid." Strouse 
added, "but there will be price cutters 
around as long as there is intensive 
competition and there will be chiseling 
buyers around as long as there are 
price cutters. It's easy to be ethical 
when your ledger shows black ink. but 
it's darn difficult when you are in the 
red. Perhaps the best job that the 
good station can do is to convince buy- 
ers that it never pays to buv price 
alone." 

Equally forceful in putting across 
the point that spot prices are an im- 
portant — but not the only — point to 
consider in buying air time was Harry 
Novik, manager of New York's WLIB, 
a station which has built a large and 
loyal following among New York's 
racial and language minorities. Said 
Novik: 

"WLIB has been offering something 
unusual in its program service for the 
past couple of years, and we're proud 
to say the station has been highly suc- 
cessful at it. Our rate card was estab- 
lished after long and careful study of 
our operating costs, overhead, person- 
nel, and the like and is designed to 
bring in a reasonable profit. We can 
no more cut our established rate card 
and hope to survive than you could cut 
your normal rate of breathing by 10 
or 15 r v and remain in good health." 

Even though stations are presenting 
a much more united front today on the 
subject of rate deals, this doesn't mean 
thai la I advertisers have stopped seek- 
ing special rate arrangements, and i hi 
that stations have stopped offering 
them to sponsors. 

Consider the experience of station 
W AIR. Winston-Salem. Jack Weldon, 
station manager, told SPONSOR: 

"" \ chain store that had purchased 
time elsewhere off-the-rate-card recent- 
l\ wanted to spend rough!) Sl22.~> a 
month with us. They stipulated what 



the) expected for this amount — one 
quarter hour and five one-minute an- 
nouncements per day, six days a week. 
According to our rate card, this would 
have come to $330 per month on a 
maximum discount basis. 

"We worked with the people for 
three days trying to convince them 
that we could cover tbem adequately 
at $225 but could not and would not 
deliver what the\ requested. We did 
not get the business and between you 
and me it was hard to look 8225 a 
month in the face and not accept it. 
But I have to shave daily and I 
wouldn't be able to look myself in the 
fare if I had accepted. 

"I would rather have my pride than 
a series of spot announcements 40 or 
r>O c /c below the rate card price." 

There's another side to this coin, 
however. 

The chief timebuyer of one of the 
largest ad agencies in the countrv 
spelled out some of the details. Asking 
that he not be quoted by name, he 
stated : 

"Even week I find stations and reps 
submitting availabilities to us to which 
the) ve attached a tag reading 'Special 
Package Price For . . .' W hen I break 
down this special flat rate, it usually 
comes to something less than the regu- 
lar rate card price. Or else thev are 
throwing in a lot of extra merchandis- 
ing or free talent in order to snag one 
or more of our clients for prestige 
purposes. 

"Some stations and reps make no 
bones about the fact that they'll bar- 
gain. We sometimes get a listing of 
special packages of announcements — 
both in radio and TV — with a foot- 
note attached which reads 'If none of 
these packages fits in with your cur- 
rent plans, call us and we'll tailor 
something to \our particular require- 
ments.' 

"Main times I've found that when- 
ever we have a spot campaign break- 
ing in which the number of announce- 
ments per station will exceed 20 a 
week, a number of stations — including 
ke\ network outlet- in big markets 
will tailor a deal in order to land the 
account. Usually, the\ submit avail- 
abilities at card rate. But if we query 
them later direct!) the\ will stall 
around and finalh make a second oiler 
that s lower than the first — and often 
lower than their published rates. 

"Such stations. I'm happ) to sa\. are 
in the minority. Even though we like 



90 



SPONSOR 



■Wl 



iii gel a good Inn i"i the i lienl - 
money, practices like this make lib- 
tough fin inc. \\ i- have a couple "I 
clients in the shop who are aware thai 
some stal ions will cul i ates. I hus, 
thej feel thai nil stations i an I"- bai 
gained w ith it you trj hard enough, 
["his i\ pe i'l client think- \ mi re nol 
mi the ball il you i an i come up w iili 
.1 bargain basemen! deal .mil will till 
ii- 'you < .m do bettei than this , 

\- a result i'l this situation where 
some clients continue t>> pressure Bta 
tions for <iit rates ami some Btations 
continue to offer them Freel) in adver- 
h-ii- there i- a i misiderable amount 
ul Dame-calling these days between 
lm\ ei ami seller. 

For iii-iam e, mil' i'l the clients mosl 
often cited bj Btation executives a- an 
outstanding example nf a bargain hun- 
ter was General Mill-, gianl of the 
i ereal ami Bour business. 

But in a conversation with a -i'<>\- 
soh editor, I.. H. Crites, directoi ol 
radio and TV media for General Mill-. 
stated : 

"We arc currently running radio 
spot campaigns for our products which 
are more than double the size ol t h>- 
>l»« >t campaigns we've used in previous 
years. However, we ilon t considei 
that we are bargain hunters. 

"\\ e queried all ol the station reps 
and most of the leading I . S. stations 
this spring. We stated clearl) thai we 
wanted something unusual a floating 
announcement si hedule of some ( )<io 
to 1.000 announeeinenls per market 
during a three-to-four month summer 

period. In some cases, we wanted only 

half that amount if the market was re- 
ceiving adequate coverage from othei 

media. We al-o Stated that we planned 

to extend these schedules for the bal- 
ance of the \ear in several cases. 

"In all. we not flat-rate offers from 
some 800 radio stations in 300 mar- 
ket-. We analyzed these without re- 
gard t<> Standard Hate & Data prices — 
against yardsticks of coverage, audi- 
ence, station's ability to move consum- 
ei goods, and the like. 

"In mam cases, stations had to 
create a new rate lor us. since the) 
had never handled floating schedules 
a- large as ours. This was entirely up 
to the station. In no ease did we 
make a eounter-ofTer to a-k for rate 
reductions. We did our choosing be- 
tween the prices offered US. 

"I don't think \ ou can call this rate 
gouging. I certainh don't approve ol 



the pi .ii in e ol offei ing several diffei 
cul prices i" several different clients 
oi a gem ies. lint it seems i" me that 
il a station sees that its rate i ard is 
im Inn ri realistic in tei tns "I todaj - 
advertising value-, thai Btation should 
icv i-e its card i ates and publish a new 
one." 

~. mi<- ul the top Btation reps, how 
e\ ii. are nol in< lined to agree with 
i i ite- thai the < reneral Mills deal 

M .i-n I rale gouging. 

"\\ e don't have an) < reneral Mill- 
business running on an) "I our Bta- 
tions at a '-p' ■ ml i ate . the ow ner of 
a leading rep organization Btated i" 
sponsor. "We told General Mills that 
the) ' ould luiv all the time the) want- 
ed at the maximum di-i mini mi the 
rate < ards .mil that we would not 
make .uiv "deal-. Im glad we didn't. 

I le ,ii mil latei that in one mid-\\ est- 
ern market General Mill- approached 
two leading stations and asked foi a 
rate-per-announcemenl based on the 
assumption that the) would spend nil 
"I their budget b>r thai market on one 
nf the stations. 

"\\ hen General Mills gol the station 
bids, the) proceeded to .-plii the busi- 
ness in hall between the two Stations 



.mil paid i"i it ii the low »p» ial i ite 
w Im b ea< h -t.it ion had offei ed 

I In- radio managei "i a Madi 
\veiiue rep him pointed out anothei 
in I' "i the < lenei al M ill- conl ra< i. and 
others like it ; 

"General Mills told ua that th.-v fell 
the) were enl itled t" i spe< ial rate be- 

• aii-e the) planned In In- mi 1 1 1. .in in 

an unusual way. I he) were goin 
have ,i week ol intensive announce 
nieiii-. then a week off, then a week ol 
announi ements and bo forth. I think 
this i- unfair, and amount- to a rate 
i hisel because the stal ion has the prob 
lem ul selling all those time slots on 
the intervening week, meanwhile hav- 
ing Bold a l"t "I time at a • ul pi 
I nough big conl racts ol that t\ pe can 
ruin a Btation. 

"1 don i think advertisers are en- 
titled tn -pei ial pi ices be* ause ol some 
odd quirk in their < ampaign, oi be- 
cause the) want tn be On the air on 
alternate I in •-■ lav -. nr because it's tlnn 
'off season." Uso, I don't think a few 
advertisers should feel the) are en- 
titled i<> a 'wholesale rate' becau-e tbev 
have an occasional big saturation cam- 
paign when dn/ens nf stead) advertis- 
ers buv al the "retail rate'." 

1000 WATTS 



Charleston's most far reaching station 




"SUMMER SLUMP? 

at the kennel! 



Not here 



"Oh, it's been awfully hot through the 
southeast — we'll grant you that. Folks 
get worn out; tempers get frayed . . . 

"That is, unless you're one of those 
lucky timebuyers who are ensconced 
comfortably on WPAL for the summer. 

"Sales of WPAL clients' products are 
staying right up there, and — nould you 
believe it? — VC'PAL sales are increasing 
right along, beat or no heat! 

"Fetter come on down to the kennel — 
where it's shady, and profitable!" 



Forjoe and Company 
S. E, Dora-Clayton Agency 



w-PAL 



of CHARLESTON 
SOUTH CAROLINA 



All this and Hoopers too! 



■r 



27 JULY 1953 



91 



\\ hat <loc- the future hold in the 
wax i>l radio and TV rate "deals"? Is 
there likeK to he more — or less — rate 
chiseling, special arrangements for off- 
beal spot campaigns, preferential dis- 
counts, and similar quasi-legitimate 
tactics? 

From the admen queried l»x sponsor 
on the rate topic, this was the consen- 
sus : 

1. The number of straight chisels 
that i>. one that is an under-the-counter 
reduction in an established rate card 
for an ordinary air campaign — is on 
the downgrade now. and will continue 
to lessen. 

2. However, the number of satura- 
tion drives in which advertisers feel 
the) are entitled to some kind of car- 
load price is likelv to increase. And, 
unless stations hold the line on rates — 
backed In industry and industry group 
support — there will he a rise in the 
number of detours around rate cards. 

3. To forestall this situation, there's 
likelx to he a lot of soul-searching 
among stations as regards radio rate 
cards. Main stations will update their 
rates, or spell out just how far they 
will go in giving special volume dis- 
counts lot extra-large campaigns. Manx 



COMPLETE BROADCASTING 
INSTITUTION IN 

/srY/if/io/ia 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



-AM 



-FM 



-TV 




First Stations of Virginia 

WTVR Blair TV Inc. 
WMBG The Boiling Co. 



more will make a point of going on 
record to the effect that thej will not 
under an) condition make a rate deal. 
4. There's some likelihood ol strong 
industry action on the part of radio 
and T\ associations and groups 
against industrx members who make 
a practice of (healing on their rate 
card.-. 

One rep summed it up thuslx : 
"There will always be some rate 
chiseling as long as human beings are 
in the radio business. But. with the 
cooperation of agencies and advertis- 
ers, I'm sure the radio industrx ax ill 
be able to police itself against actions 
which \x ill ultimately do harm to both 
buxer and seller. * * * 



MOVING DAY 

I Continued from page 41 i 

work bogging down for days and \ital 
papers and data disappearing into thin 
air. 

Some agencies, reps, and broadcast- 
ers have gotten around the lock-stock- 
and-barrel txpe move by splitting them- 
selves amoeba-stxle with various de- 
partments in different buildings. Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting Svstem. for in- 
stance, finds itself with 21 different 
addresses in New York City to handle 
its radio, TV, and film operations. 

Firms that are fortunate enough to 
get additional space in their present 
buildings sometimes find that this ver- 
tical-type growth has a tendency to be 
inefficient. 

One agency which found itself in 
that position last year was Cunning- 
ham & Walsh. Inc. During the 25 
years that the firm was housed at 40 
East 34 St., increased billings ( from 
$20 million in 1944 to $34 million in 
1952 1 had caused the agency to ex- 
pand over five floors in that building. 
Skipping around from one office to an- 
other could be a tiring experience, 
somexx hat akin to trx ing to find a par- 
ticular captain in the Pentagon. 

The firm decided to shop around 
for new quarters. C. Everett Hoyt, 
v.p. of the agenc) . told sponsor of the 
criteria the firm set: "We wanted a 
building large enough to house our 
complete operation on txxo floors, also 
we wanted to get sufficient space so we 
could expand without having to go 
through the same process again. Inso- 
far as location was concerned we had 
to consider the fact that a good main 



92 



of our employees are commuters; 
those using the long Island B.R. came 
into Perm Station (33 St. & 7 Ave. I : 
another group came into town dailx 
from Westchester using the Nexx \ ork 
Central H.K. (Grand Central I. We 
weren't particularly concerned about 
the convenience to clients because 
manx of them are out of town and any 
location in midtown New \ ork is 
cquallx accessible (or inaccessible i . ' 
The search took 18 months, finally 
narrowed down to txxo possible new 
buildings: 380 Madison Ave. 1 46th I 
on the site of the old Ritz-Carlton 
Hotel, and 260 Madison 1 38 St. i . 
C&W settled on the latter location, 
moved in on 28 Jul\ 1952. The me- 
chanics of the move are discussed later 
in this article. 

This October Lennen & Newell plans 
to take over the sixth and seventh 
floors of the new Ritz Building. The 
firm s present quarters cover about 
30.000 sq. ft.: the new area will gi\e 
them 54.00(1 sq. ft. to move around in. 
But agencies aren t the only ones 
suffering from cramped quarters. 
Storer Broadcasting Co. couldn't fit 
comfortably into its offices at 488 
Madison so the firm went out and 
leased ixxith option to buy I the whole 
building at 118 East 57 St. Setting a 
new high in lush quarters for the rep 
field. Storer gave the inside of the 
five-story building a complete going 
over, ended up with two floors of of- 
fices, and three floors of living quar- 
ters for visiting brasshats and firemen. 
Complete with formal gardens and 
Filipino houseboy. the Storer layout is 
a suitable setting in which to sign a 
contract of multi-million-dollar propor- 
tions. 

Another tenant-to-be of the Ritz 
Building is H-R Representatives. Inc.. 
and H-R Television. Inc.. xvho will 
move into the structure as soon as it is 
completed, around early October. Con- 
tracts have been signed for approxi- 
mateU 5.000 sq. ft. of office space. 

Around the end of the year Broad- 
cast Music. Inc.. and its wholly owned 
subsidiarx. Associated Music Publish- 
ers, will take oxer about 22.500 square 
feet of space in the txx in air-conditioned 
office buildings now going up at 579 
and 589 Fifth \\enue. 

A comparatively simple move was 
carried out bv the 0. L. Taylor Co. in 
June \xhen the station reps moved 
down the street from 488 to 444 Madi- 
son. In the new quarters the firm has 

SPONSOR 



2,600 -'i- Ft. "I spa< e m ith an option 
for a like amount. 

Donald < looke, Inc. < ailed in an in* 
terioi decorator to do .1 complete p>l> 
mi ii- new offices .ii 331 Madison. 
Moving from 551 Fifth on 3 August, 

this station rep 1- jumping I (|11 

t<> 1,500 sq. ft., will up the sales stafl 
7.V, . 

Television Ige, new trade publica 

linn due in VugUSt, took 1,500 Bq. ft. 

in 111 Madison. I hat's the Bame build- 
ing to which Broadcasting moved when 
ii decided in increase it- Bpace from 
T2."> i,> 2,500 sq. ft. 

sponsor, which started out in 1947 
with 800 sq. ft. at KJ E. 52 St., ex- 
panded to 2,500 sq. ft. at 510 Madi- 
son. In our new quarters, we have 
1,000 sq. ft. in whi< Ii to turn out "the 
magazine that radio and TV advertis- 
ers use" Address: 10 I. 19 St. 

Just as sponsor plans to do, Cun- 
ningham \ Walsh scheduled ii~ move 
for a weekend. Planning months in 
advance, C & \\ called in Morgan & 
Brother, which specializes in "painless 
moving for offices. Carrying the brunt 
of the burden for I '. & \\ were Ceorge 
McMoran, companj treasurer, and 
\ .P. ('.. Everett Hoyt. Uso in on the 
planning were Carson and Lundin, the 
architects who laid out the new offices. 

The agenc) was broken down b) 
departments and each unit assigned a 
different color tag which was keyed to 
correspond with a layout <d" the new 
location. The office closed down at 
noon Fridaj and the moving men took 
over. Working on a tighl time sched- 
ule, each department head and a few 
-latT members were waiting at the new 
building when thai particular depart- 
ment - equipment arrh ed. 

One hundred fifty van-loads later 
the move was completed. \n esti- 
mated 3,600 pieces of equipment and 
3,592 "book boxes" (almost 100,000 
cubic feet i were moved that afternoon 
and the following day. Monda) morn- 
ing ( \\\ - '>2o employees reported to 
the new offices and business • ontinued 
"as usual." 

For the benefit of those contemplat- 
ing Mich a move, SPONSOR asked Ar- 
thur Morgan, president nf Morgan ^ 
Brother, for some tip- on "painless 
moving." Here's what lie said: 

"1. Pick one thoroughly responsi- 
ble person and put him in charge with 
lull authority. How main lieutenants 
he needs depends on the size of the job, 
hut there should he only one boss. 



"2. ( linate • losel) with you J library should I"- pa< ked m bw Ii •■ waj 

,ii, lnii-i t Man) timet when new fui that when unpai ked il - read) to ;o on 

inline i- added to present equipment the shelves. 

there isn't adequate space in the new i [) ea | wirJh a reliable moving 

quarters. Winn a good job is done company. It ma) cost a few dollars 

there's no waste space .mil items Buch more but it's worth il to knou the job 

,i- filing cabinets fit exactl) the space will be done correctly. Vnd you'll 

assigned t<> them. save money on aspirin in the end. 

■ ;. Foi the person being moved One furthei tip from sponsor: No 

ii i^ more ol a mental than physical matter how fai in advance you tell em- 

Btrain. Careful planning is necessarj ployeesofthe ve, remind them again 

in save work and money. Files, foi ex- al the la~i minute. Then i ne will 

ample should be numbered bo as to be d<> what Ja< k < tinningham did show 

handled in propel sequence. \ml youi up Monda) al the old office. * * * 



NOSE -/EST 




All Pittsburgh just has to listen to Radio Pittsburgh — the station 
with a nose tor news. Sharp, documented news coverage ALL 
DAY by HERB MORRISON and his WJAS news staff, estab- 
lishing WJAS as Pittsburgh's radio N I \\ S leader. 

first with a report of the Steel settlement... \ll LL SEVEN 
MINI rES BEFORl the wire services. 

FIRST — with on-the-spot interviews with the principals in the 
steel d ispute. 

FIRST — with on-the-spot reports of the Worcester. Mass. tor- 
nado disaster. 

No wonder all Pittsburgh naturally turns to WJAS ALL DAY 

for complete news anerage. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

1BHT 



GREATER PITTSBURGH 
5000 Watts Metropolitan 

1320 KC. r . 

Area... 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: George P. Hollinqberv Co. 



27 JULY 1953 



93 



NOW! GOOD TV 



MOBILE, ALA! 

WKAB-TV 

CHANNEL 48 

CBS - DUMONT 
NETWORKS 




caprivarin' 

KABBY 

says: 

"20,000 television sets al- 
ready in Mobile — and 
they're still coming fast!" 

Also, remember . . . 





WKAB 



the High-Daytime 
Hooper Bargain! 



A.M. 



CALL 



^^T COMPANY 

Offices in: New York • Chicago • Atlanta 
Los Angeles • San Francisco 

SOUTHERN REPS.: 
Dora-Clayton Agency, Atlanta 




John K. Herbert, National Broadcasting (<>. 
v.p., has been named to head the television network 
of NBC under the new split-network concept. Her- 
bert joined NBC in 1950 as manager of radio sales, 
moved up to v.]>. in charge «/ radio and television 
sales in July 1952. Prioi to joining NBC, he was 
V.p. and genera/ advertising manager of Hearst maga- 
zines. Recently he played an important role in 
renewing Procter <Jr Gamble's $6.5 million con- 
tract for the continuation of PfG's six-program 
daytimi lineup of radio shows. 



* 



II iff i<i hi H. Fineshriber Jr.. NBC v.p., 

became head of that network's radio setup with the 
split. Working with him is Ted Cott who is now 
operating i. p. of the NBC radio network. Fine- 
shriber, former executive v.p. of Mutual, joined Mi'. 
in March L953. This just about completes the 
cycle lor Bill. He worked in the publicity de- 
partment of CBS alter graduation Irom Princeton, 
became manager of Carnegie Hall in 19.54. rejoined 
CBS in 1937 where he was general manager in 
charge of programing before joining Mutual. 

fif. Sf, 3p 

liurrtf ft if «l H. president. Ruthraufj $ Ryan, 
recently announced acquisition of the Sun Oil 
Co. account, effective 1 September. Addition of 
this |3 mil/ion account brings new business garnered 
in last few months to $8 million level. Ryan told 
SPONSOR: "I'd love to take the credit myself, but 
actually this Rc\ R resurgence is the work of 
our N.Y. management group consisting oj myself, 
exec v.p. Bob Wilson, and v.p.'s Wilson J. Main. 
Bourne Ruthraufj. Fred Schwemmer. and Bill Smith. 
We've ~cit no stars: lust a darn good team. 



•I tiles llcill. president. Specialty Television 
Films, Inc., concluded an agreement with a group 
of Italian men ie producers to distribute as mam as 
104 American language Italian movies to Tl outlets 
in this country. Peal, which calls for advances of 
approximately $] million, involves dubbing of 
American dialogue ante' prints. Many of the pic- 
tures are of 1919-1953 vintage, and the over-all pack- 
age will contain a variety of types including drama. 
comedy, suspense, spectacle. Ralph Serpre, head of 
Italian Films Export Tl Dept. represented producers. 



94 



SPONSOR 



Indianapolis 




VENING 

VEN 
ETTER 



It sounds like a stopper bul it's true i vening radio time is even better than early 
morning which no one needs to tell you is an excellent value from the standpoint 
of listeners per set, audience turnover and family-type audience. 

To be specific . . . take Indianapolis, where a survey* of the three-hour periods 
6:00 to 9:00 P.M. versus 6:00 to 9:00 A.M. Monday through Friday discloses 
these extremely interesting percentages! 

13 f /c higher average ratings on WIBC in the evening. 

139c more sets in use in the evening. 

Giving a still sharper edge to these figures is television's complete penetration 
into the Indianapolis area! 

This is no isolated case: it's repeated in city after city coast to coast, liven in 
many mature television markets, evening radio offers a far larger audience than 
early morning, yet the cost per thousand comparison is most attractive. 

Bargain-wise advertisers and agencies should have all the facts with which we 
support our statement that nighttime radio is today's best buy. 

Call your John Blair man today! 



particularly over WIB€, Indiana's First and Only 50,000 Watt Station 



In Indianapolis, Evening is Even Better 



WIBC Average Ratings 



Sets in Use 



1 1 3 V 



100% 




6-9 A.M. 



6-9 P.M. 



113% 



1 oo -, 



JOHN 
BLAIR 

& COMPANY 



6-9 A.M. 



6-9 P.M. 



Comparison WIRT Average Ratings and Sets in Us 
A.M. vs. 6-9 P.M. Mon.-Fri. 6-9 A.M. equals 10 

•Source: January Pulse Indianapolis 

lis is one in a continuing series of advertisements based on regular syndicated 
Jdience measurement reports. To achieve a uniform basis of measurement, the 
•itions chosen for this series are all John Rlair-represented outlets ... all in major 
nrkets. all in mature television markets. 



REPRESENTING LEADING 
RADIO STATIONS 

NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 
ST. LOUIS • DETROIT • DAHAS 
SAN FRANCISCO ■ LOS ANGELES 




Are rate deals lessening? 

"The trouble w illi doing business w itli 
a station which offers you an off-the- 
rate-card deal is that you never know 
whether other advertisers aren't get- 
ting a still-lower rate." 

This quote from a timebuyer was 
one of the observations gathered by 
sponsor in researching the article on 
rate deals which appears in this issue 
on page 33. Apparentlv the distaste 
with which this buyer views rate deals 
is shared widely. For SPONSOR found 
that in general the tide of direct, rate- 
card cheating deals is abating in spot 
radio and TV. 

But there are still many buyers with 
big budgets and big campaigns shop- 
ping for a price that's not printed on 
the card: there are many stations who 
go out for a competitor's business with 
a pitch based onlj on undercutting. 

More realistic pricing of time in 
some markets has helped relieve the 



pressure lor deal-. \nd much of the 
credit for this belongs to industry lead- 
ers in and out of the trade associations 
who've stiffened the backbone of radio 
bioadcasters or T\ stations in highly 
< ompetitive markets. 

Sharply worded speeches by \ \R- 
I II s Hal Fellows; meetings between 
clients and reps called by the Station 
Representatives Vssociation; the exam- 
ple set by broadcasters who don't pio 
for deals and say so publicly — all of 
these factors also have added up to a 
change in the radio atmosphere. 

This is good news for advertisers and 
agencies. We'll never be convinced that 
it's good business for a client to 
save dollars here and there through 
rate deals at the expense of media 
standards. The station that gives time 
awav has to cut corners somewhere. 



UHF problem in Belleville 

This happened in Belleville. 111., 
across the river from St. Louis, where 
UHF station WTVI is slated to go on 
the air soon. Someone stole into Gene 
Hotz's television shop and left with 
two LHF converters, value $68. 

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which 
owns VHF station KSD-TV, unselfishly 
published the story on page one of its 
Sundav edition. 



Dangerous when misused 

One of the most useful tools pub- 
lished by sponsor for agencies and ad- 
v ertisers is the TV list of 225 metro- 
politan markets which appeared in the 
Fall Facts Issue (13 Juh I. Within 24 



hour:- of the issue's appearance there 
were many requests for reprints i now 
available I . Together w ith Radio Basil - 
and TV Basics, we predict that this col- 
lection of data will find its place among 
\ital desk-top tools of advertising buv- 
ers every where. 

The list of metropolitan count) mar- 
kit- was designed to do one thing: 
show the -tatus of I \ in metropolitan 
markets. Advantageous as it is to have 
these data grouped in terms of metro- 
politan counties, there "s a danger in 
use of the listing. Its not intended as 
an indication of which market will pro- 
duce the most sales for you nor of the 
full <overage of the TV market of a 
specific station: it can be misleading 
il used that wa\ . 

'I he markets were compiled bv Sul- 
livan. Stauffer. Colwell & Ba\le- in 
terms of Sales Management figures for 
number of household- in metropolitan 
county areas. This was the most valu- 
able rank order to take for this pur- 
pose. SSC&B felt. But the fact that a 
market ranks among the lower third of 
the list, for example, in number of 
households doesn't mean its propor- 
tionated ranked in sales. The market 
may not bulk large in resident popu- 
lation but may be a huge buying cen- 
ter for counties for many miles around. 
Or it may have extremely high income 
in ratio to population. Stations in small 
population centers are most likeh to be 
penalized bv this ranking. 

The moral here is that no listing 
which gives a ranking, whether it s a 
lop 10 ratings list or a marketing 
breakdown, should be used as the end- 
all when picking a T\ or radio station. 



Applause 



Gratitude dept. 

Il couldn't happen twice — but it did. 

In Dallas eighl clients of Ted Work- 
man Advertising, five from distant cit- 
ies, gathered together late in June to 
throw a surprise party for the head of 
the agency. They produced a hand- 
some eight-page brochure commemo- 
rating the event, staged a dinner at the 
Lakewood Country Club, presented Ted 
Workman with two gifts — a red \\ i« 
to cover his bald pate and a Bell and 
Howell recording movie projector. The 
brochure said: 



"This is vour day. Ted. For a job 
well done, for cooperation and work 
beyond the line of duty, for long hours 
for which \ ou received no pay. for 
vour patience, understanding, and sin- 
cere interest in our problems, we. your 
clients and friends, have gathered to- 
gether todav to honor you." 

In Providence this July Albert How- 
ard, president of Howard and Lewis. 
\ew England's largest Ford dealer, 
threw a steak dinner with orchestra 
and all the trimmin's for 50 managers, 
salesmen, and announcers representing 



four radio and one T\ station carry- 
ing H&L advertising. 

No pep talks, no merchandising ap- 
peals were included. Just a straight 
35-second "thank you bv a new radio 
client who was completing his first -i\ 
months. Said Frank McCabe. head of 
the advertising agency handling the ac- 
i ount, "If Howard and Lewis hadn t 
accomplished what they did through 
the use of a so-called dead medium, 
(here would have been no party to- 
night. When a sponsor says "thank 
you' tangibly, he's had results!" 



96 



SPONSOR 




CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 






Z^&fc&c -Sfafiotts &fy6/uMe*fo&/e£- 




TELEVISIOr 







magazine R 




i 



-j «.? 






.) 



I I CPRAGUE 

NAT! ■ C A S T I N C 

FELLER PL* ' 
NEW V NY 







ON THE AIR 
SEPTEMBER 



MINNEAPOLIS-ST.PAUL 



/N CRIER 

He NORTHWEST 



many 

ABC (%sf II 



• NOW YOU CAN PRESENT YOUR SALES 

MESSAGE WITH VOICE AND PICTURES TO 

HALF A MILLION UPPER MIDWEST FAMIL'ES Ql A D 

AT A LOW COST. D fc I"t ■ bT% 

' *• c. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

NEW YORK • CHICACO • ST LOUIS 

DETROIT • DALLAS • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • JACKSONVILLE 



10 AUGUST 1953 



50< per copy « $ 8 per year 




Morton Salt finds 
nighttime radio effective 
in television markets 



page 28 



■MM 



2 nighttime ra 

fallacies exploded; 

facts, figures given 

age 30 



idio 






hat do viewers think of 
our TV commercial? 
Likes, dislikes reported 

ge 32 




iesults of new unnstai 
study of radio's 
strength: 10 findings 

>age 34 



CANADIAN RADIO 
AND TV: 1953 



" 



tarts page 59 



Canadian radio remains 
a top buy for advertisers 
and lowest-cost medium 

page 62 



Canadian Basics: Facts 
and figures, up to date 
data to aid sponsors 

ige 70 




FORD MOTOR COMPANY 



DOES A COMPLETE JOB... 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS... 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



^ICHMONB^M 7 1 

HAVENS & MARTININC. ^j 




FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



The Ford Dealers of America are observing Ford's 
50th Anniversary with a well-chosen slogan, "Fifty 
years forward on the American road." Back of it is a study 
in American private enterprise. From one man's dream 
of a "horseless carriage" has grown an organization so far 
flung it has a Ford Dealer in almost every hamlet in the U.S. 
This kind of growth can come only from inventive 
genius, hard work and dedicated service all along the way. 

These same qualities serve well in the broadcasting field 
too. Through them have come the South's only complete 
broadcasting institution — WTVR, WMBG and WCOD. Pioneers 
in AM, FM and TV, Havens & Martin, Inc. Stations have built 
large and loyal audiences in the rich areas around Richmond. 
Advertisers know the value of telling their story 
via these First Stations of Virginia. 



WMBG am WCOD m WTVR 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 




-1 



White won't be Don't expect replacement for Frank White as NBC president before 
replaced till '54 January 1954. Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, board chairman, has assumed 
White's title and duties in interim. You can spike rumor that either 
Sarnoff or TV affiliates were behind White's resignation. White drove 
himself too hard, had to quit to a v oid complete breakdown. 

-SR- 
Canada radio Like Dominion itself, Canadian radio is enjoying boom. More U.S. 
enjoying boom advertisers and agencies have been making northward trek, either by 
establishing north-of-border branches or by putting their products 
on Canadian radio. So far this year 183 U.S. or U.S. -origi n sponsors 
have bought Canadian radio. (Over-all spot business has been rim- 
ing 20% over 1952). For 1953 picture, see section starting page 59. 

-SR- 
O.K. seen for Despite scattered opposition, new Mutual Affiliation Plan expected to 
new Mutual plan be approved by most MBS affiliates by new d eadl ine 21 August . Date 

for start of plan remains 1 October. Three-part scheme calls for (1) 
reduction from 9 to 5 hours a day in station option time; (2) stations 
have to carry 5 hours a day of network program with no payment; (3) 
in exchange they get 14 hours a week of top grade programing which 
they can sell. Mutual scoffs at charge plan may wreck net radio. 

-SR- 
Radio, TV sets Radio-Electronics-Television Manufacturers Assn. (new name for RTMA) 
way over 1952 reports big increase in both radio and TV sets over last year. Six- 
month figures: 7,266,542 radios, 3,834,2 3 6 TV receivers th is year 
against 5,456,035 radio and 2,318,235 TV sets same period last year. 

-SR- 
Decks cleared FCC now expected to approve NTSC color system sometime before year- 
for color TV end, which means color TV will be certainty for 1954. Not only have 

all NTSC members approved system unanimously, but CBS O.K.'d standards 
as w ell. In fact CBS TV will start feeding NTSC color to its net 
about 15 September as warmup. Color clinic will also be held for 
affiliates in New York early in fall. 

-SR- 
lst ARF rating "Rumor": First report from American Research Foundation committee on 
report due soon rating muddle may be out by fall. Committee set up year ago. Initial 
report will probably describe what should be "ideal rating service." 
Lat er r e ports will analyze each of exist ing rating services. 

SPO\SOR in new offices 

Remember to change directories: SPONSOR editorial, advertising, and circula- 
tion headquarters are now located at Madison & 49 St. (40 E. 49 St.), New 
York 17, in heart of advertising district. Rapid expansion of SPONSOR per- 
sonnel and services made move to larger quarters necessary. Phone number re- 
mains MUrray Hill 8-2772. Other offices: Chicago, Los Angeles. 

I 1 

SPONSOR. Volume 7. No. 16. 10 Aucust 1013. Published biweekly b* SPONSOR Publlcitloris. Inc. at 3110 Elm At*.. Baltimore. Md. EieoiUre. Editorial. Advertising. Circu- 
lation Offlcej 40 E 49th St . New York 17. $8 a year in T" S $9 elsewhere Entered aj second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. poatoffice under Art 3 March 1879 



Id roll l TO SPO\SOICS tor 10 Angus! 1953 



NARTB to release 
TV counting plan 



Biggest TV web 
asked for Sheen 



Nighttime radio 
surging back 



How Lady Esther 
got into net TV 



Christal study 
shows radio big 



NARTB's plans for new TV circulation measurement will be revealed to 
nets in New York within 5 weeks. Hignly hush-hush measurement tech- 
ni que involves new conc ept. Meanwhile both existing private firms 
conducting circulation measurements plan 1954 studies (Standard Audit 
& Measurement Services, Nielsen Coverage Service). NARTB's industry- 
run measurement won't be ready to go in 1954, however, NARTB exec 
told SPONSOR. 

-SR- 

Largest TV net yet used (132 stations) has been ordered by Admiral 
Corp. via Erwin, Wasey, for renewed Bishop Sheen series. Du Mont 
hasn't cleared all stations yet but is optimistic. Negotiations also 
going on with Mutual for e xtensive radio net to carry taped version. 

-SR- 

Nighttime radio regaining much of former prestige with sponsors. 
Reason: Latest research shows both net and spot holding their own 
against TV or are growing larger. "Top 10" nighttime radio shows, for 
instance, averaged 8.7% more homes this spring th an last. Other 
studies show TV areas contribute over half of nighttime radio audi- 
ence. Result: Many blue-chip clients are buying. See story page 30. 

-SR- 

Here's backstage story of return of Lady Esther to network broadcast- 
ing, via cosponsorship of NBC TV package starring Ezio Pinza: Philip 
Morris, Biow client, had option on Saturday 8:00-8:30 p.m. slot for 
fall. Costs to Philip Morris of weekly time slot and program would 
have been too much on top of other TV properties ("I Love Lucy"). So 
Biow found Lady Esther within agency client list as cosponsor. Cos- 
metic firm's salesmen now on road showing kines of Pinza show, "I 
Bonimo," to leading accounts, urgi ig the m to stock up before sales 
deluge . Lady Esther had dropped network radio in 1946. 

-SR- 

Take it from Alfred Politz Research: Any survey showing there's less 
listening to radio in TV home can be misleading if conclusion is drawn 
the drop is necessarily due to TV ownership. (TV owners might have 
bought set because they NEVER listen to radio, for example.) That's 
why new Christal study done by Politz won't reveal any competitive 
data — study wasn't designed for that but rather to show effect of 
radio on daily life of American people. For article, see page 36. 



]%ew national spot radio and TV business 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET 


CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


Procter & Gamble. 
Cinci 


Camay soap 


Benton & Bowles, 
NY 


80 radio, 65 TV mkts 
throughout country 


Radio & TV: daytime anncts; start 17 
Aug; duration not set 


Lever Bros, NY 


Swan soap 


BBDO. NY 


2 cities: Pittsburgh, Cinci 


Radio: 60 . 20-, 10-scc daytime anncts; 
start 27 Aug: 4 wks 


Economic Labs, 
St Paul 


Soil.ix washing 
compound 


Scheideler. Beck & 
Werner. NY 


5 cities throughout country 


Radio: 5- 10-. 15-min newscasts: start 
1 Sept; duration not set 


Whitehall Pharma- 
cal Co. NY 


Anacin 


John F. Murray, 
NY 


National 


Radio & TV: 60-sec anncts: start mid- 
Sept; 13 wks 


Clicquot Club Bot- 
tling Co. LA 


Clicquot Club 
beverages 


Ross Roy, LA 


KLAC. KH) 


Radio: 60-sec anncts; start mid-Aug: 
duration not set 


Sonneborn Sons, 
NY 


Amalie Div 


Humbert & Jones, 
NY 


9 stns in 6 New England 
states 


Ridio: 60-sec anncts; start 3 Aug; 52 
wks 



SPONSOR 



Wrap Up 



BILLION-DOLLAR MARKET 

through 

WGVL 



Channel 23 
ABC 



NBC 



Greenville, S. C. 
DUMONT 



The only TV Station in the prosperous PIEDMONT AREA of South Carolina. 







emasmfcG 




mrSM*©^ 





M VHKKT 1)AT\ 






SO-mile Radina <>f Greenville 




9-5). 




940 




1 lice tive Km ing liu omi 


v| 1 1 1,000,000 




Rct.nl s.ilcv 


v 707,000,000 



GREENVILLE: Firsl Market in South Carolina 

I he Greenville, s ( Metropolitan Vrea i.mk> 103rd hi Population ami 7'>ih in Manilla* 

mring r'mpinvo among Vmerica's 168 Standard Metropolitan \n.i> 



+ 

i 
I 
i 

I 
i 



Population I .v ( ensus, 1 9i 

Employment (S. ( Emp Sec. Comm., 1951) 

Retail Sales Sales Management, it,_> 



( overerl U iri - S ( I mp Se< ( omm., 1 ' » "• 1 
Vinos •. rturks S <. Highway Dept., 1951 
Building Permits Fed Res. Bank, 19! 
Manufacturing Plants 
Value ni Manufacturer! Products s ( Laboi Depl 



$121,8-1 

J2.400 



Note: Greenville lead* all South Carolina market* in all of llie above. 



.§. 







FOR WGVLlTVi AVAILABILITIES CALL OR WIRE 

H-R TELEVISION, INC 



In the Southeast: JAMES S. AYERS CO.— ATLANTA. CA. 



10 AUGUST 1953 




Volume 7 Numb 
10 August 1953 



ARTICLES 



Mill 1 1 nil RADIO: A case history 

Morton Salt Co. reports that after four years of nighttime spot radio it finds 
the medium growing in effectiveness, especially in mature TV markets 

\ H.lll I nil RADIO: 12 fallacies exploder! 

SPONSOR matches up popular misconceptions about nighttime radio wifh 
latest facts and figures, shows lack of sound basis for generally accepted views 

What do viewers think of your TV commercial? 

Study by Ohio State University's Dr. Dameron indicates that viewers react more 
favorably to commercials on programs which they like best 

10 basic findings of ttetc Christal radio stutly 

New study, conducted by Politz for I I stations repped by Henry I. Christal 
Co., shows radio's ability to "leak through the crevices" of people's daily 
schedules, maintain loyal program audiences 

Every market is different 

Generalizations about markets can be foolish, if not downright dangerous. 
Living habits differ widely in various locales and buyers should know facts 

THIRD ANNUAL CANADIAN RADIO SECTION 

I In- Canadian market: more money to spend 

With defense efforts taking less than 8% of the nation's manufacturing ability, 
and consumer income up, a boom period seems solidly entrenched 

Canadian radio: Dominion's lowest-cost medium 

High listenership, less competition per station, deep penetration, little compe- 
tition from TV, and low rates are some reasons why radio is good buy 

Canatlian TV: Three stations now, more to come 

CBC's aim is 22 outlets on the air by end of 1954, coverage to areas in which 
about 75% of the country's population lives 

Air users: List is diversified, yrowiny rapidly 

More than 180 U.S. -origin sponsors are using Canadian radio, compared to 117 
last year. There is also a noticeable trend toward spot 

Canadian Basics: The facts and fiyures 

Up-to-date data on set counts, distribution, language breakdowns, listening 
and viewing habits, program type preferences, other information 



28 



30 



32 



34 



36 



60 



62 



66 



USi 



70 



COM I N C 



The Xeyro market: 1953 

SPONSOR, originator of studies of Negro radio, takes its annual look at 

recent developments, updates data on programing, coverage, economics <*•* /1UJI. 

Rlock Druy Co. rediscovers radio 

After three years away from major radio expenditures, Block now has one 
network and two regional radio shows in addition to a net TV show, is looking 
for more radio coverage for future 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Bernard Dwortzan _ 
49TH & MADISON 

P. S. 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

AGENCY PROFILE, T. Ralph Hart__ 

NEW TV STATIONS 

NEW SYNDICATED TV FILMS 

FILM NOTES 

ROUND-UP 

SPONSOR ASKS 

TV RESULTS 

RADO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS IN ADVERTISING... 
SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: F'aine Couper Glen' 

Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. J« 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, Ev » 

Konrad, Joan Baker 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Co<W 

(Western Manager), Maxine Cooper (Eas* 

Manager), Wallace Engelhardt ( Rogi »l 

Representative), John A. Kovchok ( Pro :■ 

tion Manager), Cynthia Soley, Ed Hig n 

Vice President - Business MgT.: Bernard M 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz ( 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Au-gusta Shearmar 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation 
Advertising Offices: 49th & Madison (40 E. 49th 
New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8- 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Grand Ave. Phone: SUi 
7-9863. West Coast Office: 6037 Sunset BouleTird 
Angeles. Telephone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing ( 
3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11, Sid. Subscriptions: Dj 
Stales $8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single < 
50c. Printed In U. S. A. Address all corretpon 
to 40 E. 49th St.. New York 17, N. Y. MUrray a ! 
2772. Copyright 1953. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 









rhings have changed 
n ARKANSAS, too! 



ynii still think of Arkansas in terms of 
otuitain cabins and kerosene lamps, take 
tother look! Arkansas has made almost mi 
■liovable progress in the last decade — 
•tail sales, for example, are 276.9ji ahead 

tin years ago* ! 

• 
here's a bright new star on the Arkansas radio 

irizon. too - - it's 50,000-watt KTHS in Little 

iock, now CBS, and the only Class 1-B Clear 

bannel station in the State. KTHS gives primary 

ivtime coverage of L,002,758 people more 

an 100.001) of whom depend on KTHS i>\i-\n- 

.vely for primary daytime service. Interference 

ee secondary daytime coverage exceeds ?>y± 

illion people, and includes practically all 

I Arkansas ! 

all the big KTHS facts, now. Write direct 
•• ask vour Branham man. 



Sales Management figures. 



0,000 Watts 




• • 



CBS Radio 



Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management As KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 

B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



KTHS 

BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 




*3 %> 



Birtipn 




PACIFIC COAST'S 

2nd 
LARGEST MARKET 

"OAKLAND 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BAY AREA" 

with KLX 

The Bay Area's Dominant and 

Only independent station 

broadcasting 

5000 WATTS 






No. 1 in News • Sports • Music 

THE TRIBUNE STATION 

TRIEUNE TOWER 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by 

Burns-Smith Company 

on Pacific Coast 

Duncan A. Scott & Company 



fiortrude \ymun. Pacific \ationat Advertising 
Agency. Seattle, bins air time for several perishable 
fruit accounts. "In a good crop year," Gertrude 
exjdains, "Washington Stale Fruit Commission 
and Washington State Apple Commission each 
use up to 50 radio stations." For both accounts, 
she works on a specified budget per market, and 
asks jor cooperation from stations in selecting ail 
time. "This system pays off jor us because of 
last minute changes in starting dates, especially 
with perishable fruits. Gertrude adds. 



Hurold S. fttVi'i'. Frederick-Clinton Co., New 
York, has been buying time for the 20 Adler Shoe 
Stores in the New York area for si.x years. "They'te 
been using radio for 15 years." Harold relates, 
"usually with the Herbert Adler-created slogan. 
Wow you can be taller than she is.'" Although this 
slogan applies only to Adler s Elevated Shoes — 
10' , of the over-all sales — it has been responsible 
tor 95 r /r of the stores' publicity. Through base- 
ball season 1953, Adler s is sponsoring Wann-I p 
Time, a half-hour sports show on Jf'MGW. 



Ruth Babich, Earle Ludgin & Co.. Chicago, 
blankets the nation with minute radio announce- 
ments for Best Foods' All Purpose Rit. a household 
tint and dye. Rit's radio budget has remained 
constant over the past three years. Ruth says, 
with additional allocations provided for T\ as 
Rit has added participations on 'he Garry M lore 
Show, CBS TV. and sjhiI T\ . "I'm constantly 
studying market conditions, both u>r product sales 
and daytime programing to decide upon the pro- 
portion of spot radio and T\ ." she adds. 



JIm»*i/ Ou'i/er, Kenyon & Eckhardt, Sew ) ork. has 

paved the win tor Crown Zippers' 15-l»eeA: radio 
debut this ill gust, with her months-long search for 
strong local radio personalities. The first of Spool 
Cotton Co.'s products to tc^t the air medium. 
Crown Zippers will go into 27 markets throughout 
the country with minute participations on local 
women's hows, "lie bought three participations 
a Week per market." \lai\ says. "And, wherever 
possible, lie chosen a local personality to tell the 
( ran n Zippei stnr\ to the women audiences." 



SPONSOR 



blue coali 




Boosted by wham 



KEEPS THE HOME FIRES 
BURNING IN ROCHESTER 



Two popular household "buy words" in 
Rochester are 'blue coal.' 

H. H. Babock & Company, one of blue 
coal's' largest and most successful distrib- 
utors, has consistently used radio for the 
past 20 years to maintain 'blue coal' as 
the leading home heating fuel. 



Radio has aided this hard-hitting sales 
and service organization not only to mar- 
ket this original trade-marked anthracite, 
but to combat competitive fuels. 

WHAM's flair for selling the home 
owner is the reason why radio is in the 
'blue coal' budget every year. 



LEI 



WHAM 



SELL FOR YOU 






The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y. Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



10 AUGUST 1953 



LOADED? 




jjSEZ^El 




Hooper 



"If you've got some- 
thing to sell, we can 
make a leetle room for 
you to reach the tenth 

largest agricultural 
market in the U. S 

a market larger than 
10 states combined. 



>K 



Js a^ at ^n g us a Jin9 \c? 



Let us show you why 
we're NUMBER ONE 
in Son Diego. 



KSDO 

1130 KC 5000 WATTS O 




Motives 
os Angeles 
San Fioncisco 
New York 



Co 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Advice to the video'lorn 

To those contemplating quitting a job in Green Ba> to seek one 
in Manhattan television, a first word of advice: Don't. To any- 
mature person, in particular, ready to chuck a career, amputate sen- 
iority, move east, or north, as the case may be, in the conviction 
that television is the magic moving stairway to fame and fortune, 
if only access can be gained to the proveibial ground floor: 'Taint. 



The "Stay Away from the Big City!" advice was valid in radio. 
It is doubly valid in the case of television which has not only the 
trained and famous alumni of radio to draw upon, but the numerous 
refugees from Hollywood now crowding Manhattan. Barbarian 
torture awaits the naive recruit from the sticks who attempts to 
crash New York big time television without 1 1 I important profes- 
sional credits or (2) enough pocket and rent money for at least a 
full vear of waiting around. 

* * # 

A panel of New York area TV directors recently were unanimous 
in their counsel to NYU's Summer workshop. Warren Jacober of 
NBC; Richard Blue of WOR; Vernon Diamond of CBS; Edward 
Cooperstein of WATV, Newark, and Alex Courtney of the Allen 
Christopher Co. united in the declaration. "New York is glutted." 

» # * 

It was glutted long before television. A favorite maxim of the 
one-time director of the program writing division at CBS Radio 
was this: "A network is a place a writer arrives at, not starts from." 
Young hopefuls never liked that pill. They dreamed of being hand- 
somely paid, installed in a nice corporation cubicle, with secretarial 
service and educated at network expense. Even in the soft war years, 
CBS was having none of that concept — not at modern union minima. 



Union conditions complicate the dreams of the hopeful. No doubt 
about it. If a boss can enjoy little or no wage differential between 
an "apprentice" and a "senior," then there is little motive for 
stringing along with beginners. Better to pay for, and get, full ex- 
perience. And this is made the more obvious in video just to the 
extent that television has greater opportunity for technical blunder- 
ing than did radio. 



"It's almost impossible to get a TV job in New York without 
experience," in the opinion of Warren Jacober. Fortunately, TV 
managements in smaller communities are not so choosy and it is 
to them that the gate-crashers must look. Quoting Ed Cooperstein: 
"Only in the small city television station, working on all kinds of 
programs, can the neophyte director acquire the balanced and varied 
experience which will help him move up." 

{Please turn to page 140) 



SPONSOR 



« 



** 



I £ 



«f 



i» 




[•] ur representatives carry more than brief- 



cases; they carry fresh, creative 



ideas . . . the priceless ingredient 



in competitive selling! 



This imaginative thinking has been 



the key to the growtn of Adam 



Young and its clients. 








cuztrb 



IMC* 




22 EAST 40th STREET • NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 

RADIO STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

NEW YORK • ST. LOUIS • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES 



10 AUGUST 1953 



__: 




10 



In your book 

Jim Timebuyer. . . 

it's not our new power that counts; it's 
the half million more potential viewers 

KPIX, San Francisco's pioneer television station, now telecasts with 100,000 watts of power, 
the absolute maximum for Channel 5. But the big thing is that those watts reach out to hundreds 
of thousands of people . . . people who are skyrocketing TV set sales in one-time fringe or non- 
reception areas. 

Thus, such major marketing centers as Sacramento, Modesto, Merced, Salinas, Monterey, Santa 
Cruz and even more distant points, as well as thousands of square miles of populous, prosperous 
town, village and rural areas now fall within the influence range of KPIX with the new power that 
beams and booms its CBS, Dumont and top-rated local shows into every area of concentrated 
population in North Central California. 
Your Katz man has details, maps, the whole story on this new bonus coverage from . . . 




W\M 



TELEVISION CHANNEL 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

. . . affiliated with CBS and DuMont Television Networks... represented by the Kati Agency 



5 



SPONSOR 



. 



New and renew 




1. 



\«*u? on Television \ettvorks 



SPONSOR 




AGENCY 




STATIONS 


4monc.in Tobacco Co 
Best Foods NY 


NY 


BBDO NY 

E.irl. Ludgin. NY 




ABC 
CBS 


TV 120 
TV 55 


Brown & Williamson L 

villi Kool Ci(tl 
Duffy Mott Co NY 
General Foods. NY 


3UI\ 


Ted Batos NY 

Young Rubic.im 
Young & Rubic.im 


NY 
NY 


CBS 

ABC 

NBC 


TV 65 

TV 27 
TV 100 


Conor.il Foods. Post 
Cereals Div NY 

Conor.il Motors Buick 
Motor Div Dctr 

Longin.s-Wittnauer 




Young & Rubic.im 
Kudner. NY 
Victor Bonn. It 


NY 


CBS 
NBC 
CBS 


TV 34 
TV 100 
TV 51 


Pepsi-Cola Co. NY 




Biow. NY 




ABC 


TV 63 


PCrC. Cinci 'Tide 1 




Benton tj Bowles. 


NY 


NBC 


TV 100 


Remington Rjnd Inc. 

Elcctr Shaver Div. NY 
Swilt & Co. Ch, 


Young Cr Rubicam. 
| Walter Thompso 


NY 
n NY 


CBS 
CBS 


TV 59 
TV 59 


Welch s Wine Div Qua 
Importers. NY 


hty 


Monroe Crccnthal 


NY 


Du Mont 6 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Danny Thomas T 9 9 30 pm . 29 Sop; 52 wk 


s 


Carry Moon Show W 1 45-2 pm 26 Aug 


52 


wks 




My Friend Irma: F 101030 pm ; 2 Oct; 52 


wks 


|«mil M 7 30 8 pm 28 Sep; 38 wks 




Bob Hope, every 4th T 8 9 pm 10 progs to 


run 


botw 20 Oct 53 3 |une 54 




Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers; Sat 1 1 30 


am - 


12 noon; 12 Sep; 52 wks 




Milton Borl. T 8-9 pm 29 Sep. 26 prods 




Chronoscope. M W. F 11-11:15 pm ; 17 Aug 


52 


wks 




Pepsi-Cola Playhouse; F 8 30-9 pm ; 2 Oct 


52 


wks 




A Letter to Loretta . Sun 10-10 30 pm 23 


Aug 


53 to 27 |une '54 




Pentagon Confidential; alt Th 10-10:30 pm 


10 


Sop 26 progs 




Carry Mooro Show; Th 1:30-45 pm seg 3 


Sep 


52 wks 




Dotty Mack Show: T 9-9:30 pm ; 7 Jul: 41 


wks 




Thr nniiii'.-i r stations l*re .(-'■ 



■ 



2. 



3 



Renewed on Television \etworks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 




STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Amcr Cig Gr Cig. NY 


SSCB, NY 




CBS 


TV 28 


Doug Edwards & News; T Th 7:30-45 pm 30 
|une; 52 wks 


Colgate-Palmolivc-Pcet 


William Esty. NY 




CBS 


TV 86 


Strike It Rich: W 9-9 30 pm 8 |ul: 52 wks 


|crscy City. N| 












Colgate-Palmolive- Pec t. 


William Esty. NY 




CBS 


TV 65 


Strike It Rich; M W. F 11 30-12 noon 29 |unc 


Icrscy City. N| 










52 wks 


Hotpoint. Inc. Chi 


Maxon. NY 




ABC 


TV 45 


Adventures of Oizic & Harriet; alt F 8-8 30 pm . 
25 Sep. 40 wks 


Philip Morns & Co. Ltd 


Biow. NY 




CBS 


TV 60 


Pentagon Confidential: alt Th 10-10:30 pm : 3 
Sep. 26 progs 


Ralston Purina Co. 


Gardner Adv St Louis 


ABC 


TV 32 


Space Patrol: Sat 11-11:30 am; 11 |ul: 52 wks 


St. Louis 












William Wrigley |r Co. 
Chi 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


Chi 


CBS 


TV 10 


Cenc Autry, T 8-8 30 pm : 14 Jul; 52 wks 



■ Advertising Ageneu Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Egbert A. Cabbie 
Terence Clyne 
lacquelinc M. Dodge 
Howard Flynn 
Edward Fontc 
Robert L. Foreman 
Todd B Franklin 
C. A. Honold 
Joseph R. Joyce 
Nicholas E Kecsely 
Edward Laing 
Burr E. Lcc 



Riverside Metal Co. Riverside NJ mkt res analyst 

Biow. NY. vp 

WDTV Pittsb. acct exec 

Radio-TV exec. Southern Cal 

Biow. NY. timebuyer 

BBDO. NY. vp chg TV 

Lcnncn & Newell. NY. vp chg mktg 

Ralph H. Jones Co. Cinci. acct exec 

Ruthrauff & Ryan. NY. exec stf 

Lcnnen & Newell. NY. dir radio & TV 

Westinghousc Elcc Corp. Pittsb. adv. sis prom exec 

ABC Chi. prodn Cr prog mgr 



Robert E Clarke & Assoc. Miami Fla sr acct exec 

Same, sr vp 

Adv Syndicate of Amcr Pittsb. acct exec 

Walter McCrecry Beverly Hills radio-TV dir 

Ruthrauff & Ryan. NY. timebuyer 

Same, chmn TV-radio plans bd 

Harry B Cohen NY vp chg mktg 

Rhoades & Davis. LA. vp. acct exec 

Same vp 

Same sr vp 

Ketchum. McLcod & Crove Pittsb. acct exec 

Schocnfcld Hubcr & Crcen Ltd Chi acct exec 



► 



In next i.«»iif>: ><»i«- and Renewed on Radio SetWOrlu, \a- 
lional Rroadrast Sales Executives. V-tr tgtMCJ IppoJItfmentj 






\ umbers niter names 


refer to A 


i Re- 


new category 




( \ru<. \nthnn 




Teri Segur 




Frnnk ) uhntr 




Mrholns Keest 




! ■ rence Clyne 


> 



10 AUGUST 1953 



11 



\ew and renew 



3. 




Advertising 


Agency Personnel Changes 








NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 






Arthur F. Marquette 


Sherman ti Marquette, Chi, pres 


Same, bd chmn 






Harry Mendelsohn 


Huber Hoge & Sons, NY, acct exec, radio dir 


Same, acct mgr 






John R. Mooney 


Tatham-Laird, Chi, asst media dir 


Nccdham, Louis & Brorby, Chi, asst media 


d. 




Cyrus Nathan 


Foote, Cone & Belding, NY, exec 


Biow, NY, vp 






M. V. Odquist 


Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY, exec 


Hilton & Riggio, NY, vp 






Dan Rubin 


Fedway Stores, NY, prom-mdsg stf 


Huber Hoge & Sons, NY, asst acct exec 






Burt Schultz 


Owens-Corning Fiberglas, Toledo, asst to publicity 
dir 


Benton & Bowles, NY, publicity, prom stf 






Teri Segur 


Masonitc Corp, Chi, asst sis prom mgr 


H. M. Cross, Chi, asst to pres 






John T. Southwell 


Hirsch & Rutledge, St Louis, vp chg radio & TV 


Smith, Hagcl & Snyder, NY, vp 






Robert L. Stevenson 


Adv Syndicate of Amer, Pittsb, vp 


Same, pres 






Jackson Taylor 


Lennen & Newell, NY, acct supvr 


Same, vp 




Louis E. Tilden 


Sherman Or Marquette, Chi, dir radio & TV dept 


Same, vp 




Larry Wherry 


Sherman & Marquette, Chi, vp, dir 


Same, pres 




Frank Yahner 


Young & Rubicam, NY, acct exec 


Biow, NY, supvr Joy acct 









f B Sponsor Personnel Changes 




NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Ralph R. B-ubaker 


Carnation Co, LA, gen sis mgr 


Same, vp chg sis & adv 


John T. Cauciel 


Crosley Div, Avco Mfg, Cinci, mgr new mkt devel 
for TV 


Same, mgr, TV sis section 


Henry Dorff 


Cruen Watch Co, Cinci, adv, publ rel dir 


Same, vp chg adv 


Thomas Emerson 


Eversharp, Inc, Chi, vp chg sis 


Same, vp, gen mgr 


Parker H. Ericksen 


Avco Mfg Corp, Cinci, dir sis, Crosley & Bendix 
appliances 


Same, vp 


Willis D. Evans 


Elgin Watch Co, Elgin, III, gen sis mgr 


Ronson Art Metal Works, Newark, NJ, vp 

mktg 


Stuart K. Hensley 


Toni Co, Chi, sis mgr 


Same, vp chg sis, adv, brand prom 


George T. Laboda 


Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, NY, hd adv res 


Same, radio-TV dir 


Wilmore H. Miller 


Toni Co, Chi, vp chg adv, brand prom 


Same, vp chg opers 


Henry J. Muesscn 


Piel Bros, Brooklyn, NY, vp, gen mgr 


Same, pres & chmn of bd 


Victoria Risk 


Universal Adv, Hywd, secy 


First Fed Svgs & Loan Assn, Hywd, dir adv, : 
rel 


William Sexton 


Creat Southern Life Ins, Houston, agency sec'y 


Same, dir adv, publ rel 


Herbert M. Stein 


Ronson Art Metal Works, Newark, NJ, asst gen 


Same, gen sis mgr 


W. J. Tormey 


LA Soap Co, LA, gen sis mgr 


Same, vp, dir sis & adv 


J. R. Wood 


Lever Bros, NY, brand mdsg mgr 


Same, asst field sis mgr, Lever Div 



5. 



Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



tscsi- 



v 



KCEB, Tulsa, new nat'l rep, Boiling 

KGU, Honolulu, new nat'l rep, NBC Spot Sales 

KHSL, Chico, Cal, to become CBS Radio affil eff 14 Aug 

(replaces KXOC) 
KVCV, Redding, Cal, to become CBS Radio affil eff 14 Aug 
WBAL, Baltimore, new nat'l rep, Henry I. Christal 
WDLP, Panama City, Fla, to become NBC Radio affil eff 

13 Aug 
WFMD, Frederick, Md, new nat'l rep, Robert Meeker 



WCN, WCN-TV, Chi, new nat'l rep, Hollingbery 
WMAR-TV, Baltimore, power increase to 100 kw in 

22 Jul) 
WOOD-TV, Crand Rapids, power increase from 28.5 to i 

kw; also switch from ch. 7 to 8; both changes eff ah 

1 Jan '54 
WTAL, Tallahassee, Fla, new nat'l rep, Robert Meeker 
WTCN, Mpls, new nat'l rep, John Blair 
WTRF, Wheeling, W Va, new nat'l rep, Hollingbery 
WPNF, Brevard, N. C, now NBC Radio affil 







Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 



Wilmore Miller 
G. T. Laboda 
S. K. Hensley 
Willis D. Evans 
J. R. Wood 



(4) 
(4) 
(4) 
(4) 
(4) 




Henry Dorff (4) 

Thomas Emerson ( 1 1 W 

Henry Muessen (4) 9 

H. M. Stein (4) 

John T. Caviezel (4) 



K» 



i^n 




12 



SPONSOR 



IOWA PEOPLE 
BY RADIO! 




Iowa Radio Users Spend More Than Twice 

As Much Time With Radio As With 

All Other Media Combined! 

Enter almost any Iowa home at almost any time 
of the day, and you will find at least one radio 
set in action — -keeping Mother company while she 
does her duties — bringing Dad the farm markets 
and news — changing the quiet house into a warm 
and friendly home. That's why the average Iowa 
family spends 10.53 hours per day with radio, as 
compared with 2.64 hours with television, 1.7 
hours with daily newspapers, 0.79 hours with 
weekh newspapers. 

Iowa people spend more time with WHO than 
with any other Iowa station! 







All the above figures are from the 1952 Iowa 
Radio-Television Audience Survey, by Dr. Forest 
L. Whan. This Survey is used regularly by lead- 
ing agencies and advertisers. It is worthy of youi 
deep study. Free copy on request. 



WIHI© 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 



Des Moines 



. 50,000 Watts 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC 

National Representatives 




10 AUGUST 1953 



13 




WHEN 
YOU 

CHOOSE ,*; 
CANADA'S 

FIRST 

STATION 



Rdail Sales up 36.9* 

/ M « I crcF R a f e8 ;, ; . 

up lesjjkaiil 
0<fse</ort /a/erf &f fimj**s. 

CFCF 

In Canada , All-Gnw^^. 




Bernard Dtvortzan 

Acting Advertising Manager 
Ronson Art Metal Works, Inc., Newark, N. J. 



The Ronson name is synonymous with quality in the cigarette 
lighter field and Bernie Dwortzan is primarily concerned with keep- 
ing that idea firmly ensconced in the public mind. 

In the U.S.. a little more than half of the company's ad budget 
is spent in air media. A year-'round spot TV announcement cam- 
paign in 65 markets and a seasonal barrage of radio in selected cities 
during gift seasons constitute the firm's domestic air advertising. 
In Canada, the firm is counting on a pair of long-pull radio programs 
to keep the sales trend pointed in the right direction — upward. I See 
sponsor's special Canadian section in this issue starting page 59. 1 

// Happened Here, a Ronson program since January 1952, is car- 
ried on 33 stations (CBC Dominion Network) which reach the 68 
principal trading areas of the country. Le Journal de Claude-Henri 
Grignon, a program aired continuously (except for summer hiatuses) 
since 1949. hits one out of every five French-Canadian radio homes 
via CKAC. Montreal. CHRC. Quebec, and CK.RS. Jonquiere. 

Coordinating with E. J. Watley, former advertising manager and 
now general manager of the Canadian subsidiary. Bernie Dwortzan 
is convinced that the continuation of these two programs is well 
worth the 50' i bite they take out of the Ronson Canadian ad budget. 
"We work on the theory that, being largely a gift item. Ronson 
lighters can. and should, be purchased for all appropriate gift 
occasions." Dwortzan told SPONSOR. ''That's why we feel that 
we can afford to hit the same audience over and over with our aired 
sales messages. But we keep adding to the audience because the 
ratings of the shows keep rising. // Happened Here, a quarter-hour 
dramatic program, now has ratings comparable with the best half- 
hour dramatic shows in the same area." 

Dwortzan. \\ atley. and Grey Advertising i which handles both do- 
mestic and Canadian advertising) work in a news peg whenever pos- 
sible to get the maximum value out of the show. In connection with 
(lane Week, for instance, the program was written by a blind man. 
performed b\ blind actors from a Braille script. 

Dwortzan. a Rutgers graduate, is married and has a two months' 
old son. W hy does he prefer tennis to golf? "1 go in for sports 
for relaxation." he says, "and it's a darn sight tougher to talk busi- 
ness on a tennis court than on a golf course." * * * 



14 



SPONSOR 




4&* 






40% GREATER 
COVERAGE 

1250,000 
TV HOMES 



We'll be towering over 'er 
all, come Fall. Our new 1,057 
foot tower means thousands 
more viewers . . . more sales 
. . . lower advertising costs 
per thousand on Michigan's 
foremost station with the top 
CBS and local shows. Get in 
on this great PLUS VALUE! 




More Than Ever 

It's True 

CHANNEL 2 
IS THE SPOT FOR YOU 



mz&rj 




Detroit 



Represented 

Nationally by 

THE KATZ AGENCY 



TOP CBS and DUMONT TELEVISION PROGRAMS 

STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY • National Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 1 18 E. 57th, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-7690 

10 AUGUST 1953 15 



when mime 

TV 

IN OMAHA 



Look to the 




KMTV Leads in 

1. COVERAGE 

With 100,000 Watts on Channel 
3, KMTV gives a better signal in 
an area containing 1 x /\ million 
people with a buying income of 
almost 2 billion. 

2. AUDIENCE 

Not only does KMTV lead with 
the TOP 5 ... it also carries 7 
of the TOP 10 weekly shows in 
Omaha (Pulse — May 17-23rd). 
KMTV has consistently been the 
"audience leader" in every Pulse 
survey. 



3. 



FACILITIES 



Now with 4,500 sq. ft. of new 
studio space, new control rooms, 
and new television equipment, 
KMTV has the finest facilities in 
the midwest. 

. LOW RATES PER 
"M" VIEWERS 

Your TV dollars go farther with 
KMTV's low rate structure plus 
the bonus coverage of 100,000 
watts. 




Kill TV™ 

OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 
CHANNEL 3 



Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY&CO., INC. 




FALL FACTS ISSUE 

There is only one word for it: "Ter- 
rific!" 

I am referring to sponsor's Fall 
Facts Issue. It is not only recom- 
mended reading for anyone in the ad- 
vertising business, but also important 
enough for constant rereading. 

Your staff has done an outstanding 
job and I can promise you that our 
copies of the Fall Facts Issue will be 
well-thumbed until the 1954 issue ar- 
rives. 

George J. Abrams 
Advertising Director 
Block Drug Co. 
Jersey City 



NETWORK COM PARAGRAPHS 

Let me throw a bouquet your way. 
I think your network Compara- 
graphs are really great. 

I use them continually — have them 
on my bulletin board for both radio 
and TV. Thanks for this useful tool. 
Louis L. Ergmann 
Radio & TV Director 
Robert W . Orr & Assoc. 
New York 



IMPARTIAL ON MEDIA 

May I take this opportunity to say 
how much a lot of us here enjoy and 
value your magazine? It is almost the 
only instance I know of where a spe- 
cialized trade paper is broadminded 
enough — while heavily supporting its 
own industry — to give a fair-minded 
bow to competitive industries. 

Your recent round-up of the pros 
and cons of the various basic types of 
media is a unique contribution to ad- 
vertising, in my opinion ("Media Ba- 
sics." ) Your present series of pro and 
con debates on the controversial Life 
study is also of outstanding interest 
("What sponsors should know about 
Life's new 4-media study," 29 June 
1953, page 27; "Is Life's media studv 
fair to radio and TV?" 13 July 1953. 
page 36). I have recommended them 



to a number of people. 

Sincerest congratulations on a lively 
and remarkably impartial handling of 
the highly competitive American media 
scene. You do full justice to broad- 
casting but you also recognize news- 
papers, outdoor, and magazines as fea- 
tures of the scenery. This is remark- 
able broadmindedness. 

R. F. Hussey 

V.P. & Media Director 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

Chicago 



SET MAINTENANCE 

An interesting situation has devel- 
oped here which might be of interest 
to you and to some of our fellow 
broadcasters. 

We have received a few complaints 
of late from listeners in our fringe area 
advising they are not receiving our sig- 
nal as well as in the past. Our chief 
engineer made a field strength test and 
convinced himself that the difficulty 
was not with our transmitting signal 
but with the condition of the actual 
sets being used. Since this did pose a 
problem, we wondered what to do 
about it and therefore called a meet- 
ing of dealers and repairmen in our 
area which resulted in the revelation of 
the following interesting facts. 

The majority of sets in use today are 
the small inexpensive table models or 
portables which wear out much faster 
than the better-made earlier and larger 
models. The dealers admitted they are 
not interested in accepting repair work 
on these small models since the set 
owner is reluctant to pay a repair bill 
of $10 or SI 5 when the set itself only 
cost roughly twice that amount. 

It is apparent the small inexpensive 
sets in production today are fast ap- 
proaching the category of small ap- 
pliances, such as electric toasters and 
irons which are thrown away on a 
junk heap at the first sign of a break- 
down and replaced by a newer and bet- 
ter model. Our chief hope in combat- 
ting this situation, therefore, seems to 
be an aggressive sales effort to help the 
dealers sell more replacement sets and 
to initiate a propaganda campaign of 
our own on the air to remind those 
(Please turn to page 21) 

SPONSOR welcomes letters from read- 
ers. Address all correspondence to 40 
E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 



16 



SPONSOR 



Now^BS 

ft 



TelevisionS Film Sales 



presents three of thfl greatest 



salesjstar^ in show business 
ready to ^ork exclusively for you 






in the markets of your choice . . . 



■JUUUUL 




details and availabili? 
on our stars and shows 
call <'■ 'k, Chicago, 

Los Angeles, San f^rai 
Atlanta or Dallas 



SWA 



Oastvufc,; 






-\ 



\ 







Ik 



Television's Pied Piper— with a successful format and 
.in established popularity from his daytime show — in 
a new film series, Art Linkletter and the Kids. When Art 
meets kids i^the general idea of these 39 quarter-hours) 
adults follow him by the millions. Questions and antics 
that are unrehearsed, uninhibited . . . and uproarious. 






«Lt-' 





• ttHttfltKifoeti*, 



Broadcasting's longest -running hit (today leading all 
other network shows in its radio version). During its 
run on the CBS Television Network, The Amos V Andy 
Show gathered more than 16,000,000 viewers a week... 
more than half the total viewing audience ! Fifty -two 
half -hours, 13 of them never before shown on television. 



ALSO AVAILABLE: 

The Gene Autry Show 
Files of Jeffrey Jones 
Hollywood on the Line 
The Range Rider 
Strange Adventure 
Annie Oakley 
Holiday in Paris 
World's Immortal Operas 
Cases of Eddie Drake 




49TH b MADISON 

[Continued from jni^e Id' 

listeners who >till own the large expen- 

-ise ami hetter-made console model-* to 
hase their radios checked lOl faults 
tubes and to treat tlieir good Beta U 
the) would their automohile from a 
-en ice standpoint. 

It occurs to me the ahose mas he 

nt \.hi interest to the local station op- 
erators. 

Arthi r J. Barm 

President 

11 1 1 >k. Poughkeepsie 



SIGN LANGUAGE 

We came up ssith a rather cute one 
today, in which I thought sou might 

he interested. This is almost a ness 
tcnitois on TV and. naturalls. sse 
can't go down the street a Mock ssith- 
out being asked when sse \sill he on 

the air: ml sse has [uipped the stall 

ssith the enclosed card which the) « airs 
in their coal breast pocket (see below I. 

Il -;i\(n the VOCal (holds and sse can 

gel dossil to business that much quicker. 

\\ II I l\M B. Ql SKI(I\ 

General Manager 
It \l'\ Cedai Rapids 

Qlad You Ashed! 

TARGET DATE 

SEPTEMBER 27 

(This Year) 
We Think We'll Make It! 



MEDIA STUDY 

I think sour marvelous studs "Basic 
Media Kvaluation" is one of the sen 
fines! things that has ever happened to 
us in radio. Please arrange to send 
this station four reprints of this en- 
tire series. 

Keep up the good work for us. 

Arch L. Madsen 
Manager 
KOVO 
Prove, Utah 



Our laboratory would appreciate in- 
formation concerning the manner in 
which the All-Media Evaluation Study 
series is available to us. We would 



particular!) like to know if these re- 
ports hase been or are to he collected 
and released undei a single <oser or 

if tiles aie t0 he asailahle U tingle i- 

sur reprints of the articles u thej ap- 
peared in SPONSOR. 

We ssoiild al-o like to hase inhuma- 
tion concerning the cost of the entire 

series "I reports and whether then- i- 
a cost reduction pet cop) if the mate 
i ial in ordered in quantit) . . . 

John <i. Mi sss 

Research issociate 

Washington Public Opinion 

Librai i 
I niversit) of Washington, Seattle 

li.. Media Stadj ~ill l>- reprinted la beea 

l..r.i. In 1954, < ..-1 an. I |. .,1.11. .11,.., .1.1.. -ill I.. 
........ ..... .-I lalrr on. Hr.t-r.atlnn. mrr- iffrpi ahlr 

no* . 



We aie collecting the series of arti- 
cles sou are running hut in some ssas 
hase missed out on the June 1. L953 
article. I'ail I. "How to choose media" 

i page 25 ' . 

Would it he possible for sou to send 
us this article or cop) of m'i>\mii< con- 
taining it? 

R. W . 1 MOM S-> 

I uf, tJi . Directoi 
Gunther Breu ing Co. 
Baltimore 

• Pari t ..f il..- in. pun media ■ertei U -illl avail- 
able. I In- complete fteriea will be pabllahed In 
I ....k form earl) in 1954. Reaertellmn are << - 
reptaMe now. vi r ii.- la SPONSOR, id E. l<» St., 

N.« fork 17. 



TV BASICS 

I am sers much taken ssith the sec- 
tion in sour Fall Facts Issue edition 

labeled "T\ Basics." 

I would like each one of our account 
executives to hase a reprint of this sec- 
tion. Could sou. therefore, -end me 

10 reprints, and if there is an) cost, 

please hill me accordingly. 
Congratulation-. 

H. Lyman Ham 
P resident 

flart-Conway Co.. Inc. 
Rochester 

• Reprint, of ihr 1<>33 "TV Ra.ir." arr no- 
atailaMr. I ».*t i- .">l)r each for KM) resiea or 
o. #r. 



TV MARKETS 

Your Jul\ L3 Fall Facts Issue i- 

packed full of powerful material and 
is a real sers ice to both buyers and 
sellers of radio and television. For this 
reason we regret that we must register 
one protest. 

i Please turn to page 1 1- I 



WKJF-TV 

s^ luinnel 

53 

PA PITT'S TV PREFERENCE 




"NOW ON THE AIR" 

WITH OUTSTANDING 

NBC PROGRAMS 

ANDTHE BEST IN LOCAL 

ENTERTAINMENT 



YES 



WKJF-TV 

Takes Pittsburgh's 

2' 4 Billion 

MARKET 

OUT OF SINGLE STATION 



Phone Wire or Write 
for Complete Data 



•EFFECTIVE SEPT 1 



^VEED TELEVISION 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



10 AUGUST 1953 



21 




H^^^a^H 




RCA Deliveries! 



In a concerted effort to 

Jeet the demands of "Post-Freeze" Tele- 
<ion, RCA is PRODUCING and DE- 
WERING TV Station Equipment at an 
precedented schedule. 

RCA's long-range planning— and abil- 
to produce UHF and VHF transmit- 
s and high-power amplifiers — is 
tting TV Stations "on-air" at rates 
equalled in Television history. 

These are some of the factors that 



combine to make this production record 
. . . and assure YOU earliest transmitter 
delivery possible. 

RCA Engineering and Planning is 

capable of anticipating station equip- 
ment requirements years ahead (take 
UHF development, for instance). RCA 
Production Engineering plans facilities 
and meets TV Station needs . . . WAY 
IN ADVANCE 

RCA's Production "know-how" is 



based on more than 20 years of pioneer- 
ing in TV transmitter design, construc- 
tion, and operation. (RCA engineers de- 
signed and produced the world's first 
commercial VHF transmitter — the 
world's first commercial UHF transmit- 
ter — and the world's first commercial 
VHF high-power TV amplifier!) 

Make sure you get vour TV transmitter 
promptly. Go RCA! Order through your 
RCA Broadcast Sales Representative. 





RA DiO CORPORA TION of A ME RICA 



ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT 



CAMDEN. N.J. 







5000 WATTS 

nniiiHiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

KDON 



POWER 

PROGRAMS 

PERSONALITIES 




_ MORGAN HU. 

SANTA CRUZ* 7 j • Gmio* 

^■"^^H .WATSOHVIIU 

' y*' .houjSIB 
PA1M BEACH T 

actrovilu 

-SA1IH 




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X 



A 100,000 



DON ^ LOYAL 

PANCHO SPANISH 

i 

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illinium 



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► ! JOHN 



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SUCCESSFUL 

PROVEN 

MERCHANDISING 




Subject: 



IMetv developments on SPONSOR stories 

"Is this TV/radio's programing pat- 
tern of the future?" 

6 October 1952, page 29 

More shows use same format on radio 
and TV for cheap total coverage 

One of the most recent converts to the practice of using the same 
program on both radio and TV is the Coca-Cola Co. Like many other 
sponsors who've turned to this approach, Coca-Cola was faced with 
the problem of satisfying 1,100 franchised bottlers all over the coun- 
try — and inadequate TV penetration to achieve its aim with that 
medium alone. 

Coca-Cola, and the D'Arcy agency, found the solution through the 
use of the Eddie Fisher Show on both radio and TV. via an opera- 
tion similar to that developed by the Compton Agency for P&G's 
Guiding Light last summer. The TV program is simply taped I with 
minor script insertions and substitutions) and played on NBC Radio 
and on MBS on different nights of the week. Result: Coca-Cola is 
able to bring the 15-minute musical variety show to every market 
where the firm has bottlers via 84 NBC TV stations, 202 NBC Radio 
stations, and 256 MBS stations, with the cost of the radio version 
peeled down to the barest minimum. 

Here's how the system worked for a typical week: the Friday, 24 
July, NBC TV show was heard over NBC Radio stations on Friday, 
31 July; on Thursday, 6 August, it was aired on MBS stations. In 
this manner, Coca-Cola achieves maximum coverage with least possi- 
ble audience duplication. 

Other sponsors who've taped their network TV shows and supple- 
ment TV coverage with net radio include: Colgate-Palmolive's Strike 
It Rich, CBS TV and NBC Radio; Kellogg. Lever Bros.. Green Giant, 
and Pillsbury with Linkletter House Party on CBS TV and CBS 
Radio; Philip Morris' My Little Margie on CBS TV and CBS Radio; 
Colgate-Palmolive's Mr. and Mrs. North on CBS TV and CBS Radio: 
Admiral Corp.'s Life Is Worth Living on Du Mont and MBS. Vari- 
ations on the same system, with film TV and live radio, or the 
same series on radio and TV with different scripts, would substan- 
tially increase this growing list to indicate that SPONSOR forecast 
another trend in its analysis of the Guiding Light pattern last year. 

f 

, "Bayuk fights back v»ith 90 r c tele- 
\i-ion budget" 

15 June 1953, page 30 

Admiration Cigars takes to radio to 
sell popular-priced line to younger 
I smokers 

For 30 years a print-media-only advertiser. E. Regensburg & Co. 
radically changed its advertising policy this summer when the cigar 
manufacturer I through Rose-Martin Advertising Agency I signed a 
52-week contract to sponsor Kenneth Banghart's Eleventh Hour 
News, WNBC, 11:00-11:15 p.m., starting 31 August. Admiration 
Cigars and Dolcin Corp. will share the program on alternating, rotat- 
ing sponsorship, with each client getting seven programs in ever\ 
two-week cycle. Says I. W. Rose Sr., president of Admiration's 
agencv: "This arrangement makes it possible for us to reach the 
maximum audience without duplication." 

Kenneth Banghart will deliver the commercials, which will be di- 
vided between Regensburg's established 25^-each cigars and the more 
recently introduced popular priced brands. 

Some two years ago E. Regensburg & Sons, makers of Admiration 
Cigars, enlarged their line of exclusively priced 25£ cigars, and at 
the same time began producing a popular-priced panatella-shaped 
cigar to retail at two for 15tf. This move was representative of the 
cigar industry's effort to appeal to younger men. • * * 




24 



SPONSOR 



L. 



LUCIFER WINK 



i» 



ihe contacting 



link 



Willi Spilt) I I 



I Iplifties (that's, lnr) 







vi 



«c- 



f>sd 



X 



r^ 



Though, frankly, hU copy 
exceedingly ilopp) 



■■i-. 



kU 



~*%\ 






Nov why do they suffer this doddering duffer' 



/ 



/ 



S* 



V 



7C 



~\ 



And the plans he submit* always stink. 



/ 



ry ... 

7 He swung a real nil t > time-buy for I pliftie — 
Bought KOWH— TOP STATION ALL DAY!" 

AVERAGE HOOPER 

35.7% 



//Y 



•o 



savs T wink's boss. 



. Tt's this way . . . jX *-. \ 



<d) 



•r, 



- J/\ 



i 



iftoral 



EVERY GOOD TIME-BUYER 
KNOWS KOWH HAS THE: 

• Largest total audience of 
anj Omaha station, 8 \.M. 
lo 6 P.M. Monday thru Sat- 
urday! (Hooper. Oct.. 1951. 
thru May, 1953.) 

• Largest share of audience. 
of any independent station 
in America! (May, 1953.) 



/i 



\ 



\ 



^3, 



I 



O M A 

"America's Most Listened-to Independent Station" 



General Manager, Todd Storz; Repreienfed Nationally By The ROLLING CO. 



Sla. "A" 



Sto "B' 



Sta 




40 Million Bushels of Wheat 
going to Market in 

Rait/ Bttnyatr 
fend/ 



Experts estimate that — this fall — at least 40 million 
bushels of hard Spring Wheat will bulge the 
elevators and terminal storage facilities of 
Paul Bunyan Land. That's millions in cash and 
plenty of feed for the poultry and livestock! 
Marketing your product to this rich, 
responsive farm and city populace is made 
so much easier and economical by WCCO! 
In the 1 09 counties of Paul Bunyan land — 
82 hear WCCO radio more than any 
other station: and in the 59 counties around 
the metropolitan centers WCCO-TV 
can deliver a picture message to 52 
percent of the 750,000 homes. 




WCCO is the one-station buy 
in a land of giant earnings! 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

WCCO 

CBS 

RADIO — 50,000 Watts— 830 K.C. 
TELEVISION— 100,000 Watts— Ch. 4 







26 



SPONSOR 



10 AUGUST 1953 





i! mm 



This spet'iul report is designed 
to help you evaluate nighttime, 
includes vuse history. Unpad picture 




■ 




Case history: Morton Salt 
finds nighttime is best buu 

"/// some respects, nighttime radio 
is more effective than it was prior 
to IV." That's quote from radio- 
II director of Morton Salt Co. 
agency. Company finds listener 
read ion is increasing, especially 
in old established Tl markets. It 
uses transcribed show in 65 mar- 
kets on spot basis. Says Morton 
Salt Co. agencyman- ". . . on a 
dollar for dollar basis nighttime 
radio is still a very effective media 
buy." ) ou'll find full fads on 
Morton approach, objectives in 
ease history article that follows. 

Xrticlr starts p«r;<> 28 




Hruad picture: /Attest facts 
refute the popular fancies 

\lain a<l men are discussing night- 
time radio these days — hut leu do 
so on the basis oj accurate, up-to- 
date information. Result: I crop 
oj fallacies about nighttime radio 
has nou become widely accepted 

as "the real inside ilope" on this 
air medium. In a special report. 
SPONSOR provides a round-up of 
the latest research data about night- 
time radio's size, s<ope. audiences, 
advertisers, and competitive media 
position and uses this report to 
relate a dozen of the nmst Lilib and 
generalized views on nighttime. 

Xrtivlt' starts ;)«?;«• 30 



10 AUGUST 1953 



21 



NIGHTTIME RADIO REPORT 




Impact increasing, company M 



J~M few weeks ago a letter arrived for 
Account Executive J. F. I Ted) Mc- 
Loney at the offices of CBS Radio 
Spot Sales in Chicago. It was from 
Robert R. Long, radio-TV director at 
the Klau-Van Pietersom-Dunlap Asso- 
ciates agenc) in Milwaukee, and when 
Ted McLoney had finished reading it 
he whooped with joy. Reason: The 
letter documented points ahout night- 
time radio McLoney. like other radio 
salesmen, was finding it rough to make 
in meetings with TV -conscious clients. 
The letter referred to the four-\ear 
nighttime spot radio histor\ of the 



Morton Salt Co. and this is how it 
went along: 

"Dear Ted: 

"Many times in the past we have dis- 
cussed the effectiveness of daytime vs. 
nighttime radio as well as radio vs. 
other media. Now that we have had 
approximately four years with radio 
on the Morton Salt account, I will at- 
tempt to summarize our experiences. 

"In some respects, nighttime radio 
is more effective than it v\as prior to 
TV. You have watched market-by- 
market ratings over a period of time 
just as closeh as I ha\e. In some mar- 



kets, TV has definitely made consider- 
ahle inroads on radio listening. In 
these particular markets rate adjust- 
ments were made to compensate for 
this drop. The point that you and I 
must bear in mind is that we had onh 
metropolitan ratings to go by. From 
a mail standpoint, rural radio listening 
has been steadily on the increase. The 
same would hold true for metropolitan 
listening — in spite of the fact that 
some ratings would indicate the oppo- 
site. Morton never used an offer on 
the air that would be considered par- 
ticularly stron». The offers made \ear 



Mor*on varies commercials with regions. Around map below are: W. account exec; Gordon Hayes, Western sales mgr., CBS Radio Spot 

K. Yates, mgr. agricultural products dept., Morton Salt; Ted McLoney, Sales; Bob Long, radio-TV director, Klau-Van Pietersom-Dunlap Assoc. 




to nighttime spot radio 

iciallv in €»l<l«»r l\ markets. It.itlio Ims spurred sales iiains 



to yeai were almost identical in nature. 
In -|»it<- of this, mail responses have 
tteadil) increased. 

"Old established T\ markets show 
the greatesl gain in increased radio 
listener reaction. This was especiall) 
true i»f multiple T\ station markets. 

"I think it could be safelj stated thai 
on a dollar-for-dollar basis nighttime 
radio is -till a **er) effective media 
bu\. Considei foi .1 moment the fact 
that we were on daytime in certain 
markets prior to this season. \\ hen we 
changed these market- ovei to Class 
"' V time, ratings as well as mail more 
than doubled even though rate- did 
not. 

" \- far a- -ale- elleeti\ ene— i- i on- 

cerned, your radio cost-per-1,000 i- 
low. Radio offers an opportunit) to 

j)Ut aero— .1 -ales message with all the 
warmth that a spoken medium has to 
offer at a cost-per-1,000 just as low if 
not lower than that of am other known 
medium. It is up to the individual 
company and/or agency to capitalize 
on radio's potentialities. ^ ou people 
offer the audience if the agenc) or 
client misses the boat, it is their fault 
entire!) ." 

Morton Salt Co. uses a transcribed 
half-hour program called / isitin' Time 
on 65 stations I see box at right listing 
call letters), mainly in Class "A" time 
between 7:30 and 9:(K) p.m. Stations 
used include two regional networks, 
the Columbia Pacific Network and a 
hookup of CBS New England stations. 
Objective of the once-a-week program 
i- to sell three different product-, two 
of them farm, one consumer: 1 1 1 Mor- 
tons Free Choice Trace Mineralized 
^alt: l2l Morton's home meat curing 
line (Tender-Quick, Sugar Cure. Sau- 
Seasoning); (3) Morton's table 
salt. The latter product i- the respon- 
sibilit) of the Needham. Louis & Bror- 
bj agenc) . Chicago. 

(Please turn to page 116) 



case history 




Morton Salt Co. $ transcribed variety show, "Visitin' Time, ' includes band, vocalists. Audi- 
ence which is seeking entertainment is more responsive to commercial pitch, firm feels 



These (»'.> stations comprise Morion** spot rutllo list 



STATE 


CITY 


STATION 


STATE 


CITY 


STATION 


Alabama 


Birmingham 


WAPI 


Nebraska 


Omaha 


KFAB 




Birmingham 


WAFM 


New Hampshire 


Concord 


WKXL 


Arkansas 


Little Rock 


KARK 




Manchester 


WFEA 




Chico 


KXOC 


New Jersey 


Paterson 


WPAT 


California 


Los Angeles 
Monterey 
Palm Springs 


KNX 

KMBY 

KCMJ 


New York 


Rochester 
Schenectady 


WHAM 
WGY 




Sacramento 


KROY 


North Carolina 


Charlotte 


WBT 




San Francisco 
Stockton 


KCBS 
KGDM 


North Dakota 


Bismarck 


KFYR 


Colorado 


Colorado Sprinc 


s KVOR 


Ohio 


Cincinnati 


WLW 




Denver 


KLZ 


Oklahoma 


Oklahoma City 


WKY 


Connecticut 


Hartford 


WDRC 




Medford 


KYJC 


Georgia 


Atlanta 


WSB 


Oregon 


North Bend 
Portland 


KFIR 
KOIN 




Boise 


KDSH 




Klamath Falls 


KFLW 


Idaho 


Twin Falls 


KEEP 




Roseburg 


KRNR 




Pocatello 


KJRL 


Pennsylvania 


Harrisburg 


WHP 




Idaho Falls 


KID 


South Carolina 


Columbia 


WIS 


Illinois 


Chicago 


WBBM 


South Dakota 


Yankton 


WNAX 


Iowa 


Des Moines 


WHO 


Tennessee 


Memphis 


WMC 


Kansas 


Concordia 


KFRM 




Nashville 


WSM 


Kentucky 


Louisville 


WHAS 




Amarillo 


KGNC 


Louisiana 


New Orleans 


WWL 


Teias 


Fort Worth 


WBAP 


Maine 


Bangor 


WGUY 




San Antonio 


WOAI 




Portland 


WGAN 


Utah 


Cedar City 


KSUB 


Massachusetts 


Boston 


WEEI 




Salt Lake City 


KSL 


Michigan 


Flint 


WFDF 


Virginia 


Richmond 


WRVA 




Kalamazoo 


WKZO 


Vermont 


Burlington 


WCAX 


Minnesota 


Minneapolis 


wcco 




Kennewick 


KWIE 


Missouri 


Kansas City 


KMBC 


Washington 


Spokane 


KXLY 




St. Louis 


KMOX 




Yakima 


KIMA 


Montana 


Butte 


KBOW 


West Virginia 


Wheeling 


WWVA 




Great Falls 


KFBB 


Wisconsin 


Madison 


WKOW 



10 AUGUST 1953 



29 



fallacy 



fallacy 
fallacy 



fallacy 



fallacy 



fallacy 



'AS TV GR 



IGHTTI 



MlUi^EtMMI 



YS DROPS' 



The pace-setters of nighttime radio, the "Top 10" of Nielsen Radio Index, are steadily 
creasing their audiences. In April 1952, average number of homes reached by nightti 
"Top 10" was 4,139,000; in April 1953, it was 4,498,000— up 8.7%. 



Not so. Networks report fall sales levels ranging from a break-even-with-'52 to a 15C 
increase in nighttime radio business. Reps report an average gain of some 12.5% in nigl 
time spot. Big names, from Chesterfield to General Foods, are in. 







Far from being a negligible factor, TV areas contributed 51% of the listening to nigl 
time network commercial shows last winter, studies show. In "Videotown," for instan 
nighttime radio made 60% listening gain between totals for '51 and '52. 



* ] '4MltUli 




Some 11% of TV homes tune to TV and radio simultaneously at night, study by For 
Whan in New England (then 49.5% TV-saturated) showed in 1952. That's because' 
homes are more likely to be multiple-set homes, conduct radio dialing in other rooms. 









nwffriViiifrihi 

In the New York area, where millions of viewers have a choice of seven TV channels a 
30 radio stations, radio outlets with big-name shows of pre-TV type got more than h 
(52.6%) of nighttime radio listening in TV homes, recent Pulse study shows. 

Checkup by one radio network shows the following: Magazine cost-per- 1,000 circulat 
has risen 32.4% since 1946; newspaper supplements, up 22.3%. Nighttime radio cos 
vs.-gross-circulation of all networks has had average drop of 3.8% since '46. 






NIGHTTIME RADIO REPORT 



12 fallacies aim 



J^l ighttime radio used to be the dar- 
ling of air advertisers. 

Nobody paid much mind to things 
like details of cost and audience size. 
When renewal time came for a night- 
time radio show with a $20,000-weekly 
talent price tag. the option was usualK 
picked up by the sponsor with the 
grace of Sir Walter Raleigh handing 



a fan back to the first Elizabeth. 

In the last couple of years, however, 
the romance has cooled. The new 
light-o'-love for air advertisers is night- 
time TV. 

Toda\ when admen discuss night- 
time radio \ ou'll often hear them use 
the glibl) disparaging generalization- 
enumerated on these pages (see ll2 



points listed in the color panel above I . 
But up-to-date research data from a 
\arietv of sources shows these general- 
izations in their true light as fallacies. 
sponsor has collected what are prob- 
ably the "Top Dozen" fallacious cliches 
about nighttime radio, and has here 
matched them up with the latest facts 
and figures on nighttime radio. 



30 



SPONSOR 



This belief, popular with spot radio buyers, is off-set by a Pulse study in 18 big 
radio-TV markets for the Katz rep firm. There are more male listencrs-per-1 ,000 
homes during the 7:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. period than during any morning, daytime slot 



Same Pulse study shows that women listeners are indeed plentiful during the late 
morning and afternoon, but during the prime evening hours about 80°o or more of 
the same women are also available. The figures for weekends are even bettei. 



In terms of advertiser interest, perhaps. But not in terms of fact. Nielsen data 
for a leading radio network shows that last season's nighttime levels, October-April, 
were 152°o higher than daytime in terms of homes, 229°o higher in listeners. 



Not any longer. A sizable number of stations in all major markets have changed to 
the "single-rate " < day rates equal to night > basis. At the same time, daytime rates 
and program costs are inching up. Costs at night can even be less than daytime now. 



This is often true on a per-broadcast basis. But, over a 12- week period, radio shows 
can multiply their ratings four or five times for a big cumulative figure, due to 
radio's huge base and large turnover. Comparable TV growth is smaller 



OF THE T 






Not so. Radio networks and stations now offer extensive merchandising and promotion- 
al follow-throughs on nighttime campaigns that are virtually ruled out by high costs of 
operation in evening TV. Radio impact is thus boosted, competition made stronger. 



fill lime radio 



Latest research on nighttime* radio 
herein rebuts «i dozen pet «id theories 



1. "" Is II expands, radio listening 
at nielli in the I .>'. inevitably drops." 

New video outlets are popping up 
like mushrooms all over tin* I ,S. land- 
scape. The toj) nighttime video net- 
work shows have been increasing their 
audiences. I / Lore Lucy, tor instance, 
added 509? to the size of its homes- 
reached figure between \pril 1952 and 



Vpril 1953.) rherefore it's no! hard 
tn understand wh) a large numbei of 
agencies and clients an- convinced 
nighttime radio is in it- final do line. 
I A 's gains, main admen feel, are 
being made at nighttime radio - ex- 
pense. Nut necessarily, research fig- 
ures would seem to show. 
Take the case oi radio's "Top 10" 



shows in the evening-once-weekl] i 
gory. In the period 20-20 April 1952, 

rding tn Nielsen Radio Index fig. 

the average number "f homes 
mm. bed bj the "Top In" was 1.1 19,000. 
\ year later. \[{| figures for the period 
L9-25 \pnl L953 showed a "Top L0" 
bomes-reached average of 1,498,000 
PL use turn to page l 1 



10 AUGUST 1953 



31 



Q 



What TV commercial 
do you like best? 



A. 



TIDE 



"Best liked of all TV commercials 
in Ohio State study 





VIEWERS LIKED "INTEGRATED" COMMERCIAL FOR TIDE. ABOVE, RESEARCHER BETTY KNOWLES CONDUCTING AN INTERVIEW 

What do viewers think of pur 
Vi commercial? : 



they like your show, they are 
more apt to like the commercial 



by Dr. Kenneth Dameron 

For the past four years Dr. Dameron 
has received a grant-in-aid from Ohio 
State University, plus some additional 
support from stations, to conduct a 
series of studies of television. Previ- 
ous studies include: the television com- 
mercial, the Columbus market, the 
various TV research techniques. hi 
charge of field work and general di- 
rection of this particular study was 
Thomas A. Torrance, M.B.A., graduate 
assistant. Dr. Dameron s current study. 
now underway, deals with use of tele- 
vision by local advertisers. 



32 



J here is mounting evidence to indi- 
cate strongly that audience-approved 
commercials do the most effective job 
of selling. For that reason it is of vital 
importance to the advertiser to know 
just how the televiewing audience re- 
acts to his commercials and to tho«e 
of his competitors, as well. 

The advertiser is interested in the 



r e s e a r c 



leasons why television commercials are 
liked — and why they are disliked. He 
wants to know how the audience re- 
gards television advertising in general. 
He is interested in knowing whether 
viewers actually watch television com- 
mercials or whether they tend to turn 
their attention awav when commercials 
are flashed upon the screen. He may 
want to find out whether viewers con- 
sider television commercials more or 
less informative than advertising in 
other media, or whether certain com- 
mercials are irritating to viewers. 

SPONSOR 












Mlii/ coiiiiiicrcidls 11 it Iflcmfj \\ hen 

uked i" recall the television coi er> 

i ia] tli<\ hkr best, I I.T(.' , ol the 
who responded to the question named 
the I ill'' detergent commeri ial <>n the 

Mi-il Skelton pi ogram. Inirty-tw 

').<)]', rated the Muriel cigai — § .* ■ t 
commercial as "favorite. Others fre- 
quently named wen-: Philip Morris 
cigarette, / l.<n<- Lucy program, with 
I*) first-place votes; Old Gold i igarette 
led M.nk's Original Imateui ll<>iu. 
17 votes; Pabsl beer, Boxing, 13 votes; 
and Pillsbur) cake mix, Irthui God- 
frey and His Friends, \'2 votes (see 
table I i . 

I Mil I I 
l IVOR] ii COMM1 R< l \l S 

( ommeri Ial Numbi i Pcrci ntage' 

I i.lr {Red Skelton) - 11.71 

Muriel 9.91? 

Philip Mum. 

./ Low f.iicj 19 

OKI Gold Original 

Imateui Hout IT 

Pabsl B i '• 1.039! 

Pillsburj ' akc mix Irlhur 

<.-.,//ro a«.i Hu I riends) 

• Percentages based i>n i in 123 respondents who 
named a "lavorite" commercial. 

In analyzing the six top-ranking 
commercials as to physical t \ [ >< ■ and 
form, the researcher can note some 
interesting comparisons: 

Physical classifications ol "Favorite' Commei 

Met hanieal 
Commetcml classifications Insertion form 

I ide Demonstration, Incorporated 

narration 
Muriel Animation' Spot 

Philip Morris Demonstration, Incorporated 

narration 
Old Gold Demonstration, Integrated 

narration 
Pabst Animation* Direct break 

Pillsbur\ Demonstration, Incorporated 

narration 

• . I'm 

The popularity of the "demonstra- 
tion and narration"' and "animation" 
U pes of physical presentation can be 
noted. These two types are more fre- 
quenth used in program commercials 
than is an) other type. \ panel survej 
by sponsor— reported in the 23 April 
l').il issue revealed that lour of the 



ATTITUDES TOWARD COMMERCIALS IN GENERAL BY INCOME 



A II I I U III 



No at ntuonil.-ti l.» incofflr gr.up 

A II l. D Total 



All advertising should bt 
mm til from telex i sion 



:t i 2 

(3.90% r 



i ..■ o) i ertaii 

hi products should be removed 
inmi television 



II 



2 I .-».» 

( 13.25% ) 



'The television industry undet its 

i ode should i ontrol 

more closet} what is said and 

slum n over television 

com i ■ 



ir, 2:1 21 93 

(23.25%) 



"The government should 
control more closely what ii 
siinl and shown over tele- 
1 1 Mini i ommert ials 



« U 2 / 

,5.25% ) 



"Telet sion adi ertising 1 1 
0. K . as it is letn >■ it alt 



3 J .lit r,U 7« E93 

( 19.50% > 



Otlin ay 



i id u »7 

{B.75.% > 



SOURCE Ohio £ 



. 



t < > ] > -i\ spot commercials were ani- 
mated; the other i\\" were of the 
demonstration and narration type. 

\ iewers apparent!) have a high re- 
gard for the "incorporated' form of 
commercial insertion; three of the lop 
five program commercials are of this 
type. 

Forty-two percent of those naming 

Tide as their lavorite said they liked it 
best because of its "incorporated" form 
of presentation: 34.295 said it is "cute. 



*• today's top commercials: -p<>t rv," sponsor., 
23 \pnl 1951, p 



i lever, entertaining : 18. 1' - liked it 
because "I Red Skelton himsell (as an- 
nouni ei I ; and 10.5 ( - stated it is 
"unique, different." I Pen entages ma\ 
not add precisely in Inn', foi -"me of 
the respondents mentioned "other" 
reasons, and. some named more than 
one reason. I 

The Muriel commercial is liked best, 
because it is "cute, clever, entertain- 
ing" (81.3$ I and because of it- 
"musical approach" (21.995 I; '> V . 
stated it i* "unique, different. 
(Please turn to j>age 1 22 » 



4 m *~ 1 fm- 

•.2- ■ ^-* 


4m Kenneth Dameron, f'h.l).. Ohio State I niversity 

Dr. Dameron is in charge of advertising studies at the university. 

Fifteen years ago he inaugurated a unit ersity -sponsored advertising 
conference which has since become a model for main other col- 
leges. 11 ell knou n in the field of advertising and marketing research. 
Dr. Dameron has directed the expenditure of over a million dollars 
for various studies. He has served as president of the Columbus 
[dvertising (dub. v. p. of the Advertising Federation of America, 
held other imjtortant posts in his field. 



10 AUCUST 1953 



33 



. 



10 basic findings of new llimlal 




Mis leven radio stations repped by the 
Henry I. Christal Co. have just spent 
$50,000 to $75,000 on a major study 
to determine the place of radio in the 
daily life of the American people. 

The 11 stations are affiliated with 
-i\ newspapers and six TV stations 
and have two TV applications filed 
among them. 

The Alfred Politz Research organi- 
zation interviewed 4,985 people in 41 
T\ areas last December and January 
to find the facts on radios daily use 
in and out of the home. 

Basic conclusion drawn by the 
Christal stations from the Politz re- 
port: Radio is "indispensable" to the 
American people and therefore "im- 
portant" to the American advertiser. 

Most significant point uncovered by 
the study, according to Alfred Politz, 
was "radios ability to 'leak through 
the crevices' of peoples daily sched- 
ules. 

This then was the objective of the 
study: to find out the "who," "where," 
"how," and "why" of radio listening, 



Major study based on 5,000 interviews in TV areas 
reveals radio is indispensable to U.S. public 



as well as "how many" listen. 

It was sponsored b\ these 11 sta- 
tions: WBAL, Baltimore; WBEN, 
Buffalo: WGAR. Cleveland; WJR, De- 
troit; WTIC, Hartford; WDAF. Kan- 
sas City; KFI, Los Angeles; WH AS. 
Louisville; WTMJ, Milwaukee; WGY, 
Schenectady, and WTAG, Worcester. 

Nevertheless it is not a competitive 
study comparing one station or one 
medium with another. As a result it 
establishes a new precedent in radio 
research. Advertisers will be quick to 
draw these conclusions from the find- 
ings, based for virtually the first time 
on extensive statistical data : 

1. Radio reaches nearh even body 
despite TV. I Study was made in tele- 
vision areas only.) 

2. Radio has an audience every 
waking hour of the day. 

3. Radio can and does follow peo- 
ple wherever they go — in and out of 
doors. 

4. Radio allows people to use it 
v\ hile doing something else. (One- 
fourth of the adults in TV areas con- 



l /lis article substitutes 
for Medio. Study fart 8 

This new Christal-Politz study is 
the first major cooperative effort 
by a group oj stations to uncover 
the facts about radio listening 
jor the benefit of the entire in- 
dustry rather than to sene the 
individual interests of a few. 
Since nothing like this has been 
done before, sponsoh felt it im- 
portant enough to substitute it 
for Part 8 of our All-Media Evalu- 
ation study, the concluding por- 
tion of "Beware, of these media 
research pitfalls" scheduled for 
this issue. The media series will 
resume in the 24 August 1953 issue. 



sider this to be radio's greatest advan- 
tage over other media. I 

The basic findings, on which the 
above points are based, are listed on 
the page at right and developed later 
in this article. They were uncovered 
through 4.985 personal interviews in 



AN AUDIENCE IN MOTION 



I. Where People Listen — at fiome 



2. Where People Listen — outside the home 



















Other 


People 


who 


listen on an average day 


Ki 


chen 


Living 

Room 


Bed- 
room 


Pining 
room 


places 
at 

home 









In 




Other 


People 


who 


listen on an average day 


car. 


At 


places. 








while 


work 


cutsirie 








driving 




home 



Between waking & breakfast 57% 16% 35% 1% 

During breakfast _ 81% 6% 2% 7% 

Between breakfast & lunch 41% 35% J 7% 10% 

During lunch . 61% 9% 3% 8% 

Between lunch & supper 32% 3.9% 15% 9% 

During supper.. 65% 11% 2% 19% 

Between supper tfr going to bed 18% 56% 22% 5% 

■ toss than hall I m percent. 

I. Ill the fiome the principal places of listening are the 
kitchen, living room, bedroom, and dining room. What is more 
important than the size of the figures, the study says, is the vivid 
pii lure this tabulation presents of an audience in motion, shifting 
from place to place from one hour to the next. 

34 



6% 
2% 
8% 
5% 
8% 
2% 
6% 



Between waking & breakfast 2% 1% 1% 

During breakfast * * 1% 

Between breakfast & lunch 16% 7% 3% 

During lunch 1% 6% 5% 

Between lunch & supper 15% 7% 4% 

During supper ._ * * ' % 

Between supper S: going to bed 3% 1% 2% 



2. Outside (lie home listening goes on wherever people are — 
in their cars, at work, in someone else's home, in lunch rooms 
and bars, at the beach, and in countless other places. Table shows 
most is done driving to and from work, but a significant number 
listen while they are at work outside the home. 

SPONSOR 



10 BASIC FINDINGS OF STUDY 



]__ Radio emerges in this study as indispensable medium — important to 
advertisers because it is important to 'people. 

2. / irtually all people use radio in. 77 arctiy of I '.S. /two out of threi 

adults listen daily, nearly nine out of I (J weekly). 

3. Radio is universal medium. Its appeal cats across all economic and 
educational levels. 

4. // operates indoors and outdoors as constant companion to people. 

5. // operates, without ever stopping, for cliunri/t(r % dynaniic audience. 

(J. // commands universal audience — by size, geography, income, education, 
ape. sex — which devotes hupc amount of its time to listeniir/ to radio. 

7. People accept radio. More than that, thev insist on having it. 

8. Majority of people depend on radio as source of contact with outside 
world. In time of emergency they turn to it for information. 

9. People primarily are favorable toward radio. Thay rely on it for 
entertainment, information — and most of all, perhaps, they enjoy it. 

10. People like radio because they can use it while thev are doinv- other things, 
'Phis they consider to he radios chief distinguishing characteristic 

and its chief distinctive advantage to them. 



11 l'\ areas of the I . S. during one 
Mreek in December (15-20) and three 
weeks in Januarv I (>-2 ( ) I . A proba- 
bility sample was used representing 
the 61.6 million people aged 15 and 
over living in TV areas. This is 57' < 
of the total adult population of the 
I . S. \\ ithin the surve\ area 72' < ol 
the people have T\ . 

Most of the findings confirmed pre- 
\ ious research. However, the studv is 
unique from two standpoints: ill It 
i- the first done b\ a group <>f stations 
for the benefit of radio as a whole 
I at least since the da\s of BMBl with 
no single station or network trying to 
prove itself best: (2) it is the first 
such attitude-motivational studv done 
on a national scale, though various 
similar aspects have been touched 
upon in previous studies b\ Dr. Paul 
Lazarsfeld di Columbia University, 
Dr. Forest L. Whan of the I niversitv 
of Wichita, the major networks, other 



stations, ami independent research 
organization-. 

Discussing his newest stud) with 
SPONSOR, Politz said: 

'"This stud) is not a quantitative 
one. Radio has had sufficient quantita- 
tive research. I here has been enough 
comparison between stations and net- 
works, using quantitative studies to 
prove themselves 'first. What was 
needed to supplement the quantitative 
data was a stud) showing radio's 
uniqueness — its place in the dailv life 
of the Vmerican people. I his the spon- 
soring stations have done. 

"Radio is not strictly, rigidl) com- 
petitive with other activities. It does 
not demand all or most oi a person - 
attention. The individual can listen 
while doing so man) things that have 
to be done — eating, working, shopping, 
driving. Radio should be proud ol 
this uniqueness. In the past I think 
it's been afraid of it. Vs a result, it 



has not sold itself as well as it might 
to the advertiser as the powerful me- 
dium it i-. 

In turning over the Endings to the 
entire industry, the Christal stations 
invited agencies, stations, and resean h- 
ers i" use and comment on the study. 
In addition the) expressed the bop< 
that this stud) would lead to future 
radio research oi a similar nature but 
mi a broader * ale, in greater detail, 
and on a continuing basis. Behind this 
reasoning is the thought that quanti- 
tative studies (ratings, total listeners, 
and who- first) used for competitive 

purposes do more harm than g 1 and 

that radio now has more to gain 
through qualitative studies such as 
this. 

SPONSOR interviewed a v 1 5 million 
adverti-er. a research director • 
leading New i ork agency, and a top 
timebuyer at one of the biggest \e 

' Pirn-,,- turn In page 1 2.". 



10 AUGUST 1953 



35 




Con Pranpicrn I ^ arS 0n roa ^ a * ^'^ a-m- are v ' sua ' rem ' n d er that San Francisco wakes up early. In inset (I. to r.) Jules Dundes, sis. 
mgr., Arthur Hull Hayes, gen. mgr., Evelyn Clark, prom. mgr. with KCBS presentation on early-morning audience 

Every market is different 

To buy time wisely you have to know eaeh market. These pictures are 
designed to remind you about some of the variables to look for 



M n San Francisco, 47% of the business offices 
open by 8:00 a.m.; 92% are open by 8:30. Result: 
Most of the population rises early. There's a radio 
audience available in force from 6:00 a.m. onward. 

This fact was dramatized forcibly in a recent 
KCBS, San Francisco, presentation (in which the 
station also lauded its morning man, Bill Weaver, 
as top audience draw in the 6:00-7:00 slot). But 
such differentiating characteristics of a market are 
often little known to outsiders. 

To stress the value of studying each market you 
buy, sponsor has assembled the pictures on these 
pages. They illustrate how four markets differ. 
Additional details on these markets start page 118. 



36 



Philadelphia: growing 

Fact that market is mature 
doesn't mean its popu- 
lation stands still. Because 
of rapid industrial growth 
in Delaware Valley, 
WCAU points out, adver- 
tiser gets growing "bonus" 
audience within station's 
primary coverage area. 
Picture shows Levittown, 
Pa., which will hold 
16,000 families 




n 



Miami: bonus outdoor audience 

When you buy a retort aroa. 

these are market characteristics 

to bear in mind: (I) Large part 

of audience, as in this WQAM 

picture, is outof home, won't 

show up in usual ratings. (2) 

Vacationers are in mood to spend, 

bring extra money into market. 

Winter tourists nr- w,<ll heeled 





Cedar Rapids: loyal farm listeners 

Of all stations, those catering 

to farm audience are hardest 

to evaluate — if you use New York City 

as criterion. Farm station's hold on 

its listeners won't even show up in 

ratings frequently. It's best proved 

by what stations like WMT. Cedar Rapid', 

Iowa, do for the farm community 

in coveraae of farm event. 



Detroit: night crew listens by day 

Many employees here work nights, 
sleep by day (at left, night shift 
streams out of Dodge plant). WWJ 
says many Detroit swing-shift workers 
listen to radio in late morning 
or afternoon as well as while working 
,it night. That means added audience 
both daytime and after-midnight 




>.-, 

-•^ — 



10 AUGUST 1953 



37 



Radio 



**„...«-<■ '"■""- a g. 






by Hob Foreman 



f/ack in the days when I was 
young and the brontosaurus was 
commonly seen among the fern 
trees, someone wrote a hook called. 
Did I Tell You About My Opera- 
tion? Maybe that wasn't the exact 
title and the author might have 
been Irvin Cobb. Hut anyway this 
book, I recall, did very well not 
only because the writer was a fun- 
ny w r riter but also because he w r as 
on a subject people like to have 
their ears bent about — ailments, 
operations, babies being born, and 
such. I don't know why this is so 
but I guess the men in white could 
tell us. 

Anyway, I got to thinking about 
this book and its current parallel 
with Arthur Godfrey's operation. 
I think Arthur's recent hospitaliza- 
tion received almost as much space 
in the newspapers (which ordinari- 



ly don't like devoting front pages 
to TV stars) as the Coronation. 

From this thought my mind wan- 
dered into the realm of pure phi- 
losophy and at the risk of giving 
Bertrand Russell a bad time, I'd 
like to record a few of these abber- 
rations. 

If anything like this were possi- 
ble, Arthur's physical troubles 
made him even more human to his 
audience. They served to weld 
viewer and star even more securely 
(don't get me wrong, this was all 
achieved without any overt attempt 
to play on people's sympathy ) . 
Trouble made their pal more hu- 
man than ever. Folks remembered 
every ache they'd ever had. They 
remembered their own tonsillec- 
tomies or whatever else caused a 
trip to the hospital. Here was real 
rapport -- real identification of 



Popular star is one with whom audience feels rapport, says Bob Foreman. Arthur Godfrey's 
recent hospitalization made this performer even more "human" than ever to his audiences 




viewer and performer. 

Same thing, from a slightly dif- 
ferent angle, occurred when the 
Arnaz family was expecting. One 
of the great charms of the / Love 
Lucy show is its realism (despite 
a normal complement of far fetched 
situation, stock characters, and so 
forth). Desi and his wife them- 
selves are natural and believable. 
And they're really husband and 
wife! Believe me, this helps! 

Then along comes that most 
natural of all events in the lives of 
a married couple (except perhaps 
arguing). A blessed event! For- 
tunately, such a phenomenon re- 
quires more time to materialize 
than the filming of a half-hour tele- 
vision show. So into the scripts 
and onto the air went the "real life 
story." Fiction became fact. Ac- 
tors became people. And every- 
body felt a little closer to Desi and 
Lucy. 

I think folks feel somewhat the 
same w*ay about Jane Froman. 
Though no reference is ever made 
on her program about her accident 
or the after effects, the audience 
knows. So when Jane takes the 
simplest of dance steps, the studio 
audience cheers and I'm sure the 
home audience chokes up. How 
can you help it? Here is a lovely 
creature who's had enough trouble 
for a dozen people. Yet it didn't 
get her down. People can feel 
that! 

All of which leads me to a ses- 
sion I went through the other day 
with a learned doctor who is put- 
ting his stethescope on advertising. 
The Doc supposedly knows all 
about stage-and-ad-personality and 
how people react to it. ^hat he 
tells you is always kind of obvious 
when you stop to think about it — 
but he backs the obvious up with 
qualitative and quantitative re- 
ports. Kind of interesting. 

For example, he maintains peo- 
ple abhor perfection. Says the 
modern crowd prefers a personal- 
ity it can identify it-elf with rather 
than an authority. He goes on to 
make quite a case for down-to- 
earth personality-selling. \\ hat the 






38 



SPONSOR 



Quick <?////« 



FOR BUYERS OF TV FILM COMMERCIALS 



*Slightly biased 



Q. Who is qualified fo make TV film commercials'"? 
A. Advertising men who areexpert sin visual selling. 



tARR^- ha been b pei ialisi in visual selling for 
more than 20 years. 



Q. Which technique is best for my commercials? 

A. The one which best suits your product and 
sales story. 



*ARRb- |, ;ls had brilliant BUCCeM with anima- 
tion, live action and stop motion — and 
combinatioas of all three. 



Q. What is the best way to work with the producer? 

A. A good producer deserves to be made a member 
of your feam. Whether he works from your 
storyboard or his, the more you draw on his 
specialized experience, the better the results. 



lARRb-'s permanent staff of script and story- 
board exports are equipped to do the 
complete job, or they will cooperate 
with the agency's departments to carry 
out its ideas. 



Q. How much of the creative preparation should the 
producer contribute? 

A. As much or as little as required. 



>ARR*± has produced more than 2500 film com- 
mercials, of which 65'c were created by 
SARRA'S own staff. 



Q. How much should a TV commercial cost? 

A. There is no such thing as a cheap commercial. 
There are good and bad commercials. Good 
commercials ore inexpensive. 



• 4^4- commercials are inexpensive because 
they sell effectively. They are so fresh 
and interesting they can be repeated 
for cumulative effect without becoming 
tiresome. 



Q. Should the producer be expected to submit a 
script or storyboard on speculation? 

A. No. An established producer's stock in trade is 
ideas and he is worfhy of your confidence. 



► 4^4 does not submit material on specula- 
tion. SARRA charges for the creation 
of scripts or storyboards but once 
okayed, they become part of the overall 
quotation. However, you do not gamble 
time or money for, of over a thousand 
storyboards and scripts created by 
SARRA, only 7 have not been pro- 
duced. 



Q. How important is the quality of the TV film prints? 

A. The print that goes on fhe air represents your 
investment of fime, talent, and money. It should 
be the finest available for TV reproduction. 



iARRA* insures good reproduction. SARRA has 
its own laboratory for the sole purpose 
of making prints of its commercials for 
TV presentation. These prints are 
called Video-O-riginals and whether 
you order one or one hundred, each 
one is custom made. 



Q. Are better commercials made in the East, in 
Chicago, or on the West Coast? 

A. Geography doesn't matter. Facilities and 
equipment are only as good as the men who 
use them. 



lARRAr specialists are available in SARRA'S 
own New York and Chicago studios 
and in associate studios in California. 
The script and your convenience de- 
termine the location. 




4**4—- 



TT' 



SPECIALISTS IN VISUAL SELLING 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 

TELEVISION COMMERCIALS • PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION • MOTION PICTURES • SOUND SLIDE FILMS 



10 AUGUST 1953 



39 




Doc does, without saying so, is to 

make a terrific case for TV. All 
his rule- of personality-salesman- 
ship apply to television in spades. 
You and J arc pals there, Doc! 

If we didn't have to rehearse 
copy so often on TV, if we could 
select the right MC's and announ- 
cers and narrator- and make them 
as familiar with the product and 
product's -.ilc- problems a-, say, 
our copy writers are — then we could 
just let 'em loose on the air. Our 
commercials would sound a lot 
better that way — work a lot harder, 
too. I think there's a non-scientific 
word lor this. It's "spontaneity." 



commercial reviews 



;£. ■ .;.- :;■>:■;--.* 

TELEVISION 

SI un sou; Welch's Wine 

PRODUCER: Lawrence White 

PROGRAM: Dotty Mack Show, Du Mont 

This spritely program provides a perfect 
case in point that commercials don't have 
to be involved or costly to produce to be 
effective. The lad who delivers the copy, 
Colin Male, at the opening, middle, and 
closing breaks is at ease and convincing as 
well as extremely pleasant to look at. This 
is all the more miraculous since he's as 
busy as a one armed 24-sheet poster-paster. 
Hoiding up the wine bottle, filling the 
glasses, adding the soda and ice, while de- 
livering his lines, Mr. Male also manages 
to rotate a lazy Susan and paste down 
photographs in an album. Yet he doesn't 
louse up his lines, nor get the label on the 
bottle canted nor spill the soda. In New 
York this kind of effort would call for 
three extras and four hours of rehearsal 
on camera. (The Dotty Mack opus is 
done in Cincinnati.) 

Copy-wise these commercials present the 
straightforward appeal that Welch's is a 
family wine; hence the middle spot sets up 
family situations in a nicely realistic, re- 
laxed way. While the selling phrases as 
well as delivery of them are low-keyed, 
they are packed with sound reason-why 
copy and should register well. 

Good demonstration of tall and short 
drinks is sure to whet the appetite. 

I dare say this commercial format is pro- 
duced for a song (Dotty Mack delivering 
same in her amazingly in-sync style of 
mouthing pop records) . However, it looks 
a lot fancier and comes off as real top- 
drawer stuff. * * * 



40 



SPONSOR 




^P=30 



ON THE 
IFIC COAST, 



NETWORK RADIO 

IS YOUR BEST 

ADVERTISING BUY 






LI 






^>°<^ 




AND DON LEE 

IS THE NATION'S 

GREATEST 

REGIONAL NETWORK 



II 



A ■ 



lOOOi 





\\\,oo 



ON LE 



ROADCASTING SYSTE 



'fiiiiifflaii 



«j ■■■■ 

11 1^1 1 m-^^kT 






MORE STATIONS -With 45 strategically located radio 
stations DON LEE offers maximum Pacific Coast pene- 
tration that no other medium can touch. 

MORE ECONOMY- DON LEE delivers more sales im- 
pressions per dollar. Each of DON LEE's 45 stations was 
designed to give its market the most complete and effi- 
cient coverage at the lowest possible cost. 

MORE FLEXIBILITY-With DON LEE you can tailor 
your selling to your distribution. Buy only as much cov- 
erage as you need — one market or the entire Pacific 
Coast. 

MORE INFLUENCE -DON LEE can release your sales 
message from a local outlet in each of 45 important 
markets (21 of them where DON LEE has the ONLY 
network station). These stations are members of their 
communities, with strong local influence. You sell where 
the people live and buy. 

That's why DON LEE consistently carries more regional 
Pacific Coast business than any other radio network. 
People who know the Pacific Coast best use . . . 

The Nation's Greatest Regional Network 



1313 NORTH VINE STREET 
HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 



Represented Nationally by John Blair & Company 




agency profile 



T. Etttlph Hurt 

Radio and TV Director 
Spitzer & Mills, Ltd., Toronto, Canada 

\ dozen clients of Spitzer \ Mills. Ltd., are spending more than 
s | ,500,000 this \ ear to send their sales messages into Canadian homes 
via radio. This accounts for a little better than 30' I "I the agency's 
billings. Shepherding thi^ air operation for S&M is T. Ralph Hart, 
radio and TV director of the agency. 

Cheeking over the list of big air spenders gives one the impression 
that the I .S. and Canada ha\e a lot in i onnnoii. Such familiar names 
as Colgate-Palmolive (Ltd.), Toni, RCA Victor, Quaker Oats, 

Kleenex. Willys Motor-. Hallmark (lards, Lehn & Fink. Coleman 
Lamps \ Stoves, and Bell Telephone Co. are studded through the 
list. Just about the only "foreign" names are J. Arthur Rank film 
distributors and Bata Shoe Co. 

These astute advertisers use radio in Canada for virtually the same 
reasons as it is used in the U.S. Hart told SPONSOR: "Radio adver- 
tising in Canada cannot be topped for: ill effective delivers of 
low-cost, high-impact sales messages; (2) effective and economical 
coverage of rural and small market an - 

No Johnny-come-lately to either Canada or advertising, Ralph was 
horn in Toronto and has been with Spitzer & Mills (formerly Lord 
& Thomas of Canada. Ltd.) for 1 1 years. 

And. although, according to Ralph. "Canadian TV has not yet 
developed to the degree of effectiveness shown 1>\ radio." several 
S&M clients plan T\ participations this fall. 

The biggest single difference between Canadian and I .S. radio 
advertising. sa\s Ralph, "is the need in Canada for broadcasting 
in two languages for a complete national broadcast effort." 

To keep abreast of developments in his field Ralph devotes a good 
deal of his time to related activities. He's a member of the Bureau 
of Broadcast Measurement research and development committee, 
and of the Association of Canadian Advertisers-Canadian Association 
of Advertising Agencies' committee on radio and television. 

And despite the fact that there are excellent hunting areas within 
weekend distance of Ralphs office, he's not intrigued by the idea. 
Probably he heard enough gunfire during the four years he spent 
overseas with the Roval Canadian Artillery. When he can get away 
from his work, he heads for the golf course. \nd Hollywood to the 
contrary, there are more people in Canada who holler "Fore" than 
who cry "Mush, mush."" * • • 



EVEN LAFAYETTE 

WATCHES 

WHEN 



.•".•.•■■:'.e-.-. ■■■ ■ '■• rffetfg <■:■ 

i'V' 




For information on world news 
and products, people in 
LaFayette watch WHEN and 
then shop the Syracuse Market. 



LaFayette, N. Y., suburb of 
Syracuse, is just one of more 
than 255 communities on the 
rich 26-county market cov- 
ered exclusively by WHEN. 
Ever increasing in impor- 
tance, this market currently 
represents over 2~ million 
people ready to buy your 
product. For testing or ex- 
panding sales volume, GET 
COMPLETE COVERAGE OF 
THIS IMPORTANT MARKET 
WITH ONE MEDIUM- 
WHEN 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 




10 AUGUST 1953 



43 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiii!ii::iiii;:i:;>iiii!;iiiiiiM 



lllllllllllllllllll! 



: 



NEW AND UPCOMING TV STATIONS 



lli:illl!lll!lllllllllllllllllllll!llll!l lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 



!lllll!lllllilllllll!!li:illl!lllll]||l!lllllllll!illlllllll!lllllllllllll!llllllllllllil!!lllll!lll^ 



f. JMetv construction permits 







CALL | 
LETTERS 


CHANNEL 
NO. 


DATE OF 
GRANT 


ON-AIR 
TARGET 


POWER 


(KW)" 


STATIONS 
ON AIR 


SETS IN 
MARKFT: 
| (000) 


LICENSEE & MANAGER 


RADI 
REP 




VISUAL 


AURAL 


ALLENTOWN, PA. 
CHAMPAIGN, LL. 




WFMZ-TV 


67 
21 


15 July 
22 July 




178 
16.2 


91.8 
8.71 








NFA 
NFA 


Perm-Allen Bdcstg. 
Champaign- Urbana 
Television 




HARRISBURG, PA. 




WCMB-TV 


27 


22 July 


Dsc. '53 


98.8 


49.5 


2 


35 


UHF 


Rcssmone C^rp. 
Ed Smith 


Cook 63 


JACKSON, MISS. 




WSLI-TV 


12 


22 July 


Dec. '53 


214 


112 


1 


19 


UHF 


Standard Life Bdcstg. 


Woedr 


KEARNEY, NEB. 
OKLAHOMACITY, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 


OKLA. 


WTTM-TV 


13 

9 

6 

40 

41 


22 July 
22 July 
15 July 
15 July 
15 July 




56.2 
316 
100 
268 

18.45 


30.2 

158 

50 

140 

9.23 



1 
1 




218 
100 


NFA 
VHF 
UHF 
NFA 
NFA 


Bi States Co. 
Oklahoma TV Corp. 
Mt Hood Radio & 
TV Bdcstg. Corp. 
Cal Tel Co 

People's Bdcstg. Corp. 
Fred Bernstein 


For Joel 


SACRAMENTO, C/ 
TRENTON, N. J. 




WESLACO, TEX. 




KRGV-TV 


5 


15 July 


Oct. '53 


28.8 


14.5 







NFA 


KRGV Television 
Barney Ogle 


O.L. 
Taylor j 



ff. \«»ir stations on air' 



CITY & STATE 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO. 



POWER (KW)* 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

(000) 



LICENSEE &. MANAGER 



AKRON, OHIO 
FORT SMITH, ARK. 
LAS VEGAS, NEV. 
MADISON, WIS. 

PUEBLO, COLO. 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 
SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 

YAKIMA, WASH. 



WAKR-TV 
KFSA-TV 
K LAS-TV 
WMTV 

KCSJ-TV 
K ROC-TV 
KEY-T 

KIMA-TV 



49 

22 

8 

33 

5 

10 

3 

29 



19 July 
26 July 
22 July 
19 July 

13 July 
19 July 
25 July 

19 July 



1 

22 
5 
17 



.5 
11 
2.5 
9.1 



17.5 10.5 
19.95 9.975 
50 25 



100 



50 



ABC 
NBC 
Unknown 

ABC, NBC, 
DuM 
NBC 

NBC, DuM 
All four 

CBS, DuM 



35 UHF 
7 UHF 
6 VHF 

15 UHF 

20 VHF 
35 VHF 
60 VHF 

6 UHF 



Summit Radio Corp. Weed T" 

S. Bernard Berk 

Southwestern Publ. Co. Pearson 

Weldon S'amps 

Las V"oas Television Weed T' 

Alex Struthers 

Bartell TV Corp. Metker | 

Gerard A. Bartell 

Star Bdcstg. Avery 

Douglas D. Kahle Knodi 

Southern Minn. Bdcstg. Meeker! 

Dave Geitl ng 
Santa Barbara Bdcstg. & HollingL 

TV Corp. 
Ha-ry C. Butcher 
Cascade Bdcstg. Wee 

R. Lee Black 



Albuquerque, N. M., KOAT-TV, ch. 7, target 15 
Sep. '53; nat'l rep, Hollingbery; pres., Al Cad- 
well; v.p. and mgr., Phil Hoffman 
Billings Mont., ch. 8, call assigned, KRHT 
Bismarck, N.D., ch. 12, call a:signed, KBSM 
Clovis, N.M., ch. 12, call assigned, KNEH 
Fairbanks, Alaska, ch. 2, target Jan. '54; gen. mgr., 

James G. Duncan 
Fort Worth, Tex., ch. 20, call assigned, KTCO 
Greenville, N. C, WNCT, ch. 9, new target Oct. 
'53; to be CBS primary, DuMont affil.; est. sets 
in market, I5.0C0 (NBC est.) 

These changes and additions may he filled in 



Iff. Addenda to previous C.P. listings 

Johnson City, Tenn., WJHL-TV, ch. II, new target 

15 Aug.; est. sets in market, 15,000 (projected 

RTMA) 
Miami, Okla., ch. 58, call assigned, KMIV 
Milwaukee, Wis., WOKY-TV, ch. 19, target, mid- 

Sep. '53; nat'l rep, H-R Television; to be ABC, 

DuMont affil. 
Monterey, Cal.. KMBY-TV, 

Sep. '53 
New Orleans, La., ch. 20, cal 
Oklahoma City, Okla., ch. 

(formerly KLPR-TV) 
Providence, R.I., ch. 16, call assigned, WNET 



ch. 8, new target I 

assigned, WTLO 

19, new call, KMPT 



Roanoke, Va., WROV-TV, ch. 27, operations cea 

as of 18 July '53; owner Radio Roanoke t 

this action to insure that its app'ication for 

7 in Roanoke would be accepted by the FCC 

Sacramento, Cal., ch. 46, call assigned KBIC- 

target, before the end of the year 
Schenectady, N.Y., ch. 35. call assigned, WTRI 
Seattle, Wash., KOMO-TV, ch. 4, target II C 
'53; nat'l rep, Hollingbery; v.p., gen. mgr., 
W. Warren; to be NBC affil. 
Sherman, Tex., ch. 46, call assigned, KSHM 
Sioux City, la., ch. 36, new call KCTV (formi 
KWTV) 



iginal chart of post-freeze C.P.'s appearing in sponsor's 9 February issue and 



*tfes thereafter. 



BOX SCORE 



Total I ,S. stations on air. 

incl. Honolulu (30 Juh '53) 20'.i 

\o. of markets covered 139 

So. of grantees on aii Hti 



\o. of post-freeze C.P's grant- 
ed [excluding 18 educational 
grants: 30 July '53 1 

Wo. oi Tl homes in I S. il 
Juh '53) 



Percent oi all L ,S. homes 

with Tl sets (1 July *53) 5.1.7 %• 

Percent of all homes in Tl 

coverage areas (1 June '.V5 1 7B.!i°' n l 



3»8 
24.Zl».000s 



'Both new C.P.'s and stations going on the air Listed here are those which occurred between 
16 July ami 30 July or on which Information could be obtained bi that period, Stations are 
considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts "Powei of C P.'s Is thai recorded 
hi FCC applications naid amendments of Individual grantees, t information on the number of set* 
In markets where not designated as being from NBC Research, consists oi estimates from the 
stations or reps and must be deemed approximate SData from NBC Research and Planning 



Percentages on homes with sets and homes in TV coverage areas are considerd approximate. 
most cases, the representative of a radio station which is granted a C.P. also represents the 
TV operation. Since at presstlme it is generally too early to confirm TV representations of I 
grantees, SPONSOB lists the rep? of the radio stations in this column (when a radio station 
been given the TV grant.) "These reps have already confirmed their representation of 
new TV stations NFA; No figures available at presstime on number of sets in market 



44 



SPONSOR 



NOW 



\ 



A 

ON THE AIR!- 

* ) 



viWDAY-TV 




wd Ttv «'<«» 0UT "" CMU " '"" > " m '" «'» tt||f r , 



WDAY-TV COVERS THE NATION'S THIRD-BEST 
COUNTY IN RETAIL SALES PER CAPITA* 
-COVERS AMERICA'S 73 rd WHOLESALE MARKET 

(WITHOUT OVERLAP FROM ART OTIER TV STATION !) 

FARGO RANKS HIGHER IN WHOLESALE SALES 

THAN MANY LARGER CITIES 

SUCH AS CAMDEN, H. J. AND WILKES BARRE, PA. 

*CASS COUNTY, N. D.- THIRD BEST AMON6 ALL 
U. S. COUNTIES OF OVER 50,000 POPULATION 



AFFILIATED WITH NBC • CBS • ABC • DUMONT 

FREE & PETERS INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



illll!lll!l!lll!lll!!!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll!!IIIIHIIII!lli 



TV film shows recently made available for syndication 

Programs issued since April 7953. Next chart will appear 7 September 

l!IIIIJ!ll!!lll!lll!!!ll!lllll!ll!l!J!lll!l!llll!ll!lll!l!!lllll!^ 



ADVENTURE 



Adventures of Noah Courneya Prod. Jerry Courneya 12 mln. $20-500 

Beory Jr. 



Ivan Sanderson Big Explorer Pictures J. B. Weill 
Game Hunt 



26V2 mln. 



$50-750 



Rocky Jones, Space UTP 
Ranger 



Roland Reed 
Prod. 



CHILDREN'S 



Funny Bunnies 



Jerry Bartell's 
PlayTlme 



Jump Jump of 
Holiday House 



Junior Science 



Punch & Trudy 



MPTV 
Apollo 



Dynamic Films 15 mln. 
Bartell I I'/j mln. 



Mary & Hairy 12 mln. 

Hickox 



Olio Video TV 01 i. Video TV 
Prod. Prod. 



Riviera Prod. Riviera Prod. 



12'. ■ mln. 
12 mln. 



on request 
to $350 



50% of air 
time 



on request 
$30-250 



COMEDY 



Amos n' Andy 



Life with 
Elizabeth 



CBS TV Film Jim Fonda 

Sales 



$100-4.000 



Guild Films 



Guild Films 



DOCUMENTARY 



How Does Your 
Garden Grow 

Victory at Sea 

Your Zoo 
Reporter 



Intl. Film 
Bureau 



Intl. Film 
Bureau 



NBC TV Film Henry Solamon 30 mln. 

Sales 



Video Pictures Video Pictures 30 mln. 



on request 



DRAMA. MYSTERY 



Captured 



NBC TV Film Phillips Lord 26'/ 2 min. 

Sales 



1 Led Throe 
Lives 


Ziv 




Ziv 


30 min. 


Inner Sanctum 


NBC TV 
Sales 


Film 


Galahad Prod. 


26'/ 2 mln 


Joe Palooka 


Guild Fi 


Ims 


Guild Films 


30 min. 


On Stage with 
Monty Wooley 


Dynamic 


Films 


Dynamic Films 


15 min. 



The Cop 



The Continental 



Your Ail-Star 
Theatre 



NBC TV Film Mark VII Prod. 26' 2 min. 

Sales 



Dynamic Films Dynamic Films 15 mln. 
Screen Gems Screen Gems 30 min. 



on request 



Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range* No. in series Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range* 



20 

13 



65 

13 



26t 



39 

78" 
13 

4lt 

13 
39 



NEWS 



= Washington Spot- Goodman 
light 



Milton Hammer 15 mln. on request 



SPORTS 



All- Ami Hear, 
Game of Week 



Play Golf with 
the Champions 



Shooting 
Straight 



~ Speed Classics 



Consolidated 
TV Sales 



Consolidated 
TV Sales 



Princeton 
Film Center 



Sportsvision 



Sportsvision 



Princeton 
Film Center 



Dynamic Films Dynamic Films 15 mln. 

30 mln. 



Sports Spotlight Tel Ra Prod. Tel Ra Prod. 

Telesports Digest United Artists Tel Ra Prod. 



= The Big Playback Screen Gems 



Wrestling from IWF 

Int'l Ampitheatre 



Screen Gems- 
Telenews 



I2'/j min. 
26V2 mln. 
15 mln. 



15 mln. 
30 mln. 
I hour 



on request 
•n request 

$40-400 

$45-850 
an request 

open 



VARIETY 



Art Llnkletter & CBS TV Film John Guedel 15 min. 

the Kids Sales 



Camera's Eye Teevee Co. 



I2'/i min. 



Cameras &. Models Paul Parry Prod. Paul Parry Prod. l2'/ 2 min. 
in Action 



Look Magazine UTP 

Photoqulz 



Telenews 



This Is the Story Morton Prod. Morton Prod. 15 mln. 

What's Wrong with Morton Prod. Morton Prod. 15 min. 

This Picture? 



WESTERN 



Buster Crabbe 
Show 



Film Vision 
Corp. 



J. B. Weill 



26'i mln. $50-750 



HISTORY 



Famous People 
Yesterday's World 



Regent TV 



15 mln. 



Slmmel-Meservey Slmmel-Meserviy 15 min. 
TV Prod. TV Prod. 



$75-1,000 
on request 



WOMAN'S NEWS 



Your Beauty Clinic MPTV 



Dynamic 



15 mln. 



on request 



"Where price range is not given it has not yet been fixed; or syndicator prefers to give price only on request. 'Available in early fall. iRun originally under 
another title, now being re-released. ^Available in black-and-white or color. SPONSOR invites all TV film syndicators to send information on new films. 



46 



(See Film Notes column , page 48.) 



SPONSOR 







Really . . . it's no 



Serious business — this making people laugh. 
Uncertain, too — until producers began using film 
to precheck. First, each show is carefully rehearsed . . . 
then, filmed and audience-tested in key sales areas. Next, re-edited. 
No mistakes (no laugh lapses) about it — you're sure of 

every word, every gesture . . . when you USE EASTMAN FILM. 





• wnh fo." 

Motion Picture Film Department 
Eastman Kodak Company 
Rochester 4, N. Y. 

East Coast Division 
342 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, N.Y. 



Midwest Division 
137 North Wabash A 
Owcoqo 2, Mnois 

West Coast Division 
6706 Santa Monica Mvd. 
Hoaywood 38, California 



Agents for the distribution and sale of 
Eastman Professional Motion Picture Rn 

W. J. Gorman, Inc., 

Fort Loo, N. J., Chicago, III., 
Hoftywood, Calif. 



UllllUU 



a No. 7 in a series / 

Why Song-Ads . 
sell 

• Because the words and 
j music fit the Product a 

9 When you buy a Song-Ad, you inherit • 
all of our experience gained from crcat- 



j ing more than 250 successful jingles A 

f] for clients coast to coast. We give you 'I 

M a song commercial that is truly blended "• 

with the product so the main sales 

a points will stick lastingly in the con- A 

(j sumer's mind. f I 

It You. too. can sell your client on radio • 
or TV by offering him a Song-Ads audi- 
j tion presentation record, created espe- 

(1 cially for his product. For just A 

X *75 M \ 

you get three complete jingles — three 
j, individual sets of words and music, re- 

n corded in Hollywood by top-flight artists A 

L and musicians. ' I 

Call, write, or wire today! • 

1 




C O M P A H Tji 



59J7 Sunut Blvd. 
Hollywood 28, Colli. 
GLodHono 6181 



llllllllll 



let Us 

dramatize 




i\ 
your sales story... 

for Television spots, 

Minute Movies, 

local dealer films 

or long length industrial 

motion pictures. 

J\eid J4. d^ay, 

FILM INDUSTRIES, Inc. 



2269 Ford Parkway, 
St. Paul 1, Minn. 



208 So. LaSalle St., 
Chicago 4, III. 



TV COSTS GOT YOU DOWN? 
The Sportsman's Club 

52 popular, well rated, 15 minute hunting, fish- 
ing and outdoor shows featuring Dave Newell 
and panel of experts. Write for audition prints. 
SYNDICATED FILMS 

1022 Forbes Street Phone: Express 1-1355 

Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 



m° 



duii 






N 



it" 



rails 



a 



Film problem: TV film syndicators 

are rapidly propelling themselves into 
an era of "bargain basement" selling. 
That's the opinion of a spokesman for 
one of the top TV film distributors, 
who told sponsor: "Most distributors 
today are taking any packages the) can 
get their hands on because of the great 
demand for filmed programing. When 
that happens, some of these films are 
bound to be second rate." 

The danger inherent in this practice, 
according to this distributor, is that it 
leads to placing films into "Class A" 
and "Class B" categories. For example, 
if a given station complains that the 
distributor's top products are priced 
too high, the syndicator's salesman 
pulls the "bargain" package out of his 
traveling bag to make the sale. 

This practice can be harmful for 
three reasons, film executives feel : I 1 I 
While inferior programing does draw 
audiences today, particularly in new 
TV areas, this situation will change in 
a year or so. It's bad policy for a TV 
station in a one-station market to be 
indiscriminate in programing. (2) Su- 
perabundance of filmed product can 
lead to price-cutting by distributors. 
Station which has been approached by 
reps of 10 syndicators tells the dis- 
tributor of top product, "I've nine oth- 
er half-hour shows I can buy at half 
your price. How about dropping the 
price for your package?" (3| With 
syndicators handling large variety of 
film fare, sale of each individual pack- 
age is apt to be infrequent. Producers 
therefore won't get good return on 
original investment, will be forced to 
go out of business. 



Musical library boom: Among the 

fastest-selling TV films today are the 
musical film libraries. Reason: These 
shorts are comparatively inexpensive, 
are a good way to draw local business- 
men into TV. From the station's view- 
point, musical films are a natural to 
fill in gaps between regular prograin- 

*5ee New TV Films chart, page 46. 



ing, and to help build up a local d.j. 
personality. 

New TV stations are among the best 
prospects for this type of film fare. 
They can lease a library of about 500 
shorts for roughly SB per short for a 
\ear, use the films as often as the\ 
want. 

Among the biggest in the musical 
short field are United Television Pro- 
grams and Official Films, both New 
York firms. LTP offers two libraries 
of 550 films each, sold separately or 
together. To date the units have been 
sold in 94 markets and to as man; as 
three stations in the same market. 
The Studio Telescription library in- 
cludes artists like (Jinny Simms, June 
Hutton. Cab Calloway. Connie Haines. 

Official's Music Hall Varieties li- 
brary consists of 1.400 three-minute 
shorts. It's now running in about 90 
markets. Among the artists: Vincent 
Lopez, Spike Jones, Nat King Cole. 

Among the smaller, more specialized 
libraries are Screen Gems' TV Disk- 
Jockey Films and Music to Remember, 
RCA Recorded Program Services' hoy 
Willing and the Riders of the Purple 
Sage, (all New York), and Tele- Art- 
ists Treasure, distributed by McCon- 
ke\ Artists Corp.. Hollywood. 

The TV Disk Jockey unit contains 
60 three-minute silent films plus 60 
accompanying records. It's now being 
shown in 20 markets. Recording stars 
include Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, 
Doris Day, Mindy Carson. 

Music to Remember consists of 13 
symphonies ranging in length from 16 
to 24 minutes. It includes works by 
Tschaikowskv. Grieg. Beethoven, and 
Wagner. 

The Foy Willing collection contains 
100 five-minute Western tunes. Filmed 
sequences include Willing and the Rid- 
ers of the Purple Sage, scenic shots. 

The Tele-Artists Treasure, McCon- 
key's library, contains 350 shorts in- 
cluding popular tunes and Westerns. 

In addition to the musical short li- 
braries, there are other short filmed 
products available in library form. 
Many of these films fall into the quiz 
category, often combining music with 
the quiz angle. Example: Spin-a-Tune. 
distributed bv Videopix, Pittsburgh. 
Videopix also handles another quiz 
collection. J iz Quiz. 

Among other distributors of quiz 
films are Movie Quick Quiz i Walter 
Schwimmer. Chicago) : What's Play- 
ing, (Dembv Productions. New York). 

• • • 



48 



SPONSOR 



•■•^•"•WENIiTV 



(MILWAUKEE) 



ALL THIS AND WCAN-TV, TOO! 

1953 is an EYE-opening year for Milwaukee. It all began when 
Milwaukeeans got their first LOOK at the Braves. They couldn't believe 
their EYES, nor could the rest of America. But the Braves 
LOOK better every day and so does Milwaukee. 

WHY? 

Because Milwaukee has something else to LOOK at now, 
something as good for Milwaukee as the Braves. 
It's WCAN-TV, the second station in one of America's 
leading television markets. 

New programs, new ideas, A NEW MARKET for 
America's smart time buyers. 

Like everyone else in Milwaukee, LOOK to WCAN-TV . . . 
For WCAN-TV is catching the "^S^ in Milwaukee. 





_,: 



-V 



tffrr 



I 



P5J 



A NEW londmark has been added lo the Milwaukee 
skyline. The WCAN-TV tower rises 677 feet above Wis- 
consin Avenue in downtown Milwaukee, atop Wisconsin » 
most prominent hotel. The Schroeder. 



For WCAN-TV is catching the'^fr-in Milwaukee ^ 0x13.211161 



I 




Milwaukee 



10 AUGUST 1953 



49 




to • 








**-• . 







5 



NBC'S TV AUDIENCE LEAD OVER SECOND 
NETWORK CONTINUES TO INCREASE 



From the beginning of network television, NBC has consistently 
led all networks in audience delivered for advertiser-. 

That lead is increasing. 

In 1952 the average NBC program— day and night- reached 
919,000 wore homes than the second network. In 1958 NBC's 
average program has increased its lead to 1,81 :,<>00 
more than the second network— mi increast of .{9.1, <)()<) homes. 



HOMES REACHED BY AVERAGE PROGRAM 


1952 


1953 


NBC 


3,640,000 


5,037,000 


NETWORK NO. 2 


2,721,000 


3,725,000 



An ever-expanding audience lead is another important reason why 
NBC is America's No. 1 Network. 

Soon . . . further proof. 

NBC's Audience Advantage is to Your Advantage . . . Use It. 



.*.•.•.•«*. .*.•♦•.•.*. .*♦•♦•«•.». 

•>•>»•. '„•?•»••>. -.•>•»•!•>«, 

TELEVISION 



•» > 'X »» •» ■•» •» •». »»»„• 

'•» X >t •» *>X »>. •» •» »»»> 

*•"•' •»; ».• •> ' »>.• •.•••. , .*♦•«• 

*5*&*^ >«&*> **$&8P 

(i si i . i of Radio Corporation of An i rica 



sources: Nielsen Television Index, January-April, I95tand t9£ Program. 

Average per-minute audience for both years. 

(Nielsen Six minute audience not available in !:■' 
NOTE: The accuracy of the abovt data ha* been verified bytht A. C. N • '-• 'ny. 



HI 




Station newsletter keeps agencies, advertisers tip to date 



"In the top 115 markets, where ra- 
dio penetration is a hairline short of 
l00 f / ( , TV penetration is 73.0%." 

"Among all the media, TV costs 
climbed highest last year; radio costs 
rose least. In between came maga- 
zines and newspapers." 

Facts on the air media like these are 
published weekly by WXLW, Indianap- 
olis, and distributed to business men 
and admen via a four-page newsletter, 
"The Radio Counselor." 

In a recent issue, "The Radio Coun- 
selor" points out: "The American Re- 
search Bureau, Inc. has measured all 
daily individual radio listening, includ- 
ing all "extra sets" and automobile 
listening. The survey shows that the 
average individual spends 108 min- 



utes with radio; 43 minutes with TV; 
34 with newspapers; 18 with mag- 
azines. In other words, people spend 
more time listening to radio than they 
spend watching television and reading 
magazines and newspapers combined!" 

Stating its case for summertime ra- 
dio, "The Radio Counselor" reports: 
"A maximum of 10^? of people are 
away from home at any one time (sum- 
mer vacationers are only a portion of 
this 10 r < ) . People spend more money 
in summer months. Total listening 
I including out-of-home) actually in- 
creases with people outdoors." 

A copy of "The Radio Counselor" 
can be secured by writing to WXLW, 
3003 Kessler Blvd., N. Dr., Indianapo- 
lis. Ind. * * * 



WKNB-TV auls blood drive by demonstration of technique 



When the Connecticut Regional 
Blood Program went to WKNB-TV 
with an emergency plea for blood 
needed for gamma globulin, the station 
decided it would dramatize the sim- 
plicity of donating blood in a 15-min- 
ute telecast. 

Before the cameras set up beside a 
bloodmobile sent by the Red Cross, 
WKNB-TV news chief. Floyd Pattee 



I seated on bed in picture ) interviewed 
Dr. Victor G. H. Wallace, director of 
the Connecticut Regional Blood Pro- 
gram. 

During the course of the interview, 
Pattee explained the simplicity of giv- 
ing blood by giving a pint of his own 
while viewers watched. He closed the 
program by urging viewers to follow 
his example during the week. * * * 



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WKNB-TV's news chief shows viewers how simple it is to donate blood tor Connecticut drive 

52 



KTTV takes over bench on 
famous corner in Hollywood 

KTTV selected the best-known in- 
tersection west of the Mississippi for 
a unique form of program promotion. 
Smack on the corner of Hollywood and 
Vine sits a bench on the front and 
back of which KTTV messages are ex- 
posed to bustling throngs. 

Bearing the legend, "Watch That 
Cood-Looking Channel 11," the signs 
also carry a plexiglas screen in the 
shape of a TV screen. Behind the plexi- 
glas a different announcement is placed 
daily, promoting a program on the air 




Daily changes keep program bulletins current 

that night. Campaign is supervised 
by Jack O'Mara, director of merchan- 
dising and promotion for the station, 
and Tom Dawson, research assistant. 
Picture shows typical bench ad. * * * 

TV program, advertising 
€lata given via index cards 

Keeping an up-to-date file of tele- 
vision program, advertising, and pro- 
duction information is made easier 
with the new Television Index. 

Subscribers to the Ross Reports on 
Television are eligible to receive these 
3" x 5" index cards containing such 
information on TV programs as title, 
station, days of week, time, stars, spon- 
sor, agency (with address and tele- 
phone number I. packager, and major 
personnel connected with the program. 

Both live shows and films are in- 
cluded in the index. The cards are 
divided into three color classifications: 
yellow for network film programs, 
white for live network shows, aiiu 
green for syndicated film shows and 
packages. 

The Television Index is revised on 
a monthly basis, and is designed as a 
portion of the industry information 
service of Ross Reports. 551 Fifth Ave., 
New York. * * * 

SPONSOR 









Zir\* iu'h- packooe coutmlna 

fire hours of weekly shows 

\ new shot in the ami f<>i radio 
uas announced recentl) b) John L. 
Sinn, executive v.p., Frederic W. Zh 
Co. This consists oi .1 new Eve a week 
hour-long radio program titled How 
oi Stiu s. Transcribed Beries will I"' 
made up of lour quarter-hour programs 
a da\ featuring Ginger Rogers, l<m\ 
Martin, Dick Powell, and Pegg) Lee. 

These top-name stars will chat about 
and plaj their favorite phonograph 
records. \ m I although each is affiliated 
with a major record company, Sinn 
promised that *"t!ie\ will be given ab- 
solute Freedom to pla) their favorite 

records b) an\ star- on am label. 

Produced bj Herb Gordon, Zi\ v.p. 
iii charge of production, the series will 
be available starting in September. 
Arrangements with major record com- 
panies assure /i\ ol getting earl) re- 
leases of new records, thus heralding 
a high degree of cooperation between 

radio and the record business. * * * 



Report from south of the 
border hu JUT Mexican rep 

On a recent \ isit to New York, Ross 
Porter, accounl representative and mar- 
ket research director. Walter Thompson 
de Mexico, gave SPONSOR a progress 

report on T\ South of the Border. 

According to Porter. "'There were 
10-12,000 TV sets sold h\ September 
1950 when \HT\ wa- inaugurated in 
the Federal District of Mexico. Today, 
this number has increased to approxi- 
mately 45.000. From the original post- 
age-stamp size studio, XHTY grew 
rapidly, joined XEW-TV in modern 
studios. 

"There's ever) indication that when 
set costs come down from the present 
> IOO-000 level main more middle- 
income families will he able to afford 
sets, rather than having to go to public 
places such as soda fountains, restau- 
rants, bars, or government buildings to 
«ee their favorite TV programs/* 

Briefly . . . 

\ picture-packed booklet outlining 
the dramatic role pla\ed b\ WJR. De- 
troit, during the recent tornadoes that 
hit that area, was published b) the 
station recently. Subtitled "The stor) 
of how a radio station, geared for 
emergency and dedicated to public 
(Please turn to pape 1 L5 1 




" Suffer Little Children . . ." 

Hank Maloy is one of the most versatile people in local 
radio. Writer, newsman, raconteur, actor, weaver of spells, 
his Saturday morning "KID STUFF" is imaginative pro- 
duction at its host. 

Be helps maintain the WTRY reputation for local pro- 
gramming of "network quality" . . . which keeps mosl of 
the AJbanv-Trov-Sehenectady listeners tuned to WTRY. 



WTRY 



ALBANY • TROY 
SCHENECTADY 



980KC 50C0W CBS RADIO NETWORK 



Represented by HEADLEY-REED CO 



10 AUCUST 1953 



53 




f]}\ 



11 w 



I 



/m 



W 11 




a forum on questions of current interest 
to ulr advertisers and their agencies 



\l littl makes Canadian radio a 
particularly aood bun for advertisers 




Mr. Hinman 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

There are a num- 
ber of reasons: 
coverage of rural 
and urban homes, 
importance of ra- 
dio stations, pro- 
motion, others. 
All of these add 
up to a good Inn . 
As the popula- 
t ion, economj 
.and buying pow- 
er of the Dominion increases so does 
the value of Canadian radio. Radio 
reaches more Canadians than any oth- 
er medium — about 94' i of the homes 
have radios. Toda\ 157 stations serv- 
ice the 14,618.000 Canadians residing 
in the large area extending from coast 
to coast and because of this geographic 
spread, radio is relied upon heavih foi 
entertainment and information. In 
many areas it is the only dav by dav 
form of communication. 

On the average, the time rates on 
the stations are well in line with the 
number of radio homes that they can 
and do reach. Listenership is high — 
all adding up to a good buy on a cost 
basis. Aside from the straight adver- 
tising impact on homes reached, there 
is another important factor adding to 
the value of Canadian radio — promo- 
tion and merchandising. It has been 
our experience that most stations arc 
anxious to work closely with the ad- 
vertisers' local men in promoting and 
merchandising the schedule and the 
products on a local level. This extra 
effort on the part of the stations pays 
off greath for the advertiser. 

I he value of radio has been further 
enhanced with the recent opening of 
the "after 7:30 p.m. time" to spot an- 
nouncements. Now, this cream eve- 
ning time is available to an advertiser 
using a